Birdingonthe.Net

Recent Postings from
The Australia Birding List

> Home > Mail
> Alerts

Updated on Friday, September 19 at 05:19 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Spectacled Owl,©BirdQuest

19 Sep French Island Report – Indian Peafowl [James Mustafa ]
19 Sep Re: Channel Billed Cuckoo [Jude Lattaway ]
19 Sep Malleefowl and Feral Cats in Hattah-Kulkyne [Greg Roberts ]
19 Sep FW: Birdpedia - Australia - New General Sighting Report - Members ["Tony Russell" ]
17 Sep Tracking Bunyip Birds: Campaign Launch [Tim Hosking ]
18 Sep Re: Channel Billed Cuckoo ["Alan Gillanders" ]
17 Sep Chiltern [Peter Bright ]
17 Sep Feel like counting Penguins [Carl Clifford ]
17 Sep Need a bit bigger SD card? [Carl Clifford ]
17 Sep SA outback update - grasswrens galore [Peter Waanders ]
17 Sep Channel-billed Cuckoo ["Philip Veerman" ]
17 Sep Re: Honeyeater ID help ["Alan Gillanders" ]
17 Sep Re: Honeyeater ID help [martin cachard ]
16 Sep Honeyeater ID help [Joseph Morlan ]
17 Sep oops re: Who will report the birds on Birdline [John Weigel ]
16 Sep Re: Northern Pintails on Hastie's Swamp, N. Qld. ["Mike Carter" ]
16 Sep Re: Channel Billed Cuckoo [Laurie Knight ]
16 Sep Who will report the birds on Birdline [John Weigel ]
16 Sep Re: Channel-billed Cuckoo Gorokan, NSW ["Julian Bielewicz" ]
16 Sep Re: Northern Pintails on Hastie's Swamp, N. Qld. [martin cachard ]
16 Sep Northern Pintails on Hastie's Swamp, N. Qld. ["Mike Carter" ]
16 Sep Bad news for the coal industry, possible good news for the environment [Carl Clifford ]
16 Sep Gluepot Visit [Chris Shaw ]
16 Sep A coincidental koel [Laurie Knight ]
16 Sep Swift Parrorts alert [Grahame Rogers ]
16 Sep Channel-billed Cuckoo Gorokan, NSW [Carl Clifford ]
16 Sep Re: Channel Billed Cuckoo [Michael Tarburton ]
16 Sep Re: toxoplasmosis and birds [Carl Clifford ]
16 Sep Re: Channel Billed Cuckoo [Ross Mulholland ]
16 Sep toxoplasmosis and birds [Denise Goodfellow ]
16 Sep Re: Channel Billed Cuckoo [Brian Everingham ]
16 Sep Re: Channel Billed Cuckoo ["Jenny Stiles" ]
16 Sep Re: Channel Billed Cuckoo [Laurie Knight ]
16 Sep Re: Canon SX50HS on sale [Peter Shute ]
15 Sep Re: Pied Currawongs in Docklands (Melbourne) [Russell Woodford ]
15 Sep Canon SX50HS on sale [Andrew Taylor ]
15 Sep Re: Channel Billed Cuckoo ["Paul Doyle" ]
15 Sep Re: Fw: A Question about Eagles []
15 Sep Bower ["Michael Hunter" ]
15 Sep Differential spring and autumn migration routes [Laurie Knight ]
15 Sep Fwd: Re: Flames in the snow [brian fleming ]
15 Sep Malleefowl Forum, Spring Sightings and a Free Coffee Cup [Peter Ewin ]
15 Sep Re: Channel Billed Cuckoo [Laurie Knight ]
15 Sep Channel Billed Cuckoo [Brian Everingham ]
15 Sep Re: Pied Currawongs in Docklands (Melbourne) [Tim Dolby ]
15 Sep Re: Pied Currawongs in Docklands (Melbourne) [martin cachard ]
15 Sep Re: Pied Currawongs in Docklands (Melbourne) [martin cachard ]
15 Sep Re: Pied Currawongs in Docklands (Melbourne) [Tim Dolby ]
15 Sep Powerful Owls - RBG Sydney [Carl Clifford ]
15 Sep Sydney Pelagic Trip Report - September 13, 2014 ["Roger McGovern" ]
14 Sep Port Stephens pelagic this Sunday 21st Sept - vacancies [Mick Roderick ]
15 Sep Re: Pied Currawongs in Docklands (Melbourne) [Peter Shute ]
15 Sep RFI Elegant and Rock Parrot's near Adelaide ["mark" ]
15 Sep Re: Pied Currawongs in Docklands (Melbourne) ["Paul Dodd" ]
15 Sep Re: Pied Currawongs in Docklands (Melbourne) [James Mustafa ]
15 Sep Re: Flames in the snow ["Paul Doyle" ]
15 Sep Re: Flames in the snow [Alistair McKeough ]
15 Sep Re: Pied Currawongs in Docklands (Melbourne) [Janine Duffy ]
15 Sep Pied Currawongs in Docklands (Melbourne) [Peter Shute ]
15 Sep Re: Flames in the snow [Martin Butterfield ]
15 Sep Re: Strange bird-call in Victoria [Janine Duffy ]
14 Sep Trip Report: King Island 9 - 13 Sept 2014 [Iian Denham via Birding-Aus ]
15 Sep Re: Flames in the snow [Martin Butterfield ]
15 Sep Birdline South Australia Weekly Update []
15 Sep Fw: A Question about Eagles ["Shirley Cook" ]
15 Sep Birdline North Queensland Weekly Update []
15 Sep Birdline Victoria Weekly Update []
15 Sep Birdline Western Australia Weekly Update []
15 Sep Birdline New South Wales Weekly Update []
15 Sep Birdline Tasmania Weekly Update []
15 Sep Birdline Australian Capital Territory Weekly Update []
15 Sep Birdline Northern Territory Weekly Update []
15 Sep Birdline Central & Southern Queensland Weekly Update []
15 Sep Birdline Australia Weekly Update []
15 Sep Re: Strange bird-call in Victoria [Steve Clark ]
15 Sep Flames in the snow ["Paul Doyle" ]

Subject: French Island Report – Indian Peafowl
From: James Mustafa <jamesmustafamusic AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 19:40:19 +1000
Since late last year, I have been trying to understand the status of the
Indian Peafowl on French Island. Through various research and sightings by
other birders, I was led to believe that this population might be
‘tickable’ – but required further research and evidence.



Part of my initial research was talking to other birders who have visited
the island in recent years. My first positive piece of information was when
I received the brief but hopeful comment of “*after the BirdLife Bayside
outing there last year (2013) I checked with one of the top ornithologists
at DEPI and they confirmed that the population on French Island is
considered self-sustaining and tickable*”.



Fueled by that piece of information I shot off a couple of emails to other
Victorian birders who shared the common belief that it is actually quite
probable, but further proof of the ten year wild status and
self-sustainment policy was required.



Today, I finally got across to the island myself accompanied by Scott Baker
and Brian Johnston to check out the population and status for ourselves.
When we arrived on the island, we met the Parks Victoria French Island
ranger David Stephenson. He gave us directions to the best spots for Indian
Peafowl and gave us a lot of promising information.



According to David, there have been three separate introductions of Peafowl
to the island. Initially the first release was in 1979 by a man when he
first moved there. After only 6 years, the same individual left the island
but released his remaining captive birds. The third release was in the
early-mid 90’s by a man named David Russell – who apparently bought a
number over to have on his property.



Today, David Stephenson and Parks Vic estimate an overall population of
100+ birds on the island, located in three different areas/populations.
These birds are now so widespread across the island; there is a culling
program in place. In fact, approx. 20 birds have been shot in the last
month.



On our trip, we managed to locate a single adult male bird off Mount
Wellington Road in the central eastern side of the island. Later in the
afternoon we happened upon 5-6 birds (both male/female) along Bullock Rd
approximately 10-15kms away from the first site. All birds seen were
extremely flighty and showed absolutely no signs of tame behaviour. In
fact, the first adult bird took off so quickly, only two of our number saw
the bird.



According to David, the peafowl are also responsible for the spread of
blackberry across the island and have done a lot of damage to the scrubland
and other native flora. Also worth noting, two years ago, the peafowl
population was over double the size it is today (est. 220) but Parks Vic
have since started the culling program. The locals and Parks Vic have seen
lots of evidence of breeding including nests, chicks and the obvious growth
in numbers.



The population is strongest around the Bullock Road and Bullock Swamp
area (*bullock
swamp no longer open to public*). This is believed to be because the owners
of the Bullock Swamp area protect the peafowl from the rangers. They like
the birds and also occasionally feed them. This seemed to be a negative
reason to the credibility of ‘wild’ bird status – however this population
have been around Bullock Swamp for over 20 years (15 years before the
current owners arrival) and are the remnants of the second released
population back around the mid 80’s. I draw comparison to the King Parrot’s
at Grant’s Picnic Ground or the Regent Bowerbirds in Lamington National
Park. Just because they get fed sometimes hardly changes their status from
wild birds to captive/tame/untickable.



So with all this information now compiled, I’d be interested to spark
further discussion with other birders and people with opinions and/or
further information on these birds. If all that information mentioned is
agreed upon, does this make French Island the first acceptable and hence
tickable peafowl population in Victoria?


James Mustafa

0400 951 517

http://jamesmustafabirding.blogspot.com.au


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Channel Billed Cuckoo
From: Jude Lattaway <2roaminoz AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 14:46:52 +1000
I saw my first Channel-billed Cuckoos today.  Three birds flying low
over Forest Hills Road, Morayfield (northern suburb of Brisbane).
All birds were silent.

Jude



Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Malleefowl and Feral Cats in Hattah-Kulkyne
From: Greg Roberts <friarbird.roberts AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 13:31:13 +1000
Yesterday I enjoyed a prolonged, close encounter with a Malleefowl along
the Nowingi Track in Victoria's Hattah-Kulkyne National Park.


On a less positive note, I was surprised that during a visit of several
days to Hattah, I did not see or hear terrestrial specialties of the region
such as Southern Scrub-Robin, Mallee Emu-wren, Striated Grasswren and Shy
Hylacola - all of which I have seen on previous visits. I saw just a single
Chesnut Quail-thrush and one pair of Gilbert's Whistler when previously
I've encountered more of these birds.


Peter Waanders has suggested that grasswrens and other small terrestrial
birds in South Australia may have suffered population declines as a result
of an increase in feral cat numbers in recent years, due to a series of
good weather seasons in southern inland Australia.


Others have suggested that cat numbers in south-west WA have increased due
to the success of fox control measures in reserves such as Dryandra; the
assumption is that foxes are efficient predators of kittens. It may be that
numbers of two endangered marsupials - Brush-tailed Bettong and Numbat - at
Dryandra have declined recently for this reason, after initially being
boosted by fox control measures.


Certainly I saw plenty of cat paw marks on the trails at Hattah, as indeed
I did at Dryandra and other reserves I have visited recently in WA and SA.


Pics of the chook and more here:

*http://tinyurl.com/lek3goo *

*Greg Roberts*


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: FW: Birdpedia - Australia - New General Sighting Report - Members
From: "Tony Russell" <pratincole08 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2014 09:19:22 +0930
Our pair ( or A pair) of Kookaburras have returned this year and are nesting
in the big palm tree in our back yard. First time back for about five years.

Tony Russell, Vista, SA

-----Original Message-----
From: Birdpedia Sighting [mailto:sighting AT birdpedia.com] 
Sent: Thursday, 18 September 2014 10:45 PM
To: sighting AT birdpedia.com
Subject: Birdpedia - Australia - New General Sighting Report - Members

NOTE: THIS IS AN AUTOMATED EMAIL - DO NOT REPLY DIRECTLY TO THIS MESSAGE.*


Hello,

The following sighting has just been reported:


Area: SA

Date: Thursday, 18 September, 2014
Time: 
Contact: David Robertson
Location: Bunnings Warehouse, Marion (SA)

Observation:
Magpie-lark (Grallina cyanoleuca) (1) I went to Bunnings at Marion today. As
I approached the door a Magpie Lark flew into the cavernous building. I
asked the team member about it and she said there was a pair who lived
inside and had a nest. I replied that Magpie Larks were mud nesters but she
turned and pointed to the interior scaffolding and there high up in amongst
the high-powered fluoros was a nest! I asked how they got in and out as the
doors are self closing and but she said that they had discovered a gap
between the top of the door and the wall and so could come and go when they
pleased. As far as I know the nearest mud would be miles away.




You can view the details of this sighting at anytime by going to the
sightings page or by clicking on the following link:

http://www.birdpedia.com/au/bi.dll/bipu04?m=910&id549=6681491266_0001&id509=
SA


Note: Threatened and / or endangered species may be hidden from view and you
may need to login to see the full report.


Are you receiving too many sightings reports or do you only want to be 
notified of rarities? You can turn off the notification feature or set the 
rarities only flag in your personal notification settings.


To login or get more information see:

http://www.birdpedia.com/au/bi.dll/bipu01?m=001


If you can suggest any improvement to the Web site or would like to see 
features added please send us an email with the details (use the 
'Make a Comment' link at the bottom of almost every page or send 
information to info AT birdpedia.com).


Sincerely,

The Staff at Birdpedia.


Looking for Books?

Looking to buy books? With thousands of books, good prices and free shipping
to many countries, Birdpedia highly recommends The Book Depository. 

Use this link to buy all your books, not just books on birds.

Go to
http://www.birdpedia.com/au/bi.dll/bipu01?m=c99g&x=pu_info_thebookdepository
.htm to find your books.



*  The email address for this message is not of the person that posted this 
sighting but of our internal mail system. Please use the email address 
available from the full details page of this sighting (click the link above)

to communicate with the poster. If they have opted to hide their email 
address you will need to login and use our internal mail system to 
communicate with them.


----------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
You have received this message because you requested to be notified of a 
sighting

If you did not activate this service then please report this 
to abuse AT birdpedia.com

If you no longer wish to receive these notifications please go to your 
personal page and turn off this feature
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
                    

                         




Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Tracking Bunyip Birds: Campaign Launch
From: Tim Hosking <Tim.Hosking AT environment.nsw.gov.au>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 22:34:00 +0000
FYI

From: murraywildlife AT gmail.com 
[mailto:murraywildlife AT gmail.com] On Behalf Of Matthew Herring 

Sent: Wednesday, 17 September 2014 6:37 AM
Subject: Tracking Bunyip Birds: Campaign Launch

G'day Folks,

Today we're officially launching our crowdfunding campaign - Tracking Bunyip 
Birds - to raise $50 000 so we can satellite track endangered Australasian 
Bitterns. We have 40 days. 


Please consider getting behind our project. Pledges start at $20, with each one 
entitling you to different rewards. It would be greatly appreciated if you 
could share this link through your networks because we're going to need a lot 
of help. Our page has a campaign video, a description of the project, details 
of the rewards and a budget. 


http://pozible.com/bunyipbirds

If we don't reach our $50K target, pledges are not withdrawn from donors and 
the project doesn't go ahead, but if we can make it happen then it's going to 
be a very exciting journey, following the bitterns' movements online. We'll 
learn so much, such as how mobile they are when breeding in the rice, where it 
is they go after rice harvest and which wetlands they depend on during the 
non-breeding season. 


Many thanks, Matt - for the Bitterns in Rice Project.



--
Matt Herring
Wildlife Ecologist
Environmental Education
Murray Wildlife Pty Ltd
Email: mherring AT murraywildlife.com.au
Mobile: 0428 236 563

Latest news, project updates and publications: 
www.murraywildlife.com.au 


---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

This email is intended for the addressee(s) named and may contain confidential 
and/or privileged information. 

If you are not the intended recipient, please notify the sender and then delete 
it immediately. 

Any views expressed in this email are those of the individual sender except 
where the sender expressly and with authority states them to be the views of 
the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage. 


PLEASE CONSIDER THE ENVIRONMENT BEFORE PRINTING THIS EMAIL


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Channel Billed Cuckoo
From: "Alan Gillanders" <alan AT alanswildlifetours.com.au>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 07:06:16 +1000
As they often fly in loose flocks perhaps it is just a contact call.

BTW, my first record this season was a bird heard at Iron Range on the 5th 
of September. My first Yungaburra record was a bird heard on the 12th and 
then three seen and heard on the 15th. None since. My first record is 
usually well behind those of southern observers. This may be due to 
different migration routes.

Phillip I have not changed the title as the communication of the thread is 
more important.

Regards,
Alan


Alan's Wildlife Tours
2 Mather Road
Yungaburra 4884

Phone 07 4095 3784
Mobile 0408 953 786
http://www.alanswildlifetours.com.au/ 




Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Chiltern
From: Peter Bright <adelpen1 AT bigpond.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 22:09:32 +1000
Heading to Chiltern next month with my local birding group.
Would like to do some spotlighting, Nightjars etc.
Any suggestions on locations would be appreciated.
Regards,
Peter

Sent from my iPhone



Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Feel like counting Penguins
From: Carl Clifford <carlsclifford AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 21:24:14 +1000
The Australian Antarctic Division has started a citizen science project where 
volunteers count penguins in images taken by remote cameras. Details of the 
project, Penguin Watch, can be found at 
http://www.antarctica.gov.au/news/2014/wanted-volunteers-to-count-antarctic-penguins 

Or you can get straight into it at http://www.penguinwatch.org

Carl Clifford


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Need a bit bigger SD card?
From: Carl Clifford <carlsclifford AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 20:52:36 +1000
For those on the list who like to really blaze away at birds with their DSLR, 
Sandisk have just announced a 512 Gig SD card. Rather mind boggling really, 
that is roughly twice the capacity of my desktop, laptop, iPod and iPad 
combined. You can read about it at 
http://time.com/3386685/sandisk-512gb-memory-card/ 


It will probably cost around 1Kbu ($1000) when it gets here, I imagine.

Carl Clifford


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: SA outback update - grasswrens galore
From: Peter Waanders <waanders.peter AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 15:06:57 +0930
Hi all,
In recent weeks we've made 2 trips up the Birdsville track and 2 trips up
the Strzelecki track as well as visited other parts of outback SA. I
thought I'd provide a brief update on our findings.
In recent years numbers of small ground-dwelling birds,
particularly grasswrens, have crashed, for reasons unclear to me, except
that there's been a dramatic increase in cats after the wet years of
2010-12. However on our most recent trip just over a week ago we found all
species, including varous Western Grasswrens along the Iron Knob road (see
previous message regarding removed railway carriages), a pair of
Short-tailed Grasswren in the Flinders Ranges (but gone are the days where
you could just drive up to Stokes Hill and be surrounded by them), a pair
of Thick-billed Grasswren near Lyndhurst (but gone are the days where you'd
have to shoo them out the way while searching for Chestnut-breasted
Whitefaces). Striated Grasswren at Gluepot has met a similar fate - you're
more likely to come across a cat these days there. A shameful situation!
Luckily they're still readily found further east in the Bookmark mallee
scrub as well as at Hattah, there together with Mallee Emu-wren. Eyrean
Grasswren we've found in various places and Grey Grasswren as well. Last
week I found a recently fledged Grey Grasswren, very cute! Inland Dotterels
seem to have moved away from the area though, but there is still the odd
Bustard around.
We've had  a few sightings of Chestnut-breasted Whiteface, both at Coober
Pedy and Lyndhurst (don't ask...) although they too are much rarer than
just a few years ago. Banded Whiteface is still around in good numbers, as
is Cinnamon Quail-thrush, and all inland chats - Orange, Crimson, Yellow
and Gibber. There appear to be no Letter-winged Kites present this season -
it's pretty dry in most parts except the Flinders Ranges and NW of there -
while Grey Falcon has been treating us to regular sightings along the
Birdsville track.
Hope this is of use to someone!

cheers,
Peter

-------

Peter Waanders


Bellbird Tours  / Southern Birding Services
 / Australian Birding Store


PO Box 2008, Berri SA 5343  Australia

Phone: 1800-BIRDING (free from landlines within Australia)

mob.: +61 (0)409 763172

sat.: +61 (0)424 212889

Email: birds AT bellbirdtours.com

Bellbird Tours: www.bellbirdtours.com

Southern Birding Services: www.sabirding.com

Birding Store: www.birdingstore.com.au

Facebook:
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Southern-Birding-Services/134270499971996


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Channel-billed Cuckoo
From: "Philip Veerman" <pveerman AT pcug.org.au>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 13:31:18 +1000
It is Channel-billed Cuckoo, not Channel Billed Cuckoo. As channel is
descriptive of the bill. Not a cuckoo with both a channel and a bill.

Philip




Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Honeyeater ID help
From: "Alan Gillanders" <alan AT alanswildlifetours.com.au>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 12:18:29 +1000
Joseph,
Your bird looks good for a Yellow-spotted to me. Have a look at this picture 
for comparison 

http://birdway.com.au/meliphagidae/yellow_spotted_honeyeater/source/yellowspothoneyeater16673.htm 


Regards,
Alan


Alan's Wildlife Tours
2 Mather Road
Yungaburra 4884

Phone 07 4095 3784
Mobile 0408 953 786
http://www.alanswildlifetours.com.au/
-----Original Message----- 
From: Joseph Morlan
Sent: Wednesday, September 17, 2014 9:22 AM
To: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
Subject: [Birding-Aus] Honeyeater ID help

Meliphaga sp. Photo at...

http://fog.ccsf.edu/~jmorlan/Australia/Yellow-spottedHoneyeaterDSCN6944.htm

27 July 2014. Julatten, QLD, Australia

I originally thought this was a Yellow-spotted Honeyeater because of the
relatively straight mandible and dark eye, but the narrow gape line under
the eye makes me wonder if it might actually be a Graceful Honeyeater. Also
the lack of evident streaking on the breast favors Graceful. Unfortunately
I have no record of its vocalizations. Comparison with online photos has
reached a dead-end partly because I lack confidence in the identity of many
of the posted online images.

Any helps would be much appreciated.
-- 
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA
"It turns out we're very good at not seeing things" - Jack Hitt



Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org ----- No virus found in this message. Checked by AVG - www.avg.com Version: 2014.0.4765 / Virus Database: 4015/8221 - Release Date: 09/16/14

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Honeyeater ID help
From: martin cachard <mcachard AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 12:38:28 +1030
hey Joseph,
this bird is a Graceful Honeyeater.
in this image the overall build gives the best clue along with the shape of ear 
patch... 

glad to be of assistance.
 
cheers, 
martin cachard,
cairns
 

 
> From: jmorlan AT gmail.com
> To: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
> Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 16:22:09 -0700
> Subject: [Birding-Aus] Honeyeater ID help
> 
> Meliphaga sp. Photo at...
> 
> http://fog.ccsf.edu/~jmorlan/Australia/Yellow-spottedHoneyeaterDSCN6944.htm
> 
> 27 July 2014. Julatten, QLD, Australia
> 
> I originally thought this was a Yellow-spotted Honeyeater because of the
> relatively straight mandible and dark eye, but the narrow gape line under
> the eye makes me wonder if it might actually be a Graceful Honeyeater. Also
> the lack of evident streaking on the breast favors Graceful. Unfortunately
> I have no record of its vocalizations. Comparison with online photos has
> reached a dead-end partly because I lack confidence in the identity of many
> of the posted online images.
> 
> Any helps would be much appreciated.
> -- 
> Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA
> "It turns out we're very good at not seeing things" - Jack Hitt
> 
> 
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Honeyeater ID help
From: Joseph Morlan <jmorlan AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 16:22:09 -0700
Meliphaga sp. Photo at...

http://fog.ccsf.edu/~jmorlan/Australia/Yellow-spottedHoneyeaterDSCN6944.htm

27 July 2014. Julatten, QLD, Australia

I originally thought this was a Yellow-spotted Honeyeater because of the
relatively straight mandible and dark eye, but the narrow gape line under
the eye makes me wonder if it might actually be a Graceful Honeyeater. Also
the lack of evident streaking on the breast favors Graceful. Unfortunately
I have no record of its vocalizations. Comparison with online photos has
reached a dead-end partly because I lack confidence in the identity of many
of the posted online images.

Any helps would be much appreciated.
-- 
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA
"It turns out we're very good at not seeing things" - Jack Hitt



Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: oops re: Who will report the birds on Birdline
From: John Weigel <jweigel AT reptilepark.com.au>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 06:23:46 +1000
Sorry about that folks. In communal email exchanges about the sighting of three 
Northern Pintails at Hastings Swamp last week, and frustration about learning 
of it only now, I failed to notice that the birding aus address had been added 
to the participants' list. Glad I didn't use any of the usual expletives!. 


Hopefully Alan and Martin can re-locate the birds - as it turns out they 
apparently split the scene of the crime shortly after initially being spotted 
on Friday. 


John


Guys, we owe it to lots of guys to get that on report onto birdline. Who will 
do that?

John
 
John Weigel AM
Australian Reptile Park
PO 737 Gosford NSW 2250
(02) 4340 1022
jweigel AT reptilepark.com.au
www.reptilepark.com.au
www.devilark.com.au
 





Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Northern Pintails on Hastie's Swamp, N. Qld.
From: "Mike Carter" <pterodroma AT bigpond.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 19:40:29 +1000
Further to my original message below I have now spoken to Chris. Apparently
he immediately informed Alan Gillanders and Keith Fisher. Alan has since
searched 5 times and not found the birds. Chris took detailed notes and
initially thought that they were females but since arriving home yesterday
now realises that they were drakes in eclipse with mainly blue bills and
barred not spotted flanks. He watched them between 3.00 & 4.00 pm feeding by
upending. Then they flew off down the swamp and have not been seen since. A
friend with Chris had a camera but they were too far away to photograph.

Cheers,

Mike Carter, 03 9787 7136
30 Canadian Bay Road
Mount Eliza, VIC 3930, Australia  

-----Original Message-----
From: Birding-Aus [mailto:birding-aus-bounces AT birding-aus.org] On Behalf Of
Mike Carter
Sent: Tuesday, 16 September 2014 6:10 PM
To: 'birding-aus'
Cc: John Weigel
Subject: [Birding-Aus] Northern Pintails on Hastie's Swamp, N. Qld.

Chris Doughty left message on my phone this afternoon to say that he saw 3
adult drake Northern Pintails on Hastie's Swamp last Friday which would be
12 September. 

Cheers,

Mike Carter, 03 9787 7136
30 Canadian Bay Road
Mount Eliza, VIC 3930, Australia  

 




Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Channel Billed Cuckoo
From: Laurie Knight <l.knight AT optusnet.com.au>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 18:40:18 +1000
Gday Mike

No, CBC call regularly during the breeding season in Australia. I dont think 
the overwintering individuals are prone to calling, so was wondering about the 
purpose of the attention-drawing inflight calls at this time of year. 


Regards, Laurie.


On 16 Sep 2014, at 12:57 pm, Michael Tarburton  
wrote: 


> G'day Laurie
> 
> Do you ask that question because the CBC call (only) on migration flight. 
They certainly called when flying over PAU in PNG on their way to Australia. 

> 
> Cheers
> 
> Mike
> 
> 
> On 16/09/2014, at 5:54 AM, Laurie Knight wrote:
> 
>> Gday chaps
>> 
>> As a matter of interest, were the first CBCs you observed calling in flight?
>> 
>> Regards, Laurie.
>> 
>> On 15 Sep 2014, at 8:48 pm, Paul Doyle  wrote:
> 




Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Who will report the birds on Birdline
From: John Weigel <jweigel AT reptilepark.com.au>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 18:47:30 +1000
Guys, we owe it to lots of guys to get that on report onto birdline. Who will 
do that? 


John
 
John Weigel AM
Australian Reptile Park
PO 737 Gosford NSW 2250
(02) 4340 1022
jweigel AT reptilepark.com.au
www.reptilepark.com.au
www.devilark.com.au
 





Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Channel-billed Cuckoo Gorokan, NSW
From: "Julian Bielewicz" <osprey AT bordernet.com.au>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 18:13:41 +1000
Greetings Carl et al

Ditto!

Insomnia is the bane of diabetes but on occasions it can have its silver 
lining.  Heard the raucous call of the Chanel-billed Cuckoo just after 
midnight.

To cap off a day of new calls, this morning Fay heard the Forest Kingfisher; 
only the second on record for Allen Road [he previous being in October 
2007].

Cheers

Julian
 AT osprey00 




Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Northern Pintails on Hastie's Swamp, N. Qld.
From: martin cachard <mcachard AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 18:47:40 +1030
hey Mike, thanx for that, what a crying shame i'm working next 5 days... & had 
today & yesterday off, grrr!!! 

& Chris would know for sure too - how frustrating!!
hope thay hang around til Monday - over to Alan...
thanx again Mike, 
cheers martin cachard
 
From: pterodroma AT bigpond.com
To: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
CC: jweigel AT reptilepark.com.au; alan AT alanswildlifetours.com.au; 
mcachard AT hotmail.com 

Subject: Northern Pintails on Hastie's Swamp, N. Qld. 
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 18:10:28 +1000

Chris Doughty left message on my phone this afternoon to say that he saw 3 
adult drake Northern Pintails on Hasties Swamp last Friday which would be 12 
September. Cheers, Mike Carter, 03 9787 713630 Canadian Bay RoadMount Eliza, 
VIC 3930, Australia 



Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Northern Pintails on Hastie's Swamp, N. Qld.
From: "Mike Carter" <pterodroma AT bigpond.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 18:10:28 +1000
Chris Doughty left message on my phone this afternoon to say that he saw 3
adult drake Northern Pintails on Hastie's Swamp last Friday which would be
12 September. 

 

Cheers,

 

Mike Carter, 03 9787 7136

30 Canadian Bay Road

Mount Eliza, VIC 3930, Australia  

 



Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Bad news for the coal industry, possible good news for the environment
From: Carl Clifford <carlsclifford AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 17:17:11 +1000
A decision by the Chinese government to reduce or ban the importation of lower 
quality coal, may be good news for the Australian environment and it's birds. 


http://www.smh.com.au/business/mining-and-resources/australian-export-risk-on-china-dirty-coal-ban-20140916-10hnzb.html 


Carl Clifford


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Gluepot Visit
From: Chris Shaw <seashore AT internode.on.net>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 16:24:11 +0930
Hi All;

I went to Gluepot for three days last week and apart from having my hair blown 
off by the evening gales and keeping my tent from getting airborne I had an 
enjoyable visit. Most common birds at the hides were Yellow-plumed and 
Brown-headed Honeyeaters and a few others. 


Chris Shaw
seashore AT internode.on.net
Mobile 0409 675912

My blog - "Top Birds and Everyfing" can be found on the following link 

http://topbirdsandeveryfing.typepad.com/top-birds-everyfing/

Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity. 
Hanlon 





















Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: A coincidental koel
From: Laurie Knight <l.knight AT optusnet.com.au>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 16:32:05 +1000
Although the A380 flight was 10 minutes earlier, I had my first observation of 
a koel for the season as I was riding past the same spot (at the same time of 
day) where I had my first observation of a CBC for the season (yesterday). 


> From: Laurie Knight 
> Subject: Re: [Birding-Aus] Channel Billed Cuckoo
> Date: 15 September 2014 4:42:33 pm AEST
> To: Brian Everingham 
> Cc: Birding Aus 
> 
> The joys of synchronicity.
> 
> I saw one calling in flight with an arriving A380 in the background as I was 
riding through Greenslopes (one of the southern suburbs of Brisbane) at 6.24 am 
today. 

> 
> Actually, Im not sure if CBCs are normally calling this time of year - do 
they do that when they are on their own and trying to find others, establishing 
a territory, or when they are nest raiding? Is it the case that the early bird 
gets the host? 

> 
> Regards, Laurie.



Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Swift Parrorts alert
From: Grahame Rogers <gwrogers AT bigpond.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 14:43:50 +1000
Possible sighting of half a dozen swift parrots flyng over National Park 
Road Ravensbourne (-27 23 56.1, 152 8 51.1).
Disappeared before identification confirmed. If anyone is in the 
neighbourhood...

-- 

Regards
Grahame Rogers




Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Channel-billed Cuckoo Gorokan, NSW
From: Carl Clifford <carlsclifford AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 14:32:58 +1000
Just heard the dulcet tones of the first CBC for the season at Gorokan, Central 
Coast, NSW, accompanied by a mixed species chorus. 


Carl Clifford


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Channel Billed Cuckoo
From: Michael Tarburton <tarburton.m AT optusnet.com.au>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 12:57:59 +1000
G'day Laurie

Do you ask that question because the CBC call (only) on migration  
flight.  They certainly called when flying over PAU in PNG on their  
way to Australia.

Cheers

Mike


On 16/09/2014, at 5:54 AM, Laurie Knight wrote:

> Gday chaps
>
> As a matter of interest, were the first CBCs you observed calling  
> in flight?
>
> Regards, Laurie.
>
> On 15 Sep 2014, at 8:48 pm, Paul Doyle   
> wrote:




Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: toxoplasmosis and birds
From: Carl Clifford <carlsclifford AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 11:20:09 +1000
Hmm. Might explain the behaviour of some people who feed masses of birds in 
their yards. It is thought that people who have what is commonly known as 
"crazy cat lady syndrome" suffer chronic toxoplasmosis infections and that 
there is a strange three way symbiosis between cats, humans and toxo. 


Speaking of "crazy cat ladies", I recently came across a "Crazy Cat Lady Action 
Figurine" set. Must buy one for my daughter. 


Carl Clifford

> On 16 Sep 2014, at 10:44, Denise Goodfellow  
wrote: 

> 
> Some interesting news from New Zealand.
> 
> 
http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/news/10483663/Cat-disease-found-in-native-birds 

> 
> 
> Denise Lawungkurr  Goodfellow
> PO Box 71
> Darwin River, NT, Australia 0841
> 
> PhD candidate, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW.
> 
> Founding Member: Ecotourism Australia
> Founding Member: Australian Federation of Graduate Women Northern Territory
> 043 8650 835
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Channel Billed Cuckoo
From: Ross Mulholland <rmul2103 AT bigpond.net.au>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 11:10:40 +1000
Hi All,
First CBC noticed this year in Beecroft (NW suburban Sydney) Friday 5th 
September and was calling in flight. 

Has also been heard/seen regularly since - same bird???
Regards
Ross
On 16 Sep 2014, at 5:54 am, Laurie Knight  wrote:

> Gday chaps
> 
> As a matter of interest, were the first CBCs you observed calling in flight?
> 
> Regards, Laurie.
> 
> On 15 Sep 2014, at 8:48 pm, Paul Doyle  wrote:
> 
>> At Como, NSW (about 5Km North of Engadine as the CBC flies), my first one
>> was on Sept. 7th.
>> Paul Doyle
>> 
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Birding-Aus [mailto:birding-aus-bounces AT birding-aus.org] On Behalf Of
>> Brian Everingham
>> Sent: Monday, 15 September 2014 3:56 PM
>> To: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
>> Subject: [Birding-Aus] Channel Billed Cuckoo
>> 
>> First sighting in Engadine, southern outskirts of Sydney, on 8th September.
>> Second sighting today, 15th, at 3.50pm.
>> 
>> Brian Everingham
> 
> 
> 
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: toxoplasmosis and birds
From: Denise Goodfellow <goodfellow AT bigpond.com.au>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 10:14:43 +0930
Some interesting news from New Zealand.


http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/news/10483663/Cat-disease-found-in-native-birds 



Denise Lawungkurr  Goodfellow
PO Box 71
Darwin River, NT, Australia 0841

PhD candidate, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW.

Founding Member: Ecotourism Australia
Founding Member: Australian Federation of Graduate Women Northern Territory
043 8650 835











Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Channel Billed Cuckoo
From: Brian Everingham <brian.everingham AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 07:51:07 +1000
In our case, in Engadine, yes. Heading south! The one on 8th Engadine had
an entourage of angry birds. The second, on 15th, calling away, had no-one
in pursuit. Neither stopped off.

Brian

On 16 September 2014 05:54, Laurie Knight  wrote:

> G’day chaps
>
> As a matter of interest, were the first CBCs you observed calling in
> flight?
>
> Regards, Laurie.
>
> On 15 Sep 2014, at 8:48 pm, Paul Doyle  wrote:
>
> > At Como, NSW (about 5Km North of Engadine as the CBC flies), my first one
> > was on Sept. 7th.
> > Paul Doyle
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Birding-Aus [mailto:birding-aus-bounces AT birding-aus.org] On
> Behalf Of
> > Brian Everingham
> > Sent: Monday, 15 September 2014 3:56 PM
> > To: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
> > Subject: [Birding-Aus] Channel Billed Cuckoo
> >
> > First sighting in Engadine, southern outskirts of Sydney, on 8th
> September.
> > Second sighting today, 15th, at 3.50pm.
> >
> > Brian Everingham
>
>


-- 
Brian Everingham
PO Box 269
Engadine
NSW 2233
Australia


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Channel Billed Cuckoo
From: "Jenny Stiles" <jstiles AT optusnet.com.au>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 07:39:55 +1000
My first Channel-billed Cuckoo for the season was seen on Friday the 12th 
September in Epping. It flew without calling into a Liquid Amber opposite my 
house & I became aware of it because of 20 Noisy Miners loudly complaining. 
After about 15 minutes the CBC flew off silently. If not for the NM chorus I 
would never have noticed it.

From Jenny Stiles




-----Original Message----- 
From: Laurie Knight
Sent: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 5:54 AM
To: Paul Doyle
Cc: Birding Aus ; Brian Everingham
Subject: Re: [Birding-Aus] Channel Billed Cuckoo

Gday chaps

As a matter of interest, were the first CBCs you observed calling in flight?

Regards, Laurie.

On 15 Sep 2014, at 8:48 pm, Paul Doyle  wrote:

> At Como, NSW (about 5Km North of Engadine as the CBC flies), my first one
> was on Sept. 7th.
> Paul Doyle
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Birding-Aus [mailto:birding-aus-bounces AT birding-aus.org] On Behalf 
> Of
> Brian Everingham
> Sent: Monday, 15 September 2014 3:56 PM
> To: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
> Subject: [Birding-Aus] Channel Billed Cuckoo
>
> First sighting in Engadine, southern outskirts of Sydney, on 8th 
> September.
> Second sighting today, 15th, at 3.50pm.
>
> Brian Everingham




Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Channel Billed Cuckoo
From: Laurie Knight <l.knight AT optusnet.com.au>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 05:54:28 +1000
Gday chaps

As a matter of interest, were the first CBCs you observed calling in flight?

Regards, Laurie.

On 15 Sep 2014, at 8:48 pm, Paul Doyle  wrote:

> At Como, NSW (about 5Km North of Engadine as the CBC flies), my first one
> was on Sept. 7th.
> Paul Doyle
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Birding-Aus [mailto:birding-aus-bounces AT birding-aus.org] On Behalf Of
> Brian Everingham
> Sent: Monday, 15 September 2014 3:56 PM
> To: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
> Subject: [Birding-Aus] Channel Billed Cuckoo
> 
> First sighting in Engadine, southern outskirts of Sydney, on 8th September.
> Second sighting today, 15th, at 3.50pm.
> 
> Brian Everingham




Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Canon SX50HS on sale
From: Peter Shute <pshute AT nuw.org.au>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 04:20:07 +1000
That sounds like a great bargain. And you're right, the SX60HS was announced 
yesterday. It's likely to be about three times that price. 


I haven't read much about it, but apart from the zoom range being a bit wider 
and longer, the big improvement I can see for birders is that the electronic 
viewfinder resolution has increased from 202k dots to 922k. That should make it 
significantly easier to find the bird in the viewfinder. 


I'm interested to hear if manual focusing is any easier on this model.

Peter Shute

Sent from my iPad

> On 15 Sep 2014, at 10:23 pm, "Andrew Taylor"  wrote:
> 
> The Canon SX50HS is currently available for $299 via Dick Smith's ebay
> store http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Canon-PS-SX50HS-UltraZoom-/261554152964
> There is a $50 cashback offer from Canon and a 15%  EBAY-wide Discount
> until Tuesday midnight (Coupon code: CELEBRATE15) bringing the price
> down to $210 delivered.  
> 
> The SX50HS has been discussed on birding-aus before, I gather a new model
> is about to be released and no doubt you can get better cameras if you
> spend more, but I haven't seen anything comparable at this price - so
> this looks  a very attractive deal if you want a cheap point-and-shoot
> for casual bird photography & record shots.
> 
> andrew
> 
> 
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Pied Currawongs in Docklands (Melbourne)
From: Russell Woodford <rdwoodford AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 23:29:06 +1000
Not a single Pied Currawong, nor any Butcherbirds, at Docklands today -
well, at least none around the new Library at the Docks. I spent the whole
day there and all I saw were Silver Gulls and Little Pied Cormorants. Apart
from the lack of avian diversity, this is a sensational library, and well
worth a visit.

Russell Woodford


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Canon SX50HS on sale
From: Andrew Taylor <andrewt AT cse.unsw.edu.au>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 22:12:47 +1000
The Canon SX50HS is currently available for $299 via Dick Smith's ebay
store http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Canon-PS-SX50HS-UltraZoom-/261554152964
There is a $50 cashback offer from Canon and a 15%  EBAY-wide Discount
until Tuesday midnight (Coupon code: CELEBRATE15) bringing the price
down to $210 delivered.  

The SX50HS has been discussed on birding-aus before, I gather a new model
is about to be released and no doubt you can get better cameras if you
spend more, but I haven't seen anything comparable at this price - so
this looks  a very attractive deal if you want a cheap point-and-shoot
for casual bird photography & record shots.

andrew



Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Channel Billed Cuckoo
From: "Paul Doyle" <paulodoyle AT optusnet.com.au>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 20:48:43 +1000
At Como, NSW (about 5Km North of Engadine as the CBC flies), my first one
was on Sept. 7th.
Paul Doyle

-----Original Message-----
From: Birding-Aus [mailto:birding-aus-bounces AT birding-aus.org] On Behalf Of
Brian Everingham
Sent: Monday, 15 September 2014 3:56 PM
To: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
Subject: [Birding-Aus] Channel Billed Cuckoo

First sighting in Engadine, southern outskirts of Sydney, on 8th September.
Second sighting today, 15th, at 3.50pm.

Brian Everingham

Sent from my iPad


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Fw: A Question about Eagles
From: <youngsfamilymail AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 02:51:29 +0000
Thanks to Phil, Greg and Val and Shirley for replying.


Shirley, thanks for passing that onto Steve, and can you pass on my thanks to 
Steve for his reply? I've read the article he referenced, and seems that given 
the context of where I heard what I heard, that it mostly likely comes from the 
book that he has reviewed. I will pass this information onto my friend as well. 



Thanks again,


Mark






Sent from Surface Pro2





From: Shirley Cook
Sent: ‎Monday‎, ‎15‎ ‎September‎ ‎2014 ‎08‎:‎30
To: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org





A note from Steve Debus

Regards
Shirley Cook
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Steve Debus" 
To: "Shirley Cook" 
Sent: Sunday, September 14, 2014 6:04 PM
Subject: RE: [Birding-Aus] A Question about Eagles


Hi Shirley,

Oh dear, where do these myths come from?  Whimsical baloney, of course (no 
offence intended to Mark or others).  I think one secondary source of this 
myth was a religious book 'on Eagles Wings', reviewed in Boobook 24(1), May 
2006.  That review scotched many such myths, and that issue of Boobook is 
available as free download from the BirdLife website via Special Interest 
Groups/Australasian Raptor Association (as are all issues 2004 to 2 years 
past, were readers might find much of interest about raptors).

Cheers,

Steve



-----Original Message-----
From: Shirley Cook [mailto:shirleycook AT skymesh.com.au]
Sent: Sunday, 14 September 2014 4:31 PM
To: Steve Debus
Subject: Fw: [Birding-Aus] A Question about Eagles

Philip Veerman and Greg Clancy have responded with "it is unlikely" so I am 
guessing you would have the same answer.

Regards
Shirley
----- Original Message -----
From: 
To: 
Sent: Sunday, September 14, 2014 10:28 AM
Subject: Re: [Birding-Aus] A Question about Eagles


> Hi,
>
>
> I heard a story recently about a species of Eagle that puts sharp sticks
> in the middle of the nest to encourage the young birds to leave the nest.
> Apparently the parent bird starts off by putting the sticks in the middle
> of the nest slowly working more towards the edges until the young birds
> have no where left to go and they are forced to leave the nest.
>
>
> Does anyone know if this is true or not?
>
>
> Regards,
>
> Mark
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Sent from Surface Pro2
> 
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Bower
From: "Michael Hunter" <drmhunter AT westnet.com.au>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 18:29:45 +1000
Hi All
A very obvious Satin Bowerbird bower with bright blue bits of plastic is right 
on the side of Mayfair Rd Mulgoa, East side a few metres up from the bottom of 
the hill. Probably wont last long but an easy ornithological icon to see at the 
moment. Several lady friends visiting, plenty of chortling, gargling, growling 
and grunting from the overexcited male, as well as mimicry. 


Spring has really sprung here, the best for years.  

                          Cheers

                                   Michael





Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Differential spring and autumn migration routes
From: Laurie Knight <l.knight AT optusnet.com.au>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 17:37:18 +1000
in north American migrants

See http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/09/140910190205.htm



Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Fwd: Re: Flames in the snow
From: brian fleming <flambeau AT labyrinth.net.au>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 16:56:29 +1000


-------- Original Message --------
Subject: 	Re: [Birding-Aus] Flames in the snow
Date: 	Mon, 15 Sep 2014 10:40:25 +1000
From: 	brian fleming 
To: 	Martin Butterfield 



    Back in September 1977, we went to Canberra in the September school
holidays. Coming back, we stopped near Thredbo to give our children a
chance to ski in the remaining snow.  The thaw had started and there was
quite a bit of bare ground with grass tussocks showing in sunny places.
At least two pairs of Flame Robins were hopping about feeding among the
tussocks of snow-grass and I took several slides. A male Flame Robin
looks very fine on a snow patch. The birds seemed to have no objection
to hopping about on the snow, as long as they could investigate the
grass clumps - they were probably getting the insects killed by the
first snow.

   Migrating flocks of Pardalotes and Honeyeaters (Yellow-faced and
White-naped) were passing overhead through the tops of the Snowgums - a
flock would fly several hundred yards and settle in the tree-tops, to be
overtaken by other flocks 'leap-frogging' over them, before they in turn
rose and flew on, heading towards Dead Horse Gap. When we got down
through Dead Horse, the road was in tall forest and the migrants were
out of sight up in the canopy.

   I recall reading an article by the late Norman Wakefield in "The Age"
- he had a weekly naturalist's column. He described seeing the first
signs of the thaw in Victorian forests. As the snow lost its grip,
buried saplings and low shrubs would suddenly spring upright, and he
wrote that the forest was alive with altitudinal migrant birds returning
from the lowlands. These birds were eagerly feeding on the chilled
insects they were finding under bark and in the vegetation well before
the snow was melted from the ground.

   We often spent skiiing holidays at Mt. Hotham when we were much
younger. I do not recall ever seeing Flame Robins at times of heavy snow
cover, though I recall seeing them after a light early fall with patchy
cover.  During the winter, the only birds were Pied Currawongs and the
occasional Grey Shrike-thrush.

Anthea Fleming



On 15/09/2014 9:58 AM, Martin Butterfield wrote:
> I did a map query in eBird looking for records of Flame Robin in June -
> September
> 
. 

>     Basically there is a big gap around the snowfields.  Whether that means
>
>     - skiers don't bird, or
>     - birders don't like snow; or
>     - Flame Robins don't like snow
>
> is open to debate.
>
> I hope the image in the blogpost is reasonable - I couldn't persuade the
> birding-aus website to allow me to post the image there.
>
> Martin
>
> Martin Butterfield
> http://franmart.blogspot.com.au/
>
> On 15 September 2014 08:41, Martin Butterfield  wrote:
>
>> I have done a very crude map from eBird showing occurence of Flame Robins
>> from June to September.
>>
>> ​
>>
>> Martin Butterfield
>> http://franmart.blogspot.com.au/
>>
>> On 15 September 2014 07:47, Paul Doyle  wrote:
>>
>>> HI All,
>>> Last weekend as I was riding up the Pleasant Valley Quad Chair at
>>> Perisher,
>>> quietly contemplating the beauty, , I was surprised to see, flashing
>>> across
>>> inn front of me, what I am sure was a flame robin. Only saw it for a few
>>> seconds. The only other possibility would be a red-capped robin, but I
>>> don't
>>> think they're up in that area.
>>> Anyone have any info about the presence or absence of either of these in
>>> the
>>> snowfields in winter?
>>>
>>> Thanks
>>> Paul
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> 
>>>
Birding-Aus mailing list >>>
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >>>
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >>>
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >>> >>> >> >
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Malleefowl Forum, Spring Sightings and a Free Coffee Cup
From: Peter Ewin <sittella AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 16:36:24 +1000
Just returned from the 5th National Mallleefowl Forum held over the 
weekend at Western Plains Zoo at Dubbo. A good crowd for the first forum
 to be held in NSW and as usual some really interesting presentations - 
each time I leave the forum my head is filled with more and more ideas 
on the complexity of managing these interesting birds.
Drove up from 
my base in Albury on Friday and returned today (after stopping in Forbes
 last night). Plenty of good birds about with a summary of threatened 
and interesting birds as follows:

Blue-billed Duck - a pair with 3
 chicks is present at Gum Swamp at Forbes (as reported on BirdLine by 
Warren Chad). I saw the adults on Friday, and the female with one chick 
this morning (the chick was diving just like an adult) - I suspect very 
few breeding records of this species. All the usual suspects, including 
at least half a dozen Freckled Ducks were also present, with 5 raptors 
this morning (best was a Peregrine hammering through and upsetting all 
the Feral Pigeons). Missed the Plum-headed Finches by about 10 minutes 
on Friday (apparently an unusual record and may have been a flock 
passing through?)

Superb Parrot - plenty in small numbers between
 Uranquinty and south of Forbes (best was five at the latter site). Many
 more were seen today, with a number of pairs between Temora and Junee.

Musk
 Lorikeet - lots around Dubbo, with a small flock feeding on lerps (like
 a Swift Parrot!) on Mountain Creek Road (see below).

Grey-crowned
 Babbler - a number of birds seen, including two separate groups at 
Mountain Creek Road (and birds yahooing while sitting in the conference 
room while at the zoo on Saturday).

On Saturday afternoon needed a
 leg stretch after sitting all day so drove towards Parks (original 
intention was Mogo SF) and stopped at a patch of bush at Mountain Creek 
Road. As well as the sightings above also had 3 Ground Cuckoo-shrikes 
and my first Pallid Cuckoo heard for the year. At least four species of 
orchids were present with Glossodia major in particyular being common.

White-breasted
 Woodswallows are returning - 1 heard at Gum Swamp and a number in 
Parkes on Friday evening, and one crossed the road near Wyalong this 
morning. A couple of Duskies were the only Woodswallow recorded.

Plenty of Rufous Songlarks on wires (but they were in the eastern Riverina by 
late August this year). 


I
 was intrigued that Brown Honeyeaters were so common in Dubbo (I could 
hear at least four from my motel). Apparently they have increased 
significantly in the last ten years or so, but this is my first record 
on visits in the last few years.

If you have got this far, I 
managed to leave my reusable Keep Cup on the fence post at the front of 
the bird hide this morning. Not particualrly worried, and would be happy
 if another birder claims it (sorry it is in Cronulla Sharks colours). 
Otherwise, I am intrigued to see if this network will track down its 
final owner.

Cheers,
Peter 		 	   		  


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Channel Billed Cuckoo
From: Laurie Knight <l.knight AT optusnet.com.au>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 16:42:33 +1000
The joys of synchronicity.

I saw one calling in flight with an arriving A380 in the background as I was 
riding through Greenslopes (one of the southern suburbs of Brisbane) at 6.24 am 
today. 


Actually, Im not sure if CBCs are normally calling this time of year - do they 
do that when they are on their own and trying to find others, establishing a 
territory, or when they are nest raiding? Is it the case that the early bird 
gets the host? 


Regards, Laurie.

 
On 15 Sep 2014, at 3:55 pm, Brian Everingham  
wrote: 


> First sighting in Engadine, southern outskirts of Sydney, on 8th September. 
Second sighting today, 15th, at 3.50pm. 

> 
> Brian Everingham
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Channel Billed Cuckoo
From: Brian Everingham <brian.everingham AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 15:55:56 +1000
First sighting in Engadine, southern outskirts of Sydney, on 8th September. 
Second sighting today, 15th, at 3.50pm. 


Brian Everingham

Sent from my iPad


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Pied Currawongs in Docklands (Melbourne)
From: Tim Dolby <Tim.Dolby AT vu.edu.au>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 05:08:50 +0000
Yes, Grey Butcherbird, Martin, thanks. Of course I blame the local Pied 
Currawong for the error of my ways. Pity really, Pied Butcherbird, and their 
wonderful call, is one of my favorite Australian birds. Their call, for me, is 
number one! 


Cheers,

Tim
________________________________________
From: martin cachard [mcachard AT hotmail.com]
Sent: Monday, September 15, 2014 2:52 PM
To: Tim Dolby; Peter Shute; 'James Mustafa'; Paul Dodd
Cc: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
Subject: RE: [Birding-Aus] Pied Currawongs in Docklands (Melbourne)

hey Tim,
really, a Pied Butcherbird in Northcote??
I'm sure you meant to type "Grey"!!

cheers  :-))

martin cachard.
cairns



> From: Tim.Dolby AT vu.edu.au
> To: pshute AT nuw.org.au; jamesmustafamusic AT gmail.com; paul AT angrybluecat.com
> Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 04:20:47 +0000
> CC: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
> Subject: Re: [Birding-Aus] Pied Currawongs in Docklands (Melbourne)
>
> Actually Pete - in terms of inner urban Melbourne - your observation isn't 
all that obvious. At this stage Pied Currawong are mainly limited to the 
eastern and northern suburbs of inner Melbourne, with the Docklands basically 
representing the dividing point of their Melbourne range. There are found in 
the west, at places such as Newport Lakes Park etc., but at this stage there 
not all that common (yet). 

>
> By contrast though, where I live in Northcote, Pied Currawong is now a daily 
backyard birds. This, along with other 'native' species such as Little Raven, 
Australian Magpie, Pied Butcherbird, Noisy Miner, Crested Pigeon, Galah, Silver 
Gull, Welcome Swallow, Magpie Lark, Willie Wagtail, Red and Little Wattlebird, 
Red-rumped Parrot, Rainbow Lorikeet and, occasionally, Brown Thornbill, Spotted 
Pardalote, Musk, Little and Scaly-breasted Lorikeet, Little Corella, 
Sulphur-crested Cockatoo, Pacific Black Duck (overhead), Australian Darter 
(high overhead), Peregrine, Australian Hobby and Tawny Frogmouth (had one in 
the garden last week). I even saw a Swift Parrot (next door at the pool) a few 
months ago. Not bad! Also had a Marbled Gecko in the garden a few days ago - 
you often hear them barking at night. In terms of native mammals I get 
Brushtail and Ringtail Possum, and Grey-headed Flying Fox. (I call them the 
"Northcote Big Three" when going for a walk at night :-) Northcote's version of 
the Serengeti "Big Five".) 

>
> This is a far cry from the days (and it wasn't that long ago) when the only 
urban birds you'd see in places like Northcote or Brunswick were House Sparrow, 
European Starling, Spotted and Rock Dove, Common Myna and Eurasian Blackbird. 
For fun, sometimes, I walk out into my backyard and see how many native species 
I can see before I see an introduced species. I think my best is 7. 

>
> Cheers,
>
> Tim
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Birding-Aus [mailto:birding-aus-bounces AT birding-aus.org] On Behalf Of 
Peter Shute 

> Sent: Monday, 15 September 2014 12:50 PM
> To: 'James Mustafa'; Paul Dodd
> Cc: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
> Subject: Re: [Birding-Aus] Pied Currawongs in Docklands (Melbourne)
>
> Thanks everyone, it's sounds like it's surprising I haven't seen one here 
before. It just came back a second time, so it looks like it might be a regular 
now. 

>
> Peter Shute
>
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: James Mustafa [mailto:jamesmustafamusic AT gmail.com]
> > Sent: Monday, 15 September 2014 11:54 AM
> > To: Paul Dodd
> > Cc: Janine Duffy; Peter Shute; birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
> > Subject: Re: [Birding-Aus] Pied Currawongs in Docklands (Melbourne)
> >
> > I know they're regularly seen in the botanical gardens. Very common in
> > there now.
> >
> > On Mon, Sep 15, 2014 at 11:13 AM, Paul Dodd 
> > wrote:
> >
> >
> > I see them reasonably frequently in South Melbourne (Dorcas St, Moray
> > St and
> > Bank St) too. I would be surprised if they weren't in Docklands,
> > Albert
> > Park, Middle Park, Albert Park Lake and even in the Royal Botanical
> > Gardens
> > also.
> >
> > Paul Dodd
> > Docklands, Victoria
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Birding-Aus
> > [mailto:birding-aus-bounces AT birding-aus.org] On Behalf Of
> > Janine Duffy
> > Sent: Monday, 15 September 2014 10:20 AM
> > To: Peter Shute; birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
> > Subject: Re: [Birding-Aus] Pied Currawongs in Docklands
> > (Melbourne)
> >
> > Hi Peter
> > We've been seeing them on and off around Port Melbourne for a few
> > years
> > now. So I wouldn't be surprised if they are coming through
> > Docklands
> > as well.
> > Janine
> >
> > --
> >
> > JANINE DUFFY Director Marketing ECHIDNA WALKABOUT PO Box 370 Port
> > Melbourne, Victoria 3207 AUSTRALIA
> > E: [1]janine AT echidnawalkabout.com.au Web:
> > [2]www.echidnawalkabout.com.au
> > Ph: +61 (0)3 9646 8249
> >  Mob: +61 (0)427 808
> > 747  Fax: +61 (0)3 9681
> > 9177
> > OPERATIONS & GROUP enquiries contact: [3]Roger [4]Smith Director
> > Operations A.B.N. 72 716 985 505
> >
> > [5]Peter Shute
> > Monday, 15 September 2014 9:58 AM
> >
> > Last week I heard a Pied Currawong calling near the casuarina
> > plantation in Navigation Drive in Docklands, and just now one
> > landed on
> > the roof of the builidng opposite where I work.
> > I submitted a Birdline for last week's bird, but it was rejected
> > on the
> > grounds that PC sightings around the CBD are common now. Fair
> > enough,
> > especially as they've been regularly seen around the zoo for years
> > now,
> > but it was my first sighting of them in Docklands that I've had in
> > the
> > 6 years since we moved here.
> > I'm wondering if this is just part of a general spreading of their
> > range, or a sign that the trees in Docklands, most of which are
> > less
> > than 10 years old, are maturing to the point that they are now
> > attractive to them. Or possibly just that residents are now
> > feeding
> > them. Have others seen them in Docklands before?
> > Peter Shute
> > 
> >
Birding-Aus mailing list > >
[6]Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org > >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: > >
> > > > [7]http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > > > > > > References > > > > 1. mailto:janine AT echidnawalkabout.com.au > > 2. http://www.echidnawalkabout.com.au/ > > 3. mailto:roger AT echidnawalkabout.com.au > > 4. mailto:roger AT echidnawalkabout.com.au > > 5. mailto:pshute AT nuw.org.au > > 6. mailto:Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org > > 7. > > http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > >
> >
Birding-Aus mailing list > >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org > >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: > >
> > http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > > > > > > > >
> >
Birding-Aus mailing list > >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org > >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: > >
> > http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > > > > > > > > > > > > > > -- > > > > All the best, > > > > James Mustafa > > > > 0400 951 517 > > www.jamesmustafajazzorchestra.com > > >
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > > This email, including any attachment, is intended solely for the use of the intended recipient. It is confidential and may contain personal information or be subject to legal professional privilege. If you are not the intended recipient any use, disclosure, reproduction or storage of it is unauthorised. If you have received this email in error, please advise the sender via return email and delete it from your system immediately. Victoria University does not warrant that this email is free from viruses or defects and accepts no liability for any damage caused by such viruses or defects. > >
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > This email, including any attachment, is intended solely for the use of the intended recipient. It is confidential and may contain personal information or be subject to legal professional privilege. If you are not the intended recipient any use, disclosure, reproduction or storage of it is unauthorised. If you have received this email in error, please advise the sender via return email and delete it from your system immediately. Victoria University does not warrant that this email is free from viruses or defects and accepts no liability for any damage caused by such viruses or defects.

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Pied Currawongs in Docklands (Melbourne)
From: martin cachard <mcachard AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 15:46:56 +1030
hey it's my fave call too!!! cheers martin
 
> From: Tim.Dolby AT vu.edu.au
> To: mcachard AT hotmail.com; pshute AT nuw.org.au; jamesmustafamusic AT gmail.com; 
paul AT angrybluecat.com 

> CC: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
> Subject: RE: [Birding-Aus] Pied Currawongs in Docklands (Melbourne)
> Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 05:08:50 +0000
> 
> Yes, Grey Butcherbird, Martin, thanks. Of course I blame the local Pied 
Currawong for the error of my ways. Pity really, Pied Butcherbird, and their 
wonderful call, is one of my favorite Australian birds. Their call, for me, is 
number one! 

> 
> Cheers,
> 
> Tim
> ________________________________________
> From: martin cachard [mcachard AT hotmail.com]
> Sent: Monday, September 15, 2014 2:52 PM
> To: Tim Dolby; Peter Shute; 'James Mustafa'; Paul Dodd
> Cc: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
> Subject: RE: [Birding-Aus] Pied Currawongs in Docklands (Melbourne)
> 
> hey Tim,
> really, a Pied Butcherbird in Northcote??
> I'm sure you meant to type "Grey"!!
> 
> cheers  :-))
> 
> martin cachard.
> cairns
> 
> 
> 
> > From: Tim.Dolby AT vu.edu.au
> > To: pshute AT nuw.org.au; jamesmustafamusic AT gmail.com; paul AT angrybluecat.com
> > Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 04:20:47 +0000
> > CC: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
> > Subject: Re: [Birding-Aus] Pied Currawongs in Docklands (Melbourne)
> >
> > Actually Pete - in terms of inner urban Melbourne - your observation isn't 
all that obvious. At this stage Pied Currawong are mainly limited to the 
eastern and northern suburbs of inner Melbourne, with the Docklands basically 
representing the dividing point of their Melbourne range. There are found in 
the west, at places such as Newport Lakes Park etc., but at this stage there 
not all that common (yet). 

> >
> > By contrast though, where I live in Northcote, Pied Currawong is now a 
daily backyard birds. This, along with other 'native' species such as Little 
Raven, Australian Magpie, Pied Butcherbird, Noisy Miner, Crested Pigeon, Galah, 
Silver Gull, Welcome Swallow, Magpie Lark, Willie Wagtail, Red and Little 
Wattlebird, Red-rumped Parrot, Rainbow Lorikeet and, occasionally, Brown 
Thornbill, Spotted Pardalote, Musk, Little and Scaly-breasted Lorikeet, Little 
Corella, Sulphur-crested Cockatoo, Pacific Black Duck (overhead), Australian 
Darter (high overhead), Peregrine, Australian Hobby and Tawny Frogmouth (had 
one in the garden last week). I even saw a Swift Parrot (next door at the pool) 
a few months ago. Not bad! Also had a Marbled Gecko in the garden a few days 
ago - you often hear them barking at night. In terms of native mammals I get 
Brushtail and Ringtail Possum, and Grey-headed Flying Fox. (I call them the 
"Northcote Big Three" when going for a walk at night :-) Northcote's version of 
the Serengeti "Big Five".) 

> >
> > This is a far cry from the days (and it wasn't that long ago) when the only 
urban birds you'd see in places like Northcote or Brunswick were House Sparrow, 
European Starling, Spotted and Rock Dove, Common Myna and Eurasian Blackbird. 
For fun, sometimes, I walk out into my backyard and see how many native species 
I can see before I see an introduced species. I think my best is 7. 

> >
> > Cheers,
> >
> > Tim
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Birding-Aus [mailto:birding-aus-bounces AT birding-aus.org] On Behalf Of 
Peter Shute 

> > Sent: Monday, 15 September 2014 12:50 PM
> > To: 'James Mustafa'; Paul Dodd
> > Cc: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
> > Subject: Re: [Birding-Aus] Pied Currawongs in Docklands (Melbourne)
> >
> > Thanks everyone, it's sounds like it's surprising I haven't seen one here 
before. It just came back a second time, so it looks like it might be a regular 
now. 

> >
> > Peter Shute
> >
> > > -----Original Message-----
> > > From: James Mustafa [mailto:jamesmustafamusic AT gmail.com]
> > > Sent: Monday, 15 September 2014 11:54 AM
> > > To: Paul Dodd
> > > Cc: Janine Duffy; Peter Shute; birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
> > > Subject: Re: [Birding-Aus] Pied Currawongs in Docklands (Melbourne)
> > >
> > > I know they're regularly seen in the botanical gardens. Very common in
> > > there now.
> > >
> > > On Mon, Sep 15, 2014 at 11:13 AM, Paul Dodd 
> > > wrote:
> > >
> > >
> > > I see them reasonably frequently in South Melbourne (Dorcas St, Moray
> > > St and
> > > Bank St) too. I would be surprised if they weren't in Docklands,
> > > Albert
> > > Park, Middle Park, Albert Park Lake and even in the Royal Botanical
> > > Gardens
> > > also.
> > >
> > > Paul Dodd
> > > Docklands, Victoria
> > >
> > > -----Original Message-----
> > > From: Birding-Aus
> > > [mailto:birding-aus-bounces AT birding-aus.org] On Behalf Of
> > > Janine Duffy
> > > Sent: Monday, 15 September 2014 10:20 AM
> > > To: Peter Shute; birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
> > > Subject: Re: [Birding-Aus] Pied Currawongs in Docklands
> > > (Melbourne)
> > >
> > > Hi Peter
> > > We've been seeing them on and off around Port Melbourne for a few
> > > years
> > > now. So I wouldn't be surprised if they are coming through
> > > Docklands
> > > as well.
> > > Janine
> > >
> > > --
> > >
> > > JANINE DUFFY Director Marketing ECHIDNA WALKABOUT PO Box 370 Port
> > > Melbourne, Victoria 3207 AUSTRALIA
> > > E: [1]janine AT echidnawalkabout.com.au Web:
> > > [2]www.echidnawalkabout.com.au
> > > Ph: +61 (0)3 9646 8249
> > >  Mob: +61 (0)427 808
> > > 747  Fax: +61 (0)3 9681
> > > 9177
> > > OPERATIONS & GROUP enquiries contact: [3]Roger [4]Smith Director
> > > Operations A.B.N. 72 716 985 505
> > >
> > > [5]Peter Shute
> > > Monday, 15 September 2014 9:58 AM
> > >
> > > Last week I heard a Pied Currawong calling near the casuarina
> > > plantation in Navigation Drive in Docklands, and just now one
> > > landed on
> > > the roof of the builidng opposite where I work.
> > > I submitted a Birdline for last week's bird, but it was rejected
> > > on the
> > > grounds that PC sightings around the CBD are common now. Fair
> > > enough,
> > > especially as they've been regularly seen around the zoo for years
> > > now,
> > > but it was my first sighting of them in Docklands that I've had in
> > > the
> > > 6 years since we moved here.
> > > I'm wondering if this is just part of a general spreading of their
> > > range, or a sign that the trees in Docklands, most of which are
> > > less
> > > than 10 years old, are maturing to the point that they are now
> > > attractive to them. Or possibly just that residents are now
> > > feeding
> > > them. Have others seen them in Docklands before?
> > > Peter Shute
> > > 
> > >
Birding-Aus mailing list > > >
[6]Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org > > >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: > > >
> > > > > > [7]http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > > > > > > > > > References > > > > > > 1. mailto:janine AT echidnawalkabout.com.au > > > 2. http://www.echidnawalkabout.com.au/ > > > 3. mailto:roger AT echidnawalkabout.com.au > > > 4. mailto:roger AT echidnawalkabout.com.au > > > 5. mailto:pshute AT nuw.org.au > > > 6. mailto:Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org > > > 7. > > > http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > > >
> > >
Birding-Aus mailing list > > >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org > > >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: > > >
> > > http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > > > > > > > > > > > >
> > >
Birding-Aus mailing list > > >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org > > >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: > > >
> > > http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > -- > > > > > > All the best, > > > > > > James Mustafa > > > > > > 0400 951 517 > > > www.jamesmustafajazzorchestra.com > > > > >
> >
Birding-Aus mailing list > >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org > >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: > >
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > > > > This email, including any attachment, is intended solely for the use of the intended recipient. It is confidential and may contain personal information or be subject to legal professional privilege. If you are not the intended recipient any use, disclosure, reproduction or storage of it is unauthorised. If you have received this email in error, please advise the sender via return email and delete it from your system immediately. Victoria University does not warrant that this email is free from viruses or defects and accepts no liability for any damage caused by such viruses or defects. > > > >
> >
Birding-Aus mailing list > >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org > >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: > >
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > > > This email, including any attachment, is intended solely for the use of the intended recipient. It is confidential and may contain personal information or be subject to legal professional privilege. If you are not the intended recipient any use, disclosure, reproduction or storage of it is unauthorised. If you have received this email in error, please advise the sender via return email and delete it from your system immediately. Victoria University does not warrant that this email is free from viruses or defects and accepts no liability for any damage caused by such viruses or defects.

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Pied Currawongs in Docklands (Melbourne)
From: martin cachard <mcachard AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 15:22:06 +1030
hey Tim,
really, a Pied Butcherbird in Northcote?? 
I'm sure you meant to type "Grey"!!
 
cheers  :-))
 
martin cachard.
cairns
 

 
> From: Tim.Dolby AT vu.edu.au
> To: pshute AT nuw.org.au; jamesmustafamusic AT gmail.com; paul AT angrybluecat.com
> Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 04:20:47 +0000
> CC: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
> Subject: Re: [Birding-Aus] Pied Currawongs in Docklands (Melbourne)
> 
> Actually Pete - in terms of inner urban Melbourne - your observation isn't 
all that obvious. At this stage Pied Currawong are mainly limited to the 
eastern and northern suburbs of inner Melbourne, with the Docklands basically 
representing the dividing point of their Melbourne range. There are found in 
the west, at places such as Newport Lakes Park etc., but at this stage there 
not all that common (yet). 

> 
> By contrast though, where I live in Northcote, Pied Currawong is now a daily 
backyard birds. This, along with other 'native' species such as Little Raven, 
Australian Magpie, Pied Butcherbird, Noisy Miner, Crested Pigeon, Galah, Silver 
Gull, Welcome Swallow, Magpie Lark, Willie Wagtail, Red and Little Wattlebird, 
Red-rumped Parrot, Rainbow Lorikeet and, occasionally, Brown Thornbill, Spotted 
Pardalote, Musk, Little and Scaly-breasted Lorikeet, Little Corella, 
Sulphur-crested Cockatoo, Pacific Black Duck (overhead), Australian Darter 
(high overhead), Peregrine, Australian Hobby and Tawny Frogmouth (had one in 
the garden last week). I even saw a Swift Parrot (next door at the pool) a few 
months ago. Not bad! Also had a Marbled Gecko in the garden a few days ago - 
you often hear them barking at night. In terms of native mammals I get 
Brushtail and Ringtail Possum, and Grey-headed Flying Fox. (I call them the 
"Northcote Big Three" when going for a walk at night :-) Northcote's version of 
the Serengeti "Big Five".) 

> 
> This is a far cry from the days (and it wasn't that long ago) when the only 
urban birds you'd see in places like Northcote or Brunswick were House Sparrow, 
European Starling, Spotted and Rock Dove, Common Myna and Eurasian Blackbird. 
For fun, sometimes, I walk out into my backyard and see how many native species 
I can see before I see an introduced species. I think my best is 7. 

> 
> Cheers,
> 
> Tim
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Birding-Aus [mailto:birding-aus-bounces AT birding-aus.org] On Behalf Of 
Peter Shute 

> Sent: Monday, 15 September 2014 12:50 PM
> To: 'James Mustafa'; Paul Dodd
> Cc: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
> Subject: Re: [Birding-Aus] Pied Currawongs in Docklands (Melbourne)
> 
> Thanks everyone, it's sounds like it's surprising I haven't seen one here 
before. It just came back a second time, so it looks like it might be a regular 
now. 

> 
> Peter Shute
> 
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: James Mustafa [mailto:jamesmustafamusic AT gmail.com]
> > Sent: Monday, 15 September 2014 11:54 AM
> > To: Paul Dodd
> > Cc: Janine Duffy; Peter Shute; birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
> > Subject: Re: [Birding-Aus] Pied Currawongs in Docklands (Melbourne)
> >
> > I know they're regularly seen in the botanical gardens. Very common in
> > there now.
> >
> > On Mon, Sep 15, 2014 at 11:13 AM, Paul Dodd 
> > wrote:
> >
> >
> >       I see them reasonably frequently in South Melbourne (Dorcas St, Moray
> > St and
> >       Bank St) too. I would be surprised if they weren't in Docklands,
> > Albert
> >       Park, Middle Park, Albert Park Lake and even in the Royal Botanical
> > Gardens
> >       also.
> >
> >       Paul Dodd
> >       Docklands, Victoria
> >
> >       -----Original Message-----
> >       From: Birding-Aus
> > [mailto:birding-aus-bounces AT birding-aus.org] On Behalf Of
> >       Janine Duffy
> >       Sent: Monday, 15 September 2014 10:20 AM
> >       To: Peter Shute; birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
> >       Subject: Re: [Birding-Aus] Pied Currawongs in Docklands
> > (Melbourne)
> >
> >          Hi Peter
> >          We've been seeing them on and off around Port Melbourne for a few
> > years
> >          now.  So I wouldn't be surprised if they are coming through
> > Docklands
> >          as well.
> >          Janine
> >
> >          --
> >
> >          JANINE DUFFY Director Marketing ECHIDNA WALKABOUT PO Box 370 Port
> >          Melbourne,  Victoria  3207  AUSTRALIA
> >          E:  [1]janine AT echidnawalkabout.com.au    Web:
> >          [2]www.echidnawalkabout.com.au
> >          Ph: +61 (0)3 9646 8249
> >      Mob: +61 (0)427 808
> > 747   Fax: +61 (0)3 9681
> >          9177
> >          OPERATIONS & GROUP enquiries contact:  [3]Roger [4]Smith Director
> >          Operations A.B.N.  72 716 985 505
> >
> >          [5]Peter Shute
> >          Monday, 15 September 2014 9:58 AM
> >
> >          Last week I heard a Pied Currawong calling near the casuarina
> >          plantation in Navigation Drive in Docklands, and just now one
> > landed on
> >          the roof of the builidng opposite where I work.
> >          I submitted a Birdline for last week's bird, but it was rejected
> > on the
> >          grounds that PC sightings around the CBD are common now. Fair
> > enough,
> >          especially as they've been regularly seen around the zoo for years
> > now,
> >          but it was my first sighting of them in Docklands that I've had in
> > the
> >          6 years since we moved here.
> >          I'm wondering if this is just part of a general spreading of their
> >          range, or a sign that the trees in Docklands, most of which are
> > less
> >          than 10 years old, are maturing to the point that they are now
> >          attractive to them. Or possibly just that residents are now
> > feeding
> >          them. Have others seen them in Docklands before?
> >          Peter Shute
> >          
> >
Birding-Aus mailing list > >
[6]Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org > >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: > >
> > > > [7]http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > > > > > > References > > > > 1. mailto:janine AT echidnawalkabout.com.au > > 2. http://www.echidnawalkabout.com.au/ > > 3. mailto:roger AT echidnawalkabout.com.au > > 4. mailto:roger AT echidnawalkabout.com.au > > 5. mailto:pshute AT nuw.org.au > > 6. mailto:Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org > > 7. > > http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > >
> >
Birding-Aus mailing list > >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org > >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: > >
> > http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > > > > > > > >
> >
Birding-Aus mailing list > >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org > >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: > >
> > http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > > > > > > > > > > > > > > -- > > > > All the best, > > > > James Mustafa > > > > 0400 951 517 > > www.jamesmustafajazzorchestra.com > > >
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > > This email, including any attachment, is intended solely for the use of the intended recipient. It is confidential and may contain personal information or be subject to legal professional privilege. If you are not the intended recipient any use, disclosure, reproduction or storage of it is unauthorised. If you have received this email in error, please advise the sender via return email and delete it from your system immediately. Victoria University does not warrant that this email is free from viruses or defects and accepts no liability for any damage caused by such viruses or defects. > >
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Pied Currawongs in Docklands (Melbourne)
From: Tim Dolby <Tim.Dolby AT vu.edu.au>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 04:20:47 +0000
Actually Pete - in terms of inner urban Melbourne - your observation isn't all 
that obvious. At this stage Pied Currawong are mainly limited to the eastern 
and northern suburbs of inner Melbourne, with the Docklands basically 
representing the dividing point of their Melbourne range. There are found in 
the west, at places such as Newport Lakes Park etc., but at this stage there 
not all that common (yet). 


By contrast though, where I live in Northcote, Pied Currawong is now a daily 
backyard birds. This, along with other 'native' species such as Little Raven, 
Australian Magpie, Pied Butcherbird, Noisy Miner, Crested Pigeon, Galah, Silver 
Gull, Welcome Swallow, Magpie Lark, Willie Wagtail, Red and Little Wattlebird, 
Red-rumped Parrot, Rainbow Lorikeet and, occasionally, Brown Thornbill, Spotted 
Pardalote, Musk, Little and Scaly-breasted Lorikeet, Little Corella, 
Sulphur-crested Cockatoo, Pacific Black Duck (overhead), Australian Darter 
(high overhead), Peregrine, Australian Hobby and Tawny Frogmouth (had one in 
the garden last week). I even saw a Swift Parrot (next door at the pool) a few 
months ago. Not bad! Also had a Marbled Gecko in the garden a few days ago - 
you often hear them barking at night. In terms of native mammals I get 
Brushtail and Ringtail Possum, and Grey-headed Flying Fox. (I call them the 
"Northcote Big Three" when going for a walk at night :-) Northcote's version of 
the Serengeti "Big Five".) 


This is a far cry from the days (and it wasn't that long ago) when the only 
urban birds you'd see in places like Northcote or Brunswick were House Sparrow, 
European Starling, Spotted and Rock Dove, Common Myna and Eurasian Blackbird. 
For fun, sometimes, I walk out into my backyard and see how many native species 
I can see before I see an introduced species. I think my best is 7. 


Cheers,

Tim

-----Original Message-----
From: Birding-Aus [mailto:birding-aus-bounces AT birding-aus.org] On Behalf Of 
Peter Shute 

Sent: Monday, 15 September 2014 12:50 PM
To: 'James Mustafa'; Paul Dodd
Cc: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: [Birding-Aus] Pied Currawongs in Docklands (Melbourne)

Thanks everyone, it's sounds like it's surprising I haven't seen one here 
before. It just came back a second time, so it looks like it might be a regular 
now. 


Peter Shute

> -----Original Message-----
> From: James Mustafa [mailto:jamesmustafamusic AT gmail.com]
> Sent: Monday, 15 September 2014 11:54 AM
> To: Paul Dodd
> Cc: Janine Duffy; Peter Shute; birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
> Subject: Re: [Birding-Aus] Pied Currawongs in Docklands (Melbourne)
>
> I know they're regularly seen in the botanical gardens. Very common in
> there now.
>
> On Mon, Sep 15, 2014 at 11:13 AM, Paul Dodd 
> wrote:
>
>
>       I see them reasonably frequently in South Melbourne (Dorcas St, Moray
> St and
>       Bank St) too. I would be surprised if they weren't in Docklands,
> Albert
>       Park, Middle Park, Albert Park Lake and even in the Royal Botanical
> Gardens
>       also.
>
>       Paul Dodd
>       Docklands, Victoria
>
>       -----Original Message-----
>       From: Birding-Aus
> [mailto:birding-aus-bounces AT birding-aus.org] On Behalf Of
>       Janine Duffy
>       Sent: Monday, 15 September 2014 10:20 AM
>       To: Peter Shute; birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
>       Subject: Re: [Birding-Aus] Pied Currawongs in Docklands
> (Melbourne)
>
>          Hi Peter
>          We've been seeing them on and off around Port Melbourne for a few
> years
>          now.  So I wouldn't be surprised if they are coming through
> Docklands
>          as well.
>          Janine
>
>          --
>
>          JANINE DUFFY Director Marketing ECHIDNA WALKABOUT PO Box 370 Port
>          Melbourne,  Victoria  3207  AUSTRALIA
>          E:  [1]janine AT echidnawalkabout.com.au    Web:
>          [2]www.echidnawalkabout.com.au
>          Ph: +61 (0)3 9646 8249
>      Mob: +61 (0)427 808
> 747   Fax: +61 (0)3 9681
>          9177
>          OPERATIONS & GROUP enquiries contact:  [3]Roger [4]Smith Director
>          Operations A.B.N.  72 716 985 505
>
>          [5]Peter Shute
>          Monday, 15 September 2014 9:58 AM
>
>          Last week I heard a Pied Currawong calling near the casuarina
>          plantation in Navigation Drive in Docklands, and just now one
> landed on
>          the roof of the builidng opposite where I work.
>          I submitted a Birdline for last week's bird, but it was rejected
> on the
>          grounds that PC sightings around the CBD are common now. Fair
> enough,
>          especially as they've been regularly seen around the zoo for years
> now,
>          but it was my first sighting of them in Docklands that I've had in
> the
>          6 years since we moved here.
>          I'm wondering if this is just part of a general spreading of their
>          range, or a sign that the trees in Docklands, most of which are
> less
>          than 10 years old, are maturing to the point that they are now
>          attractive to them. Or possibly just that residents are now
> feeding
>          them. Have others seen them in Docklands before?
>          Peter Shute
>          
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
[6]Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
> > [7]http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > > > References > > 1. mailto:janine AT echidnawalkabout.com.au > 2. http://www.echidnawalkabout.com.au/ > 3. mailto:roger AT echidnawalkabout.com.au > 4. mailto:roger AT echidnawalkabout.com.au > 5. mailto:pshute AT nuw.org.au > 6. mailto:Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org > 7. > http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
> http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > > > >
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
> http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > > > > > > > -- > > All the best, > > James Mustafa > > 0400 951 517 > www.jamesmustafajazzorchestra.com >

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org This email, including any attachment, is intended solely for the use of the intended recipient. It is confidential and may contain personal information or be subject to legal professional privilege. If you are not the intended recipient any use, disclosure, reproduction or storage of it is unauthorised. If you have received this email in error, please advise the sender via return email and delete it from your system immediately. Victoria University does not warrant that this email is free from viruses or defects and accepts no liability for any damage caused by such viruses or defects.

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Powerful Owls - RBG Sydney
From: Carl Clifford <carlsclifford AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 13:46:16 +1000
Does anyone know if the Powerful Owls are in residence at the Royal Botanic 
Gardens, Sydney, at the moment? 


TIA

Carl Clifford


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Sydney Pelagic Trip Report - September 13, 2014
From: "Roger McGovern" <roglou AT bigpond.net.au>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 13:36:14 +1000
OVERVIEW

There had been some very good seabirds reported off the NSW coast in the
past couple of weeks and I had some optimism that it could be a really good
day on the ocean today. This optimism was fuelled by the fact that weather
conditions were settling down after a good blow earlier in the week and that
there should be some really hungry birds around. In the event, it didn't
turn out this way at all and we had one of our quietest days for some time.
There were no rarities seen and several species which might be expected in
September (Fairy Prion, Cape Petrel, Brown Skua, Buller's Albatross,
Wilson's Storm Petrel) failed to put in an appearance. Besides the birds, we
recorded False Killer Whales, Inshore Bottlenose Dolphin, Short-beaked
Common Dolphin, Southern Ocean Sunfish, fur seals, Humpback Whales and a
flying fish - so there was plenty to keep the interest levels up. 

We left the heads in good sea conditions of less than one metre sea on a one
metre swell and with light south westerly winds in the morning, conditions
remained quite benign for most of the day. The journey out to the shelf
break was under a heavy overcast with intermittent light rain which made for
difficult light conditions, both for identification and photography. We
arrived at Brown's Mountain in good time just after 10.30am and set up a
berleying drift for about 45 minutes. With no birds coming in to the berley,
we set off on a northwards track along the shelf break before turning back
for home at about 12.30pm. with the wind backing around to the north west
and freshening a little, we had a nice following breeze for the trip back
and arrived at Rose Bay just after 3.15pm. Sea water temperature was a
little warmer than normal for September running from 18.5degC to just over
19.0degC.

TRIP SUMMARY

We departed from Rose Bay with 14 passengers, our smallest group of birders
this year, and while we were still in the harbour we sighted a group of the
resident Inshore Bottlenose Dolphins and a distant loafing fur seal. As we
left the heads, the fish offal berley immediately brought in good numbers of
Silver Gulls and Wedge-tailed Shearwaters along with some Greater Crested
Terns and the odd Australasian Gannet. These were joined by a few immature
Black-browed Albatross and several groups of Fluttering-type shearwaters
flew by which were very hard to identify in the gloomy conditions. However,
examination of photographs revealed that most of these birds were Fluttering
Shearwaters and just a few were Hutton's Shearwaters. A classic newly
fledged Shy (White-capped) Albatross in very fresh plumage joined us for a
while and a few Short-tailed Shearwaters were seen in passing. About 12NM
off Sydney, we had to make a detour to pass behind a large merchant vessel
which was travelling northwards and, as we crossed its wake, the throng of
birds following our boat suddenly peeled off and instantaneously disappeared
all in the space of about 30 seconds - it was a very strange occurrence
which I haven't seen before. For the rest of the trip to the shelf break at
Brown's Mountain, we had no birds following the vessel despite attempts to
berley them in. We had distant views of a small group of False Killer Whales
and a brief visit from a pod of Short-beaked Common Dolphins. A giant petrel
was seen at some distance and did not approach the boat closely enough to
allow identification as to species and a distantly seen storm petrel was
thought to be a White-faced. (A second storm petrel was seen later in the
trip and examination of a very fuzzy photograph the next day confirmed that
it was indeed a White-faced Storm Petrel).

As we approached Brown's Mountain medium distance views of both Great-winged
and Providence Petrels were obtained but none came very near the boat.
Similarly, our only Wandering-type albatross of the day passed by the boat
at a distance of 400 meters and wasn't seen again. The large size and very
white appearance of the bird indicated that it was indeed a Wandering
Albatross (Diomedea exulans) rather than the Gibson's race of Antipodean
Albatross. We started a drift at Brown's Mountain and, for the first time in
my memory and despite the good berley trail, we did not see a bird of any
sort for 45 minutes. The decision was taken to motor northwards and see if
we could find some birds by travelling, and to a certain degree this tactic
paid off. We had the visit of a giant petrel with quite indistinct
coloration on the bill tip but examination of photographs on board showed it
to be a Northern Giant Petrel. Shortly after turning for home, we spotted a
group of Humpback Whales travelling south and motored over for a closer
look. While we drifted waiting for the whales to appear, we were visited by
several Black-browed and Shy (White-capped) Albatross, the Northern Giant
Petrel and a Southern Ocean Sunfish. The four Humpbacks eventually
re-surfaced close by giving great views and photo opportunities.

On the journey back to Sydney, no new species were seen but we came across
some large flocks of Fluttering and Hutton's Shearwaters resting on the
water. For the regulars on board, it was something of a disappointing day
but there were several people for whom this was their first pelagic trip and
they found plenty to hold their interest during the day.

BIRD LIST
(Note that the numbers in parentheses represent the approximate maximum
number of that species in view at one time)

Wandering Albatross	1	(1)
Black-browed Albatross	12	(5)  no adult birds
Shy Albatross 	5	(2)  all thought to be White-capped
Indian Yellow-nosed Albatross	1	(1)  seen by only one person on
board
Northern Giant Petrel	1	(1)
Giant Petrel (sp)	1	(1)
Great-winged Petrel	4	(1)
Providence Petrel	3	(1)
Wedge-tailed Shearwater	200	(120)
Short-tailed Shearwater	15	(6)
Fluttering Shearwater	500	(450)
Hutton's Shearwater	20	(15)  numbers estimated based on the
proportions of those identified
White-faced Storm Petrel	2	(1)
Australasian Gannet	8	(3)
Greater Crested Tern	8	(4)
Silver Gull	80	(60)

OTHER
Humpback Whale	4
False Killer Whale	6
Inshore Bottlenose Dolphin	6
Short-beaked Common Dolphin	20
Southern Ocean Sunfish	2
Fur seal (sp)	4
Flying fish	1

The next Sydney pelagic trip is scheduled for Saturday 11 October 2014
departing from Cremorne Point ferry wharf at 06.45am and Rose Bay public
wharf at 07.00am. Please e-mail me or Hal at hepstein AT bigpond.net.au to make
a booking. Booking well ahead is a great help in our planning.

Cheers
Roger McGovern  




	













Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Port Stephens pelagic this Sunday 21st Sept - vacancies
From: Mick Roderick <mickhhb AT yahoo.com.au>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 20:04:56 -0700
Hi all,

I have 2 vacancies for this Sunday's pelagic out of Port Stephens. More 
information at the link below: 



http://www.sossa-international.org/forum/content.php?420-Port-Stephens-Pelagic-Trips 


Contact me off-list if you're interested.

Cheers
Mick 


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Pied Currawongs in Docklands (Melbourne)
From: Peter Shute <pshute AT nuw.org.au>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 12:50:26 +1000
Thanks everyone, it's sounds like it's surprising I haven't seen one here 
before. It just came back a second time, so it looks like it might be a regular 
now. 


Peter Shute

> -----Original Message-----
> From: James Mustafa [mailto:jamesmustafamusic AT gmail.com] 
> Sent: Monday, 15 September 2014 11:54 AM
> To: Paul Dodd
> Cc: Janine Duffy; Peter Shute; birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
> Subject: Re: [Birding-Aus] Pied Currawongs in Docklands (Melbourne)
> 
> I know they're regularly seen in the botanical gardens. Very 
> common in there now.
> 
> On Mon, Sep 15, 2014 at 11:13 AM, Paul Dodd 
>  wrote:
> 
> 
> 	I see them reasonably frequently in South Melbourne 
> (Dorcas St, Moray St and
> 	Bank St) too. I would be surprised if they weren't in 
> Docklands, Albert
> 	Park, Middle Park, Albert Park Lake and even in the 
> Royal Botanical Gardens
> 	also.
> 	
> 	Paul Dodd
> 	Docklands, Victoria
> 	
> 	-----Original Message-----
> 	From: Birding-Aus 
> [mailto:birding-aus-bounces AT birding-aus.org] On Behalf Of
> 	Janine Duffy
> 	Sent: Monday, 15 September 2014 10:20 AM
> 	To: Peter Shute; birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
> 	Subject: Re: [Birding-Aus] Pied Currawongs in Docklands 
> (Melbourne)
> 	
> 	   Hi Peter
> 	   We've been seeing them on and off around Port 
> Melbourne for a few years
> 	   now.  So I wouldn't be surprised if they are coming 
> through Docklands
> 	   as well.
> 	   Janine
> 	
> 	   --
> 	
> 	   JANINE DUFFY Director Marketing ECHIDNA WALKABOUT PO 
> Box 370 Port
> 	   Melbourne,  Victoria  3207  AUSTRALIA
> 	   E:  [1]janine AT echidnawalkabout.com.au    Web:
> 	   [2]www.echidnawalkabout.com.au
> 	   Ph: +61 (0)3 9646 8249 
>      Mob: +61 (0)427 808 
> 747   Fax: +61 (0)3 9681
> 	   9177
> 	   OPERATIONS & GROUP enquiries contact:  [3]Roger 
> [4]Smith Director
> 	   Operations A.B.N.  72 716 985 505
> 	
> 	   [5]Peter Shute
> 	   Monday, 15 September 2014 9:58 AM
> 	
> 	   Last week I heard a Pied Currawong calling near the casuarina
> 	   plantation in Navigation Drive in Docklands, and 
> just now one landed on
> 	   the roof of the builidng opposite where I work.
> 	   I submitted a Birdline for last week's bird, but it 
> was rejected on the
> 	   grounds that PC sightings around the CBD are common 
> now. Fair enough,
> 	   especially as they've been regularly seen around the 
> zoo for years now,
> 	   but it was my first sighting of them in Docklands 
> that I've had in the
> 	   6 years since we moved here.
> 	   I'm wondering if this is just part of a general 
> spreading of their
> 	   range, or a sign that the trees in Docklands, most 
> of which are less
> 	   than 10 years old, are maturing to the point that 
> they are now
> 	   attractive to them. Or possibly just that residents 
> are now feeding
> 	   them. Have others seen them in Docklands before?
> 	   Peter Shute
> 	   
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
[6]Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
> > [7]http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > > > References > > 1. mailto:janine AT echidnawalkabout.com.au > 2. http://www.echidnawalkabout.com.au/ > 3. mailto:roger AT echidnawalkabout.com.au > 4. mailto:roger AT echidnawalkabout.com.au > 5. mailto:pshute AT nuw.org.au > 6. mailto:Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org > 7. > http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
> http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > > > >
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
> http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > > > > > > > -- > > All the best, > > James Mustafa > > 0400 951 517 > www.jamesmustafajazzorchestra.com >

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: RFI Elegant and Rock Parrot's near Adelaide
From: "mark" <mjbuckby AT tpg.com.au>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 12:26:33 +1000
I'm travelling to Adelaide next week and would appreciate any help in
finding Elegant and Rock Parrot.

 

Thank You Mark.



Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Pied Currawongs in Docklands (Melbourne)
From: "Paul Dodd" <paul AT angrybluecat.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 11:13:32 +1000
I see them reasonably frequently in South Melbourne (Dorcas St, Moray St and
Bank St) too. I would be surprised if they weren't in Docklands, Albert
Park, Middle Park, Albert Park Lake and even in the Royal Botanical Gardens
also.

Paul Dodd
Docklands, Victoria

-----Original Message-----
From: Birding-Aus [mailto:birding-aus-bounces AT birding-aus.org] On Behalf Of
Janine Duffy
Sent: Monday, 15 September 2014 10:20 AM
To: Peter Shute; birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: [Birding-Aus] Pied Currawongs in Docklands (Melbourne)

   Hi Peter
   We've been seeing them on and off around Port Melbourne for a few years
   now.  So I wouldn't be surprised if they are coming through Docklands
   as well.
   Janine

   --

   JANINE DUFFY Director Marketing ECHIDNA WALKABOUT PO Box 370 Port
   Melbourne,  Victoria  3207  AUSTRALIA
   E:  [1]janine AT echidnawalkabout.com.au    Web:
   [2]www.echidnawalkabout.com.au
   Ph: +61 (0)3 9646 8249    Mob: +61 (0)427 808 747 Fax: +61 (0)3 9681
   9177
   OPERATIONS & GROUP enquiries contact:  [3]Roger [4]Smith Director
   Operations A.B.N.  72 716 985 505

   [5]Peter Shute
   Monday, 15 September 2014 9:58 AM

   Last week I heard a Pied Currawong calling near the casuarina
   plantation in Navigation Drive in Docklands, and just now one landed on
   the roof of the builidng opposite where I work.
   I submitted a Birdline for last week's bird, but it was rejected on the
   grounds that PC sightings around the CBD are common now. Fair enough,
   especially as they've been regularly seen around the zoo for years now,
   but it was my first sighting of them in Docklands that I've had in the
   6 years since we moved here.
   I'm wondering if this is just part of a general spreading of their
   range, or a sign that the trees in Docklands, most of which are less
   than 10 years old, are maturing to the point that they are now
   attractive to them. Or possibly just that residents are now feeding
   them. Have others seen them in Docklands before?
   Peter Shute
   

Birding-Aus mailing list
[6]Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
[7]http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org References 1. mailto:janine AT echidnawalkabout.com.au 2. http://www.echidnawalkabout.com.au/ 3. mailto:roger AT echidnawalkabout.com.au 4. mailto:roger AT echidnawalkabout.com.au 5. mailto:pshute AT nuw.org.au 6. mailto:Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org 7. http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Pied Currawongs in Docklands (Melbourne)
From: James Mustafa <jamesmustafamusic AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 10:14:48 +1000
When I was house sighting in Port Melbourne last year. I saw/heared the
occasional Pied Currawong in that area. Seems like they're right through
this part of Melbourne now. Or at least increasing.

On Mon, Sep 15, 2014 at 9:58 AM, Peter Shute  wrote:

> Last week I heard a Pied Currawong calling near the casuarina plantation
> in Navigation Drive in Docklands, and just now one landed on the roof of
> the builidng opposite where I work.
>
> I submitted a Birdline for last week's bird, but it was rejected on the
> grounds that PC sightings around the CBD are common now. Fair enough,
> especially as they've been regularly seen around the zoo for years now, but
> it was my first sighting of them in Docklands that I've had in the 6 years
> since we moved here.
>
> I'm wondering if this is just part of a general spreading of their range,
> or a sign that the trees in Docklands, most of which are less than 10 years
> old, are maturing to the point that they are now attractive to them. Or
> possibly just that residents are now feeding them. Have others seen them in
> Docklands before?
>
> Peter Shute
> 
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > > -- All the best, James Mustafa 0400 951 517 www.jamesmustafajazzorchestra.com

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Flames in the snow
From: "Paul Doyle" <paulodoyle AT optusnet.com.au>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 10:47:31 +1000
Thanks Alistair,

So they are presumably present in the snow. Had never seen them there 
previously. 


 

Paul

 

From: Alistair McKeough [mailto:alistair.mckeough AT gmail.com] 
Sent: Monday, 15 September 2014 10:31 AM
To: Martin Butterfield
Cc: Paul Doyle; Birding Aus
Subject: Re: [Birding-Aus] Flames in the snow

 

We heard (but did not see) Flame Robins at Thredbo in the first week of 
September. 


 

On 15 September 2014 09:58, Martin Butterfield  > wrote: 


I did a map query in eBird looking for records of Flame Robin in June -
September
.
   Basically there is a big gap around the snowfields.  Whether that means

   - skiers don't bird, or
   - birders don't like snow; or
   - Flame Robins don't like snow

is open to debate.

I hope the image in the blogpost is reasonable - I couldn't persuade the
birding-aus website to allow me to post the image there.

Martin

Martin Butterfield
http://franmart.blogspot.com.au/


On 15 September 2014 08:41, Martin Butterfield  > wrote: 


> I have done a very crude map from eBird showing occurence of Flame Robins
> from June to September.
>
> ​
>
> Martin Butterfield
> http://franmart.blogspot.com.au/
>
> On 15 September 2014 07:47, Paul Doyle  > wrote: 

>
>> HI All,
>> Last weekend as I was riding up the Pleasant Valley Quad Chair at
>> Perisher,
>> quietly contemplating the beauty, , I was surprised to see, flashing
>> across
>> inn front of me, what I am sure was a flame robin. Only saw it for a few
>> seconds. The only other possibility would be a red-capped robin, but I
>> don't
>> think they're up in that area.
>> Anyone have any info about the presence or absence of either of these in
>> the
>> snowfields in winter?
>>
>> Thanks
>> Paul
>>
>>
>>
>> 
>>
Birding-Aus mailing list >>
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >>
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >>
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >> >> > >

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Flames in the snow
From: Alistair McKeough <alistair.mckeough AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 10:31:00 +1000
We heard (but did not see) Flame Robins at Thredbo in the first week of
September.

On 15 September 2014 09:58, Martin Butterfield  wrote:

> I did a map query in eBird looking for records of Flame Robin in June -
> September
> <
> http://carwoolabirds.blogspot.com.au/2014/09/flame-robins-in-snowfields.html
> >.
>    Basically there is a big gap around the snowfields.  Whether that means
>
>    - skiers don't bird, or
>    - birders don't like snow; or
>    - Flame Robins don't like snow
>
> is open to debate.
>
> I hope the image in the blogpost is reasonable - I couldn't persuade the
> birding-aus website to allow me to post the image there.
>
> Martin
>
> Martin Butterfield
> http://franmart.blogspot.com.au/
>
> On 15 September 2014 08:41, Martin Butterfield 
> wrote:
>
> > I have done a very crude map from eBird showing occurence of Flame Robins
> > from June to September.
> >
> > ​
> >
> > Martin Butterfield
> > http://franmart.blogspot.com.au/
> >
> > On 15 September 2014 07:47, Paul Doyle 
> wrote:
> >
> >> HI All,
> >> Last weekend as I was riding up the Pleasant Valley Quad Chair at
> >> Perisher,
> >> quietly contemplating the beauty, , I was surprised to see, flashing
> >> across
> >> inn front of me, what I am sure was a flame robin. Only saw it for a few
> >> seconds. The only other possibility would be a red-capped robin, but I
> >> don't
> >> think they're up in that area.
> >> Anyone have any info about the presence or absence of either of these in
> >> the
> >> snowfields in winter?
> >>
> >> Thanks
> >> Paul
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> 
> >>
Birding-Aus mailing list > >>
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org > >>
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: > >>
> http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > >> > >> > > > > >
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > >

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Pied Currawongs in Docklands (Melbourne)
From: Janine Duffy <janine AT echidnawalkabout.com.au>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 10:19:38 +1000
   Hi Peter
   We've been seeing them on and off around Port Melbourne for a few years
   now.  So I wouldn't be surprised if they are coming through Docklands
   as well.
   Janine

   --

   JANINE DUFFY Director Marketing ECHIDNA WALKABOUT PO Box 370 Port
   Melbourne,  Victoria  3207  AUSTRALIA
   E:  [1]janine AT echidnawalkabout.com.au    Web:
   [2]www.echidnawalkabout.com.au
   Ph: +61 (0)3 9646 8249    Mob: +61 (0)427 808 747 Fax: +61 (0)3 9681
   9177
   OPERATIONS & GROUP enquiries contact:  [3]Roger [4]Smith Director
   Operations A.B.N.  72 716 985 505

   [5]Peter Shute
   Monday, 15 September 2014 9:58 AM

   Last week I heard a Pied Currawong calling near the casuarina
   plantation in Navigation Drive in Docklands, and just now one landed on
   the roof of the builidng opposite where I work.
   I submitted a Birdline for last week's bird, but it was rejected on the
   grounds that PC sightings around the CBD are common now. Fair enough,
   especially as they've been regularly seen around the zoo for years now,
   but it was my first sighting of them in Docklands that I've had in the
   6 years since we moved here.
   I'm wondering if this is just part of a general spreading of their
   range, or a sign that the trees in Docklands, most of which are less
   than 10 years old, are maturing to the point that they are now
   attractive to them. Or possibly just that residents are now feeding
   them. Have others seen them in Docklands before?
   Peter Shute
   

Birding-Aus mailing list
[6]Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
[7]http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org References 1. mailto:janine AT echidnawalkabout.com.au 2. http://www.echidnawalkabout.com.au/ 3. mailto:roger AT echidnawalkabout.com.au 4. mailto:roger AT echidnawalkabout.com.au 5. mailto:pshute AT nuw.org.au 6. mailto:Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org 7. http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Pied Currawongs in Docklands (Melbourne)
From: Peter Shute <pshute AT nuw.org.au>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 09:58:32 +1000
Last week I heard a Pied Currawong calling near the casuarina plantation in 
Navigation Drive in Docklands, and just now one landed on the roof of the 
builidng opposite where I work. 


I submitted a Birdline for last week's bird, but it was rejected on the grounds 
that PC sightings around the CBD are common now. Fair enough, especially as 
they've been regularly seen around the zoo for years now, but it was my first 
sighting of them in Docklands that I've had in the 6 years since we moved here. 


I'm wondering if this is just part of a general spreading of their range, or a 
sign that the trees in Docklands, most of which are less than 10 years old, are 
maturing to the point that they are now attractive to them. Or possibly just 
that residents are now feeding them. Have others seen them in Docklands before? 


Peter Shute


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Flames in the snow
From: Martin Butterfield <martinflab AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 09:58:23 +1000
I did a map query in eBird looking for records of Flame Robin in June -
September
.
   Basically there is a big gap around the snowfields.  Whether that means

   - skiers don't bird, or
   - birders don't like snow; or
   - Flame Robins don't like snow

is open to debate.

I hope the image in the blogpost is reasonable - I couldn't persuade the
birding-aus website to allow me to post the image there.

Martin

Martin Butterfield
http://franmart.blogspot.com.au/

On 15 September 2014 08:41, Martin Butterfield  wrote:

> I have done a very crude map from eBird showing occurence of Flame Robins
> from June to September.
>
> ​
>
> Martin Butterfield
> http://franmart.blogspot.com.au/
>
> On 15 September 2014 07:47, Paul Doyle  wrote:
>
>> HI All,
>> Last weekend as I was riding up the Pleasant Valley Quad Chair at
>> Perisher,
>> quietly contemplating the beauty, , I was surprised to see, flashing
>> across
>> inn front of me, what I am sure was a flame robin. Only saw it for a few
>> seconds. The only other possibility would be a red-capped robin, but I
>> don't
>> think they're up in that area.
>> Anyone have any info about the presence or absence of either of these in
>> the
>> snowfields in winter?
>>
>> Thanks
>> Paul
>>
>>
>>
>> 
>>
Birding-Aus mailing list >>
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >>
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >>
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >> >> > >

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Strange bird-call in Victoria
From: Janine Duffy <janine AT echidnawalkabout.com.au>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 09:32:49 +1000
   Hi all,
   It's a Superb Lyrebird, but I think you know that already.
   By the way, after 16 years of researching koalas I have never heard a
   koala do that call.  Female koalas do make some screech-type calls but
   their tone is quite different.
   Thanks Tom for uploading it!
   Janine

   --

   JANINE DUFFY Director Marketing ECHIDNA WALKABOUT PO Box 370 Port
   Melbourne,  Victoria  3207  AUSTRALIA
   E:  [1]janine AT echidnawalkabout.com.au    Web:
   [2]www.echidnawalkabout.com.au
   Ph: +61 (0)3 9646 8249    Mob: +61 (0)427 808 747 Fax: +61 (0)3 9681
   9177
   OPERATIONS & GROUP enquiries contact:  [3]Roger [4]Smith Director
   Operations A.B.N.  72 716 985 505

   [5]martin cachard
   Monday, 15 September 2014 7:40 AM

   hi all,
   I've been trying in vain to send a message here for over an hour but
   such is internet reception in Cairns at times!!!
   I was about to say that it sounds somewhere between a Sooty & Masked
   Owl, but i'm with Greg & leaning more towards a Masked - I definitely
   don't think that it's a Koala at all, but definitely a Tyto owl...
   cheers,
   martin cachard,
   cairns
   

Birding-Aus mailing list
[6]Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
[7]http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org [8]Tom Tarrant Sunday, 14 September 2014 6:16 PM Whilst driving to the summit of Mt Donna Buang near Warburton, Vic on Sunday 14 September I saw a bird making this call in response to a 'Feral' cat, it becomes obvious what species it is near the end but (I think) it sounds remarkably similar to a 'Tyto' Owl. What do you think? [9]http://www.aviceda.org/audio/?p=347 Tom References 1. mailto:janine AT echidnawalkabout.com.au 2. http://www.echidnawalkabout.com.au/ 3. mailto:roger AT echidnawalkabout.com.au 4. mailto:roger AT echidnawalkabout.com.au 5. mailto:mcachard AT hotmail.com 6. mailto:Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org 7. http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org 8. mailto:aviceda AT gmail.com 9. http://www.aviceda.org/audio/?p=347

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Trip Report: King Island 9 - 13 Sept 2014
From: Iian Denham via Birding-Aus <birding-aus AT birding-aus.org>
Date: Sun, 14 Sep 2014 16:28:23 -0700
Trip Report: King Island 9 - 13 Sept 2014
Mark Buckby, Iian Denham, Christine Shelley, Dave Torr [Organiser]

Aim was to see all the King Island endemic subspecies, a few of the introduced 
species and hopefully the Morepork. There have been very few trip reports about 
King Island and not much on eBird, so we relied largely on the recent 
Clarke/Dolby book. 


We flew to King Island from Melbourne on Regional Express Airlines [Rex], 
Stayed at Bass Cabins - Currie, and hired a Toyota Hi-Lux from King Island Car 
Rentals. Rex provides basic facilities for the short duration of the flight. 
The cabins also were basic but clean, comfortable and adequate for a self 
catering stay. The Hi-Lux was up to the task for the conditions of King Island. 
We ate at the Golf Club and Parers Hotel, and had many cups of coffee (and 
scones/jam/cream) at the Harbour Road Cafe 


We criss crossed the island over three days and two half days and made the most 
of the daylight hours. Days 2 and 3 were quite windy, and there were 
intermittent showers each day, but none long enough to restrict birding 
activities. 


Introduced species.
Driving from the airport to the main principal town of Currie [8km] we notched 
up the largest ferals; Indian Peafowl, Wild Turkey, and Common Pheasant. 
Numerous flocks of European Goldfinch were seen throughout the island, as were 
Common Starling. House Sparrows abounded at Currie and Grassy. A small flock of 
European Greenfinch was located at Yellow Rock Beach. California Quail were 
found at 2 sites along Tin Mine Road. This is a long road and the first 
sighting was aided by chatting to a passing local. 


The first afternoon was spent in the south west of the island where we found 
our first Dusky Robin [kingi]. We went on to find them quite numerous over most 
of the island. While passing 40 degrees south latitude on the west coast we saw 
our only Little-black Cormorant. Great Cormorant were at many sites in low 
numbers. 


We hoped a visit to the cliffs at Seal Rocks would provide views of pelagic 
birds, due to the strong westerly blowing, but all we got was a solitary Shy 
Albatross. Small numbers of 'Shys' were encountered at most points where we had 
ocean views. No other pelagic birds were encountered. 


We located Colliers Swamp where we ticked New Holland Honeyeater [caudatus], 
Shining Bronze-cuckoo, Brush Bronzewing and Yellow Wattlebird [kingi] (Both 
Wattlebird and New Holland were common throughout the island). Our principal 
target here was Scrubtit [greeniana] which eluded us, and continued to do so 
for the whole trip. 


Day 2 was spent in the north. The Nooks Swamp area was extensively burned some 
years ago and we did not get many birds in this area. Strong winds may have 
also had a bearing on that. Yellow Rock Beach and estuary provided a pair of 
Hooded Dotterel and the aforementioned European Greenfinch. The dense 
undergrowth along Tin Mine Road provided good cover for Olive Whistler, Bassian 
Thrush and Grey Shrikethrush. A pair of Yellow-tailed Black-cockatoo gave us a 
flyover, and would be the only cockatoos of the trip. At Currie we visited the 
harbour area to add Black-faced Cormorant and Sooty Oystercatcher. The Currie 
sewerage works have been transformed into a wetland area, where several Little 
Grassbird were heard calling. This site should become more productive in years 
to come. 


On Day 3 we returned to Colliers Swamp and added Crescent Honeyeater. Of the 
small birds Superb Fairy-wren [elizabethae], Tasmanian Thornbill [magnirostris] 
and occasional Tasmanian Scrubwren [humilis] were all located, but no Scrubtit. 
In the afternoon we drove up to Pegarah State Forest via Grassy Harbour Little 
Penguin colony. At Pegarah we added Green Rosella [brownii]. This area is is in 
serious need of maintenance with many trees down over the road and drivers 
making alternative tracks to pass. Last stop for the day was Sea Elephant. This 
area was somewhat quiet, maybe due to the late afternoon, but more likely the 
result of fires some years ago. On the drive out of Sea Elephant we did get our 
only Common Bronzewing of the trip. 


Day 4 we returned to Pegarah SF in calmer conditions and added Yellow-throated, 
Strong-billed and Black-headed Honeyeaters. We visited Shag Lagoon where where 
there were numerous waterfowl, with the highlight being a pair of Pink-eared 
Ducks, believed to be vagrant on King Island. Also of note were eleven Latham 
Snipe roosting on the islands of the lagoon. 


The afternoon was spent back at Colliers Swamp where we carried out a very 
thorough sweep of the area and still no Scrubtit. Thanks to a tip from Denise 
at the Harbour Road Cafe we were given a location along Old Grassy Road for 
Tasmanian Morepork. We visited that site later in the evening and after two 
hours of hearing a pair call deep in the forest were treated to an appearance 
around 9:30. 


Day 5 Having a couple of hours before our departure, we returned to Yellow Rock 
Beach where we added Double-banded, and Red-capped Plovers. Along the road we 
encountered our only Cattle Egrets despite cattle being everywhere. 


Black Currawong [colei] were surprisingly scarce. We had two in Currie on two 
separate days. Silvereyes [ochrochrous] occurred regularly at many sites, but 
typically you would be hard pressed to locate them if you wanted to. 


Raptors: White-bellied Sea-eagle was found most days and at many locations. 
Brown Falcon was scarce with a pair found at Colliers Swamp and the odd single 
bird while driving in the north. Swamp Harrier we quite numerous and not as shy 
as the Victorian ones were are used to. Nankeen Kestrel was seen most days with 
4 at different locations on day 2. A single Brown Goshawk was seen over Currie. 


We finished the trip with a total of 88 birds for King Island as follows:

Emu  ("Dromaius novaehollandiae") [domestic?]
Wild Turkey  ("Meleagris gallopavo")
Common Pheasant  ("Phasianus colchicus")
Indian Peafowl  ("Pavo cristatus")
California Quail  ("Callipepla californica")
Cape Barren Goose (novaehollandiae) 
Greylag Goose  ("Anser anser") [domestic]
Black Swan  ("Cygnus atratus")
Australian Shelduck  ("Tadorna tadornoides")
Pink-eared Duck  ("Malacorhynchus membranaceus")
Maned Duck  ("Chenonetta jubata")
Mallard  ("Anas platyrhynchos") [domestic?]
Pacific Black Duck  ("Anas superciliosa")
Australasian Shoveler (rhynchotis) 
Grey Teal  ("Anas gracilis")
Chestnut Teal  ("Anas castanea")
Hardhead  ("Aythya australis")
Blue-billed Duck  ("Oxyura australis")
Musk Duck  ("Biziura lobata")
Little Penguin  ("Eudyptula minor")
Shy Albatross (cauta)
Hoary-headed Grebe  ("Poliocephalus poliocephalus")
Eastern Cattle Egret  ("Bubulcus coromandus")
White-necked Heron  ("Ardea pacifica")
Great Egret ("Ardea alba modesta")
White-faced Heron  ("Egretta novaehollandiae")
Little Pied Cormorant   ("microcarbo melanoleucos melanoleucos")
Black-faced Cormorant  ("Phalacrocorax fuscescens")
Little Black Cormorant  ("Phalacrocorax sulcirostris")
Great Cormorant  ("Phalacrocorax carbo")
White-bellied Sea Eagle  ("Haliaeetus leucogaster")
Swamp Harrier  ("Circus approximans")
Brown Goshawk (fasciatus)  ("Accipiter fasciatus fasciatus")
Nankeen Kestrel  ("Falco cenchroides cenchroides")
Brown Falcon ("Falco berigora tasmanicus")
Purple Swamphen ("Porphyrio porphyrio melanotus")
Eurasian Coot ("Fulica atra australis")
Pied Oystercatcher  ("Haematopus longirostris")
Sooty Oystercatcher ("Haematopus fuliginosus fuliginosus")
Banded Lapwing  ("Vanellus tricolor")
Masked Lapwing  ("Vanellus miles novaehollandiae")
Red-capped Plover  ("Charadrius ruficapillus")
Double-banded Plover (bicinctus)  ("Charadrius bicinctus bicinctus")
Hooded Dotterel  ("Thinornis rubricollis")
Latham's Snipe  ("Gallinago hardwickii")
Sanderling ("Calidris alba alba")
Silver Gull  ("Chroicocephalus novaehollandiae novaehollandiae")
Pacific Gull  ("Larus pacificus pacificus")
Greater Crested Tern  ("Thalasseus bergii cristatus")
Common Bronzewing  ("Phaps chalcoptera")
Brush Bronzewing ("Phaps elegans elegans")
Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoo  ("Calyptorhynchus funereus xanthanotus")
Green Rosella  ("Platycercus caledonicus brownii")
Shining Bronze Cuckoo (plagosus)  ("Chrysococcyx lucidus plagosus")
Fan-tailed Cuckoo  ("Cacomantis flabelliformis")
Morepork ("Ninox novaeseelandiae leucopsis")
Superb Fairywren ("Malurus cyaneus elizabethae")
Yellow-throated Honeyeater  ("Lichenostomus flavicollis")
Strong-billed Honeyeater  ("Melithreptus validirostris")
Black-headed Honeyeater  ("Melithreptus affinis")
Yellow Wattlebird  ("Anthochaera paradoxa kingi")
Crescent Honeyeater ("Phylidonyris pyrrhopterus pyrrhopterus")
New Holland Honeyeater  ("Phylidonyris novaehollandiae caudatus")
White-fronted Chat  ("Epthianura albifrons")
Tasmanian Scrubwren  ("Sericornis humilis tregellasi")
Tasmanian Thornbill  ("Acanthiza ewingii rufifrons")
Olive Whistler ("Pachycephala olivacea apatetes")
Australian Golden Whistler  ("Pachycephala pectoralis")
Grey Shrikethrush  ("Colluricincla harmonica strigata")
Australian Magpie ("Gymnorhina tibicen tyrannica")
Black Currawong ("Strepera fuliginosa colei")
Black-faced Cuckooshrike  ("Coracina novaehollandiae novaehollandiae")
Dusky Robin ("Melanodryas vittata kingi")
Flame Robin  ("Petroica phoenicea")
Grey Fantail ("Rhipidura albiscapa albiscapa")
Forest Raven  ("Corvus tasmanicus tasmanicus")
Eurasian Skylark ("Alauda arvensis arvensis")
Welcome Swallow ("Hirundo neoxena neoxena")
Little Grassbird ("Megalurus gramineus gramineus")
Silvereye ("Zosterops lateralis ochrochrous")
Common Starling  ("Sturnus vulgaris")
Bassian Thrush (lunulata)  ("Zoothera lunulata lunulata")
Common Blackbird  ("Turdus merula")
House Sparrow  ("Passer domesticus")
Australian Pipit ("Anthus australis bistriatus")
European Greenfinch  ("Chloris chloris")
European Goldfinch  ("Carduelis carduelis")


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Flames in the snow
From: Martin Butterfield <martinflab AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 08:41:48 +1000
I have done a very crude map from eBird showing occurence of Flame Robins
from June to September.

​

Martin Butterfield
http://franmart.blogspot.com.au/

On 15 September 2014 07:47, Paul Doyle  wrote:

> HI All,
> Last weekend as I was riding up the Pleasant Valley Quad Chair at Perisher,
> quietly contemplating the beauty, , I was surprised to see, flashing across
> inn front of me, what I am sure was a flame robin. Only saw it for a few
> seconds. The only other possibility would be a red-capped robin, but I
> don't
> think they're up in that area.
> Anyone have any info about the presence or absence of either of these in
> the
> snowfields in winter?
>
> Thanks
> Paul
>
>
>
> 
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > >

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Birdline South Australia Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 15 Sep 2014 08:30:35 +1000
   Birdline South Australia

   Published sightings for the week ending 14 Sep 2014.

   Fri 12 Sep Banded Lapwing Balaklava
   One heard flying on calm moonlit night. Now rarely reported in this
   area.
   Paul Taylor
   Thu 11 Sep Western Grasswren Whyalla Conservation Park
   1 pair, nice views
   Greg Roberts
   Tue 9 Sep Blue-breasted Fairy-wren, Southern Scrub-Robin Port Lincoln
   National Park
   Fairy-wren at 3 sites; Scrub-Robin at 10 sites
   Greg Roberts


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Fw: A Question about Eagles
From: "Shirley Cook" <shirleycook AT skymesh.com.au>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 08:30:48 +1000
A note from Steve Debus

Regards
Shirley Cook
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Steve Debus" 
To: "Shirley Cook" 
Sent: Sunday, September 14, 2014 6:04 PM
Subject: RE: [Birding-Aus] A Question about Eagles


Hi Shirley,

Oh dear, where do these myths come from?  Whimsical baloney, of course (no 
offence intended to Mark or others).  I think one secondary source of this 
myth was a religious book 'on Eagles Wings', reviewed in Boobook 24(1), May 
2006.  That review scotched many such myths, and that issue of Boobook is 
available as free download from the BirdLife website via Special Interest 
Groups/Australasian Raptor Association (as are all issues 2004 to 2 years 
past, were readers might find much of interest about raptors).

Cheers,

Steve



-----Original Message-----
From: Shirley Cook [mailto:shirleycook AT skymesh.com.au]
Sent: Sunday, 14 September 2014 4:31 PM
To: Steve Debus
Subject: Fw: [Birding-Aus] A Question about Eagles

Philip Veerman and Greg Clancy have responded with "it is unlikely" so I am 
guessing you would have the same answer.

Regards
Shirley
----- Original Message -----
From: 
To: 
Sent: Sunday, September 14, 2014 10:28 AM
Subject: Re: [Birding-Aus] A Question about Eagles


> Hi,
>
>
> I heard a story recently about a species of Eagle that puts sharp sticks
> in the middle of the nest to encourage the young birds to leave the nest.
> Apparently the parent bird starts off by putting the sticks in the middle
> of the nest slowly working more towards the edges until the young birds
> have no where left to go and they are forced to leave the nest.
>
>
> Does anyone know if this is true or not?
>
>
> Regards,
>
> Mark
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Sent from Surface Pro2
> 
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Birdline North Queensland Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 15 Sep 2014 08:30:23 +1000
   Birdline North Queensland

   Published sightings for the week ending 14 Sep 2014.

   Fri 12 Sep Peaceful Dove Loyalty Beach
   Immature peaceful Dove from Loyalty Beach are still present. Another
   image.
   Greg McKay
   Channel-billed Cuckoo Gregory River camp area Gregory Downs
   Single bird observed early this morning feeding on large grasshopper
   high up in the trees lining the river.
   Greg and Janice McKay
   Thu 11 Sep Common Starling Tinaburra Boat Ramp, Lake Tinaroo
   One bird seen, introduced species which is not normally found this far
   north although there has been odd sightings on the Atherton Tableland
   and Cairns. Further north on the west coast of Cape York Peninsula one
   was seen at Pompurraw whist conducting BirdLife Australia surveys in
   about 2001.
   Chris Doughty via Keith Fisher
   Mon 8 Sep Wilson's Storm Petrel Michaelmas and Upolu Cays National Park
   offshore pelagic
   Uncommon in area. One bird seen whilst traveling from Michaelmas Cay to
   Hastings Reef.
   Chris Doughty via Keith Fisher
   Red-footed Booby Great Barrier Reef--Michaelmas Cay
   4 birds present. Uncommon in area. Four birds were also reported on
   29th August from Agincourt Reef out from Port Douglas, maybe same
   birds?
   Chris Doughty via Keith Fisher
   Thu 4 Sep Peaceful Dove Loyalty Beach Caravan Park Bamaga
   We observed this pair of doves at our campsite over the3 days we were
   there. The size of Peaceful Dove we didn't pay much attention to them
   until one morning one landed very close by in a tree next to me and I
   was able to observe its unique eye markings. Its partner had the same.
   (Moderator Note:- Your photo shows an immature Peaceful Dove of the
   sub-species peninsulae. It is an interesting photo as The Handbook of
   Australian, New Zealand and Antarctic birds {HANZAB} says " Bare parts
   of juvenile peninsulae not known", this was published in 1996).
   Greg and Janice McKay
   Fri 29 Aug Red-footed Booby, Roseate Tern Agincourt Reef, Great Barrier
   Reef
   Apologies for late post. At least four Red-footed Booby with around 35
   Brown Booby on helicopter platform as we arrived at the site, as well
   as several Black-naped Tern, 40-odd Sooty Tern and around 150 Common
   Noddy. All birds dispersed as helicopter arrived, and I observed
   Roseate Tern fly past thereafter. Noted largely red bills, very long
   white tail streamers and dark upperside to outer primaries with no dark
   trailing edge on underwing.
   Steve Davidson


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Birdline Victoria Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 15 Sep 2014 08:30:49 +1000
   Birdline Victoria

   Published sightings for the week ending 14 Sep 2014.

   Sun 14 Sep Black-eared Cuckoo Mount Arapiles-Tooan State Park--Mt.
   Arapiles
   Following up earlier report. Heard then seen along left side of Summit
   Road, a few hundred metres west of the C240. Awesome views while it
   perched.
   James Mustafa, Owen Lishmund
   Banded Lapwing (8). Williams Landing 3027.
   At 1730 hours, I observed four adult Banded Lapwings and four juveniles
   in a large grassed paddock east of Palmers Road (between Williams
   Landing Boulevard and Freya Drive). The four juveniles were with an
   adult pair and the two other adult birds appeared to be a pair.
   Peter Gibbons.
   Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater Travancore Park, Travancore
   A single Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater calling from the top of a Plane Tree
   adjacent to the Park. Flew off east in the direction of Royal Park.
   Very uncommon.
   Chris and Rosemary Lester
   Sat 13 Sep Cape Gannet Point Danger
   Single Cape Gannet located amongst the hundreds of Australasian
   Gannet's in the colony at Point Danger. Spent a lot of time huddled
   down (partnerless) but darker area around the eye still prominent and
   clearly different from Aus Gannets. Long gular stripe clearly seen when
   the bird lifted it's head up for a look around. Lighter iris also
   observed. Cape Gannet and colony was observed through scopes from
   outside the fence.
   James Mustafa, Owen Lishmund, Tony Bischoff and Rob Farnes
   Curlew Sandpiper, Sharp-tailed Sandpiper, Latham's Snipe, White-winged
   Triller Boomahnoomoonah Road Wetland (Yarrawonga)
   A Curlew Sandpiper was seen actively feeding in the middle of the
   wetland with a small flock of 4 Sharp-tailed Sandpipers, in
   non-breeding plumage. My first ever record in NE Victoria and probably
   the only record in many years with no records on eBird or Birdata for
   NE Victoria either. Also spring returns of a Latham's Snipe and two
   male White-winged Trillers.
   Michael Ramsey
   Black-eared Cuckoo Plunkett's Rd, Newstead
   Multiple birds calling mid-afternoon along with Pallid, Fan-tailed,
   Shining and Horsfield's bronze-cuckoos.
   Geoff Park
   Fri 12 Sep White-fronted Honeyeater Skipton
   In blossoming plum tree in garden in Skipton, observed from close by,
   poor photo taken (attached) before it was chased off into a neighbours
   yard, heard singing for 10 minutes or so.
   Tristan Kennedy
   Straw-necked Ibis, White Ibis MacLeod Morass Wildlife Reserve,
   Bairnsdale
   Large rookery approx 24 ha, with ibis nesting in reedbeds near northern
   end of Morass. Provisional estimate 11,000 to 20,000 birds, mostly
   Straw-necked Ibis; proportion incubating not determined. Rookery site
   shifts from year to year; this is an earlier start to breeding than
   most years.
   Chris Healey, BirdLife East Gippsland
   Freckled Duck MacLeod Morass Wildlife Reserve, Bairnsdale
   9 Freckled Duck in company with small numbers of Black Duck, Chestnut
   Teal and Grey Teal. Also Aus Spotted Crake, Aus Reed-warbler.
   Chris Healey, BirdLife East Gippsland
   White-bellied Cuckoo-Shrike, Black-winged Stilt and Red-kneed Dotterel
   Woodlands Historic Park
   1 lone bird in a flock with Black-faced Cuckoo-shrikes, was singled out
   and as the black-faced flew this bird stayed behind giving us great
   extended views, many pictures and even was rewarded with its beautiful
   call. A cracking bird for this area. The Stilts and Red-kneed Dotterel
   were found down at the large dam in south east corner, 3 new birds for
   the park for a day out...
   Philip Peel and Matt Mccrae
   Wed 10 Sep Black-eared Cuckoo Mount Arapiles
   Two birds calling on Circuit Track near Summit Road, one seen well.
   Also seen on this track were several Shy Heathwrens, Gilbert's
   Whistlers, White-winged Trillers, White-fronted Honeyeaters and a
   Peregrine Falcon.
   Richard and Margaret Alcorn
   Tue 9 Sep Noisy Friarbird Newry, East Gippsland
   Not sure if they are common here or not, but haven't seen one here
   before and it was suggested I report it here. Coming in to eat the
   nectar in the Nectarine Blossom.
   Debbie Radde
   Mon 8 Sep White-headed pigeon Karbeethong (Mallacoota)
   I first saw this species here during a visit in May 2014. On this trip
   I have seen 1-3 on each of the last 4 days. This morning I observed 3
   in a tree near the intersection of Karbeethong Avenue and Lakeside
   Drive. One bird was doing a bobbing DIsplay followed by putting a wing
   over its target bird. About 40 minutes later and about 1km away I saw
   another bird carrying a twig into dense garden plantings. So they seem
   to be breeding.
   Martin Butterfield
   Sun 7 Sep 33 Latham's Snipe 'Golden Pond', Peterbough,
   this is a small wetland on the western edge of Peterborough, named
   Golden Pond by members of BirdLife Warrnambool (all visible birds where
   counted by Peter Barrand through his telescope)
   Samantha Greiner + all on the Cross Boarder Camp Out at Warrnambool
   Square-tailed Kite Hanging Rock
   An adult being swooped repeatedly by a vociferous Australian Magpie as
   it flew from south to north over the upper section of Hanging Rock at
   1515 hours.
   Charles Silveira
   Gould's Petrel, Killer Whale BirdLife Australia Portland Pelagic
   Despite what turned out to be a very quiet day on the water for pelagic
   seabirds, we still had a couple of highlights. There were 2 Gould's
   Petrels observed on the way out to the shelf and a pod of 4-5 Killer
   Whales out past the shelf. We are still looking at the identity of a
   juvenile albatross, which might be a Grey-headed or a Black-browed.
   Otherwise, a day of small species numbers and low numbers of birds
   overall.
   Chris Lester, Paul Dodd, Tim Bawden et al
   Sat 6 Sep Yellow-faced Honeyeater - migration Merri Estuary--Rutledges
   Cutting, Kelly Swamp and Saltwater Swamp
   we saw 5-10 small flocks (around 16 in each group but up to 20 birds in
   one flock) at this location and again at the Killarney Sports Ground,
   they flew from the west along the dunes system towards the east and
   Warrnambool
   Samantha Greiner + all on the Cross Boarder Camp Out at Warrnambool


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Birdline Western Australia Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 15 Sep 2014 08:31:06 +1000
   Birdline Western Australia

   Published sightings for the week ending 14 Sep 2014.

   Fri 5 Sep Javan Pond Heron Cocos Keeling Island
   Sighted again on the same sheltered beach on Home island at low tide
   .First sighted early December 2013.
   Pam Jones and Geof Christie


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Birdline New South Wales Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 15 Sep 2014 08:30:04 +1000
   Birdline New South Wales

   Published sightings for the week ending 14 Sep 2014.

   Mon 15 Sep Australian Koel Bellevue Hill (Sydney)
   1 Australian Koel calling from 4 am onwards.
   Chris Gladwin
   Sun 14 Sep Whiskered Tern Pejar Dam, Crookwell (Goulburn)
   10 Whiskered Terns (and 20 Great-crested Grebes)
   Chris Gladwin
   Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater End of Geoffrey Road Chittaway Point
   A Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater who was bathing in a puddle was flushed into
   the nearby Casuarina trees by my arrival. It was observed for a few
   minutes but was too difficult to photograph.
   Steve Merrett
   Regent Honeyeater Widden Valley, Upper Hunter Valley
   Pair of Regent Honeyeaters busy nest building and feeding on mistletoe
   in the river oaks along the river. Also large numbers of Rainbow
   Bee-eaters in the valley now.
   michael ronan.
   Plumed Whistling-Duck, Australian Shelduck Bungendore Meadow Dam
   13 Plumed Whistling-Duck and 14 Australian Shelduck. Over the past 6
   years Plumed Whistling-Ducks have become regular in this area, but not
   until mid/late October. Thus an unusually early return.
   Martin Butterfield
   Topknot Pigeon, Eastern Osprey, Pacific Baza Lane Cove National
   Park--Sugarloaf Point
   30+ Topknot Pigeons were resting on a gumtree, flushed by a
   White-throated Treecreeper call nearby, interestingly. Also a single
   Pacific Baza soaring high and calling. Resident Eastern Osprey around
   the river chased by Masked (Black-shouldered) Lapwings.
   Fatih Sam
   White-eared Monarch, Little Bronze-Cuckoo, Varied Triller Chambigne
   Creek TSR, Old Glen Innes Rd, via Grafton
   Unusal sighting (for this location) of single White-eared Monarch
   feeding in tops of wattles beside creek. Varied Triller in same
   location along with Olive-backed Oriole and many Australian Figbirds
   feeding on native Fig fruit. Many Scarlet and Brown Honeyeaters. Also
   good looks at a Little Bronze-Cuckoo in drier vegetation near road/TSR
   junction.
   Darryl and Gary Eggins
   Bar-shouldered Dove, Striated Heron, Channel-billed Cuckoo Warriewood
   Wetlands
   A single Bar-shouldered Dove was seen in clear view from about 10 m
   away and heard calling at about 8:45 am this morning. A Striated Heron
   was seen very briefly flying off through the wetlands. A Channel-billed
   Cuckoo was also heard this morning and 2 days ago.
   Jayden Walsh
   Sat 13 Sep Pacific Baza, White-headed Pigeon Kurrajong area
   One Pacific Baza in garden Grey Gums where this species formerly nested
   was my first local sighting in several years. Remarkably, another bird
   (different, worn secondaries) seen about an hour later in Kurrajong
   village about 3 km away. Also seen White-headed Pigeon, displaying
   Yellow-throated Scrubwren, nesting Common Bronzewing, and large numbers
   of southwards migrating Yellow-faced Honeyeaters with smaller numbers
   of White-naped Honeyeaters.
   Eric Finley
   Little Lorikeet Cambridge Gardens
   Approximately 6 Little Lorikeets feeding among Rainbow Lorikeets and a
   few Scaly-breasted Lorikeets in the large Mugga Ironbark on my street
   corner.
   Akos Lumnitzer
   Pacific Baza Kooringal Avenue, Thornleigh
   Noisy Miner alarm calls alerted me to 4 Pacific Bazas circling overhead
   (in shallow circles as per Pizzey and Knight). One peeled off and
   plunged down, and almost immediately the other 3 did likewise, with all
   4 tumbling into large trees on all four sides of where I stood. Amazing
   to watch and first time I have seen more than 2 Bazas at any one time.
   I found one Baza four houses along from ours in an angophora feeding on
   a Noisy Miner, but could not locate the other 3.
   Cameron Ward
   Black-shouldered Kite breeding pair Pughs Lagoon Richmond NSW
   2 Black-shouldered Kites, breeding pair. One called from a large stick
   nest at the top of a nearby pine tree. One fed the other. One broke of
   a twig from a gumtree and took it to the nest. Several Willie Wagtails
   calling in picnic area & a Restless Flycatcher.
   Adrian O'Hara
   Sacred Kingfisher Woodfield Avenue Bundeena NSW
   Heard this morning, first for me for this season of this returning
   migrant
   Deryk Engel
   Fri 12 Sep Plum-headed Finch, breeding Blue-billed Ducks Gum Swamp
   (Forbes)
   Very surprised to see 50 plus Plumheads at the swamp this afternoon.
   I've never recorded them at this site before. A pair of Bluebilled
   Ducks had three very small chicks, and Freckled Ducks were still very
   abundant. Sea Eagle was on nest and White-breasted Woodswallows were
   present.
   Warren Chad
   Regent Honeyeaters Private property Scrubby Rush Road, Cowra
   2 individuals seen feeding about 5.00pm in a red flowering gum with Red
   Wattlebirds, Little Friarbirds, White-plumed Honeyeaters - has been
   seen previously by the property owner
   Frances Smith -Hastings Birdwatchers
   Latham's Snipe, Comb-crested Jacana, Little Egret Kings Creek Road
   Swamp, Wauchope
   Saw my first Latham's Snipe for the season, when it flushed from the
   edge of this wetland. Also present was a Jacana, and a Little Egret, an
   uncommon visitor to this swamp. For once, there were no Whistling Ducks
   of either species.
   Alan Morris
   Striated Heron Warriewood Wetlands
   Immature in full view at main boardwalk around 1 pm
   Carl Weber
   Striated Heron, Nankeen Night Heron, Scaly-breasted Lorikeet Deep Water
   Park Milperra
   two separate adult Striated Herons, both along the river, one with
   green feet and one with bright orange feet. Single adult Night Heron on
   the island in the first pond on Maxwell Ave. Still hundreds of Musk
   Lorikeets feeding mostly on flowers of Blue Box and Forest Red Gum. One
   partially leucistic bird had yellow and green scaly upperprats.
   Probably more than 20 pairs of Scaly-breasted Lorikeets nesting. A pair
   of Australian King Parrots. !0 species of honeyeaters on the eucalypt
   blossum, including White-cheeked and Scarlet Honeyeater. (Moderator's
   Note; Bright orange/red legs and feet in Striated Herons is a sign that
   they are breeding. AKM)
   David James
   Swift Parrot Deep Water Park Milperra
   12 Swift Parrots this morning about 8 am. At least 5 adults and at
   least 2 immatures. Contra HANZAB, the immatures were obvious with
   reduced brightness and sharpness of red face, no red in vent. One had
   missing central tail feathers. Feeding on blossom of Blue Box
   Euc.bauriana and Forest Red Gum E. teriticornis along both sides of
   Maxwell Ave in front of the Paint Ball car park.
   David James
   Thu 11 Sep Pacific Baza pair Greggs rd/Redbank rd Kurrajong NSW
   2 Pacific Bazas passed through canopy along Redbank creek, paused
   momentarily to copulate. 1 bird broke of small gum twig and ate fresh
   leaves (possibly lerps on leaf surface?)
   Adrian O'Hara
   Rainbow Bee-eater, Rufous Whistler, Olive-backed Oriole Koolumbung Ck
   Reserve Port Macquarie
   When I visited this reserve at 930 hrs, Rainbow Bee-eaters were flying
   over heading south, in small numbers, I estimated 12 birds. Rufous
   Whistlers (saw 3) and Olive-backed Orioles were in full song as were
   Golden Whistlers.
   Alan Morris
   Leaden Flycatcher, Shining Bronze-Cuckoo, Rainbow Bee-eater Red Cliff,
   Yuraygir National Park
   Adult pair of Leaden Flycatchers, two Shining Bronze-Cuckoos, one adult
   male New Zealand race (very green head and nape, some purple brown
   patches, other either adult female New Zealand race or male or female
   Australian race (see photo). Rainbow Bee-eaters calling overhead.
   Greg Clancy & Russell Jago
   Leaden Flycatcher, Forest Kingfisher, Coastal Emu, Rainbow Bee-eater
   Brooms Head Road, Taloumbi
   Female plumaged flycatcher in paperbarks and Forest Red Gums, Adult
   male Forest Kingfisher on powerline, 3 Coastal Emus, 2 foraging in old
   soya bean paddock, heard Rainbow Bee-eaters overhead.
   Greg Clancy & Russell Jago
   Square-tailed Kite Kellyville
   1 Square-tailed Kite seen circling low over vegetation near the corner
   of Balmoral Road and Old Windsor Road.
   Carl Corden
   Noisy Pitta Ourimbah
   Noisy Pitta heard from my front door in adjacent property (Forest of
   Tranquility) - the first visit I am aware of for several years.
   Moderator's Note: A Noisy Pitta was observed at the Forest of
   Tranquility on 1/7/2014 by Colin Bradshaw and the observation was
   published on Birdline NSW. AKM)
   John Weigel
   Peregrine Falcon Penrith CBD
   One adult on the wing at 13:15 much to the displeasure of the city
   slicker bird population around Henry and High Streets.
   Akos and Donata Lumnitzer
   Painted Honeyeater Yarrie Lake
   At least 3 Painted Honeyeaters heard (1 visual ID; no photo) calling
   this morning from casuarinas with flowering mistletoes in them at the
   creek feeding Yarrie Lake near Wee Waa. Large numbers of other
   nectar-eating species competing with them - mostly Brown, White-plumed,
   Spiny-cheeked Honeyeaters and Little Friarbirds, but also many
   Mistletoebirds. Painted Honeyeater calls were recorded ("further
   information" link).
   Michael Dahlem
   Common Blackbird, Latham's Snipe Eastlakes golf course
   Single bird Common Blackbird and 7 Latham's Snipe this morning.
   Mark Young
   Wed 10 Sep Eastern Osprey Penrhyn Estuary, Botany Bay
   One Eastern Osprey flew in and landed on the edge of Estuary at about
   11 am. We were at the viewing platform.
   Allan Richards & Max O'Sullivan
   Wedge-tailed Eagle Castlereagh
   Female and first-year seen along Castlereagh Road again at 15:50 and
   until 17:00. It is also of note, that last week we observed the same
   two birds on at least four afternoons in the same area, including my
   report on September 1.
   Akos Lumnitzer and Peter Phelan
   Paradise Riflebird Beechwood - private property
   A male Paradise Riflebird seen calling from the top emergent gums along
   Morton's Creek. Further calls in the area to late morning
   Peter West & Sue Proust
   Square-tailed Kite, Sacred Kingfisher Ingleside, Sydney Northern
   Beaches
   An immature Square-tailed Kite is quite unusual for this area - the
   first I have seen here in five years. The Sacred Kingfisher was my
   first Sydney record of the spring and, with no others so far reported
   on Birdline, may be an early arrival?
   Roger McGovern
   Glossy Black-Cockatoo, Sacred Kingfisher, Leaden Flycatcher Coutts
   Crossing, SW of South Grafton
   Went to bushland near Coutts Crossing Cemetery early this morning to
   photograph the Glossy Black-Cockatoo family that I had seen late
   yesterday. They were feeding in a small Black She-oak adjacent to
   Armidale Road. The juvenile was heavily marked with yellow and had
   yellow on the red barred panels indicating that it was a female.
   Another trio, this time with a juvenile male was found feeding on Black
   She-oak 'cones' while at least two other birds, apparently adults
   joined the first trio, so a total of 8+ birds. Heard Sacred Kingfisher,
   first for season at this site and observed an adult male Leaden
   Flycatcher after hearing one late yesterday.
   Greg Clancy & Warren Thompson
   Tue 9 Sep Black Kite Duranbah, Tweed Valley
   8 birds over road kill on Pacific Highway.
   Rob Morrow
   Eastern Koel Maryville (suburban Newcastle)
   Single bird heard in the early morning.
   Tom Clarke per Mick Roderick
   Regent Honeyeater, Rockwarbler, Rainbow Bee-eater Giants Creek (Upper
   Hunter)
   Whilst most of the ironbark blossom is tailing off, I found a single
   Regent HE 'braving conditions', with several aggressive Noisy Friars,
   in a pair of (planted) Mugga Ironbarks 600m south of where I'd
   previously found Regents earlier. I was granted access to the property
   so explored the area and to my complete surprise I found 2 further
   separate Regents on the ridge in habitat I'd never have expected them
   in (shrubby Grey Gum with Stypandra/Acacia understorey - no blossom
   anywhere). There was a pair of Rockwarbler on the edge of the ridge
   too, in fairly marginal habitat. Some early Rainbow Bee-eaters (for the
   Hunter Valley) were along Giants Creek.
   Mick Roderick
   Glossy Black-Cockatoo, Leaden Flycatcher Coutts Crossing SW of Grafton
   Adult pair of Glossy Black-Cockatoos with begging juvenile feeding on
   'cones' in Black She-oaks in bushland at edge of village, flew to
   Spotted Gum to roost together at dusk. One Leaden Flycatcher heard
   calling on dusk. First record this season at this site.
   Greg Clancy
   Gang-gang Cockatoo North Epping
   This is my first sighting of Gang-gang Cockatoos in my suburb for many,
   many years.
   Frances Rein
   Australian Brush-turkey Pacific Hwy, Gore Hill
   Walking along the highway this afternoon, I spotted an Australian
   Brush-turkey ahead of me, just opposite the ABC tower. It then
   proceeded to walk down an entry way to a block of units. On reaching
   the front door which was closed, it flew up onto a window sill and in
   the window into a unit.
   Judy Clark
   Little Corella 147 Levenstrath Rd. Levenstrath, nr Grafton
   Flock of 250-300 Little Corella flying fairly high and direct in a
   westerly direction.
   Warren Thompson
   Red-necked Avocet, Caspian Tern Tuggerah Bay Saltmarsh, Tuggerah
   There were 58 Red-necked Avocet at the saltmarsh today. First reported
   by Luke Ullrich on 28/8/14, they have been coming and going since.
   Other birds present included 2 Little Egrets, 8 Caspian Terns, Black
   Swans etc.. Avocets are rare birds in the Tuggerah Lakes system. To
   access this site, you enter from the end of Lake Road, Tuggerah, and
   walk down the firetrail, which was once the road to Tuggerah Point,
   where early visitors to The Entrance caught a ferry, after having
   alighted from the train at Tuggerah Stn.
   Alan Morris
   Shy-type Albatross, Great-winged-type Petrel Brown's Mountain, 20nm
   East of Sydney
   Two immature Shy-type Albatross and a single Great-winged-type Petrel
   noted whilst fishing at Brown's Mountain off Sydney. [Moderator's note
   (NH): According to geolocator data most (but not all) Shy-type
   Albatross of NSW and QLD are White-capped Albatross (Th. c. steadi).
   Also, it is currently not entirely clear, which of the two taxa of
   Great-winged Petrel are predominant. Grey-faced Petrel (P. m. gouldi)
   is certainly the predominant taxon in summer, but the winter/spring
   situation is unclear.]
   Darryl Smedley
   Mon 8 Sep Black-chinned Honeyeater, Little Lorikeet 8 Mile Lane &
   Avenue Rd Glenugie Nr Grafton
   There is profuse flowering of Forest Red Gum which is attracting many
   lorikeets and honeyeaters. At least 3 Black-chinned Honeyeaters were
   seen and birds were calling in several places so there may have been
   others around. Four species of Lorikeet were present but the majority
   perhaps 100+ were Little Lorikeets. Also feeding were, Scarlet,
   Fuscous, White-throated, Blue-faced and Yellow-faced Honeyeaters plus,
   Noisy Friarbirds. The light was poor and there were light showers so
   other species could easily have been missed.
   Peter West and Sue Proust
   Eastern Common Terns, Curlew Sandpiper, Ruddy Turnstones Soldiers
   Point, Norah Head
   I could see some small terns with black bills on the Island off
   Soldiers Pt, and assumed that they would be White-fronted Terns. Being
   low tide, I went out to check as it was possible to get onto the
   island. I was surprised to find that there were 78 Eastern Common Terns
   roosting there, which is an early date. At least 12 of the Common Terns
   were still in breeding plumage, the rest were both immatures/juveniles,
   or were in the process of changing into non-breeding plumage, also all
   appeared to have red legs. Also present were 9 Ruddy Turnstone (up from
   the usual winter number of 3-4), and a single Curlew Sandpiper, also a
   first return to the Central Coast.
   Alan Morris
   Citrine Wagtail (Subject to submission to BARC) Putta Bucca Wetlands,
   Mudgee
   Citrine Wagtail still present during visit this afternoon at 4pm. We
   enjoyed good views for the whole time we were there, still in reported
   location. [Moderator's note (NH): Sightings of Citrine Wagtail should
   be submitted to BARC. So far only three Citrine Wagtails have been
   accepted by BARC: Botany Bay, NSW, 1962; Goolwa, SA, 1987; Christmas
   Island, 2009. It would be great if we could get a complete
   documentation of the Putta Bucca bird]
   Paul & Phillip Shelley
   Hooded Robin, Jacky Winter, Speckled Warbler Bullio, Southern Highlands
   It was great to see a variety of woodland species on private property
   in the north-western part of the Wingecarribee Shire. Other species
   included Brown Treecreeper, Crested Shrike-tit, Varied Sitella and a
   couple of Emus.
   Martin Filipczyk
   Superb Parrot Mangerton, Wollongong
   2 adult Superb Parrots in trees in my backyard in Mangerton,
   Wollongong. (Moderator's Note: Most likely these birds are aviary
   escapees. AKM).
   John Maughan
   Swift Parrot, Striated Heron, Long-billed Corella Deepwater Park,
   Milperra
   Four Swift Parrots in flowering Box near Blue Gum Farm. Also a pair of
   Striated Heron showing nesting behaviour. Also a pair of Long-billed
   Corella - not uncommon but a first for myself at this site.
   Greg McLachlan, Debbie Andrew
   Sun 7 Sep Channel-billed Cuckoo North Epping
   This is a very early sighting for my suburb - they, and the koels,
   usually arrive on or around the October long weekend. (Moderator's
   note: This is the 10th report of the arrival of the Channel-billed
   Cuckoos, mostly to the Sydney and Central Coast Region. From now only
   special sightings at unusual locations and or large numbers will be
   published. AKM)
   Frances Rein
   White-winged Chough Quakers Hill
   Driving along the Quakers Hill Parkway I saw two White-winged Choughs
   in a tree in a park just north of the Quakers Hill railway station.
   Darryl Smedley
   Apostlebird Great Western Highway, Minchinbury
   Saw a single Apostlebird on the median strip at 7:15am whilst stopped
   at the traffic lights. [Moderator's note (NH): AKM tells me that this
   is a known site for the feral Apostlebirds that escaped from
   Featherdale Farm 20-30 years ago.]
   L. Morgan
   Swift Parrot Capertee Valley--Genowlan Bridge
   Great views of 7 Swift Parrots seen by all on BMBO outing to Capertee
   Valley. They were in eucalypts on the north-east side of the bridge,
   gleaning leaves presumably for lerps, only 10m from observers and at
   eye level.
   Mark Ley and 14 members of Blue Mountains Bird Observers.
   Noisy Pitta, Spangled Drongo Irrawong Reserve
   Excellent views of foraging Noisy Pitta. Also Spangled Drongo.
   Nicholas Beswick
   Channel-billed Cuckoo Bicentennial Park (Glebe)
   1 bird heard at around 10am, seems to be consistent date-wise with
   other other reports of them arriving in Sydney. First for Glebe that I
   know of, for the year.
   Simon Gorta
   Sat 6 Sep Spectacled Monarch Sawtell
   At least 2 Spectacled Monarchs in forest on southern side of headland;
   first returns for season. Many Scarlet Honeyeaters and Silvereyes
   around at present (two subspecies of Silvereye). Also observed four
   Grey Fantails, at least one of which appeared to have much less white
   on uppertail.
   Peter Higgins
   Brush Cuckoo Weston, Hunter Valley
   Heard calling around 6am. Usually passes through early Oct.. Early
   record.
   Steve Roderick
   Square-tailed Kite, correct e-mail address and correct name Cattai
   Wetlands
   "While photographing water birds two Square-tailed Kites flew over and
   I had them identified on a birding photography website from my pictures
   . They are reported to have been seen before." [Moderator's note (NH):
   This post came without a valid e-mail address, with no observer name
   and no photo attached. As this happens frequently, I'd like to address
   this issue here and now: While photos are certainly not mandatory
   (however often very useful as in this case), the name of the observer
   and an e-mail address are. Please always make sure that your e-mail
   address is correct so that we can reach you for queries. Thanks!]
   Nikolas Haass (moderator)
   white phase Southern Giant-petrel, White-headed Petrel, Buller's
   Albatross Royal National Park--Wattamolla
   Seen my first white phase Southern Giant-petrel for this year which
   hung around off Wattamolla for most of the day. Also 1 White-headed
   Petrel and 2 Buller's Albatross.
   michael ronan.
   Fri 5 Sep Citrine Wagtail (Subject to submission to BARC) Putta Bucca
   Wetlands, Mudgee
   I have just published a video on youtube of the Citrine Wagtail at
   Putta Bucca wetlands, which I made on the morning of Sep 5:
   Bruce Roubin (per Birding-Aus)
   Thu 4 Sep Freckled Duck, White-breasted Woodswallow McPherson Rd Swamp,
   Tuggerah
   The Freckled Ducks had not been seen for the past few weeks, possibly
   because of all the rain the Central Coast has been receiving, but two
   were back today. Also present was a pair of White-breasted
   Woodswallows, first return report for the Central Coast, usually they
   turn up the last week of August.
   Alan Morris & Allan Benson
   Wed 3 Sep Spotted Harrier Lake Windamere
   Spotted Harrier at the southern end of Lake Windamere.
   Graham Blackwell & Alec Gillespie
   Mon 1 Sep Rainbow Bee-eater Sawtell
   Heard in flight at two separate locations over suburb, apparently
   moving southwards. First records for season in Sawtell (but note
   reports a few kilometres north, Sawtell-Coffs Harbour, 21 Aug).
   Michael Cheers & Peter Higgins
   Sun 31 Aug White-breasted Woodswallow, Olive-backed Oriole Sawtell
   White-breasted Woodswallows heard in flight over Sawtell (AM), moving
   south; later, seen flying south over Toormina shopping centre (26 birds
   in small groups, largest of nine birds, 16:50-17:00). Olive-backed
   Oriole heard calling from early morning, and heard persistently each
   day since (>1 week later). First returns noted for season (although
   note report of Oriole here 15 June).
   Peter Higgins
   Sat 30 Aug White-headed Petrel, Great-winged-type Petrel, Buller's
   Albatross Wattamolla.Royal National Park.
   Highlights from a seawatch today from Wattamolla was a White-headed
   Petrel. About 40 Great-winged-type Petrels, 3 adult Buller's Albatross,
   1 Wandering-type Albatross, 2 Fairy Prions and 2 Brown Skuas.
   michael ronan.
   Sun 24 Aug Wandering Albatross Offshore--Wollongong pelagic
   Highlights of the Sunday SOSSA pelagic were approx. 20 Wandering-type
   Albatross (13 of which were exulans). Again not a single Cape Petrel
   and also no Giant-petrels on either trip. The photograph of the
   Buller's Albatross was taken by Mick Roderick. For a detailed trip
   report and further pictures see here on the SOSSA website:
   Nikolas Haass and all on the Sandra K
   Sat 23 Aug Atlantic Yellow-nosed Albatross (BARC submission in prep),
   White-headed Petrel Offshore--Wollongong pelagic
   Highlights of the Saturday pelagic were: 1 Atlantic Yellow-nosed
   Albatross (BARC submission in prep), 2 White-headed Petrels and 15-20
   Pygmy Killer Whales. Attached photos by Duade Paton. For a detailed
   trip report and further pictures see here on the SOSSA website:
   Nikolas Haass and all on the Sandra K


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Birdline Tasmania Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 15 Sep 2014 08:30:41 +1000
   Birdline Tasmania

   Published sightings for the week ending 14 Sep 2014.

   Mon 8 Sep Masked Owl Sisters Beach Rd
   Probable male seen briefly in car headlamps at 1945 in mature eucalypt
   woodland. Too pale and small for female. Species seen in area
   previously as roadkill. Could also be Barn Owl but these are very rare
   in Tasmania.
   Richard Ashby
   Sat 6 Sep Shining Bronze Cuckoo Bicentennial Park (Mount Nelson)
   Calling from the gully above Churchill Avenue during a morning
   field-trip of the Tasmanian Field Naturalists Club.
   Simon Grove


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Birdline Australian Capital Territory Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 15 Sep 2014 08:29:46 +1000
   Birdline Australian Capital Territory

   Published sightings for the week ending 14 Sep 2014.

   Tue 9 Sep White-browed Woodswallow Mt Majura Nature Reserve
   An estimated flock of 120 birds riding the updrafts from the strong
   northwesterly wind over the ridge in Mt Majura Nature Reserve around
   noon today. This is the earliest date in spring that I have recorded
   this species in the ACT.
   PJ Milburn
   Sun 7 Sep Lewin's Rail Jerrabomberra Wetlands Nature Reserve
   1 Lewin's Rail at the southern end of Kelly's
   (kek-kek-kek-kek-kek-kek-kek heard 3 times at 6.03-6.05pm). A bird was
   also heard in the morning by Alastair Smith.
   Viv Rolland and Alastair Smith


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Birdline Northern Territory Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 15 Sep 2014 08:30:30 +1000
   Birdline Northern Territory

   Published sightings for the week ending 14 Sep 2014.

   Sat 13 Sep Red-necked Avocets Katherine Wastewater Treatment Plant
   7 birds seen in central rear pond (with every other bird in the
   ponds!!) A first on my KWTP list
   Mick Jerram
   Wed 10 Sep Rufous Owl Kakadu National Park--Cooinda
   1 Rufous Owl adult perched in dead tree at Home Billabong boat ramp,
   Cooinda at 20:30. Also Large-tailed Nightjar.
   Darcy Ginty and Felicity Hatton
   Mon 8 Sep Black bittern Palmerston--Marlow Lagoon
   Late afternoon two Black Bittern were observed. One flushed from under
   a foot bridge onto an island and the second bird was observed shortly
   afterwards on the second island at the southern end. Both spotted by
   Tim Collins.
   Tim Collins, Anne Collins
   Gouldian Finch Policemans Pt. (Timber Creek)
   Repeated sightings of flocks of up to 80-90 birds over the past three
   days. First sighting 5.30pm 06/09 comprised mixed mature and juv. birds
   feeding on bare ground beside track to Point. Second and third
   sightings yesterday and today appears to be different flock comprised
   solely of Juv. birds and one mature ( or matures have separated for
   whatever reason). Long-tailed Finches and Chestnut-breasted Mannikins
   intermingled. My target bird, YR Mannikin not to be seen.
   Jean & Paul Newman
   Wed 3 Sep Chestnut Rail Buffalo Creek, Darwin
   After six failed efforts at four different NT and WA sites this year, a
   third attempt at Buffalo Creek produced no fewer than five Chestnut
   Rails during the last hour of daylight from the boat ramp to approx
   600m upstream. It is notable that conditions included a very low tide
   at dusk, which precluded any boat activity. The two birds in image
   appeared at dark, right across creek from boat ramp, after I'd loaded
   the car and was preparing to leave.
   John Weigel
   Wed 20 Aug Pacific Baza Mary River Wilderness Retreat
   Saw 2 in the morning on the Wallaby track. Then saw one in the
   afternoon at the start of the Bamboo walk.
   Kerry Allen


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Birdline Central & Southern Queensland Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 15 Sep 2014 08:29:52 +1000
   Birdline Central & Southern Queensland

   Published sightings for the week ending 14 Sep 2014.

   Sun 14 Sep Asian Dowitcher Toorbul--high tide roost
   1 bird present today at the roost.
   Rob Morris
   Logrunner, Noisy Pitta Fig Tree Walk, Kenilworth
   A small group of Logrunners on one side of track and a pair on the
   other had the males engaged in a lively territorial contest calling
   back and forth for some minutes - a lot of noise from such relatively
   small birds. Also Noisy Pitta heard and seen.
   Anne Burgess
   Black-faced Monarch; Spectacled Monarch; Eastern Spinebill Mt Gravatt
   summit trail
   I was surprised to see these three species this morning - in my
   experience, these birds prefer rainforest. Lots of common bush birds
   calling as well.
   Elliot Leach; Jess Mackie; Andrew Mackie
   Lewin's Rail, Pale-vented Bush-hen, Azure Kingfisher Huntingdon Creek,
   Upper Brookfield
   MCCG platypus surveys this morning from 5-7am; sites along Huntingdon
   Estate creek, off Rafting Ground Road. Lewin's Rail heard in dense
   undergrowth bordering creek, then briefly poked head out from thicket
   when I played call softly to myself for reference. Same bird later
   fluttered across creek into opposite bank veg. Buff-banded Rail was
   foraging on opposite creek for convenient comparison. Other surveyors
   100m downstream reported prolonged views of Bush-hen. Would caution
   that, while I have heard and seen both species here regularly, this is
   not an amenable site for getting consistently good views, due to
   denseness of bank veg. This is also local territory for an Azure
   Kingfisher.
   Russell Yong
   Sat 13 Sep Spotless Crake (2); Latham's Snipe; Glossy Ibis; Wandering
   Whistling-duck Sandy Camp Road Wetlands
   Spotless Crake in their usual hangout in the reddish pond near the
   shelter, Latham's seen on a grassy little island in the second lagoon,
   and a single Glossy Ibis seen throughout the morning feeding in the
   first two lagoons along with a number of Wandering Whistling-ducks. A
   nice morning birding.
   Elliot Leach; Jess Mackie
   White-Eared Monarch, Noisy Pitta, Barred Cuckoo-Shrike Gold Creek
   Reservoir
   White-Eared Monarch seen near the last creek crossing before the car
   park. Noisy Pitta seen in regenerated creek side forest just before
   last creek crossing. Barred Cuckoo-Shrike feeding and calling in tree
   with yellow fruits opposite regenerated forest.
   Jo & Matt Culican
   Leaden Flycatcher Walter Zimmerman Park, Pine Mountain
   A remembered song and a reacquaintance as the migrants return from
   their winter holidays
   Peter Horler
   Fri 12 Sep Black Kite Kedron Wetland
   After the influx some time ago, this was the first bird I've seen here
   for a while. (Moderator's note: There have been a few records on ebird
   recently.)
   Nick Leseberg
   Dollarbird Cedar Creek Rd at 27ADEG50'56'S 153ADEG11'45'E (restricted
   access)
   First return for the season at 0605 this morning in a large eucalyptus
   tree in front paddock.
   Sandra Gallienne
   Cotton Pygmy-Goose Robina--Skill Stadium wetland
   A single bird.
   Terry Dillon, Hans & Judy Beste
   Thu 11 Sep Rainbow Bee-eaters Crn Wiseman Street and Kelly Street, The
   Range, South Rockhampton 4700
   Pair of Rainbow Bee Eaters sitting on overhead wires at 0630 as
   sunshine touches top of hill. Have seen birds 2 days consecutively at
   this time. Had a pair a few days earlier further down hill at
   intersection of Lavarach and Lamington Streets at around midday when
   sun is above.
   Carolyn Larkin
   Channel-billed Cuckoo Maskell Court, Draper, Samford Valley
   Just heard and saw the first Channel-billed Cuckoo for the season.
   Julie Sarna
   Tue 9 Sep Cicadabird University of Queensland (St Lucia)
   Heard a Cicadabird's distinctive reel, coming from a treed stretch
   along Will Macgregor Drive by the river, adjacent to the Eleanor
   Schonell (aka Green) Bridge, at about 8:30am. Remarkable given the time
   (just beginning to migrate through), habitat and location; this is the
   first time I've encountered this species on UQ, or indeed in inner
   suburban Brisbane. The first Channel-bills and Koels for the year have
   shown up on campus and there are plenty of parrots (Galahs, corellas
   and both common lorikeets) checking out nest hollows on both ends of
   the Green Bridge.
   Russell Yong
   Australian Koel Kalinga Park
   One male seen feeding in a fig in Kalinga Park. Although there have
   been several Channel-billed Cuckoo records already this year, is this
   the first east coast record of a koel for 2014/15 season? (Moderator's
   Note: The first record for the East Coast for this season in ebird is
   from Innisfail on September 1, 2nd record by the Daintree Boatman on
   Sept 3, then 3 records from Bamaga, Kingfisher Park and Rowes Bay at
   Townsville on Sept 4 - Nick's record appears to be the first record for
   South-East Queensland).
   Nick Leseberg
   Powerful Owl Fig Tree Pocket
   Seen at 1:50 am perched on the clothesline of my backyard as soon as I
   got closer it flew away, no calling heard.
   Josphe Hartigan
   Mon 8 Sep Sooty Owl, Masked Owl, Marbled Frogmouth D'Aguilar NP - Mount
   Glorious
   Sooty Owls at two sites, Masked Owl at one site and Marbled Frogmouth
   calling at four sites in D'Aguilar NP, from Mount Glorious down to
   Bellbird Grove during surveys over the last week. Many Southern
   Boobooks and Australian Owlet-Nightjars seen and heard right throughout
   the park.
   Nick Leseberg
   Eastern Barn Owl East Brisbane
   At 10pm an Eastern Barn Owl called right next to our house and another
   one responded from a bit further away. We have heard Eastern Barn Owls
   now a number of times since the beginning of August in this location.
   There are also Tawny Frogmouths and Southern Boobooks around.
   Nikolas Haass & Raja Stephenson
   Grey-Crowned Babbler Bentley Court, Joyner, 4500.
   Three birds seen in late June, increasing to 8 birds in September. Seen
   in our daughter's and her neighbour's yards. They don't seem to be
   worried by the dogs, and the dogs ignore them.
   Roy and Pamela Hallett
   Bush Stone Curlew Centennial Way, Forest Lake, South-West Brisbane
   area.
   I heard Curlew calling in close proximity to my residence around
   2.00am. I caught a glimpse of the bird scurrying from my front yard
   towards the adjacent roadway. I believe there may have been more than 1
   bird calling but I only observed the one. The calls continued for a few
   minutes until the birds left the area. I am aware that Curlews have
   been observed in parts of this suburb on other occasions but this is
   the first time I've seen or heard them in my street.
   Errol Leslie MADDEN
   Spotted Harrier Nathan Road Wetlands Reserve
   Single adult low over sparse woodland and reedbeds. Typical harrier
   flight pattern. Two observers.
   David John Collis
   Sun 7 Sep Glossy Black-Cockatoo Allen Road, Nanango
   Heard calling from NE of property
   Julian & Fay Bielewicz


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Birdline Australia Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 15 Sep 2014 08:29:34 +1000
   Birdline Australia

   Published sightings for the week ending 14 Sep 2014.

   Fri 5 Sep Javan Pond Heron Cocos Keeling Island
   Sighted again on the same sheltered beach on Home island at low tide
   .First sighted early December 2013.
   Pam Jones and Geof Christie


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Strange bird-call in Victoria
From: Steve Clark <bukoba.steve AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 08:03:02 +1000
Surely it's a Lyrebird...


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Flames in the snow
From: "Paul Doyle" <paulodoyle AT optusnet.com.au>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 2014 07:47:41 +1000
HI All,
Last weekend as I was riding up the Pleasant Valley Quad Chair at Perisher,
quietly contemplating the beauty, , I was surprised to see, flashing across
inn front of me, what I am sure was a flame robin. Only saw it for a few
seconds. The only other possibility would be a red-capped robin, but I don't
think they're up in that area.
Anyone have any info about the presence or absence of either of these in the
snowfields in winter?

Thanks
Paul





Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org