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Updated on Friday, October 31 at 09:54 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Boat-billed Heron,©BirdQuest

1 Nov Advertising on birding-aus [Russell Woodford ]
1 Nov Re: ADVERTISEMENT - Birds of Australia: A Photographic Guide (Princeton University Press) [Carl Clifford ]
1 Nov Re: ADVERTISEMENT - Birds of Australia: A Photographic Guide (Princeton University Press) [Peter Shute ]
1 Nov Some interesting moves in feral cat control [Carl Clifford ]
1 Nov Re: ADVERTISEMENT - Birds of Australia: A Photographic Guide (Princeton University Press) [Carl Clifford ]
01 Nov April 2015 Trip to Panama ["Greg Roberts" ]
31 Oct ADVERTISEMENT - Birds of Australia: A Photographic Guide (Princeton University Press) [Eoghan Barry ]
31 Oct Like Shazam For Songbirds, Warblr Identifies Birds by Tweet | Digital Trends [Charles ]
31 Oct Re: Is there a bird app for southern Argentina and Chile? ["Peter Madvig" ]
31 Oct Re: Is there a bird app for southern Argentina and Chile? [Sonja Ross ]
31 Oct Mystery calls from Wyperfeld NP, Victoria, [Marc Anderson ]
31 Oct Re: Is there a bird app for southern Argentina and Chile? ["Peter Madvig" ]
31 Oct Re: nest story [Carl Clifford ]
31 Oct Re: nest story ["Alan Gillanders" ]
31 Oct Re: Mystery calls from Wyperfeld NP, Victoria [PennyDB ]
31 Oct Where are the Aussie Painted Snipes this year? [John Weigel ]
31 Oct Our resident Kookaburras have gone missing...any ideas? [David Adams ]
31 Oct Buff-breasted Paradise-Kingfisher [Kingfisher Park Birdwatchers Lodge ]
31 Oct nest story ["Shirley Cook" ]
31 Oct Re: Eaglehawk Pelagic Trip Report - 18/10/2014 [Robert Hamilton ]
30 Oct Notes from a research seminar on the decimation of migratory shorebird species on the East Asian Flyway [Laurie Knight ]
30 Oct Is there a bird app for southern Argentina and Chile? [Sonja Ross ]
30 Oct Re: Mystery calls from Wyperfeld NP, Victoria [ ]
30 Oct Re: Mystery calls from Wyperfeld NP, Victoria [Allan Richardson ]
30 Oct Re: Mystery calls from Wyperfeld NP, Victoria [Rebecca Boulton ]
30 Oct Bird strike segment on Catalyst [Carl Clifford ]
30 Oct Re: Eaglehawk Pelagic Trip Report - 18/10/2014 [Robert Hamilton ]
30 Oct Re: Mystery calls from Wyperfeld NP, Victoria [martin cachard ]
30 Oct Re: Mystery calls from Wyperfeld NP, Victoria [Allan Richardson ]
30 Oct Re: Mystery calls from Wyperfeld NP, Victoria [Tom Tarrant ]
30 Oct Urgent - ASF to report to the Queensland State Government tomorrow 31st October ["Judy Leitch" ]
30 Oct Re: Mystery calls from Wyperfeld NP, Victoria [Marc Anderson ]
30 Oct Invasive species ["Euan Moore" ]
30 Oct Re: Mystery calls from Wyperfeld NP, Victoria [Peter Shute ]
30 Oct Mystery calls from Wyperfeld NP, Victoria [Marc Anderson ]
29 Oct Major Mitchell's Cockatoos in Parkes, NSW [Harry Nyström ]
29 Oct Re: [birdswa] Little Ringed Plover at Nairns ["Tony Russell" ]
29 Oct Re: Sydney Fox Rescue? ["Dave & Marj" ]
29 Oct Re: [birdswa] Little Ringed Plover at Nairns [Mark Newman ]
29 Oct Re: Little Ringed Plover at Nairns [Carl Clifford ]
29 Oct Re: [birdswa] Little Ringed Plover at Nairns [Stewart Ford ]
29 Oct Re: [birdswa] Little Ringed Plover at Nairns [Nigel Jackett ]
29 Oct Re: [birdswa] Little Ringed Plover at Nairns [Nigel Jackett ]
29 Oct Cumberland Dam and Karumba Trip Report [Tim Dolby ]
29 Oct Re: Little Ringed Plover at Nairns [Kev Lobotomi ]
29 Oct Re: Little Ringed Plover at Nairns [John Tongue ]
29 Oct Re: Little Ringed Plover at Nairns ["Alan Gillanders" ]
29 Oct Re: FW: Warblr: an app that recognises birds from their song [Carl Clifford ]
28 Oct Port Stephens pelagic this Sunday (2nd Nov) - vacancy [Mick Roderick ]
29 Oct Little Ringed Plover at Nairns [John Graff ]
29 Oct Invasive Species Council [Carl Clifford ]
29 Oct Re: Exotics, their importation and naturalisation [Denise Goodfellow ]
29 Oct Re: FW: Warblr: an app that recognises birds from their song [Peter Shute ]
29 Oct That was a short week [Carl Clifford ]
29 Oct Re: Exotics, their importation and naturalisation [Carl Clifford ]
29 Oct Re: FW: Warblr: an app that recognises birds from their song [Carl Clifford ]
29 Oct Birdline Tasmania Weekly Update []
29 Oct Birdline Western Australia Weekly Update []
29 Oct Birdline Victoria Weekly Update []
29 Oct Birdline Australian Capital Territory Weekly Update []
29 Oct Birdline South Australia Weekly Update []
29 Oct Birdline Northern Territory Weekly Update []
29 Oct Birdline New South Wales Weekly Update []
29 Oct Birdline North Queensland Weekly Update []
29 Oct Birdline Central & Southern Queensland Weekly Update []
29 Oct Birdline Australia Weekly Update []
29 Oct Darwin Airport Birds [Chris Shaw ]
29 Oct Exotics, their importation and naturalisation ["Alan Gillanders" ]
28 Oct Re: FW: Warblr: an app that recognises birds from their song [Nikolas Haass ]
29 Oct FW: Warblr: an app that recognises birds from their song [Peter Shute ]
29 Oct Re: Sydney Fox Rescue? [Denise Goodfellow ]
29 Oct White-headed Pigeons ["Julian Bielewicz" ]
28 Oct Writing about Pauline Reilly [Wenfei Tong ]
28 Oct Eaglehawk Pelagic Trip Report - 18/10/2014 [Paul Brooks ]
28 Oct Re: Sydney Fox Rescue? ["Julian Bielewicz" ]
28 Oct Re: Sydney Fox Rescue? [brian fleming ]

Subject: Advertising on birding-aus
From: Russell Woodford <rdwoodford AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 1 Nov 2014 13:26:31 +1100
Hi all

Some months ago I removed the "no advertising" restriction and simply asked
that people who wished to advertise birding services and products are
welcome to do so, but that they should place  ADVERTISEMENT in the subject
header.

Remember that posts from new members are moderated (and some from older
members are moderated :-)   )  so we can easily filter out irrelevant ads.

The publisher of the new photographic guide contacted me to ask permission
to post, and also used the correct subject header. I'm perfectly happy with
this sort of message. In fact, I think it would be helpful for members to
have a look at the new guide and post some feedback. Additionally, the
offer of a discount for birding-aus readers is a nice gesture, and not
something I was aware of.

In the early days of the Internet (I'm one of the oldies who remembers
them) almost all public access was through universities, via services such
as AARPAnet. Administrators saw that it might be useful to expand the
Internet to include people outside the academic world, but there was an
understanding that usage should be not-for-profit. Early users like myself
remember when anyone touting services or products via email, newsgroups,
etc were sternly rebuked. In more recent tiems, services like eBay and
Paypal suggested that maybe there could be a commercial side to the
Internet after all ... and the rest, as they say, is history!

Russell Woodford
Birding-Aus Owner


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Subject: Re: ADVERTISEMENT - Birds of Australia: A Photographic Guide (Princeton University Press)
From: Carl Clifford <carlsclifford AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 1 Nov 2014 12:34:47 +1100
Fair enough Peter. I hope advertisers give a little donation to the running of 
Birding Aus. 


Carl Clifford


> On 1 Nov 2014, at 12:30, Peter Shute  wrote:
> 
> The no ads rule was modified earlier this year, Carl. Messages are not 
allowed if they: 

> "6. contain commercial content, unless it is related to birds or birding, and 
contains the word ADVERTISEMENT in the Subject Line" 

> 
> Peter Shute
> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
>> On 1 Nov 2014, at 10:32 am, Carl Clifford  wrote:
>> 
>> What is an advertisement doing on Birding Aus? If this ad is allowed, why 
not other book sellers such as Andrew Isles or the Natural History Book 
Service. Fair is fair. 

>> 
>> 
>>> On 1 Nov 2014, at 00:06, Eoghan Barry  
wrote: 

>>> 
>>> The latest addition to the Princeton University Press range of Bird and 
Natural History guides is Birds of Australia: A Photographic Guide, by Ian 
Campbell, Sam Woods and Nick Leseberg. We would be very interested in any 
comments, reviews or (hopefully not too many of these) corrections from 
Birding-Aus readers - please post to this list. Readers of Birding-Aus can 
obtain a discount of 20% on orders through the PUP website using this discount 
code: P05950. More details on the book below the link. 

>>> 
>>> http://press.princeton.edu/titles/10338.html
>>> 
>>> Australia is home to a spectacular diversity of birdlife, from parrots and 
penguins to emus and vibrant passerines. Birds of Australia covers all 714 
species of resident birds and regularly occurring migrants and features more 
than 1,100 stunning color photographs, including many photos of subspecies and 
plumage variations never before seen in a field guide. Detailed facing-page 
species accounts describe key identification features such as size, plumage, 
distribution, behavior, and voice. This one-of-a-kind guide also provides 
extensive habitat descriptions with a large number of accompanying photos. The 
text relies on the very latest IOC taxonomy and the distribution maps 
incorporate the most current mapping data, making this the most up-to-date 
guide to Australian birds. 

>>> 
>>> 
>>> * Covers all 714 species of resident birds and regularly occurring migrants 

>>> 
>>> *         Features more than 1,100 stunning color photos
>>> 
>>> * Includes facing-page species accounts, habitat descriptions, and 
distribution maps 

>>> 
>>> * The ideal photographic guide for beginners and seasoned birders alike 

>>> 
>>> Eoghan Barry
>>> Digital Marketing Assistant
>>> 
>>> [P Logo]
>>> Princeton University Press
>>> 41 William Street
>>> Princeton, NJ 08540-5237
>>> www.press.princeton.edu
>>> 
>>> Eoghan_Barry AT press.princeton.edu
>>> 
>>> 
>>>
Birding-Aus mailing list >>>
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >>>
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >>>
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >>> >>

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Subject: Re: ADVERTISEMENT - Birds of Australia: A Photographic Guide (Princeton University Press)
From: Peter Shute <pshute AT nuw.org.au>
Date: Sat, 1 Nov 2014 12:30:05 +1100
The no ads rule was modified earlier this year, Carl. Messages are not allowed 
if they: 

"6. contain commercial content, unless it is related to birds or birding, and 
contains the word ADVERTISEMENT in the Subject Line" 


Peter Shute

Sent from my iPad

> On 1 Nov 2014, at 10:32 am, Carl Clifford  wrote:
> 
> What is an advertisement doing on Birding Aus? If this ad is allowed, why not 
other book sellers such as Andrew Isles or the Natural History Book Service. 
Fair is fair. 

> 
> 
>> On 1 Nov 2014, at 00:06, Eoghan Barry  
wrote: 

>> 
>> The latest addition to the Princeton University Press range of Bird and 
Natural History guides is Birds of Australia: A Photographic Guide, by Ian 
Campbell, Sam Woods and Nick Leseberg. We would be very interested in any 
comments, reviews or (hopefully not too many of these) corrections from 
Birding-Aus readers - please post to this list. Readers of Birding-Aus can 
obtain a discount of 20% on orders through the PUP website using this discount 
code: P05950. More details on the book below the link. 

>> 
>> http://press.princeton.edu/titles/10338.html
>> 
>> Australia is home to a spectacular diversity of birdlife, from parrots and 
penguins to emus and vibrant passerines. Birds of Australia covers all 714 
species of resident birds and regularly occurring migrants and features more 
than 1,100 stunning color photographs, including many photos of subspecies and 
plumage variations never before seen in a field guide. Detailed facing-page 
species accounts describe key identification features such as size, plumage, 
distribution, behavior, and voice. This one-of-a-kind guide also provides 
extensive habitat descriptions with a large number of accompanying photos. The 
text relies on the very latest IOC taxonomy and the distribution maps 
incorporate the most current mapping data, making this the most up-to-date 
guide to Australian birds. 

>> 
>> 
>> * Covers all 714 species of resident birds and regularly occurring migrants 

>> 
>> *         Features more than 1,100 stunning color photos
>> 
>> * Includes facing-page species accounts, habitat descriptions, and 
distribution maps 

>> 
>> * The ideal photographic guide for beginners and seasoned birders alike 

>> 
>> Eoghan Barry
>> Digital Marketing Assistant
>> 
>> [P Logo]
>> Princeton University Press
>> 41 William Street
>> Princeton, NJ 08540-5237
>> www.press.princeton.edu
>> 
>> Eoghan_Barry AT press.princeton.edu
>> 
>> 
>>
Birding-Aus mailing list >>
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >>
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >>
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >> >

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Subject: Some interesting moves in feral cat control
From: Carl Clifford <carlsclifford AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 1 Nov 2014 12:04:25 +1100
Good to see something positive towards feral cat control.
http://www.abc.net.au/environment/articles/2014/10/31/4118217.htm

Carl Clifford





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Subject: Re: ADVERTISEMENT - Birds of Australia: A Photographic Guide (Princeton University Press)
From: Carl Clifford <carlsclifford AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 1 Nov 2014 10:32:44 +1100
What is an advertisement doing on Birding Aus? If this ad is allowed, why not 
other book sellers such as Andrew Isles or the Natural History Book Service. 
Fair is fair. 



> On 1 Nov 2014, at 00:06, Eoghan Barry  
wrote: 

> 
> The latest addition to the Princeton University Press range of Bird and 
Natural History guides is Birds of Australia: A Photographic Guide, by Ian 
Campbell, Sam Woods and Nick Leseberg. We would be very interested in any 
comments, reviews or (hopefully not too many of these) corrections from 
Birding-Aus readers - please post to this list. Readers of Birding-Aus can 
obtain a discount of 20% on orders through the PUP website using this discount 
code: P05950. More details on the book below the link. 

> 
> http://press.princeton.edu/titles/10338.html
> 
> Australia is home to a spectacular diversity of birdlife, from parrots and 
penguins to emus and vibrant passerines. Birds of Australia covers all 714 
species of resident birds and regularly occurring migrants and features more 
than 1,100 stunning color photographs, including many photos of subspecies and 
plumage variations never before seen in a field guide. Detailed facing-page 
species accounts describe key identification features such as size, plumage, 
distribution, behavior, and voice. This one-of-a-kind guide also provides 
extensive habitat descriptions with a large number of accompanying photos. The 
text relies on the very latest IOC taxonomy and the distribution maps 
incorporate the most current mapping data, making this the most up-to-date 
guide to Australian birds. 

> 
> 
> * Covers all 714 species of resident birds and regularly occurring migrants 

> 
> *         Features more than 1,100 stunning color photos
> 
> * Includes facing-page species accounts, habitat descriptions, and 
distribution maps 

> 
> * The ideal photographic guide for beginners and seasoned birders alike 

> 
> Eoghan Barry
> Digital Marketing Assistant
> 
> [P Logo]
> Princeton University Press
> 41 William Street
> Princeton, NJ 08540-5237
> www.press.princeton.edu
> 
> Eoghan_Barry AT press.princeton.edu
> 
> 
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
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http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >

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Subject: April 2015 Trip to Panama
From: "Greg Roberts" <ninderry AT westnet.com.au>
Date: Sat, 01 Nov 2014 07:11:59 +1000
There is one spot left on a private trip I am organising for a group
of Australian birders to tour Panama between April 1 and April 21 (3
weeks) next year.
Please let me know if interested.
Greg Roberts




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Subject: ADVERTISEMENT - Birds of Australia: A Photographic Guide (Princeton University Press)
From: Eoghan Barry <Eoghan_Barry AT press.princeton.edu>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 13:06:47 +0000
The latest addition to the Princeton University Press range of Bird and Natural 
History guides is Birds of Australia: A Photographic Guide, by Ian Campbell, 
Sam Woods and Nick Leseberg. We would be very interested in any comments, 
reviews or (hopefully not too many of these) corrections from Birding-Aus 
readers - please post to this list. Readers of Birding-Aus can obtain a 
discount of 20% on orders through the PUP website using this discount code: 
P05950. More details on the book below the link. 


http://press.princeton.edu/titles/10338.html

Australia is home to a spectacular diversity of birdlife, from parrots and 
penguins to emus and vibrant passerines. Birds of Australia covers all 714 
species of resident birds and regularly occurring migrants and features more 
than 1,100 stunning color photographs, including many photos of subspecies and 
plumage variations never before seen in a field guide. Detailed facing-page 
species accounts describe key identification features such as size, plumage, 
distribution, behavior, and voice. This one-of-a-kind guide also provides 
extensive habitat descriptions with a large number of accompanying photos. The 
text relies on the very latest IOC taxonomy and the distribution maps 
incorporate the most current mapping data, making this the most up-to-date 
guide to Australian birds. 



* Covers all 714 species of resident birds and regularly occurring migrants 


*         Features more than 1,100 stunning color photos

* Includes facing-page species accounts, habitat descriptions, and distribution 
maps 


*         The ideal photographic guide for beginners and seasoned birders alike

Eoghan Barry
Digital Marketing Assistant

[P Logo]
Princeton University Press
41 William Street
Princeton, NJ 08540-5237
www.press.princeton.edu

Eoghan_Barry AT press.princeton.edu



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Subject: Like Shazam For Songbirds, Warblr Identifies Birds by Tweet | Digital Trends
From: Charles <ccgfh AT yahoo.com.au>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 23:39:08 +1100
> 
> 
www.digitaltrends.com/mobile/warblr-app-shazam-for-bird-identification#%21cpYfzs?utm_campaign=trueAnthem%3A+New+Content+%28Feed%29&utm_content=cpYfzs&utm_medium=trueAnthem&utm_source=twitter 

> 


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Subject: Re: Is there a bird app for southern Argentina and Chile?
From: "Peter Madvig" <madvig AT iprimus.com.au>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 21:21:12 +1100
Hi Sonja,

Ah - that explains...I misunderstood your query!! Enjoy and good luck.
Regards,
Peter



----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Sonja Ross" 
To: "Peter Madvig" 
Cc: "Birding_Aus Aus" 
Sent: Friday, October 31, 2014 6:59 PM
Subject: Re: [Birding-Aus] Is there a bird app for southern Argentina and 
Chile?


Hi Peter,

Thanks for that.   We board a ship there and head into the Weddell Sea, and 
then use a helicopter to go to an area where there is a fairly recently 
discovered Emperor colony, but of course it all depends on the weather!

Sonja

On 31/10/2014, at 5:36 PM, "Peter Madvig"  wrote:

> Hi Sonja,
>
> Sorry - ne way you'll see Emperors in Ushuaia.....they are in the 
> Antarctic itself. The most you can see are Magelanics in that area.
> Can't help with an APP.
> Cheers,
> Peter Madvig
> PS. some lovely geese and smaller birds in the area......
>
>
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Sonja Ross" 
> To: "Birding_Aus Aus" 
> Sent: Thursday, October 30, 2014 9:44 PM
> Subject: [Birding-Aus] Is there a bird app for southern Argentina and 
> Chile?
>
>
>> My husband and I are unexpectedly off on an expedition hoping to see 
>> Emperor Penguins later this month.  We will have part of a day on the way 
>> and on the way back in Ushuaia so might hire a car and go out to the 
>> National Park perhaps, so I'm wondering if there is an app. for the area?
>>
>> Thanks in advance,
>>
>> Sonja
>> 
>>
Birding-Aus mailing list >>
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >>
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >>
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >> > >

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Subject: Re: Is there a bird app for southern Argentina and Chile?
From: Sonja Ross <sonja.ross7 AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 18:59:26 +1100
Hi Peter,

Thanks for that. We board a ship there and head into the Weddell Sea, and then 
use a helicopter to go to an area where there is a fairly recently discovered 
Emperor colony, but of course it all depends on the weather! 


Sonja

On 31/10/2014, at 5:36 PM, "Peter Madvig"  wrote:

> Hi Sonja,
> 
> Sorry - ne way you'll see Emperors in Ushuaia.....they are in the Antarctic 
itself. The most you can see are Magelanics in that area. 

> Can't help with an APP.
> Cheers,
> Peter Madvig
> PS. some lovely geese and smaller birds in the area......
> 
> 
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Sonja Ross" 
> To: "Birding_Aus Aus" 
> Sent: Thursday, October 30, 2014 9:44 PM
> Subject: [Birding-Aus] Is there a bird app for southern Argentina and Chile?
> 
> 
>> My husband and I are unexpectedly off on an expedition hoping to see Emperor 
Penguins later this month. We will have part of a day on the way and on the way 
back in Ushuaia so might hire a car and go out to the National Park perhaps, so 
I'm wondering if there is an app. for the area? 

>> 
>> Thanks in advance,
>> 
>> Sonja
>> 
>>
Birding-Aus mailing list >>
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >>
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http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >> > >

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Subject: Mystery calls from Wyperfeld NP, Victoria,
From: Marc Anderson <marc AT marcanderson.com.au>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 18:21:54 +1100
Thanks all for your comments so far.

While the habitat was mallee, it was on the fringe with some dry 
woodland nearby.

It seems fairly certain that the first call was indeed Mulga Parrot - 
Here's an existing recording of Mulga Parrot which I compared it with - 
http://www.xeno-canto.org/40562

The jury is still out on the second call, and I'm now leaning towards 
one of the larger parrots like Mallee Ringneck or Yellow Rosella.

Marc Anderson





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Subject: Re: Is there a bird app for southern Argentina and Chile?
From: "Peter Madvig" <madvig AT iprimus.com.au>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 17:36:59 +1100
Hi Sonja,

Sorry - ne way you'll see Emperors in Ushuaia.....they are in the Antarctic 
itself. The most you can see are Magelanics in that area.
Can't help with an APP.
Cheers,
Peter Madvig
PS. some lovely geese and smaller birds in the area......


----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Sonja Ross" 
To: "Birding_Aus Aus" 
Sent: Thursday, October 30, 2014 9:44 PM
Subject: [Birding-Aus] Is there a bird app for southern Argentina and Chile?


> My husband and I are unexpectedly off on an expedition hoping to see 
> Emperor Penguins later this month.  We will have part of a day on the way 
> and on the way back in Ushuaia so might hire a car and go out to the 
> National Park perhaps, so I'm wondering if there is an app. for the area?
>
> Thanks in advance,
>
> Sonja
> 
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
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http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > >

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Subject: Re: nest story
From: Carl Clifford <carlsclifford AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 17:57:58 +1100
Some birds certainly aren't easily put off from their nesting places. I was in 
Pokhara, Nepal in February. Just down the road from where I stayed, there was a 
tiny bakery café I visited a few times. In the middle of the café, a pair of 
Barn Swallows had built a nest on a fluorescent light fitting attached to the 
ceiling. It was rather pleasant to watch the Swallows flying back and forth 
bringing food to their chicks, while having 11ses. Easiest tick you could get. 


Carl Clifford

> On 31 Oct 2014, at 17:02, Alan Gillanders  
wrote: 

> 
> A pair of silly young Willies have tried to build a nest on a beam outside my 
office. Of course there is no way they can attach the spider webs and plaant 
material. I placed a suitably sized forked twig on one of their favourite spots 
and a wire coiled over the beam and looped to a suitable size on the side. One 
bird tried to remove the wire but they have shifted their attention to further 
along the beam. Every now and then they seem to have a day or too off but this 
has been going on for over two weeks now. 

> 
> A good friend suggested I should refrain from helping as they are too stupid 
to breed. That doesn't seem to stop our species! 

> Alan
> 
> 
> Alan's Wildlife Tours
> 2 Mather Road
> Yungaburra 4884
> 
> Phone 07 4095 3784
> Mobile 0408 953 786
> http://www.alanswildlifetours.com.au/
> -----Original Message----- From: Shirley Cook
> Sent: Friday, October 31, 2014 06:47 AM
> To: Messages Birding-aus
> Subject: [Birding-Aus] nest story
> 
> Dear all
> 
> My friend Susan Cantrell and her husband Ray have settled in Armidale.  Here
> is her story (without the attached pictures) about a nest.  If anyone wants
> to see the photos, please ask and I'll forward the complete email to you.
> 
> Shirley Cook
> _______
> Hi Shirley. Thought you might like to see these photos. Last year when
> we first moved in here I found quite a few nests in the garden. One was a
> Grey Fantail's attached to a roll of wire. I found it hanging from the
> rafters in a garden shed. I actually took it down and  took it all the way
> up to Tamborine Mt to show my old bird group. It's a much-travelled nest! I
> hung it back up when I returned home and lo and behold a pair of Willy Wags
> has taken it over this year and laid three eggs in it! Talk about recycling!
> They don't sit on it in the heat of the day - I presume that's because it's
> too hot under the corrugated iron roof of the shed. I hope the eggs don't
> cook!
>  The difference between the two species' nests is - the GF's is woven
> grass and cobwebs and has a tail like a wine glass. The WW's is made of a
> similar material but is cupped - no tail about the same size though.
> Nevertheless they don't seem to mind the architecture, so long as it works!
> In the second photo that's him telling me off. The only access they have to
> the nest is through the door as the shed is totally wired in elsewhere. The
> tail of the original nest  has been somewhat shortened and the WW's seems to
> built almost on top of it - to one side.
> Cheers
> Susan
> 
> 
> 
>
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Subject: Re: nest story
From: "Alan Gillanders" <alan AT alanswildlifetours.com.au>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 16:02:11 +1000
A pair of silly young Willies have tried to build a nest on a beam outside 
my office. Of course there is no way they can attach the spider webs and 
plaant material. I placed a suitably sized forked twig on one of their 
favourite spots and a wire coiled over the beam and looped to a suitable 
size on the  side. One bird tried to remove the wire but they have shifted 
their attention to further along the beam. Every now and then they seem to 
have a day or too off but this has been going on for over two weeks now.

A good friend suggested I should refrain from helping as they are too stupid 
to breed. That doesn't seem to stop our species!
Alan


Alan's Wildlife Tours
2 Mather Road
Yungaburra 4884

Phone 07 4095 3784
Mobile 0408 953 786
http://www.alanswildlifetours.com.au/
-----Original Message----- 
From: Shirley Cook
Sent: Friday, October 31, 2014 06:47 AM
To: Messages Birding-aus
Subject: [Birding-Aus] nest story

Dear all

My friend Susan Cantrell and her husband Ray have settled in Armidale.  Here
is her story (without the attached pictures) about a nest.  If anyone wants
to see the photos, please ask and I'll forward the complete email to you.

Shirley Cook
_______
Hi Shirley. Thought you might like to see these photos. Last year when
we first moved in here I found quite a few nests in the garden. One was a
Grey Fantail's attached to a roll of wire. I found it hanging from the
rafters in a garden shed. I actually took it down and  took it all the way
up to Tamborine Mt to show my old bird group. It's a much-travelled nest! I
hung it back up when I returned home and lo and behold a pair of Willy Wags
has taken it over this year and laid three eggs in it! Talk about recycling!
They don't sit on it in the heat of the day - I presume that's because it's
too hot under the corrugated iron roof of the shed. I hope the eggs don't
cook!
   The difference between the two species' nests is - the GF's is woven
grass and cobwebs and has a tail like a wine glass. The WW's is made of a
similar material but is cupped - no tail about the same size though.
Nevertheless they don't seem to mind the architecture, so long as it works!
In the second photo that's him telling me off. The only access they have to
the nest is through the door as the shed is totally wired in elsewhere. The
tail of the original nest  has been somewhat shortened and the WW's seems to
built almost on top of it - to one side.
Cheers
Susan




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Subject: Re: Mystery calls from Wyperfeld NP, Victoria
From: PennyDB <penny AT pennydb.org>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 13:36:08 +1100
Dear all

Re: White-browed Treecreepers in mallee - at Gluepot they can be found 
in the stands of casuarinas, particularly near Babbler camp site.  Seen 
them there several times.
Penny D-B

On 30/10/14 9:53 PM, wildlifeexperiences AT gmail.com wrote:
> Hi all,
> White-browed Treecreeper in mallee? Not too sure about that.... They are a 
cypress pine and casuarina specialist in Victoria. Where abouts in Wyperfeld 
Marc? 

>
> Yours in all things "green"
>
> John Harris BASc, GDipEd
> Director - Wildlife Experiences P/L
> Principal Zoologist/Ecologist
> Nature Photographer
> Wildlife Guide
> Croydon, Vic
> 0409 090 955
>
> President, Field Naturalists Club of Victoria
> www.fncv.org.au
>
> ----- Reply message -----
> From: "martin cachard" 
> To: "Allan Richardson" , "Marc Anderson" 
 

> Cc: "birding-aus-request AT birding-aus.org" , 
"birding-aus AT lists.vicnet.net.au"  

> Subject: [Birding-Aus] Mystery calls from Wyperfeld NP, Victoria
> Date: Thu, Oct 30, 2014 20:09
>
> no doubt about that being a White-browed Treecreeper in my mind either!! 
lovely sound it is too... 

>
> cheers, martin cachard, cairns
>
>
>> From: albirdo AT bigpond.net.au
>> Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 19:40:32 +1100
>> To: marc AT wildambience.com
>> CC: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org; birding-aus AT lists.vicnet.net.au
>> Subject: Re: [Birding-Aus] Mystery calls from Wyperfeld NP, Victoria
>>
>> Hi Marc,
>>
>> I reckon you’re on with the White-browed Treecreeper and the second one 
sounds like a Quail-thrush as Peter suggested. 

>>
>> Regards,
>>
>> Allan Richardson
>> Morisset NSW
>>
>>> On 30 Oct 2014, at 12:06 pm, Marc Anderson  wrote:
>>>
>>> I'm hoping someone familiar with these calls can help with ID. My only 
guess is White-browed Treecreeper. 

>>>
>>> Recorded in mallee, Wyperfeld National Park, Victoria around 8:30am.
>>>
>>> http://www.xeno-canto.org/200386
>>>
>>> http://www.xeno-canto.org/200381
>>>
>>> Thanks!
>>>
>>> -- 
>>> Marc Anderson
>>>
>>> Wild Ambience
>>> Sydney, Australia
>>> P +61 (0) 430 072 299
>>> E marc AT wildambience.com
>>> wildambience.com
>>> marcanderson.com.au
>>> twitter.com/wildambience
>>>
>>>
>>> 
>>>
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Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >>>
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >>>
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >>> >> >>
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Subject: Where are the Aussie Painted Snipes this year?
From: John Weigel <jweigel AT reptilepark.com.au>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 12:32:20 +1100
Some El Nino, eh? Too wet on the east coast for the usual Painted Snipe traps 
(thanks for Hunter updates Mick R). Has anyone, ANYWHERE seen the little Aussie 
secret nomads this Spring? 






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Subject: Our resident Kookaburras have gone missing...any ideas?
From: David Adams <dpadams AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 10:33:55 +1100
We've been livining in a neighborhood on the Far South Coast of NSW for
about 12 years now. During that entire time, we've had at least a family of
Kookaburras all along. Over the past few weeks, we've seen no more than one
bird at a time and never heard their regular calls. And their calls sere
very regular...

Any ideas of what would make such reliable residents disappear? The only
thing we can come up with this that some trees around the corner were
cleared not so long ago. We don't know where these Kookaburras had their
nests, but it could have been over there.

Any thoughts appreciated.


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Subject: Buff-breasted Paradise-Kingfisher
From: Kingfisher Park Birdwatchers Lodge <sootyowl AT bigpond.com>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 07:31:54 +1000
Hi Folks,
Our first Buff-breasted Paradise-Kingfisher for the season arrived back 
overnight, it was heard and glimpsed high in a tree in our rainforest.
The earliest they have arrived at the Lodge has been 16th October and 
the latest 18th November. We thought they might have been late this year 
due to the dry
weather and S-E winds. Great to have them back.

Cheers,
Keith & Lindsay.

-- 
     Keith & Lindsay Fisher
     Kingfisher Park Birdwatchers Lodge
     RN 6 Mt. Kooyong Road
     Julatten QLD 4871
     Ph : (07) 4094 1263
     Web Site: www.birdwatchers.com.au
     Blog: http://kingfisherparkbirdwatchers.blogspot.com/




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Subject: nest story
From: "Shirley Cook" <shirleycook AT skymesh.com.au>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 07:47:32 +1100
Dear all

My friend Susan Cantrell and her husband Ray have settled in Armidale.  Here 
is her story (without the attached pictures) about a nest.  If anyone wants 
to see the photos, please ask and I'll forward the complete email to you.

Shirley Cook
_______
Hi Shirley. Thought you might like to see these photos. Last year when
we first moved in here I found quite a few nests in the garden. One was a
Grey Fantail's attached to a roll of wire. I found it hanging from the
rafters in a garden shed. I actually took it down and  took it all the way
up to Tamborine Mt to show my old bird group. It's a much-travelled nest! I
hung it back up when I returned home and lo and behold a pair of Willy Wags
has taken it over this year and laid three eggs in it! Talk about recycling!
They don't sit on it in the heat of the day - I presume that's because it's
too hot under the corrugated iron roof of the shed. I hope the eggs don't
cook!
   The difference between the two species' nests is - the GF's is woven
grass and cobwebs and has a tail like a wine glass. The WW's is made of a
similar material but is cupped - no tail about the same size though.
Nevertheless they don't seem to mind the architecture, so long as it works!
In the second photo that's him telling me off. The only access they have to
the nest is through the door as the shed is totally wired in elsewhere. The
tail of the original nest  has been somewhat shortened and the WW's seems to
built almost on top of it - to one side.
Cheers
Susan




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Subject: Re: Eaglehawk Pelagic Trip Report - 18/10/2014
From: Robert Hamilton <robhamilton2 AT optusnet.com.au>
Date: Fri, 31 Oct 2014 06:32:47 +1100
Thanks Judy and Mona,

Sorry about that.

Here are the links.


http://birdsnmore.smugmug.com/Eaglehawk-Neck-Pelagics/Eaglehawk-Pelagic-18th-October/ 



http://birdsnmore.smugmug.com/King-Island

Rob

On 30/10/2014, at 10:11 PM, Judy Leitch wrote:

> Hi Robert,
> 
> I think you have copied the URL from within the organize tab, so one needs
> to login...
> 
> I am enjoying using smugmug, and look forward to seeing your photos.
> 
> Kind Regards,
> Judy
> 
> 
> 
> 




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Subject: Notes from a research seminar on the decimation of migratory shorebird species on the East Asian Flyway
From: Laurie Knight <l.knight AT optusnet.com.au>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 21:28:45 +1000
Gday

I attended a lunchtime seminar presented by Peter Fuller (UQ) today on the 
ongoing decline of the number of migratory waders reaching Australia. 


Peter is part of a group studying wader dynamics over the last couple of 
decades. While the abundance of non-magratory shorebirds has been stable, most 
transhemispherical migrants are declining at annual rates of 4 to 9%. Curlew 
Sandpipers are one of the hardest hit species, with their numbers down 84% over 
25 years. 


The common factor in the decline for most species is the loss of habitat in the 
Yellow sea (basically two thirds in recent decades (there is a recent article 
on the subject at 
http://www.wantchinatimes.com/news-subclass-cnt.aspx?id=20141027000048&cid=1105 
). Peter noted that 90% of the variance in the rate of decline of the various 
species studies was linked to the dependence of those species on the Yellow Sea 
as a transit point for their migrations. 


About half of the inter-tidal habitat loss was due to land use changes (15% 
aquaculture, 25% agriculture, 10% industrial). The other 50% was due to coastal 
erosion - a combination of sea level rise and reduced sediment deposition (due 
to the presence of dams etc). 


The long term survival of the impacted migratory species may depend on how they 
can adjust their migrations to get around the loss of their transit points. 
Peter noted that there had been changes in Ruff migration routes in response to 
habitat issues. 


Two research questions that occurred to me were:
1. How are the size and age structure of the overwintering populations of the 
migratory species changing? 

2. Are the patterns of vagrancy changing? Do they presage possible changes in 
migratory behaviour? 


Ultimately, there is the fundamental question of evolutionary plasticity - will 
the shorebirds be able to change enough to survive the changes in the world? 


Regards, Laurie.


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Subject: Is there a bird app for southern Argentina and Chile?
From: Sonja Ross <sonja.ross7 AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 21:44:23 +1100
My husband and I are unexpectedly off on an expedition hoping to see Emperor 
Penguins later this month. We will have part of a day on the way and on the way 
back in Ushuaia so might hire a car and go out to the National Park perhaps, so 
I'm wondering if there is an app. for the area? 


Thanks in advance,

Sonja


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Subject: Re: Mystery calls from Wyperfeld NP, Victoria
From: "wildlifeexperiences AT gmail.com" <wildlifeexperiences@gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 21:53:16 +1100
Hi all,
White-browed Treecreeper in mallee? Not too sure about that.... They are a 
cypress pine and casuarina specialist in Victoria. Where abouts in Wyperfeld 
Marc? 


Yours in all things "green"

John Harris BASc, GDipEd
Director - Wildlife Experiences P/L
Principal Zoologist/Ecologist
Nature Photographer
Wildlife Guide
Croydon, Vic
0409 090 955

President, Field Naturalists Club of Victoria
www.fncv.org.au

----- Reply message -----
From: "martin cachard" 
To: "Allan Richardson" , "Marc Anderson" 
 

Cc: "birding-aus-request AT birding-aus.org" , 
"birding-aus AT lists.vicnet.net.au"  

Subject: [Birding-Aus] Mystery calls from Wyperfeld NP, Victoria
Date: Thu, Oct 30, 2014 20:09

no doubt about that being a White-browed Treecreeper in my mind either!! lovely 
sound it is too... 


cheers, martin cachard, cairns


> From: albirdo AT bigpond.net.au
> Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 19:40:32 +1100
> To: marc AT wildambience.com
> CC: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org; birding-aus AT lists.vicnet.net.au
> Subject: Re: [Birding-Aus] Mystery calls from Wyperfeld NP, Victoria
> 
> Hi Marc,
> 
> I reckon you’re on with the White-browed Treecreeper and the second one 
sounds like a Quail-thrush as Peter suggested. 

> 
> Regards,
> 
> Allan Richardson
> Morisset NSW
> 
> > On 30 Oct 2014, at 12:06 pm, Marc Anderson  wrote:
> > 
> > I'm hoping someone familiar with these calls can help with ID. My only 
guess is White-browed Treecreeper. 

> > 
> > Recorded in mallee, Wyperfeld National Park, Victoria around 8:30am.
> > 
> > http://www.xeno-canto.org/200386
> > 
> > http://www.xeno-canto.org/200381
> > 
> > Thanks!
> > 
> > -- 
> > Marc Anderson
> > 
> > Wild Ambience
> > Sydney, Australia
> > P +61 (0) 430 072 299
> > E marc AT wildambience.com
> > wildambience.com
> > marcanderson.com.au
> > twitter.com/wildambience
> > 
> > 
> > 
> >
Birding-Aus mailing list > >
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>
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Subject: Re: Mystery calls from Wyperfeld NP, Victoria
From: Allan Richardson <albirdo AT bigpond.net.au>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 22:00:38 +1100
Hi John

They’re in mallee in Gluepot not very far away….

And although I said quail-thrush was a good fit for the second call I think 
it’s a treecreeper as well as the background call in the first recording. 


Regards,

Allan

> On 30 Oct 2014, at 9:53 pm, wildlifeexperiences AT gmail.com wrote:
> 
> Hi all,
> White-browed Treecreeper in mallee? Not too sure about that.... They are a 
cypress pine and casuarina specialist in Victoria. Where abouts in Wyperfeld 
Marc? 

> 
> Yours in all things "green"
> 
> John Harris BASc, GDipEd
> Director - Wildlife Experiences P/L
> Principal Zoologist/Ecologist
> Nature Photographer
> Wildlife Guide
> Croydon, Vic
> 0409 090 955
> 
> President, Field Naturalists Club of Victoria
> www.fncv.org.au 
> ----- Reply message -----
> From: "martin cachard" 
> To: "Allan Richardson" , "Marc Anderson" 
 

> Cc: "birding-aus-request AT birding-aus.org" , 
"birding-aus AT lists.vicnet.net.au"  

> Subject: [Birding-Aus] Mystery calls from Wyperfeld NP, Victoria
> Date: Thu, Oct 30, 2014 20:09
> 
> no doubt about that being a White-browed Treecreeper in my mind either!! 
lovely sound it is too... 

>  
> cheers, martin cachard, cairns
> 
>  
> > From: albirdo AT bigpond.net.au
> > Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 19:40:32 +1100
> > To: marc AT wildambience.com
> > CC: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org; birding-aus AT lists.vicnet.net.au
> > Subject: Re: [Birding-Aus] Mystery calls from Wyperfeld NP, Victoria
> > 
> > Hi Marc,
> > 
> > I reckon you’re on with the White-browed Treecreeper and the second one 
sounds like a Quail-thrush as Peter suggested. 

> > 
> > Regards,
> > 
> > Allan Richardson
> > Morisset NSW
> > 
> > > On 30 Oct 2014, at 12:06 pm, Marc Anderson  wrote:
> > > 
> > > I'm hoping someone familiar with these calls can help with ID. My only 
guess is White-browed Treecreeper. 

> > > 
> > > Recorded in mallee, Wyperfeld National Park, Victoria around 8:30am.
> > > 
> > > http://www.xeno-canto.org/200386 
> > > 
> > > http://www.xeno-canto.org/200381 
> > > 
> > > Thanks!
> > > 
> > > -- 
> > > Marc Anderson
> > > 
> > > Wild Ambience
> > > Sydney, Australia
> > > P +61 (0) 430 072 299
> > > E marc AT wildambience.com
> > > wildambience.com
> > > marcanderson.com.au
> > > twitter.com/wildambience
> > > 
> > > 
> > > 
> > >
Birding-Aus mailing list > > >
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> >
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Subject: Re: Mystery calls from Wyperfeld NP, Victoria
From: Rebecca Boulton <rlboulton AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 20:12:00 +1030
The first bird is a Mulga Parrot in flight. No doubt, have heard hundreds.
The second I agree with Tom, it's either a Mulga Parrot or a Ringneck, very
rosella like, so probably a ringneck.

Bec

On 30 October 2014 19:39, martin cachard  wrote:

> no doubt about that being a White-browed Treecreeper in my mind either!!
> lovely sound it is too...
>
> cheers, martin cachard, cairns
>
>
> > From: albirdo AT bigpond.net.au
> > Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 19:40:32 +1100
> > To: marc AT wildambience.com
> > CC: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org; birding-aus AT lists.vicnet.net.au
> > Subject: Re: [Birding-Aus] Mystery calls from Wyperfeld NP, Victoria
> >
> > Hi Marc,
> >
> > I reckon you’re on with the White-browed Treecreeper and the second one
> sounds like a Quail-thrush as Peter suggested.
> >
> > Regards,
> >
> > Allan Richardson
> > Morisset NSW
> >
> > > On 30 Oct 2014, at 12:06 pm, Marc Anderson 
> wrote:
> > >
> > > I'm hoping someone familiar with these calls can help with ID. My only
> guess is White-browed Treecreeper.
> > >
> > > Recorded in mallee, Wyperfeld National Park, Victoria around 8:30am.
> > >
> > > http://www.xeno-canto.org/200386
> > >
> > > http://www.xeno-canto.org/200381
> > >
> > > Thanks!
> > >
> > > --
> > > Marc Anderson
> > >
> > > Wild Ambience
> > > Sydney, Australia
> > > P +61 (0) 430 072 299
> > > E marc AT wildambience.com
> > > wildambience.com
> > > marcanderson.com.au
> > > twitter.com/wildambience
> > >
> > >
> > > 
> > >
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> >
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Subject: Bird strike segment on Catalyst
From: Carl Clifford <carlsclifford AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 20:44:26 +1100
On this evenings episode of the ABC's Catalyst, there was an interesting 
segment on aviation Bird strikes in Australia. Well worth catching on iView if 
you missed it. 


Carl Clifford




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Subject: Re: Eaglehawk Pelagic Trip Report - 18/10/2014
From: Robert Hamilton <robhamilton2 AT optusnet.com.au>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 20:14:39 +1100
Hi everyone,

Thanks  for organising and the  report Paul.

Here are some photos I took on the day including some mediocre Antarctic Prion 
shots, but I am not expecting the chance for better shots to come up any time 
soon. The other unusual event of the day was having a White-headed Petrel land 
in the slick. 



http://birdsnmore.smugmug.com/organize/Eaglehawk-Neck-Pelagics/Eaglehawk-Pelagic-18th-October 


I had a trip to King Island, with my son James, earlier in the month and 
despite the trying weather conditions I managed to do some photography. Rain is 
obvious in the background of some photos. Despite the weather we had a 
fantastic time getting the game birds, getting the rental car bogged and seeing 
a couple of Red-kneed Dotterel which are vagrant to Tasmania. We also saw Mute 
Swan, of unknown origin, on Lake Flanagan in the north of the island. 


http://birdsnmore.smugmug.com/organize/King-Island

Cheers,

Rob


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Subject: Re: Mystery calls from Wyperfeld NP, Victoria
From: martin cachard <mcachard AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 20:09:39 +1100
no doubt about that being a White-browed Treecreeper in my mind either!! lovely 
sound it is too... 

 
cheers, martin cachard, cairns

 
> From: albirdo AT bigpond.net.au
> Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 19:40:32 +1100
> To: marc AT wildambience.com
> CC: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org; birding-aus AT lists.vicnet.net.au
> Subject: Re: [Birding-Aus] Mystery calls from Wyperfeld NP, Victoria
> 
> Hi Marc,
> 
> I reckon youre on with the White-browed Treecreeper and the second one 
sounds like a Quail-thrush as Peter suggested. 

> 
> Regards,
> 
> Allan Richardson
> Morisset NSW
> 
> > On 30 Oct 2014, at 12:06 pm, Marc Anderson  wrote:
> > 
> > I'm hoping someone familiar with these calls can help with ID. My only 
guess is White-browed Treecreeper. 

> > 
> > Recorded in mallee, Wyperfeld National Park, Victoria around 8:30am.
> > 
> > http://www.xeno-canto.org/200386
> > 
> > http://www.xeno-canto.org/200381
> > 
> > Thanks!
> > 
> > -- 
> > Marc Anderson
> > 
> > Wild Ambience
> > Sydney, Australia
> > P +61 (0) 430 072 299
> > E marc AT wildambience.com
> > wildambience.com
> > marcanderson.com.au
> > twitter.com/wildambience
> > 
> > 
> > 
> >
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Subject: Re: Mystery calls from Wyperfeld NP, Victoria
From: Allan Richardson <albirdo AT bigpond.net.au>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 19:40:32 +1100
Hi Marc,

I reckon you’re on with the White-browed Treecreeper and the second one 
sounds like a Quail-thrush as Peter suggested. 


Regards,

Allan Richardson
Morisset NSW

> On 30 Oct 2014, at 12:06 pm, Marc Anderson  wrote:
> 
> I'm hoping someone familiar with these calls can help with ID. My only guess 
is White-browed Treecreeper. 

> 
> Recorded in mallee, Wyperfeld National Park, Victoria around 8:30am.
> 
> http://www.xeno-canto.org/200386
> 
> http://www.xeno-canto.org/200381
> 
> Thanks!
> 
> -- 
> Marc Anderson
> 
> Wild Ambience
> Sydney, Australia
> P +61 (0) 430 072 299
> E marc AT wildambience.com
> wildambience.com
> marcanderson.com.au
> twitter.com/wildambience
> 
> 
> 
>
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Subject: Re: Mystery calls from Wyperfeld NP, Victoria
From: Tom Tarrant <aviceda AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 19:05:39 +1100
Could the second be a Mulga Parrot or Ringneck? It sounds a bit
Rosella-like and I seem to recall a Mulga making a similar-call in the
Thargomindah area a couple of years ago.

Tom

On Thu, Oct 30, 2014 at 6:28 PM, Marc Anderson 
wrote:

> Thanks Peter - I've compared the first call with another recording of
> Mulga Parrot & it matches - http://www.xeno-canto.org/40562
>
> Now waiting to see if anyone can confirm the second call -
> http://www.xeno-canto.org/200381
>
>
> Marc
>
>
> On 30/10/2014 17:58, Peter Ewin wrote:
>
>> Marc,
>> The first to me sounds like a Mulga Parrot (particularly a flight call).
>> The second may be a White-browed Treecreeper, but doesn't sound quite right
>> (though I never got on to them too ofen when in Mildura). I always thought
>> they sounded a lot like Jacky Winter (that sort of pace) but I don't think
>> it is that.
>> Interested what other responses you get.
>> Cheers,
>> Peter
>>
>> > Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 12:06:27 +1100
>> > From: marc AT wildambience.com
>> > To: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
>> > CC: birding-aus AT lists.vicnet.net.au
>> > Subject: [Birding-Aus] Mystery calls from Wyperfeld NP, Victoria
>>
>> >
>> > I'm hoping someone familiar with these calls can help with ID. My only
>> > guess is White-browed Treecreeper.
>> >
>> > Recorded in mallee, Wyperfeld National Park, Victoria around 8:30am.
>> >
>> > http://www.xeno-canto.org/200386
>> >
>> > http://www.xeno-canto.org/200381
>> >
>> > Thanks!
>> >
>> > --
>> > Marc Anderson
>> >
>> > Wild Ambience
>> > Sydney, Australia
>> > P +61 (0) 430 072 299
>> > E marc AT wildambience.com
>> > wildambience.com
>> > marcanderson.com.au
>> > twitter.com/wildambience
>> >
>> >
>> > 
>> >
Birding-Aus mailing list >> >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >> >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >> >
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_ >> birding-aus.org >> > >> > >
>
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To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > > -- ******************************** Ian (Tom) Tarrant Hawthorn East 3123 Victoria http://www.aviceda.org ********************************

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Subject: Urgent - ASF to report to the Queensland State Government tomorrow 31st October
From: "Judy Leitch" <judyleitch AT optusnet.com.au>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 17:58:43 +1000
Hi all,

 

This is now extremely urgent.

 

ASF have to report to the Queensland State Government tomorrow.

 

There is an email provided by Save Our Broadwater which members can action

 

http://www.saveourbroadwater.com/email

 

 

 

Thanks,

Judy

 

 

 

Please sign our petition to 

STOP ASF BEFORE IT IS TOO LATE!

 

https://www.communityrun.org/petitions/save-our-broadwater

 



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Subject: Re: Mystery calls from Wyperfeld NP, Victoria
From: Marc Anderson <marc AT wildambience.com>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 18:28:09 +1100
Thanks Peter - I've compared the first call with another recording of 
Mulga Parrot & it matches - http://www.xeno-canto.org/40562

Now waiting to see if anyone can confirm the second call - 
http://www.xeno-canto.org/200381


Marc


On 30/10/2014 17:58, Peter Ewin wrote:
> Marc,
> The first to me sounds like a Mulga Parrot (particularly a flight 
> call). The second may be a White-browed Treecreeper, but doesn't sound 
> quite right (though I never got on to them too ofen when in 
> Mildura). I always thought they sounded a lot like Jacky Winter (that 
> sort of pace) but I don't think it is that.
> Interested what other responses you get.
> Cheers,
> Peter
>
> > Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 12:06:27 +1100
> > From: marc AT wildambience.com
> > To: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
> > CC: birding-aus AT lists.vicnet.net.au
> > Subject: [Birding-Aus] Mystery calls from Wyperfeld NP, Victoria
> >
> > I'm hoping someone familiar with these calls can help with ID. My only
> > guess is White-browed Treecreeper.
> >
> > Recorded in mallee, Wyperfeld National Park, Victoria around 8:30am.
> >
> > http://www.xeno-canto.org/200386
> >
> > http://www.xeno-canto.org/200381
> >
> > Thanks!
> >
> > --
> > Marc Anderson
> >
> > Wild Ambience
> > Sydney, Australia
> > P +61 (0) 430 072 299
> > E marc AT wildambience.com
> > wildambience.com
> > marcanderson.com.au
> > twitter.com/wildambience
> >
> >
> > 
> >
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Subject: Invasive species
From: "Euan Moore" <calamanthus5 AT bigpond.com>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 14:28:28 +1100
The stuff about the Sydney Fox Rescue and other issues with invasive species
is rather timely as I have been looking at the following website
http://www.feralscan.org.au/default.aspx

 

Some of you will already be familiar with Mynascan
http://www.feralscan.org.au/mynascan/ but for those who aren't the site is
worth a look and it is a chance to at least help take some action against
some feral species.  Many of us are out in the field a fair bit so we are
ideally suited to contribute to this citizen science project and to the
control of invasive species.

 

Mynascan also has a mobile phone app for those who want to send records that
way.

 

Carl mentioned the idea of a white list of permitted species and bonds
required from those that imported new species.  This was raised recently
during stakeholder consultations with DEPI (in Vic) relating to the
management of invasive birds. You can see a summary of what happened at
http://invasives.org.au/blog/paying-lip-service-prevention/  

 

Cheers,

Euan Moore



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Subject: Re: Mystery calls from Wyperfeld NP, Victoria
From: Peter Shute <pshute AT nuw.org.au>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 12:31:57 +1100
I haven't had a proper listen to either of them, but have you considered Jack 
Winter for the first and Chestnut Quail-thrush for the second? 


Peter Shute 

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Marc Anderson [mailto:marc AT wildambience.com] 
> Sent: Thursday, 30 October 2014 12:06 PM
> To: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
> Cc: birding-aus AT lists.vicnet.net.au
> Subject: Mystery calls from Wyperfeld NP, Victoria
> 
> I'm hoping someone familiar with these calls can help with 
> ID. My only guess is White-browed Treecreeper.
> 
> Recorded in mallee, Wyperfeld National Park, Victoria around 8:30am.
> 
> http://www.xeno-canto.org/200386
> 
> http://www.xeno-canto.org/200381
> 
> Thanks!
> 
> --
> Marc Anderson
> 
> Wild Ambience
> Sydney, Australia
> P +61 (0) 430 072 299
> E marc AT wildambience.com
> wildambience.com
> marcanderson.com.au
> twitter.com/wildambience
> 
> 
> 


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Subject: Mystery calls from Wyperfeld NP, Victoria
From: Marc Anderson <marc AT wildambience.com>
Date: Thu, 30 Oct 2014 12:06:27 +1100
I'm hoping someone familiar with these calls can help with ID. My only 
guess is White-browed Treecreeper.

Recorded in mallee, Wyperfeld National Park, Victoria around 8:30am.

http://www.xeno-canto.org/200386

http://www.xeno-canto.org/200381

Thanks!

-- 
Marc Anderson

Wild Ambience
Sydney, Australia
P +61 (0) 430 072 299
E marc AT wildambience.com
wildambience.com
marcanderson.com.au
twitter.com/wildambience




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Subject: Major Mitchell's Cockatoos in Parkes, NSW
From: Harry Nyström <harrynystrom AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 11:29:54 +0200
Hello from wintery Finland,

My colleague had to make a quick business trip to Oz and stays at the
moment in Parkes, NSW. Just thought to let you know about his recent,
better sightings in the area.

Today, during a short morning walk, he observed 5 loudly screeching Major
Mitchell's Cockatoos flying in from West and landing on a small hill just a
little North of town, opposite of Station Motel. The birds stayed there ca.
30 minutes for him to photograph before taking off and heading to South.
I'm assuming that the species is usually seen even further inland?

Additionally, on Tuesday, he observed and photographed 4 adult Whiskered
Terns in Gum Swamp, Forbes, NSW. According to eBird, the species is not
very common there.

Cheers,
-Harry


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Subject: Re: [birdswa] Little Ringed Plover at Nairns
From: "Tony Russell" <pratincole08 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 16:43:11 +1030
That's fixed that then.

-----Original Message-----
From: Birding-Aus [mailto:birding-aus-bounces AT birding-aus.org] On Behalf Of
Nigel Jackett
Sent: Wednesday, 29 October 2014 1:51 PM
To: John Graff
Cc: Birding-Aus; birdswa AT googlegroups.com
Subject: Re: [Birding-Aus] [birdswa] Little Ringed Plover at Nairns

Hi all,

Just realised Birding-Aus was included in this thread. Nairns is located
near Mandurah, south of Perth, WA.

Cheers,

Nigel

> On 29 Oct 2014, at 9:50 am, John Graff  wrote:
> 
> Hi all,
>  
> Craig Lester has photographed a Little Ringed Plover at Nairns this
morning
>  
> Cheers,
> John 
> -- 
> 
> --- 
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
"birdswa" group.
> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
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Subject: Re: Sydney Fox Rescue?
From: "Dave & Marj" <bushlands07 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 19:37:21 +1100
Hi Everyone,

This subject is somewhat alarming. The fox rescuers have a Facebook page.
Its worth a visit and a comment or 2
https://www.facebook.com/SydneyFoxRescue?fref=ts

Cheers,

David Cameron

On 29 October 2014 07:45, Denise Goodfellow 
wrote:

> And there are those (admittedly mostly European) who donated millions to
> the establishment of Franz Weber’s Bonrook Station, Pine Creek, NT.  This
> refuge for wild horses, set up in Hooded Parrot territory, was advertised
> as an “ecotour" resort.
>
> Denise Lawungkurr  Goodfellow
> PO Box 71
> Darwin River, NT, Australia 0841
>
> PhD candidate, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW.
>
> Founding Member: Ecotourism Australia
> Founding Member: Australian Federation of Graduate Women Northern Territory
> 043 8650 835
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On 28 Oct 2014, at 8:01 pm, Julian Bielewicz 
> wrote:
>
> > Greetings Anthea, et al
> >
> > And what about all those people who see the fox as a "beautiful animal"
> but are well aware that it s not a native?  Akin to many European
> Australians going around the ridges?
> >
> > Cheers
> >
> > Julian
> >
> >  AT osprey00
> > www.birdingsouthburnett.com
> >
> > 
> >
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Subject: Re: [birdswa] Little Ringed Plover at Nairns
From: Mark Newman <mark.newman AT skippers.com.au>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 04:39:06 +0000
Yep Still there & in front of the Birders who are currently there.
Sadly can’t make it until after work.

From: birdswa AT googlegroups.com [mailto:birdswa AT googlegroups.com] On Behalf Of 
Nigel Jackett 

Sent: Wednesday, 29 October 2014 11:18 AM
To: John Graff
Cc: birdswa AT googlegroups.com; Birding-Aus
Subject: Re: [birdswa] Little Ringed Plover at Nairns

Craig reports the Little Ringed Plover is still at Nairns.

Sent from my iPhone

On 29 Oct 2014, at 9:50 am, John Graff 
> wrote: 

Hi all,

Craig Lester has photographed a Little Ringed Plover at Nairns this morning

Cheers,
John
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Subject: Re: Little Ringed Plover at Nairns
From: Carl Clifford <carlsclifford AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 15:20:42 +1100
It is in City of Mandurah, WA

Carl Clifford


> On 29 Oct 2014, at 13:45, Kev Lobotomi  wrote:
> 
> Where is Nairns?
> 
> --- Original Message ---
> 
> From: "John Graff" 
> Sent: 29 October 2014 12:50 PM
> To: birdswa AT googlegroups.com, "Birding-Aus" 
> Subject: [Birding-Aus] Little Ringed Plover at Nairns
> 
> Hi all,
> 
> Craig Lester has photographed a Little Ringed Plover at Nairns this morning
> 
> Cheers,
> John
> 
> 
>
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Subject: Re: [birdswa] Little Ringed Plover at Nairns
From: Stewart Ford <stewartford AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 11:25:32 +0800
Nairns is in SW WA:


https://www.google.com.au/search?q=nairns+western+australia&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&hl=en-au&client=safari 


Cheers

Stewart

> On 29 Oct 2014, at 11:18, Nigel Jackett  wrote:
> 
> Craig reports the Little Ringed Plover is still at Nairns.
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On 29 Oct 2014, at 9:50 am, John Graff  wrote:
>> 
>> Hi all,
>>  
>> Craig Lester has photographed a Little Ringed Plover at Nairns this morning
>>  
>> Cheers,
>> John 
>> -- 
>> 
>> --- 
>> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"birdswa" group. 

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> -- 
> 
> --- 
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Subject: Re: [birdswa] Little Ringed Plover at Nairns
From: Nigel Jackett <nigel.jackett AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 11:20:30 +0800
Hi all,

Just realised Birding-Aus was included in this thread. Nairns is located near 
Mandurah, south of Perth, WA. 


Cheers,

Nigel

> On 29 Oct 2014, at 9:50 am, John Graff  wrote:
> 
> Hi all,
>  
> Craig Lester has photographed a Little Ringed Plover at Nairns this morning
>  
> Cheers,
> John 
> -- 
> 
> --- 
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"birdswa" group. 

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Subject: Re: [birdswa] Little Ringed Plover at Nairns
From: Nigel Jackett <nigel.jackett AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 11:17:59 +0800
Craig reports the Little Ringed Plover is still at Nairns.

Sent from my iPhone

> On 29 Oct 2014, at 9:50 am, John Graff  wrote:
> 
> Hi all,
>  
> Craig Lester has photographed a Little Ringed Plover at Nairns this morning
>  
> Cheers,
> John 
> -- 
> 
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Subject: Cumberland Dam and Karumba Trip Report
From: Tim Dolby <Tim.Dolby AT vu.edu.au>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 02:59:45 +0000
Hey all,

Please see below a report of a trip Greg Oakley and I did to Cumberland Dam and 
Karumba a few years ago. You can see the full report with images at 
http://tim-dolby.blogspot.com.au. It was originally attached to a Cairns trip 
report, however I thought it sits much better on its own. For the fun of it, 
I've added quite a bit of additional info, which might be useful. Of course any 
comments most welcomed. Any corrections please send to me personally (I can 
always make changes online :) - and, again, most welcomed! 


If you've been to these places, I hope it brings back some good memories. If 
you haven't, I hope it inspires you to do a trip there soon. 


Thanks, Tim Dolby

CUMBERLAND DAM AND KARUMBA TRIP REPORT
One thing that's worth considering when you visit Cairns for a birding trip is 
to do an 'add-on'. One such add-on is heading north up Cape York to places such 
as the Iron Range. Another is to head to the southern sections of Cape York. 
Aside from Mt Isa, the major birding locations to visit are Cumberland Dam and, 
moving west, Karumba. This report covers these two fantastic birding spot. The 
trip takes you through Australia's Gulf Savannah, an habitat type that occupies 
about a quarter of the continent, around 2 million square kilometres! 


The benefits of visiting Cumberland Dam and Karumba - apart from seeing some 
fantastic Australian landscapes - is that you get see a wide range birds not 
generally found around Cairns. To give you a taste of what I mean, at these two 
sites you may see Black-breasted Buzzard, Sarus Crane (if you've missed seeing 
them already on the Atherton Tableland), White-breasted and Mangrove Golden 
Whistler, Zitting Cisticola, Yellow White-eye, Red-headed, Rufous-throated, 
Banded and Yellow-tinted Honeyeater, Arafura and Mangrove Grey Fantail and 
Red-browed Pardalote. Not bad! And for those of us who like seeing finches, 
there's finches in abundance: you might see Star, Black-throated, Masked. 
Plum-headed, Zebra and Double-barred Finch and there's also a chance of seeing 
Pictorella Mannikin and (with a big stroke of luck) Gouldian Finch. 


GULF DEVELOPMENT ROAD
Driving west along the Gulf Development Road, the distance to Cumberland Dam 
from the Atherton Tableland is approximately 300 km. From Cumberland Dam it's 
another 350 km to Karumba. So a round trip from the Cairns adds about 1300 km 
to any trip, so you'd need to allow for about 4-6 additional days. However, if 
you have time, believe me it is well worth the effort! The Gulf Development 
Road is part of the 'Savannah Way' - its full length is 3700 km, from Cairns to 
Broome. 


While driving the Gulf Developmental Road look for signs of birdlife anywhere 
along the roadside. Look out for Ground Cuckoo-shrike; when I did this trip I 
saw them at a number of locations. There's a chance of seeing Little 
Woodswallow, particularly in rocky areas. Stop along any creek line and search 
for Black Bittern, the best time to see them tends to be late spring. Along the 
creek look in the larger smooth bark eucalypts for Red-browed Pardalote. 


In the grassy woodlands between Mt Surprise and Georgetown looks for 
Red-backed, Forest and Sacred Kingfisher, Ground Cuckoo-shrike, Little and 
Red-chested (uncommon) Button-quail, White-throated Gerygone, and there's the 
potential see five species of Woodswallow - as mentioned Little, but also 
White-breasted, White-browed, Masked and Black-faced. 


You should see quite a few kangaroo along the way, such as Eastern Grey 
Kangaroo, Common Wallaroo (Euro), Agile Wallaby, Northern Nailtail Wallaby and 
Rufous Bettong - particularly if you're traveling at night. Unfortunately many 
end up as road-kill, so be careful! This attracts the larger raptors such as 
Wedge-tailed Eagle, Spotted Harrier, and Black and Whistling Kite. You're also 
likely to see Black-breasted Buzzard - one of the main highlights for the trip 
- we saw a pair approximately 20 km west of Mt Surprise. 


Undara Lava Tubes
As a one day detour, just before you get to Mt Surprise, you pass by Undara 
Volcanic National Park and the spectacular Undara Lava Tubes. These are amongst 
the largest and longest lava tubes on the planet. It's not the greatest bird 
site, but if you do head in, it's a pretty good for dry country woodland birds 
such as Squatter Pigeon, Pale-headed Rosella, Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo, 
Red-winged Parrot, Peaceful and Diamond Dove, White-browed and Masked 
Woodswallow, Rainbow Bee-eater, and Australian Bustard. Black Bittern are 
occasionally seen i.e. on the Swamp Walking Track, and it can be quite good for 
swifts such as Fork-tailed Swift and White-throated Neddletail. Red Goshawk has 
also been recorded there, so keep your eyes peeled. Generally speaking, Undara 
Volcanic National Park is actually probably a better spot to see mammals than 
birds, being a good place to see Whiptail (Pretty-faced) Wallaby, Antilopine 
and Common Wallaroo, Mareeba Rock Wallaby (common at the lava tubes), and 
Rufous Bettong (common around the lodge at night), while Eastern Horseshoe Bat, 
Little-Bent Winged Bat and Brown Bent Wing Bat inhabit the Lava Tubes. 


CUMBERLAND DAM

Some background notes
Cumberland is a ghost town 24 km west of Georgetown (-18.301016,143.350335). 
Formerly a gold town, its days of grandeur are long gone. For instance, in the 
late 19th century it had four hotels. Like many gold towns, once the gold was 
gone the town went bust. The last remaining resident left in the 1940s, and the 
only remaining building is a square brick chimney, built by Cornish masons, 
from the old Cumberland Battery. There are two dams, both intermittently 
covered with white water lilies. The main dam is known as Cumberland Dam. Today 
Cumberland is mostly used as a rest area for people doing the 'Big Lap', 
however it also happens to be one of Australia's top birding sites! And for 
good reason. Despite being located in the arid interior of southern Cape York, 
an amazing 171 species of bird have been recorded - and this is in an area no 
bigger than a few Australian rules football fields! This makes it one of 
Queenslands great birding hot spots! (See a full eBird list for Cumberland Dam 
here.) 


When I visited Cumberland Dam with Greg Oakley a few years ago, we deliberately 
timed our trip to coincide with the end of the dry season and the beginning of 
spring. This is the perfect time to visit - much of the water on the Cape has 
dried up, so it gave us the best shot for seeing birds coming in to drink at 
the dam. At this time of year, therefore the dam is an oasis in a vast arid 
landscape. 


Part of the reason Cumberland Dam is so good is because of its fantastic 
geographic location. It's located in a transition zone for many species at the 
very limit of their normal range. For instance the dam is (basically) the 
northern limit for Plum-headed Finch, the eastern limit for Pictorella 
Mannikin, Gouldian Finch, Yellow-tinted Honeyeater, Varied Lorikeet and 
Spinifex Pigeon, the western limit of Squatter Pigeon, and the southern limit 
of Masked Finch. 


It's also pretty much the dividing line between the distribution of Paperbark 
Flycatcher (to the west) and Restless Flycatcher (to the east). The birds at 
Cumberland Dam tend to be Paperback Flycatcher, although you do also get 
Restless Flycatcher. So this is one of the only places in Australia where you 
potentially get both species side by side. Paperback Flycatcher are slightly 
smaller than Restless Flycatcher, and listen for the Paperback Flycatcher's 
distinctive musical toowee call. In line with being different species, 
Paperbark and Restless Flycatcher don't interbreed. 


Also most of Cape York subspecies start their general distribution around 
Cumberland Dam, such as the Brown Treecreeper ('Black Treecreeper' melanota 
ssp), Pale-headed Rosella ('Blue-cheeked Rosella' adscitus ssp) and Red-browed 
Pardalote (yorki ssp), Black-throated Finch (black-rumped atropygialas ssp) and 
Masked Finch ('White-eared Finch' leucotis ssp). 


Note that there's no facilities at Cumberland Dam - there's bush camping only - 
however there is accommodation at Georgetown, such as the such as Midway 
Caravan Park. 


The habitat and plants
Although during the summer months southern Cape York is one of the most arid 
regions in the world, after significant rains, the vegetation in the region 
transforms. The colour of the soils is a wonderful red-ochre colour, a colour 
that features in the large and numerous scattered termite mounds. Also in terms 
of colour, one of the striking things I noticed about Cumberland Dam was the 
colour of the light at dusk and twilight, changing to become the most subtle 
pastel blues and pinks. 


The habitat consists of subtropical grassland, savannah, and subtropical 
savannah, typically dominated by a tall grass layer with varying densities of 
trees, dominantly eucalyptus. The most common trees are Darwin Stringybark 
(Eucalyptus tetrodonta), River Red Gum (Eucalyptus camaldulensis), Coolibah (E. 
microtheca), Long-fruited Bloodwood (Corymbia polycarpa) and Northern Swamp 
Mahogany (Lophostemon grandiflorus). 


Smaller trees include Gutta-percha (Excoecaria parvifolia), Soapbush Wattle 
(Acacia holosericea), Lancewood (A. shirleyi), Whitewood (Atalaya hemiglauca), 
Cochlospermum (Cochlospermum gillivraei), Red Ironwood (Erythrophleum 
chlorostachys), Sandpaper Fig (Ficus opposita), Gardenia (Gardenia vilhelmii), 
Darwin Silky Oak (Grevillea pteridifolia), Quinine Bush (Petalostigma banksii) 
and Wild Plum (Terminalia platyphylla), and there's a nice range of Melaleuca 
including Silver-crowned Paperbark (Melaleuca fluviatilis), Silver Cadjeput (M. 
argentea) and Broad-leaved Paperbark (M. viridiflora). 


The birds that we saw!
We arrived at the Cumberland Dam just after dusk; during the night we heard 
Southern Boobook, Australian Owlet-nightjar and a distant Spotted Nightjar. 


In the morning I awoke in my tent to a fantastic dawn chorus. The most vocal 
birds being the honeyeaters, including Yellow-tinted, Rufous-throated, Brown, 
Yellow, Banded, and Blue-faced Honeyeater, as well as Yellow-throated Miner, 
and Noisy and Little Friarbird. Fantastic. The first bird seen after getting 
out of my tent was Rufous-throated Honeyeater, which turned out to be the most 
common bird there. Nearby a Pied Butcherbird sung its wonderful piping call - 
my all-time favourite bird call - while a happy family of Grey-crowned Babbler 
claimed several trees as their own. And there was a very large Great 
Bowerbird's bower directly opposite our bush camping area 
(-18.30178,143.350788). 


All up we spent several days at Cumberland Dam, once on the way through to 
Karumba, and once on the way back to Cairns. In terms of seeing finches, we 
found that the most productive dam - in terms of birds coming in for their 
morning drink - was not the main dam but the smaller dam immediately to the 
west (-18.29905,143.349211) - sometimes called West Cumberland Dam. At this dam 
several mid-sized shrubs acted as a protective vantage point for the finches 
and honeyeaters to roost upon just before coming down to drink. The finches 
would land on the ground on the north-east side of the dam, feed on grass 
seeds, then fly to the shrubs in preparation for drinking. At one point we had 
six species of finch roosting in these over-hanging shrubs - Zebra, 
Double-barred, Black-throated, Masked and Plum-headed Finch and 
Chestnut-breasted Mannikin! Does it get any better than that! Well possibly! 
Greg and I had our fingers crossed in the hope of seeing Gouldian Finch or 
Pictorella Mannikin. Unfortunately, on this trip, it was not to be. 


In terms of Gouldian Finch, there had actually been no sightings on Cape York 
for several years. During surveys conducted by Cairns Naturalists Club, they 
reported Gouldian Finch at the dam every year between 1974 and 1997. As far as 
I know, unfortunately they haven't been seen since. Similarly Spinifex Pigeon 
was once quite regularly, however there are now very few records. 


In terms of waterbirds, the larger dam is the place to be. At this dam there 
were Green Pygmy-Geese, Magpie Geese, Hardhead, Grey Teal, Pink-eared, Pacific 
Black and Australian Wood Duck, Intermediate and Great Egret, White-faced and 
White-necked Heron, Australasian Grebe, Little Black and Little Pied Cormorant, 
Australasian Darter, Australian Pelican, Black-winged Stilt, Red-kneed and 
Black-fronted Dotterel (there's at least one at every dam or waterhole in the 
outback) and Comb-crested Jacana. Now that's a pretty good list of waterbirds. 
Interestingly Comb-crested Jacana seems to turn up wherever there's a spare 
lily pad, even if the lily pad is located in a dam in the middle of no-where 
and the dam's only the size a tennis court. 


Although we didn't see any, other waterbirds recorded at Cumberland Dam include 
Cotton Pygmy-Goose, Freckled Duck, Black Bittern and Australian Painted Snipe, 
so keep your eyes open. In summer, there's a good chance of seeing migratory 
waders such as Sharp-tailed and Marsh Sandpiper, Common Greenshank and Latham's 
Snipe. 


One evening a dense flock of ~200 Plumed Whistling Duck landed on the north 
side of the dam, and set up camp for the night. It's a great site to see such a 
large flock of these birds, and to hear the combined cacophony of their 
twittering whistling calls. When I was a kid an alternative name for Plumed 
Whistling Duck was Whistling Tree-Duck, so it was nice to see some of them 
roosting in the trees beside the dam. 


Aside from the waterbirds, there was a great variety of woodland species around 
the dam. We found Squatter Pigeon - always a target species for Cumberland Dam 
- in the bush on the eastern side of the larger dam, and several came into 
drink at the main dam in the evening. The Squatter Pigeon here have the red-eye 
ring of the Cape York ssp peninsulae. While other birds here included Brown 
Quail, Diamond and Peaceful Dove, Brown (Black) Treecreeper, Red-winged 
Fairy-wren, Striated Pardalote, White-throated Gerygone, Black-faced 
Woodswallow, Paperbark Flycatcher, Apostlebird, White-bellied Cuckoo-shrike and 
Australasian Bushlark. 


Woodland parrots around the dam included Pale-headed (Blue-cheeked) Rosella, 
Red-winged Parrot and Cockatiel and Budgerigar, and there was an abundance of 
Galah, giving a theatrical performance - as they do - each night when they came 
in to drink. There was a spectacular flock of Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo, 
flashing their dramatic red tail every time they took off or landed. Varied 
Lorikeet are also occasionally seen at Cumberland Dam - they have preference 
for flowering Bloodwood, particularly any with Mistletoe. This is the the 
north-east limit for this species, and they are rare here. 


Raptors recorded included Whistling and Black Kite, Nankeen Kestrel, Collared 
Sparrowhawk and Australian Hobby, and Brown and Black Falcon (seem 10 km west 
of Cumberland Dam) while other birds included Australian Bustard (they came in 
each night to drink), Black-necked Stork (same as above), Blue-winged 
Kookaburra, Red-backed, Sacred and Forest Kingfisher and Australian Pratincole. 
Mammals to look for around Cumberland Dam include Red and Eastern Grey 
Kangaroo, Common Wallaroo (Euro) and Agile Wallaby and, less commonly, Northern 
Nailtail Wallaby. 


To sum up, the birds at Cumberland Dam were simply spectacular. It was as close 
as you get to an Australian version of a Serengeti water hole experience - 
minus the Lions of course. 


Some other good birding spots near Cumberland Dam
If you're staying around the Georgetown region for a few days, there are other 
spots that you should visit. These include the Georgetown Racecourse, Durham 
Dam, Flat Creek Station and Cobbold Gorge Nature Refuge. 


Georgetown Racecourse
The Georgetown Racecourse is a another good spot for finches, most notably 
Pictorella Mannikin. A good spot to look is near the dam in the middle of the 
track (-18.299575, 143.522653), and a good time to look is mid to late 
afternoon, let's say around 4:00 pm'ish. You should also see Zebra, Masked, 
Black-throated, Double-barred Finch and Chestnut-breasted Mannikin. Other birds 
to look out for include Black-breasted Buzzard, Australian Bustard, Banded 
Lapwing, Red-backed Kingfisher, Sqautter Pigoen, Brown Quail, Dollarbird, 
Red-winged Parrot, Pale-headed Rosella, Yellow and Rufous-throated Honeyeater, 
Australasian Bushlark, Masked, White-browned and Black-faced Woodswallow, 
Grey-crowned Babbler and Varied Sittella, to name a few. 


Durham Dam
Another dam thats worth visiting in the area is Durham Dam. Access is ~7 km 
west of Georgetown, with the located about 500 m south of the Gulf Development 
Road, here -18.289531, 143.478209. There is an access gate to the dam, but you 
can walk in. Durham Dam attracts similar birds to Cumberland Dam, and is great 
for finches, for instance Gouldian Finch have been previously seen here. It 
also has the addition of Variegated Fairy-wren, representing the very 
north-east range limit for this species (look near the small channel dams near 
the road). It's worth trying to flush the odd Button-quail or two, with a 
chance of seeing Red-chested Button-quail. The dam is also a good place for 
seeing wild Dingo. 


Flat Creek Station
Flat Creek Station is a large cattle grazing property approximately 50 km from 
Georgetown (-18.523549, 143.327751). Gouldian Finch have been recorded on the 
property (with a few recent sighting), and they hold an annual finch surveys. 
The other specialty bird for the property is Spinifex Pigeon, being one of the 
few places in the region where you can reliably find then. Other woodland birds 
include Squatter Pigeon, Pale-headed Rosella, Red-winged Parrot, Red-backed 
Fairy-wren, Red-browed Pardalote, Brown (Black) Treecreeper and honeyeaters 
such as Yellow, Yellow-tinted, Rufous-throated, Brown and Blue-faced. There's a 
bird list for the Flat Creek Station available at the homestead. There's a very 
pleasant camping ground (with unpowered sites) and they also have showers with 
hot water! Bookings are essential when visiting the station (07 40 625304), web 
page http://www.flatcreekstation.com.au - and they even have a Facebook page. 


Cobbold Gorge Nature Refuge
Cobbold Gorge Nature Refuge is a 4720 hectares of sandstone escarpment and dry 
tropical savannah. A serine place, a reason to visit Cobbold Gorge is for its 
scenery as much as its birds. The landscape around the gorge is quite different 
from any other in the surrounding Georgetown area, with large expanse of deeply 
dissected sandstone on the south-west side of Robertson River. In the areas of 
sandstone Spinifex and shrubs grows in otherwise bare rock. It was once a 
relatively inaccessible area and, as a result, until recently few people knew 
of its existence. This resulted in the area remaining in a relatively natural 
state. The refuge was first established in 2009, mainly to protect a range of 
rare plant species such as the Gilbert River Ghost Gum (Corymbia glibertensis), 
Thorny Solanum (Solanum carduiforme) Hop Bush (Dodonea oxyptera), Labichea 
(Labichea brassi) and Tea Tree (Leptospermum palladium). 


Quite obviously, the reserve contains a spectacular 2 km long gorge along the 
Roberson River, with a large permanent waterhole. As you can imagine this is 
the perfect conditions for birdlife. As you'd expect, it's a good place 
waterbird, for example Black Bittern regularly occur there. Other birds you 
might see include Black-breated Buzzard, Blue-winged Kookaburra, Azure 
Kingfisger, Squatter Pigeon, Red-winged Parrot, Pale-headed Rosella, Cockatiel, 
Budgerigar, Crimson Chat, Red-browed Pardolote, Brown (Black) Treecreeper, and 
honeyaters, such as Yellow, Yellow-tinted, Rufous-throated, White-throated, 
Brown and Blue-faced Honeyeater. Because it's a wildlife corridors and 
catchment linkage and contains some nice riverine bushland, it acts a bit like 
an oasis, attracting unusual birds that you may not normally see in the region 
such as Spectacled Monarch. It's the sort of place that anything could turn up. 
With permanent water there is an abundant of native fish, such as Sooty Grunter 
(Hephaestus fuliginosus), Freshwater Long Tom (Strongylura krefftii), a fish 
that looks like Garfish, and Rifle or Archer Fish (Toxotes Cuvier), a fish 
that's famous for shooting powerful jets of water from its mouth to catch its 
prey. As a result of the abundance of fish, Cobbold Gorge has a sizable 
population of Freshwater Crocodile. 


To get there from Georgetown head 42 km south to Forsayth, then drive another 
43 km to Cobbold. At the end of the road you'll find excellent camping 
facilities and semi-self-contained ensuite cabins. 


Cumberland Dam to Normanton
From Cumberland Dam we headed to Karumba, on the way passing the famous 
Gulflander railway, a train that runs between Croydon and Normanton, or to put 
it another way (with no disrespect intended) between nowhere and nowhere. 
Unless you happen to live in nowhere, in which case it's a great railway 
service! 


In grasslands between Georgetown and Normanton, keep an eye open for Emu, 
Australian Bustard, Sarus Crane and Brolga, and birds of prey such as 
Black-breasted Buzzard, Spotted Harrier, Wedge-tailed Eagle, Black Kite, and 
Brown, Black and Peregrine Falcon. 


Normanton to Karumba
Along here we saw a pair of Sarus Crane with young as well as large numbers of 
Brolga. Both species breed in the gulf area during the wet season, before 
heading to the Atherton Tableland during the dry. Interestingly it was along 
this road that Australia's first Sarus Crane were record in 1966. Some people 
suggest that they were present in Australia for much longer that, but were 
simply overlooked due to their similarity with Brolga, and were simply 
overlooked. Along this road we also saw Australian Bustard, Black-necked Stork, 
Glossy Ibis, and Australian Pratincole - the latter found in patches of 
grassland that had recently been burnt. Keep an eye open for Square-tailed Kite 
along this section of road. 


Mutton Hole Wetlands
On the road between Karumba and Normanton you pass by the Mutton Hole Wetlands 
(9000 ha), a complex system of estuarine and freshwater wetlands. It's extends 
~30 km inland from Karumba. Part of the Southern Gulf Aggregation, during the 
wet season large areas of the wetland are covered by shallow water. Nationally 
important, it is one of the largest, most diverse and least fragmented natural 
wetland aggregations in Australia and, as a result, attracts vast numbers of 
water birds. The Mutton Hole Wetlands are a breeding, feeding, moulting and 
drought refuge for Sarus Crane, Brolga, and Plumed and Wandering Whistling 
Duck, Radjah Shelduck, Magpie Geese, Pied Heron and Black-necked Stork. 
Gouldian and Star Finch also occur at the wetland. 


Between August and April it's visited by large numbers of migratory shorebirds, 
such as Marsh, Curlew, Sharp-tailed and Pectoral Sandpiper, Red and Great Knot, 
Red-necked Stint, and less common species such as Little Curlew, Oriental 
Pratincole and Oriental Plover. Surveys estimate that an average 122,000 
shorebirds visit each summer, while 23,000 birds reside there each winter. 


Note that the road to Karumba is bitumen, so access should be available year 
round. However it's always worth checking the current road conditions, 
particularly during December to February, when the water levels during the wet 
can get very high. 


KARUMBA
Karumba is located on the coastline of the Arafura Sea. Put simply, Karumba is 
an absolutely fantastic place for seeing mangrove species, and is easily one of 
the best mangrove areas in Australia. While in Karumba, we camped in the 
Karumba Point Caravan Park. During the night several Barking Owl called from 
the larger trees in the caravan park, while Agile Wallaby started to appear in 
large numbers, as if from nowhere. 


The habitat and plant's around Karumba
Karumba is surrounded by savannah grassland, meandering wetlands, savannah 
scrub and open woodlands, salt flats and coastal mangrove. Here's a bit of a 
rundown of the plants in those habitats. 


Mangrove communities line the margins of the Norman River. These are 
predominantly Grey (or White) Mangrove (Avicennia marina ssp. eucalyptifolia), 
but also Red (or Long-style Stilt) Mangrove (Rhizophora stylosa), Rib-fruited 
Yellow Mangrove (Ceriops tagal), White-flowered Black Mangrove (Lumnitzera 
racemosa), Club Mangrove (Aegialitis annulata), Blind Your Eye Mangrove 
(Excoecaria agallocha), Cedar Mangrove (Xylocarpus moluccensis), Rib-fruited 
Orange Mangrove (Bruguiera exaristata), and Black (or River) Mangrove 
(Aegiceras corniculatum). That's a lot of mangroves, and is the perfect habitat 
for mangrove bird species, such as Mangrove and White-breasted Whistler, 
Mangrove Robin, Red-headed Honeyeater, Yellow White-eye, to name a few. 
Seagrass beds (made up of two species, mainly Halodule pinifolia, but also a 
small percentage of H. ovalis) occur around the mouth of the Norman River i.e. 
near Alligator Point and the Elbow Banks. This is the spot you'll find Dugong 
and, when the water level drops, shorebirds. 


Behind the coastal fringe of mangroves you find saline clay plains. 
Periodically inundated with water, these areas are predominately un-vegetated 
except for scattered low shrubs such as Shrubby Samphire (Tecticornia 
halocnemoides), Blue Bush (Chenopodium auricomum) and Kimberley Seablite 
(Suaeda arbusculoides). There are also patchy grassy swards of Marine (or 
Coastal Rat-tail) Couch (Sporobolus virginicus) and Rice Grass (Xerochhloa 
imberbis). It's in these areas that you'll find Golden-headed and Zitting 
Cisticola (the local ssp Normani) and Tawny Grassbird. 


The riparian woodlands around Karumba are dominated by broad and narrow leaved 
Melaleuca such as Silver-crowned Paperbark (Melaleuca fluviatilis), Purpurea 
Tea Tree (M. Trichostachya), Silver Cadjeput (M. argentea), Cadjeput (M. 
leucadendra), and the Broad-leaved Paperbark (M. viridiflora). While other 
species of tree include River Red Gum (Eucalyptus camaldulensis), River She-oak 
(Casuarina cunninghamiana), Pandanus Palm (Pandanus spiralis), Northern Swamp 
Mahogany (Lophostemon grandiflorus). There's a range of Terminalia species such 
as Bendee (Terminalia bursarina), Yellowwood (T. Oblongata), and Durin or Pear 
Tree (T. platyphylla). Frequently the riparian woodlands includes some 
rainforest elements, where you might find Leichhardt Tree (Nauclea orientalis), 
Cathormium Tree (Cathormium umbellatum), Sweet Sandpaper Fig (Ficus opposita) 
and Cluster Fig Tree (Ficus racemosa). The dry woodlands around Karumba are 
dominated by Red Bloodwood (Corymbia erythrophloia), Gutta-percha (Excoecaria 
parvifolia), Coolabah (Eucalyptus microtheca) and Beef Oak (Grevillea striata). 


Karumba's birds
From a birdwatching perspective, when in Karumba I think there are a few 
essential thing to do. These are listed below. 


The Ferryman and the Norman River
Firstly it is essential to do a boat trip with Ferryman River Cruises. 
Generally the boat leaves at 9:00 am (during the dry) from the boat ramp in the 
centre of town - although make sure you book the night before. From the boat we 
saw Red-headed Honeyeater (they like flowering mangroves), White-breasted and 
Mangrove Golden Whistler, Mangrove Robin, Mangrove Grey and Arafura Fantail, 
Broad-billed and Paperbark Flycatcher, Little Bronze-Cuckoo, and Mangrove 
Gerygone! Now that's a bird list that rivals any of the great birding boat 
trips in Australia! 


On the water and on the river banks we saw Black-necked Stork, Brahminy Kite, 
White-bellied Sea-Eagle and waders such as Terek and Common Sandpiper, 
Whimbrel, Eastern Curlew, and Greater and Lesser Sand Plover, Beach 
Stone-curlew and Little Tern! We also travelled out of the mouth of the Norman 
River, where Alligator Point and Elbow Banks were both great for waders at low 
tide. Birds seen include Lesser and Greater Sand Plover, Grey and Pacific 
Golden Plover, Curlew and Sharp-tailed Sandpiper, Red-necked Stint, Eastern 
Curlew and Whimbrel. 


Mangrove and salt flats just north of Karumba
Secondly, it's important to take a walk in the mangroves and tidal salt flats 
north of the town - access near the intersection of Norman and Carron Street 
(-17.437961, 140.857318). White-breasted Whistler, Yellow White-eye, Mangrove 
Robin and Mangrove Gerygone inhabited the head-high mangrove clumps. As with 
most mangrove birds, 'pishing' is a very effective way to attract them. Other 
birds seen here included Broad-billed and Paperbark Flycatcher, Mangrove and 
Arafura Grey Fantail, Rufous Whistler, Little Bronze-Cuckoo and honeyeaters 
such as Rufous-throated, Red-headed and Yellow (western-most limit) Honeyeater. 


In the scattered salt flats grasslands between the mangroves we found Tawny 
Grassbird, Variegated Fairy-wren, Golden-headed and Zitting Cisticola (race 
Normani). Zitting Cisticola are often confused with their more common cousin 
Golden headed Cisticola - the former is distinguished by the lack of golden 
colouring on the head and rump, tends to be paler underneath, are more heavily 
streaked on top and, during breeding, have a heavy white edge to the tail 
feathers. Other places to look for Zitting Cisticola are the grasslands around 
the airport and along cemetery road. 


The Sunset Tavern and the Norman River mudflats
Thirdly: you have to have a few quiet beers at the Sunset Tavern in Karumba. 
This is not only because it has a spectacular view the sun setting over the 
Arafura Sea, but it's also located in front of mudflats that attracts large 
numbers of waders! So you can drink beer and play wader-watching pub-games at 
the same time i.e. spot the Broad-billed Sandpiper. Everybody is happy! 


During the dry season, 30 to 40 metres of mud-bank are be exposed along the 
Norman Rivers during low tide. Hence the large number of waders. Aside from 
Broad-billed Sandpiper, we also saw Lesser and Greater Sand Plover, Grey and 
Pacific Golden Plover, Common, Curlew and Sharp-tailed Sandpiper, Red-necked 
Stint, Eastern Curlew, Whimbrel and Grey-tailed Tattler. We also got the 
feeling that anything could turn up. Australia's first Spoon-billed Sandpiper 
perhaps?! 


Note: an alternative to eating at the pub is to buy a Barra Burger (yep, a 
hamburger made with Barramundi) from the local fish and chip shop. They're 
pretty damn good! 


Star Finch!
Last, but definitely not least, it is important to search for Star Finch at 
small dam immediately to the north of the intersection of Karumba Point Road 
(Col Kitching Drive) and the Karumba Development Road (-17.457325,140.860299). 
Here, in a small bush beside the dam, Greg and I saw a mixed flock of over 100 
finches. That flock included Star, Double-barred and Zebra Finch and 
Chestnut-breasted Mannikin. Now that's a good mixed-finch flock! 


If you have time, other spots worth visiting in Karumba are the grasslands near 
the airport, the areas opposite the caravan park, the area opposite the Karumba 
Health Centre (on Walker Street) and, of course, what birding trip would be 
complete without a trip to the rubbish tip - another good place to look for 
Star Finch. 


Karumba's other wildlife
Just out of interest, mammals in the general area include macropods such as Red 
Kangaroo, Agile Wallaby, Common Wallaroo, and Northern Nail-tail Wallaby and 
there's a chance of seeing the spectacular Spectacled Hare-wallaby. Other 
mammals include Short-beaked Echidna, Common Water Rat and Long-haired Rat. 


The coastal waters around Karumba is a good spot for sea turtles. Green, 
Loggerhead, Flatback, Hawksbill and Olive Ridley Turtle are all found in the 
Arafura Sea. While dolphins in the area include the spectacular Irrawaddy River 
Dolphin (a species that's genetically closely related to the Killer Whale) as 
well as Indo-Pacific Humpback and Bottlenose Dolphin. Dugong are regularly seen 
in aerial surveys of the Norman River, and their feeding trails travel through 
local seagrass beds. 


Fruit bats include Black and Little Red Flying Fox and there are chance of 
Dagger-toothed Long-nosed Fruit Bat (now that's a good name). There's a nice 
selection of smaller bats, with a possibility of finding Large-footed Myotis, 
Hoary Wattled, Lesser Long-eared, Northern Broad-nosed, Beccari's Free-tailed, 
Dusky Leaf-nosed, Little Broad-nosed, and Yellow-bellied Sheath-tailed Bat. 


Of course the saltwater tidal estuaries are the perfect habitat of Estuarine 
(Saltwater) Crocodile. Freshwater Crocodile are also found in the freshwater 
lagoons, such as the Mutton Hole Wetland, with substantial breeding area just 
upstream of Normanton. Other reptiles to look for include Merton's Water 
Monitor, Black-headed Python (a snake eating python), both Eastern Brown and 
Western Brown Snake, as well as several species of Whip and File Snake. 


Amphibians are well represented: you might see Green Tree, Ornate Burrowing, 
Marbled, Dahls Aquatic, Desert Tree, Green Reed, Roths Tree, Bumpy Rocket and 
Giant Frog, Northern Spadefoot Toad and, unfortunately, the introduced Cane 
Toad. 


Summing up
From Karumba, we headed back to Cumberland Dam, to break up the trip back to 
Cairns. I know others have continued along the Savannah Way to the Mt Isa 
region then further afield. Indeed, one day I want to drive the entire length 
of the Savannah Way, non-stop birding from Cairns to Broome. Now that would be 
a great trip! 


The birds of the trip for me were White-breasted Whistler, Red-headed, 
Yellow-tinted and Rufous-throated Honeyeater and, of course, the finches, which 
included Star Finch. For a birdwatcher from Victoria, these species are all 
very exotic. The dawn chorus and the morning at Cumberland Dam, and the 
mangrove birds at Karumba, are two reasons why birders travel vast distances 
just to see and hear new birds. The birds at Cumberland Dam and Karumba, were 
like one of the sunsets at the Sunset Tavern in Karumba. Spectacular. 


Cheers,

Tim Dolby





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Subject: Re: Little Ringed Plover at Nairns
From: Kev Lobotomi <kevlobotomi AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 13:45:38 +1100
Where is Nairns?

--- Original Message ---

From: "John Graff" 
Sent: 29 October 2014 12:50 PM
To: birdswa AT googlegroups.com, "Birding-Aus" 
Subject: [Birding-Aus] Little Ringed Plover at Nairns

Hi all,

Craig Lester has photographed a Little Ringed Plover at Nairns this morning

Cheers,
John



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Subject: Re: Little Ringed Plover at Nairns
From: John Tongue <jspk AT iprimus.com.au>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 13:37:40 +1100
Hi all,
Sorry to show my ignorance, but where is Nairns?

Cheers,
John Tongue
Devonport, Tas.


On 29/10/2014, at 12:50 PM, John Graff  wrote:

> Hi all,
> 
> Craig Lester has photographed a Little Ringed Plover at Nairns this morning
> 
> Cheers,
> John 
> 		 	   		  
> 
>
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Subject: Re: Little Ringed Plover at Nairns
From: "Alan Gillanders" <alan AT alanswildlifetours.com.au>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 12:39:25 +1000
John,
Where is Nairns? Could it possibly be Cairns as I am off there soon. Any 
chance yu could send a text to my mobile 0408 953 786 with information and 
or contact details for Craig?
REgards,
Alan



Alan's Wildlife Tours
2 Mather Road
Yungaburra 4884

Phone 07 4095 3784
Mobile 0408 953 786
http://www.alanswildlifetours.com.au/
-----Original Message----- 
From: John Graff
Sent: Wednesday, October 29, 2014 11:50 AM
To: birdswa AT googlegroups.com ; Birding-Aus
Subject: [Birding-Aus] Little Ringed Plover at Nairns

Hi all,

Craig Lester has photographed a Little Ringed Plover at Nairns this morning

Cheers,
John



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Subject: Re: FW: Warblr: an app that recognises birds from their song
From: Carl Clifford <carlsclifford AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 12:55:40 +1100
I have just visited the Warblr web site and watched the video. The project is 
kosher (one of the founders has been given a 5 year Fellowship by Queen Mary 
University of London for the project). 


Warblr is designed to recognise calls AND songs. So far the system can 
recognise some 80 spp. 


It is a brilliant project and I recommend that birders help financially even 
$5-10 would help. The project may sound a bit pie in the sky, but how many of 
you would have imagined being able to have multiple field guides in a device 
the size of an iPhone 15-20 years ago? 


Carl Clifford


> On 29 Oct 2014, at 12:22, Peter Shute  wrote:
> 
> Nikolas, it says "Warblr is an audio recognition mobile app that identifies 
bird songs and calls", so perhaps the subject line assumes people won't make 
that distinction. 

> 
> Peter Shute
> 
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Nikolas Haass [mailto:n.haass1 AT uq.edu.au] 
>> Sent: Wednesday, 29 October 2014 9:13 AM
>> To: Peter Shute; birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
>> Subject: Re: [Birding-Aus] FW: Warblr: an app that recognises 
>> birds from their song
>> 
>> Hi Peter,
>> 
>> It appears to be about bird songs, not calls in general. A 
>> song is a very specialised subtype of the many call types 
>> (flight call, alarm call, contact call, advertisement callŠ 
>> just to name a few). As I rarely hear people talk about all 
>> these call types, I suggest for convenience to talk about 
>> 'song' versus 'calls'.
>> 
>> Cheers,
>> 
>> Nikolas
>> 
>> 
>> Nikolas Haass | MD, PhD, FACD
>> Associate Professor; Head, Experimental Melanoma Therapy 
>> Group President of the Australasian Society of Dermatology 
>> Research (ASDR)
>> 
>> The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute Level 6 | 
>> Translational Research Institute | 37 Kent Street | 
>> Woolloongabba QLD 4102
>> 
>> T: +61 (0)7 3443 7087 | M: +61 (0)424 603 579
>> F: +61 (0)7 3443 6966
>> E:  n.haass1 AT uq.edu.au | W: www.di.uq.edu.au 
>> ; 
>> http://www.di.uq.edu.au/associate-professor-nikolas-haass;
>> http://www.medfac.usyd.edu.au/people/academics/profiles/nhaass.php;
>> http://asdr.org.au/
>> 
>> 
>> ...Turning scientific discoveries into better treatmentsŠ
>> 
>> CRICOS Code 00025B
>> 
>> This email is intended solely for the addressee. It may 
>> contain private or confidential information. If you are not 
>> the intended addressee, you must take no action based on it, 
>> nor show a copy to anyone. Kindly notify the sender by reply 
>> email. Opinions and information in this email which do not 
>> relate to the official business of The University of 
>> Queensland shall be understood as neither given nor endorsed 
>> by the University
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>>> On 29/10/14 7:04 AM, "Peter Shute"  wrote:
>>> 
>>> After the recent discussion here about automatic recognition of bird 
>>> calls, some of you might be interested to follow this up.
>>> 
>>> I've got no idea if it's really feasible, or if they'd ever
>> get around 
>>> to doing any Australain species anyway.
>>> 
>>> Peter Shute
>>> 
>>> -----Original Message-----
>>> From: bounce-118311262-25344097 AT list.cornell.edu
>>> [mailto:bounce-118311262-25344097 AT list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Dan 
>>> Stowell
>>> Sent: Wednesday, 29 October 2014 2:31 AM
>>> To: bioacoustics-l AT cornell.edu
>>> Subject: Warblr: an app that recognises birds from their song
>>> 
>>> Dear all,
>>> 
>>> We've just launched a Kickstarter project, for a mobile app to 
>>> recognise birds. It's based on the research we published
>> earlier this 
>>> year.* As well as getting the technology into people's
>> hands, our hope 
>>> is to collect data that could be useful for conservation
>> monitoring and 
>>> for future research. Please help to spread the word if you can:
>>> 
>>> https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1190241008/warblr-an-app
> -that-reco
>>> gni
>>> ses-birds-from-their-son
>>> 
>>> Best
>>> Dan
>>> 
>>> --
>>> Dan Stowell
>>> EPSRC Research Fellow
>>> Centre for Digital Music
>>> Queen Mary, University of London
>>> Mile End Road, London E1 4NS
>>> http://www.mcld.co.uk/research/
>>> 
>>> * https://peerj.com/articles/488
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>>
Birding-Aus mailing list >>>
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >>>
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>>> http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >>> >
>
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Subject: Port Stephens pelagic this Sunday (2nd Nov) - vacancy
From: Mick Roderick <mickhhb AT yahoo.com.au>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 18:56:14 -0700
Hi all,

I have one vacancy for this Sunday's Port Stephens pelagic. November is a very 
reliable month for Black Petrel (we had 6 of them on the Nov 2012 trip + a 
Cook's Petrel). Contact me off-list if you're interested. More info at the link 
below. 


Southern Oceans Seabird Study Association Inc. (SOSSA) - Port Stephen's Pelagic 
Trips 


 
 
 
 
 
 
Southern Oceans Seabird Study Association Inc. (SOSSA) - Port Stephen's Pelagic 
Trips 

trips boat pelagic spray argonaut mick time hours bring port  
View on www.sossa-international.org Preview by Yahoo  
 

Mick 


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Subject: Little Ringed Plover at Nairns
From: John Graff <jgraff2 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 09:50:27 +0800
Hi all,
 
Craig Lester has photographed a Little Ringed Plover at Nairns this morning
 
Cheers,
John 
 		 	   		  


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Subject: Invasive Species Council
From: Carl Clifford <carlsclifford AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 12:42:39 +1100
I have just visited the Invasive Species Council's web page, and I am surprised 
at the amount of work they are doing. I would encourage any Australian birder 
to support their work, either morally or finacially. Donate to them now before 
the Feds stop you claiming it on your tax. 


Carl Clifford




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Subject: Re: Exotics, their importation and naturalisation
From: Denise Goodfellow <goodfellow AT bigpond.com.au>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 11:06:37 +0930
Ive liked the ISC page.  

Denise
Denise Lawungkurr  Goodfellow
PO Box 71
Darwin River, NT, Australia 0841

PhD candidate, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW.

Founding Member: Ecotourism Australia
Founding Member: Australian Federation of Graduate Women Northern Territory
043 8650 835









On 29 Oct 2014, at 10:31 am, Carl Clifford  wrote:

> Well said Alan.
> 
> Carl Clifford
> 
> 
>> On 29 Oct 2014, at 10:13, Alan Gillanders  
wrote: 

>> 
>> Greetings,
>> Following on from two recent threads:
>> Carl wrote, Personally, I would ban the keeping of all exotic bird species, 
but, unfortunately, that would be impossible. 

>> 
>> That might be impossible but it should not be impossible to prevent the 
importation of more species or other forms of species which are already a 
problem. A list of allowed species for all life forms would be a great idea. 
Anything else is banned. Any application for importation needs a risk 
assessment provided by the proponent with the right to challenge it extended to 
anyone in the community with an interest. A bond of considerable size should be 
added in most cases too and held for a minimum of 10 years. 

>> 
>> If you feel like me you might consider supporting the Invasive Species 
Council http://invasives.org.au/ , an organisation whose proactive work has 
lead to protocols being established for pests and potential pests. Though 
without political will these are not always followed. Take Myrtle Rust for 
example ... 

>> 
>> Regards,
>> Alan
>> 
>> Alan's Wildlife Tours
>> 2 Mather Road
>> Yungaburra 4884
>> 
>> Phone 07 4095 3784
>> Mobile 0408 953 786
>> http://www.alanswildlifetours.com.au/
>> 
>>
Birding-Aus mailing list >>
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >>
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >>
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >> > >
>
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Subject: Re: FW: Warblr: an app that recognises birds from their song
From: Peter Shute <pshute AT nuw.org.au>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 12:22:19 +1100
Nikolas, it says "Warblr is an audio recognition mobile app that identifies 
bird songs and calls", so perhaps the subject line assumes people won't make 
that distinction. 


Peter Shute

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Nikolas Haass [mailto:n.haass1 AT uq.edu.au] 
> Sent: Wednesday, 29 October 2014 9:13 AM
> To: Peter Shute; birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
> Subject: Re: [Birding-Aus] FW: Warblr: an app that recognises 
> birds from their song
> 
> Hi Peter,
> 
> It appears to be about bird songs, not calls in general. A 
> song is a very specialised subtype of the many call types 
> (flight call, alarm call, contact call, advertisement call 
> just to name a few). As I rarely hear people talk about all 
> these call types, I suggest for convenience to talk about 
> 'song' versus 'calls'.
> 
> Cheers,
> 
> Nikolas
> 
>  
> Nikolas Haass | MD, PhD, FACD
> Associate Professor; Head, Experimental Melanoma Therapy 
> Group President of the Australasian Society of Dermatology 
> Research (ASDR)
>  
> The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute Level 6 | 
> Translational Research Institute | 37 Kent Street | 
> Woolloongabba QLD 4102
>  
> T: +61 (0)7 3443 7087 | M: +61 (0)424 603 579
> F: +61 (0)7 3443 6966
> E:  n.haass1 AT uq.edu.au | W: www.di.uq.edu.au 
> ; 
> http://www.di.uq.edu.au/associate-professor-nikolas-haass;
> http://www.medfac.usyd.edu.au/people/academics/profiles/nhaass.php;
> http://asdr.org.au/
>  
>  
> ...Turning scientific discoveries into better treatments
>  
> CRICOS Code 00025B
>  
> This email is intended solely for the addressee. It may 
> contain private or confidential information. If you are not 
> the intended addressee, you must take no action based on it, 
> nor show a copy to anyone. Kindly notify the sender by reply 
> email. Opinions and information in this email which do not 
> relate to the official business of The University of 
> Queensland shall be understood as neither given nor endorsed 
> by the University
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> On 29/10/14 7:04 AM, "Peter Shute"  wrote:
> 
> >After the recent discussion here about automatic recognition of bird 
> >calls, some of you might be interested to follow this up.
> >
> >I've got no idea if it's really feasible, or if they'd ever 
> get around 
> >to doing any Australain species anyway.
> >
> >Peter Shute
> >
> >-----Original Message-----
> >From: bounce-118311262-25344097 AT list.cornell.edu
> >[mailto:bounce-118311262-25344097 AT list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Dan 
> >Stowell
> >Sent: Wednesday, 29 October 2014 2:31 AM
> >To: bioacoustics-l AT cornell.edu
> >Subject: Warblr: an app that recognises birds from their song
> >
> >Dear all,
> >
> >We've just launched a Kickstarter project, for a mobile app to 
> >recognise birds. It's based on the research we published 
> earlier this 
> >year.* As well as getting the technology into people's 
> hands, our hope 
> >is to collect data that could be useful for conservation 
> monitoring and 
> >for future research. Please help to spread the word if you can:
> >
> >https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1190241008/warblr-an-app
-that-reco
> >gni
> >ses-birds-from-their-son
> >
> >Best
> >Dan
> >
> >--
> >Dan Stowell
> >EPSRC Research Fellow
> >Centre for Digital Music
> >Queen Mary, University of London
> >Mile End Road, London E1 4NS
> >http://www.mcld.co.uk/research/
> >
> >* https://peerj.com/articles/488
> >
> >
> >
> >
Birding-Aus mailing list > >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org > >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: > >
> >http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > > > >

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Subject: That was a short week
From: Carl Clifford <carlsclifford AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 11:58:56 +1100
I have just received notifications from Eremaea for the week ending on the 
28th. Have the calendars changed without me noticing? 


Carl Clifford


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Subject: Re: Exotics, their importation and naturalisation
From: Carl Clifford <carlsclifford AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 12:01:05 +1100
Well said Alan.

Carl Clifford


> On 29 Oct 2014, at 10:13, Alan Gillanders  
wrote: 

> 
> Greetings,
> Following on from two recent threads:
> Carl wrote, “Personally, I would ban the keeping of all exotic bird 
species, but, unfortunately, that would be impossible.” 

> 
> That might be impossible but it should not be impossible to prevent the 
importation of more species or other forms of species which are already a 
problem. A list of allowed species for all life forms would be a great idea. 
Anything else is banned. Any application for importation needs a risk 
assessment provided by the proponent with the right to challenge it extended to 
anyone in the community with an interest. A bond of considerable size should be 
added in most cases too and held for a minimum of 10 years. 

> 
> If you feel like me you might consider supporting the Invasive Species 
Council http://invasives.org.au/ , an organisation whose proactive work has 
lead to protocols being established for pests and potential pests. Though 
without political will these are not always followed. Take Myrtle Rust for 
example ... 

> 
> Regards,
> Alan
> 
> Alan's Wildlife Tours
> 2 Mather Road
> Yungaburra 4884
> 
> Phone 07 4095 3784
> Mobile 0408 953 786
> http://www.alanswildlifetours.com.au/
> 
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
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http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >

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Subject: Re: FW: Warblr: an app that recognises birds from their song
From: Carl Clifford <carlsclifford AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 11:51:35 +1100
Hi Nikolas,

Well, it is a start to a rather daunting task. More strength to them, I say.

Carl Clifford


> On 29 Oct 2014, at 09:13, Nikolas Haass  wrote:
> 
> Hi Peter,
> 
> It appears to be about bird songs, not calls in general. A song is a very
> specialised subtype of the many call types (flight call, alarm call,
> contact call, advertisement callŠ just to name a few). As I rarely hear
> people talk about all these call types, I suggest for convenience to talk
> about 'song' versus 'calls'.
> 
> Cheers,
> 
> Nikolas
> 
> 
> Nikolas Haass | MD, PhD, FACD
> Associate Professor; Head, Experimental Melanoma Therapy Group
> President of the Australasian Society of Dermatology Research (ASDR)
> 
> The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute
> Level 6 | Translational Research Institute | 37 Kent Street |
> Woolloongabba QLD 4102
> 
> T: +61 (0)7 3443 7087 | M: +61 (0)424 603 579
> F: +61 (0)7 3443 6966
> E:  n.haass1 AT uq.edu.au | W: www.di.uq.edu.au ;
> http://www.di.uq.edu.au/associate-professor-nikolas-haass;
> http://www.medfac.usyd.edu.au/people/academics/profiles/nhaass.php;
> http://asdr.org.au/
> 
> 
> ...Turning scientific discoveries into better treatmentsŠ
> 
> CRICOS Code 00025B
> 
> This email is intended solely for the addressee. It may contain private or
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> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
>> On 29/10/14 7:04 AM, "Peter Shute"  wrote:
>> 
>> After the recent discussion here about automatic recognition of bird
>> calls, some of you might be interested to follow this up.
>> 
>> I've got no idea if it's really feasible, or if they'd ever get around to
>> doing any Australain species anyway.
>> 
>> Peter Shute
>> 
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: bounce-118311262-25344097 AT list.cornell.edu
>> [mailto:bounce-118311262-25344097 AT list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Dan
>> Stowell
>> Sent: Wednesday, 29 October 2014 2:31 AM
>> To: bioacoustics-l AT cornell.edu
>> Subject: Warblr: an app that recognises birds from their song
>> 
>> Dear all,
>> 
>> We've just launched a Kickstarter project, for a mobile app to recognise
>> birds. It's based on the research we published earlier this year.* As
>> well as getting the technology into people's hands, our hope is to
>> collect data that could be useful for conservation monitoring and for
>> future research. Please help to spread the word if you can:
>> 
>> https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1190241008/warblr-an-app-that-recogni
>> ses-birds-from-their-son
>> 
>> Best
>> Dan
>> 
>> --
>> Dan Stowell
>> EPSRC Research Fellow
>> Centre for Digital Music
>> Queen Mary, University of London
>> Mile End Road, London E1 4NS
>> http://www.mcld.co.uk/research/
>> 
>> * https://peerj.com/articles/488
>> 
>> 
>> 
>>
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Subject: Birdline Tasmania Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 29 Oct 2014 09:57:31 +1000
   Birdline Tasmania

   Published sightings for the week ending 28 Oct 2014.

   Sun 26 Oct Bar-tailed Godwit Picnic Beach, Ulverstone
   A single bird feeding along the shoreline. This is the first record I
   know of for this area in the14 years I have been resident here. It was
   busy feeding for at least an hour. It appeared to be an immature
   female.
   Hazel Britton and Alison Parks


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Subject: Birdline Western Australia Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 29 Oct 2014 09:59:14 +1000
   Birdline Western Australia

   Published sightings for the week ending 28 Oct 2014.


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Subject: Birdline Victoria Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 29 Oct 2014 09:58:07 +1000
   Birdline Victoria

   Published sightings for the week ending 28 Oct 2014.

   Sun 26 Oct Freckled Duck Eynesbury Ornamental Lake
   One Freckled Duck seen at Eynesbury ornamental lake, near Melton. Seen
   during Bird Week in Melton activities. Twelve Freckled Ducks last seen
   here in March 2014
   Daryl Akers
   Freckled Duck Ruffey Lake Doncaster
   Freckled Ducks in second small lake and Buff-banded Rail at first small
   lake. Many Noisy Miners a few Grey Butcherbirds and 2 Nankeen Night
   Heron.
   Andrew Wallis
   King Quail St Andrews Beach Mornington Peninsula
   One bird seen in backyard. Can't rule out an aviary escape - bird was
   not particularly tame.
   Nina Hutchison
   Banded Lapwing Large area of vacant land, Williams Landing
   At 1840 hours, we observed nine Banded Lapwings on the large area of
   open vacant land bounded by Palmers Road, Freya Drive, Chessington
   Drive and Williams Landing Boulevard, Williams Landing. Four of the
   birds appeared to be juvenile.
   Peter & Robyn Gibbons
   Eastern Koel Bay St & Rowan St Golden Square (Bendigo)
   One bird heard distinctly at 8am.
   Ken Dredge
   Sat 25 Oct White-throated Gerygone Private property, Earlston
   One bird seen and heard in box-ironbark woodland at Earlston. First
   local record in 20 years' observation here.
   Doug Robinson
   Common Greenfinch Trentham railway station
   At least 4-5 singing males in the vicinity of Trentham railway station
   and over towards main street; from atop oaks and cypresses. Only
   started calling in the last 2-3 days. Inexplicably invisible during
   much of the rest of the year when not singing! Very rare and patchily
   distributed in this local area.
   Lawrie Conole
   Fri 24 Oct Australian Owlet-nightjar, White-browed Woodswallow, Varied
   Sitella Rocklands State Forest--Rocklands-Cherrypool Road, Victoria
   Small family group of Sittellas were actively collecting food and
   feeding it to nestlings in tree beside road. Also at this site we saw
   White-browed Woodswallows looking at a possible nest site and an Owlet
   Nightjar out in the sun for approximately 10-15minutes. BirdLife
   Hamilton outing.
   Samantha Greiner & BirdLife Hamilton
   Sun 19 Oct Crimson Rosella St Andrews Beach Mornington Peninsula
   Unusual coloured bird, there were two birds with this colour. I was
   visiting the area so not familiar with the birds in this area. Is this
   colour form common on Mornington Peninsula?
   John Hutchison


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Subject: Birdline Australian Capital Territory Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 29 Oct 2014 09:53:11 +1000
   Birdline Australian Capital Territory

   Published sightings for the week ending 28 Oct 2014.


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Subject: Birdline South Australia Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 29 Oct 2014 09:57:11 +1000
   Birdline South Australia

   Published sightings for the week ending 28 Oct 2014.

   Tue 28 Oct Wood Sandpiper Whyalla Conservation Park
   Single bird on the small dam next to the entrance track around mid day
   Ian & Amanda Ashton


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Subject: Birdline Northern Territory Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 29 Oct 2014 09:56:51 +1000
   Birdline Northern Territory

   Published sightings for the week ending 28 Oct 2014.

   Mon 27 Oct White wagtail Lee Point
   Hi all, This morning at around 6:05 AM I saw a white wagtail at Lee
   Point. It was a very short encounter, I entered the beach at 5:55 and
   was looking at some sandplovers on the rocks near the entrance. I then
   walked further on the beach heading to Buffelo Creek for the shorebird
   count. on the right of the entrance of the beach you have a line of
   casuarina trees and I was about halfway those trees when the white
   wagtail flew towards me. It was still pretty dark because sunrise was a
   couple of minutes later. The bird flew at a height of about 5-7 metres
   in its typical undulating flight (up-down) and called with it's typical
   "dzip" every time it was at its lowest point of it's flight. tail was
   relatively long and slim. wings were pretty wide and it had a short
   head. I'm a Dutch Intern at CDU and see white wagtails (I know
   different subspec. but silhouette and sound are still the same) on a
   daily basis back home and I see them very often flying over like the
   bird did this morning. In short: I'm 100% sure it was a white wagtail.
   I don't no how often there are white wagtails in Darwin but if not, I
   hope you guys are able to find it again. Cheers
   Coen van Tuijl


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Subject: Birdline New South Wales Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 29 Oct 2014 09:54:50 +1000
   Birdline New South Wales

   Published sightings for the week ending 28 Oct 2014.

   Tue 28 Oct Caspian Tern Iron Cove, Leichhardt, inner west, Sydney
   A single Caspian Tern foraging over shallows of Iron Cove in front of
   Leichhardt Pool. Occasionally reported further west around Homebush,
   but first I've seen in many years of running around Iron Cove
   Andrew Taylor
   Grey Goshawk Streeton Lookout, Freemans Reach
   Grey Goshawk seen flying south toward river 7pm this evening
   Mike Felstead
   Sacred Kingfisher Bellevue Hill - Sydney
   Dead Sacred Kingfisher.
   Oscar Arnott
   Mon 27 Oct White-browed, Masked Woodswallows and Rose-crowned
   Fruit-doves Myall Lakes National Park--Mungo Brush
   3 mixed flocks of White-browed & Masked Woodswallows, 10-30 birds in
   each. Location is around 800 m from the beach. Also Rose-crowned
   Fruit-doves still present. [Moderator's note (NH): Interesting mix of
   dry inland and rainforest species near the beach!]
   Steve Roderick
   Black Kite Hoskinstown Plain
   Reported by a reliable neighbour. Largish raptor with a forked tail.
   Dark undersides and dark brown on top. Followed the baler for a long
   period. This is the first I have heard of for this area although a few
   are reported each year from the nearby ACT.
   Martin Butterfield
   Red Knot Deeban Spit, Port Hacking
   Red Knot foraging alone by waters edge around 1.30 in afternoon.
   Julie Keating
   Little Bronze-Cuckoo Tamarind Close, Richmond Hill, 8 km east of
   Lismore
   One Little Bronze-Cuckoo heard calling this morning. The usual 4 note
   descending call plus 2 of the trilling calls. This is the second Little
   Bronze-Cuckoo for Oct. in our garden.
   June Harris
   Sun 26 Oct White-winged Triller Hastings River Valley
   White-winged Trillers have arrived on the north coast with the dry
   weather and were present throughout the Hastings Valley during the
   Twitchathon at Forbes River, Byabarra, Rosewood Road and Fernbank Creek
   Road.
   The Ninja Pigeons (Tim, Drew and Frederik Morris)
   Pacific Baza Anchorage Caravan Park, Iluka
   Adult Pacific Baza sitting low on nest in Flooded Gum.
   Black-necked Stalkers (Greg Clancy, Gary Eggins, Russell Jago)
   Greater Sand Plover, Lesser Sand Plover, Wandering Tattler Woody Head
   rock platform, Bundjalung National Park
   c.22 Greater & 2+ Lesser Sand Plovers, 1 Wandering Tattler - all
   loafing on rocks.
   Black-necked Stalkers (Greg Clancy, Gary Eggins, Russell Jago)
   Black-chinned Honeyeater Gwydir Highway, Ramornie
   1+ Black-chinned Honeyeater heard calling.
   Black-necked Stalkers (Greg Clancy, Gary Eggins, Russell Jago)
   White-throated Needletail Truckstop on Gwydir Highway, E of Washpool
   National Park turnoff
   One White-throated Needletail flying over Highway.
   Black-necked Stalkers (Greg Clancy, Gary Eggins, Russell Jago)
   Rufous Scrub-bird, Southern Emu-wren, Scarlet Robin Surveyors Creek,
   Gibraltar Range National Park
   Rufous Scrub-bird heard calling at edge of rainforest gully, Southern
   Emu-wrens heard calling in heathland and Scarlet Robin observed in
   recently burnt area.
   Black-necked Stalkers (Greg Clancy, Gary Eggins, Russell Jago)
   White-winged Triller, Varied Sittella, Forest Kingfisher Upper
   Coldstream Road, Tyndale
   Adult male White-winged Triller and 3+ Varied Sittellas in trees and
   Forest Kingfisher heard calling near wetland.
   Black-necked Stalkers (Greg Clancy, Gary Eggins, Russell Jago)
   Buff-banded Rail, Chestnut Teal Fullers Road, The Parade Ground, near
   Ulmarra
   Buff-banded Rail feeding at water's edge near Chestnut Teal.
   Black-necked Stalkers (Greg Clancy, Gary Eggins, Russell Jago)
   White-winged Triller Washpool Road, near Four Mile Lane, Clarenza
   White-winged Triller heard singing.
   Black-necked Stalkers (Greg Clancy, Gary Eggins, Russell Jago)
   Spangled Drongo, Common Cicadabird Bellbird Gully, Gibraltar Range
   National Park
   Adult Spangled Drongo constructing nest in Brush Box. Common Cicadabird
   heard singing.
   Black-necked Stalkers (Greg Clancy, Gary Eggins, Russell Jago)
   White-browed and Masked Woodswallows Kurri Kurri Woodlands, Hunter
   Valley
   Around 30 Woodswallows, mostly White-browed.
   Hunter Home Brewers (Steve & Mick Roderick, Craig Anderson & Lucas
   Grenadier
   Square-tailed Kite St Ives
   At around midday whilst working in Richmond Ave, St. Ives, my daughter
   alerted me to a large 'hawk' flying low over the roof and tree tops. It
   was an adult Square-tailed Kite and I was lucky enough to observe it
   for a minute as it quartered the area - which is adjacent to the
   wildflower garden. Eventually to was seen off by an unlikely alliance
   of Masked Lapwings, Australian Magpies and an Australian Raven!
   Nick Billington
   Satin Bowerbird, Green Catbird, Yellow-throated Scrubwren, Topknot
   Pigeon, Black-faced Monarch Royal National Park--Werrong Track
   The Black-faced Monarchs were up the top along the road but more heard
   down the track as well as whistlers. In the section between the
   clifftop plateau and about 50 m from the (supposed) meteorite lake (dry
   at the moment) at least 5 x female-type Satin Bowerbirds feeding and
   bickering in a native fruit tree. More heard close by. The same area
   where the Topknot Pigeon was photographed the previous morning. The
   Green Catbird and Yellow-throated Scrubwren at the dry lake. Superb
   Lyrebird unusually high in a tree (I think he was eating the fruit) at
   the lake. He tried very hard to mimic some whistles I gave him and came
   down quite low to have a bit of a vocal spar with me but wasn't well
   practised which makes me think he was quite young. Lots of White-browed
   Scrubwrens and thornbills, Crimson Rosellas, two Australian
   King-Parrots and quite a few Sulphur-crested Cockatoos around lake
   area. The Cliff foliage at North end of the beach held Eastern Yellow
   Robin nest. Superb Fairywrens and some Lewin's Honeyeaters.
   White-bellied Sea-eagle seen flying out to sea and around the southern
   beach clifftop. Butcherbirds, Pied Currawongs and Laughing Kookaburras
   up near the cliff top carpark.
   Richard Hardiman
   Apostlebird, Blue-faced Honeyeater, White-winged Triller, White-thoated
   Needle-tail Nurragingy Nature Reserve
   A pair of Blue-faced Honeyeater with their two chicks were feeding near
   the pond. On the track near creek we found 3 juvs of White-winged
   Triller still fed by their parents. A pair of Apostlebirds is still
   building their nest. We saw Collared Sparrowhawk (probably male - very
   small bird) feeding on a Magpie Lark chick near the entrance to the
   reserve. 23 White-throated Needle-tails were circling over reserve.
   Ted Wnorowski
   Sat 25 Oct Hooded Robin, White-winged Triller, Horsfield's
   Bronze-Cuckoo, Dusky Woodswallow, Weebill Graman-Ashford Road, SW of
   Ashford
   Adult male Hooded Robin, adult male White-winged Triller and Dusky
   Woodswallow observed, Horsfield's Bronze-Cuckoo and Weebill heard
   calling. Jacky Winter and Musk Lorikeet also present.
   Black-necked Stalkers (Greg Clancy, Gary Eggins, Russell Jago)
   Powerful Owl, Noisy Pitta, Australian Owlet-nightjar Coachwood Picnic
   Area, Washpool National Park
   Powerful Owl heard calling to east at night. Noisy Pitta heard calling
   throughout the night. Australian Owlet-nightjar heard calling.
   Black-necked Stalkers (Greg Clancy, Gary Eggins, Russell Jago)
   Eastern Barn Owl Emmaville to Dundee Road
   Two separate Eastern Barn Owls perched on fence posts a few kilometres
   apart.
   Black-necked Stalkers (Greg Clancy, Gary Eggins, Russell Jago)
   Barking Owl, Turquoise Parrot, Southern Boobook near Strathbogie, W of
   Emmaville, Ashford-Emmaville Road
   Adult pair of Barking Owls responded to imitation of call and flew in
   for good views at 20:30 hrs. Turquoise Parrot seen at dusk (only seen
   by Russell). Southern Boobook heard calling at night.
   Black-necked Stalkers (Greg Clancy, Gary Eggins, Russell Jago)
   Australian Ringneck, Chestnut-breasted Mannikin, Pale-headed Rosella
   Reedy Creek, Warialda
   One Australian Ringneck, 4+ Pale-headed Rosellas and 5+
   Chestnut-breasted Mannikins along creek.
   Black-necked Stalkers (Greg Clancy, Gary Eggins, Russell Jago)
   Eastern Barn Owl Fossickers Way, south-east of Warialda
   Road kill Eastern Barn Owl on Fossickers Way.
   Black-necked Stalkers (Greg Clancy, Gary Eggins, Russell Jago)
   White-winged Triller Park in Glen Innes
   Female White-winged Triller in exotic trees.
   Black-necked Stalkers team (Greg Clancy, Gary Eggins, Russell Jago)
   Brolga, Latham's Snipe Chaffin Swamp, Tucabia
   Adult Brolga sitting low on nest in swamp. One Latham's Snipe foraging
   nearby. Brolga not present on October 26. Nest presumably robbed by
   predator.
   Greg Clancy & Russell Jago
   Freckled Duck, Pink-eared Duck, Blue-billed Duck, Aust. Shoveler,
   Yellow-throated Miner Gunnedah sewage treatment plant
   Freckled Duck (1), Aust. Shoveler (3+), Pink-eared Duck (100s),
   Blue-billed Duck (5+), Yellow-throated Miner (2)
   Dodgy Drongos - Max Breckenridge, Nick Livanos and Grant Brosie
   Hooded Robin, Spotted Bowerbird, White-backed Swallow Kelvin Road,
   north of the Boggabri-Manilla Road
   Absolutely firing! Heaps of White-browed, Masked and Dusky Woodswallow,
   White-backed Swallow and Rainbow Bee-eater. Hooded Robin carrying food.
   Spotted Bowerbird, Australian Koel and Yellow-throated Miner at the
   farm house. Other good birds included Southern Whiteface, Restless
   Flycatcher and Peaceful Dove.
   Dodgy Drongos - Max Breckenridge, Nick Livanos and Grant Brosie
   Turquoise Parrot, Brush Cuckoo, Black-chinned Honeyeater Borah
   Travelling Stock Reserve
   3 Turquoise Parrots and 3-5 Black-chinned Honeyeaters (the latter heard
   only). Brush Cuckoo was an unusual sighting. Unfortunately Borah has
   suffered from over grazing and dry conditions which was reflected in
   the low numbers of seed eaters. Only 2 Diamond Firetails were seen.
   Several flowering gums were filled with small honeyeaters but Little
   Lorikeets were only present in small numbers. Rainbow Bee-eaters,
   White-browed Woodswallow and Tree Martins were common.
   Dodgy Drongos - Max Breckenridge, Nick Livanos and Grant Brosie
   Thu 23 Oct Australian Hobby Brooms Head Road, Taloumbi
   Adult Australian Hobby sitting on nest previously reported.
   Greg Clancy & Russell Jago
   White-throated Nightjar W of Lake Arragan, Yuraygir National Park
   Adult White-throated Nightjar sitting on egg. Adult missing on October
   26 with feathers on ground and remains of egg in nest. Adult presumably
   killed by predator - fox or monitor? Note: observers never approached
   closely to nest. Bird photographed at distance through spotting scope.
   Greg Clancy & Russell Jago
   Latham's Snipe Wetland along Pacific Highway at Cowper
   Two Latham's Snipe flushed from water's edge.
   Greg Clancy & Russell Jago
   Tue 21 Oct Pacific Baza Pacific Highway, N of Iluka turnoff
   One Pacific Baza flew over Highway to roadside tree.
   Greg Clancy & Warren Thompson
   Swamp Harrier Yaegl Nature Reserve, Harwood
   Swamp Harrier in flight over Pacific Highway and Nature Reserve.
   Uncommon during spring and summer months on the NSW north coast. Common
   migrant in the autumn-winter.
   Greg Clancy & Warren Thompson
   Sat 18 Oct Collared Sparrowhawk Toumbaal Fire Trail, N of Sandon,
   Yuraygir National Park
   Collared Sparrowhawk in flight over fire trail (Collared Sparrowhawks
   are uncommon on the NSW north coast compared to the Brown Goshawk).
   Greg Clancy
   Fri 17 Oct Shy Heathwren,Yellow-plumed Honeyeater, Splendid Fairywren,
   Crested Bellbird,Yellow-rumped Pardalote Taleeban Mining Reserve, near
   Weethalle
   Camped overnight 17/18 October at Taleeban mallee. Highlights of 42
   species recorded were 2 Shy Heathwren, many Yellow-plumed Honeyeater,
   Splendid & Variegated Fairywrens, Spotted Pardalote (2 nesting pairs of
   yellow-rumped mallee form), Crested Bellbird, Hooded Robin,
   White-browed Woodswallow, Rainbow Bee-eater, Little Eagle, Tawny
   Frogmouth, Australian Owlet-nightjar, Horsfield's Bronze-cuckoo, Mulga
   Parrot, Yellow-throated Miner, Pied & Grey Butcherbirds,
   Chestnut-rumped, Yellow & Inland Thornbill.
   Marnix & Maurits Zwankhuizen
   Thu 16 Oct Collared Sparrowhawk East of Bellingen
   Collared Sparrowhawk in flight (Collared Sparrowhawks are uncommon on
   the NSW north coast compared to the Brown Goshawk).
   Greg Clancy, Mary & Jack Wyatt, Sue & Jerry Miller


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Subject: Birdline North Queensland Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 29 Oct 2014 09:56:14 +1000
   Birdline North Queensland

   Published sightings for the week ending 28 Oct 2014.


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Subject: Birdline Central & Southern Queensland Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 29 Oct 2014 09:53:44 +1000
   Birdline Central & Southern Queensland

   Published sightings for the week ending 28 Oct 2014.

   Mon 27 Oct Barking Owl D'Aguilar National Park--Maiala picnic ground
   Spontaneous spotlighting/reptile-spotting trip up Nebo/Glorious last
   night. One Barking Owl called at length from the trees across the main
   road at the top of Maiala picnic ground at about 10:30pm. A poor
   attempt to vocally mimic its call surprisingly brought the bird out of
   the trees and onto the powerlines, where it sat for about two seconds
   before flying down the road.
   Russell Yong, with C. Archibald & A. Rogers
   Sun 26 Oct Common Sandpiper, Red-necked Avocet Lindum Wetlands
   1 Common Sandpiper in mangroves, 3 Red-necked Avocets
   Greg Roberts
   Turquoise Parrot, White-Backed Swallow, White-Browed Babbler, Spotted
   Nightjar Sundown National Park--Broadwater Section
   Very dry and very hot. Creek only a series of shrinking waterholes.
   Conditions likely to be concentrating birds close to the creek line. Up
   to 14 White-Backed swallows mingling with welcomes, over the paddocks
   on Permanents Road. Turquoise Parrots in late afternoon in the trees
   along the creek before the cattle yards. 4 White-Browed Babblers by the
   creek near the ranger station and 1 Spotted Nightjar calling several
   times during the night.
   Jo & Matt Culican
   Tue 21 Oct Rufous Songlark Samsonvale, QLD
   Male seen displaying and singing at SW end of Lake Samsonvale in large
   open paddock.
   Derrick J. Thrasher


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Subject: Birdline Australia Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 29 Oct 2014 09:51:56 +1000
   Birdline Australia

   Published sightings for the week ending 28 Oct 2014.

   Mon 27 Oct White wagtail Lee Point
   Hi all, This morning at around 6:05 AM I saw a white wagtail at Lee
   Point. It was a very short encounter, I entered the beach at 5:55 and
   was looking at some sandplovers on the rocks near the entrance. I then
   walked further on the beach heading to Buffelo Creek for the shorebird
   count. on the right of the entrance of the beach you have a line of
   casuarina trees and I was about halfway those trees when the white
   wagtail flew towards me. It was still pretty dark because sunrise was a
   couple of minutes later. The bird flew at a height of about 5-7 metres
   in its typical undulating flight (up-down) and called with it's typical
   "dzip" every time it was at its lowest point of it's flight. tail was
   relatively long and slim. wings were pretty wide and it had a short
   head. I'm a Dutch Intern at CDU and see white wagtails (I know
   different subspec. but silhouette and sound are still the same) on a
   daily basis back home and I see them very often flying over like the
   bird did this morning. In short: I'm 100% sure it was a white wagtail.
   I don't no how often there are white wagtails in Darwin but if not, I
   hope you guys are able to find it again. Cheers
   Coen van Tuijl


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Subject: Darwin Airport Birds
From: Chris Shaw <seashore AT internode.on.net>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 09:52:42 +1030
You dont have to walk far from the Terminal at Darwin Airport to find 
interesting birds. Right beside the public car parking is a small bird rich 
woodland well worth a walk if you have a few spare minutes when visiting the 
Top End airport and waiting for your flight and Rapid Creek is only a short 
stroll further 


Blue-faced honeyeaters etc

Chris Shaw
seashore AT internode.on.net
Mobile 0409 675912

My blog - "Top Birds and Everyfing" can be found on the following link 

http://topbirdsandeveryfing.typepad.com/top-birds-everyfing/

Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity. 
Hanlon 





















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Subject: Exotics, their importation and naturalisation
From: "Alan Gillanders" <alan AT alanswildlifetours.com.au>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 09:13:06 +1000
Greetings,
Following on from two recent threads:
Carl wrote, “Personally, I would ban the keeping of all exotic bird species, 
but, unfortunately, that would be impossible.” 


That might be impossible but it should not be impossible to prevent the 
importation of more species or other forms of species which are already a 
problem. A list of allowed species for all life forms would be a great idea. 
Anything else is banned. Any application for importation needs a risk 
assessment provided by the proponent with the right to challenge it extended to 
anyone in the community with an interest. A bond of considerable size should be 
added in most cases too and held for a minimum of 10 years. 


If you feel like me you might consider supporting the Invasive Species Council 
http://invasives.org.au/ , an organisation whose proactive work has lead to 
protocols being established for pests and potential pests. Though without 
political will these are not always followed. Take Myrtle Rust for example ... 


Regards,
Alan

Alan's Wildlife Tours
2 Mather Road
Yungaburra 4884

Phone 07 4095 3784
Mobile 0408 953 786
http://www.alanswildlifetours.com.au/


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Subject: Re: FW: Warblr: an app that recognises birds from their song
From: Nikolas Haass <n.haass1 AT uq.edu.au>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 22:13:18 +0000
Hi Peter,

It appears to be about bird songs, not calls in general. A song is a very
specialised subtype of the many call types (flight call, alarm call,
contact call, advertisement call just to name a few). As I rarely hear
people talk about all these call types, I suggest for convenience to talk
about 'song' versus 'calls'.

Cheers,

Nikolas

 
Nikolas Haass | MD, PhD, FACD
Associate Professor; Head, Experimental Melanoma Therapy Group
President of the Australasian Society of Dermatology Research (ASDR)
 
The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute
Level 6 | Translational Research Institute | 37 Kent Street |
Woolloongabba QLD 4102
 
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On 29/10/14 7:04 AM, "Peter Shute"  wrote:

>After the recent discussion here about automatic recognition of bird
>calls, some of you might be interested to follow this up.
>
>I've got no idea if it's really feasible, or if they'd ever get around to
>doing any Australain species anyway.
>
>Peter Shute
>
>-----Original Message-----
>From: bounce-118311262-25344097 AT list.cornell.edu
>[mailto:bounce-118311262-25344097 AT list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Dan
>Stowell
>Sent: Wednesday, 29 October 2014 2:31 AM
>To: bioacoustics-l AT cornell.edu
>Subject: Warblr: an app that recognises birds from their song
>
>Dear all,
>
>We've just launched a Kickstarter project, for a mobile app to recognise
>birds. It's based on the research we published earlier this year.* As
>well as getting the technology into people's hands, our hope is to
>collect data that could be useful for conservation monitoring and for
>future research. Please help to spread the word if you can:
>
>https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1190241008/warblr-an-app-that-recogni
>ses-birds-from-their-son
>
>Best
>Dan
>
>--
>Dan Stowell
>EPSRC Research Fellow
>Centre for Digital Music
>Queen Mary, University of London
>Mile End Road, London E1 4NS
>http://www.mcld.co.uk/research/
>
>* https://peerj.com/articles/488
>
>
>
>
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Subject: FW: Warblr: an app that recognises birds from their song
From: Peter Shute <pshute AT nuw.org.au>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 08:04:29 +1100
After the recent discussion here about automatic recognition of bird calls, 
some of you might be interested to follow this up. 


I've got no idea if it's really feasible, or if they'd ever get around to doing 
any Australain species anyway. 


Peter Shute

-----Original Message-----
From: bounce-118311262-25344097 AT list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-118311262-25344097 AT list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Dan Stowell 

Sent: Wednesday, 29 October 2014 2:31 AM
To: bioacoustics-l AT cornell.edu
Subject: Warblr: an app that recognises birds from their song

Dear all,

We've just launched a Kickstarter project, for a mobile app to recognise birds. 
It's based on the research we published earlier this year.* As well as getting 
the technology into people's hands, our hope is to collect data that could be 
useful for conservation monitoring and for future research. Please help to 
spread the word if you can: 



https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1190241008/warblr-an-app-that-recognises-birds-from-their-son 


Best
Dan

--
Dan Stowell
EPSRC Research Fellow
Centre for Digital Music
Queen Mary, University of London
Mile End Road, London E1 4NS
http://www.mcld.co.uk/research/

* https://peerj.com/articles/488




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Subject: Re: Sydney Fox Rescue?
From: Denise Goodfellow <goodfellow AT bigpond.com.au>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 06:15:10 +0930
And there are those (admittedly mostly European) who donated millions to the 
establishment of Franz Webers Bonrook Station, Pine Creek, NT. This refuge for 
wild horses, set up in Hooded Parrot territory, was advertised as an ecotour" 
resort. 


Denise Lawungkurr  Goodfellow
PO Box 71
Darwin River, NT, Australia 0841

PhD candidate, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW.

Founding Member: Ecotourism Australia
Founding Member: Australian Federation of Graduate Women Northern Territory
043 8650 835









On 28 Oct 2014, at 8:01 pm, Julian Bielewicz  wrote:

> Greetings Anthea, et al
> 
> And what about all those people who see the fox as a "beautiful animal" but 
are well aware that it s not a native? Akin to many European Australians going 
around the ridges? 

> 
> Cheers
> 
> Julian
> 
>  AT osprey00
> www.birdingsouthburnett.com 
> 
> 
>
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Subject: White-headed Pigeons
From: "Julian Bielewicz" <osprey AT bordernet.com.au>
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2014 04:27:09 +1000
Greetings Folks

Following a comparative drought [one bird on 16.10] yesterday, returning from 
school, saw six White-headed Pigeons all foraging on side of D’Aguilar 
Highway near old church in Blackbutt . 


Cheers

Julian

“osprey00
www.birdingsouthburnett.com


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Subject: Writing about Pauline Reilly
From: Wenfei Tong <wt249 AT cam.ac.uk>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 10:35:25 -0500
Hello, 

I am writing a book about women scientists, and would like to concentrate 
especially on female naturalists, as I am a keen birder and biologist myself. 
Pauline Reilly seems remarkable, and I would love to include her in the book, 
but I cant seem to find much about her as a person. If you knew her, worked 
with her or birded with her, and would be willing to share some anecdotes and 
insights, please do email me. 


Many thanks in advance,
Wenfei


Dr. Wenfei Tong

Department of Zoology
University of Cambridge
Downing Street 
Cambridge
CB2 3EJ 
U.K.

Work: +44 (0) 1223 767130
Mob: +44 (0) 7507 105169
 
wt249 AT cam.ac.uk

http://darwinsjackal.blogspot.com/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/wenfeitong/sets/




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Subject: Eaglehawk Pelagic Trip Report - 18/10/2014
From: Paul Brooks <theleadboots AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 21:58:59 +1100
Participants:

Rob Armstrong, Sue Armstrong, Chris Darby, Maureen Davey, Karen Dick, Rob
Hamilton, Liz Hynes, Mona Loofs-Samorzewski, Jeremy O’Wheel, Glen Pacey,
Els Wakefield, John Weigel and Paul Brooks (organiser and report compiler).



Conditions:

Conditions were fairly calm inshore with little breeze or sea to speak of;
the swell was below 1 metre for most of the day.  Seas began to rise as we
rounded the Hippolyte and the wind picked up.  On our way to the shelf, the
northerly kicked in and had us pitching about on choppy seas of 1.5
metres.  As we crossed the shelf, the wind picked up to around 20 knots
with seas over 2 metres.  The northerly dropped to around 15 knots at
around 1000 hrs but picked up again before midday and only got stronger,
until winds were 30-35 knots at our final berley stop; the ride home was a
slow and bumpy affair.  It was a mainly fine day, partly cloudy but cold.
Water temperature was 13.6 deg C inshore, rising to 14 deg C over the shelf
break and beyond.



Activity:

Left Pirates Bay at 0705 hrs and headed southeast to circumnavigate the
Hippolytes at 0805 hrs.  Headed east to berley over 180 fathoms at 0905
hrs, drifting south-southeast to around 230 fathoms.  At 1050 hrs we headed
east to berley over 500 fathoms, drifting south for an hour, before heading
back up the slick.  After reaching the beginning of the slick, we
immediately motored back inside the shelf to 70 fathoms and berleyed for 15
mins before heading back to port, docking at 1455 hrs.



Mammals:

c. 10 fur seals on Hippolyte Rock.



Birds (IOC v 4.2 – max at one time in brackets):



Antipodean Albatross: 3 (1) 1 at the first berley point; a very similar (or
the same) bird appeared at the second berley point. 1 adult male Gibson’s
at the second berley point and  1 at the 3rd berley point.  One other
Wandering-type seen in the distance while motoring between the first and
seconds stops.



Southern Royal Albatross: 3 (1) 1 adult at the first berley point; 1 adult
and 1 juvenile at the second berley point.



NORTHERN ROYAL ALBATROSS: 1 at the first berley point.



Black-browed Albatross: 6 (2) 1 juvenile offshore in the morning; a
sub-adult at the first berley point; 2 juveniles and a sub-adult at the
second berley point; 1 juvenile at the 3rd berley point.



Campbell Albatross: 5 (2) An adult and a sub-adult at the first berley
point; an adult and 2 sub-adults at the second berley point.



Shy Albatross: c. 80 (22) Just 1 bird inshore in the morning; 16 on the way
to the shelf; remainder pelagic.



SALVIN’S ALBATROSS: 2 (1) 1 adult and 1 sub-adult at the first berley point.



Southern Giant Petrel: 1 offshore in the morning.



Northern Giant Petrel: 12 (5) 1 offshore in the morning; 3 at the first
berley stop; 5 immatures and 1 adult at the second berley stop; 2 at the
third berley stop.



Cape Petrel: 3 (3) Probably the same 3 birds following us around all day; 2
nominate, 1 *australe*.  The *australe* bird approached just inside the
shelf  break, the other 2 joined us later.



ANTARCTIC PRION: 1 What was likely the same bird made a few moderately
close approaches at the first berley point.  ID confirmed from photos.



Fairy Prion: 11 (3) All pelagic.



Great-winged Petrel: 10 (2) 1 offshore in the morning, the remainder
pelagic.  All race *gouldi*.



White-headed Petrel: 7 (2) 2 offshore in the morning, remainder pelagic.



White-chinned Petrel: c. 30 (11) 5 offshore in the morning, c. 20 in
pelagic waters, many of which followed the boat between stops.



Sooty Shearwater: 1 Pelagic.



Short-tailed Shearwater: c. 8000 (c. 500) Omnipresent in all waters; most
abundant just offshore where large rafts occurred.



Wilson’s Storm Petrel: 9 (5) Pelagic.



Grey-backed Storm Petrel: 8 (4)



White-faced Storm Petrel: 1 Pelagic.



Black-faced Cormorant: c.315 Mainly on the Hippolytes.



Australasian Gannet: 13 (12) Mainly on the Hippolytes.



Sooty Oystercatcher: 1 On a rock shelf just outside Prates Bay in the
morning.



Silver Gull: c. 70 Mainly on the Hippolyte.



Pacific Gull: 4 (2) 2 inshore, 2 on the Hippolyte.





Kelp Gull: c. 220 (c. 30) Inshore and on the Hippolyte.



Greater Crested Tern: 30 (5) 1 inshore in the morning; 7 offshore in the
morning; remainder pelagic.



Skua Sp.: A Brown Skua-type bird seen well west of the boat on our first
drift.  Didn’t approach closely enough to make a positive ID.



Welcome Swallow: 1 at the Hippolyte.



PB


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Subject: Re: Sydney Fox Rescue?
From: "Julian Bielewicz" <osprey AT bordernet.com.au>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 20:31:58 +1000
Greetings Anthea, et al

And what about all those people who see the fox as a "beautiful animal" but 
are well aware that it s not a native?  Akin to many European Australians 
going around the ridges?

Cheers

Julian

 AT osprey00
www.birdingsouthburnett.com 




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Subject: Re: Sydney Fox Rescue?
From: brian fleming <flambeau AT labyrinth.net.au>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 16:43:36 +1100
On 28/10/2014 3:15 PM, Greg and Val Clancy wrote:
> The problem is that by rescuing foxes instead of humanely euthanizing 
> them we run the risk of changing people's attitudes to the point where 
> there will be a call for the cute and cuddly fox to be protected, like 
> the feral horse issue when we call them (romantically) brumbies.  I 
> like horses but not as feral animals damaging delicate ecosystems.  
> Similarly the various deer species that people think are cute are a 
> problem.  They may well be cute but they are doing much damage in our 
> parks and reserves.
The Ornithological Congress in Christchurch NZ had an evening barbecue 
at a deer farm.

Father returned with plate of hamburgers, to wife and waiting small 
daughter. "Don't tell her they're Bambi".

They have been Bambiburgers ever since.

Brian Fleming



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