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Updated on Sunday, December 21 at 08:13 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Hooded Wheatear,©Jan Wilczur

22 Dec RFI: egrets in Victoria/SE Australia []
22 Dec Birdline Australian Capital Territory Weekly Update []
22 Dec Birdline Western Australia Weekly Update []
22 Dec Birdline Victoria Weekly Update []
22 Dec Birdline Tasmania Weekly Update []
22 Dec Birdline South Australia Weekly Update []
22 Dec Birdline Northern Territory Weekly Update []
22 Dec Birdline North Queensland Weekly Update []
22 Dec Birdline New South Wales Weekly Update []
22 Dec Birdline Central & Southern Queensland Weekly Update []
22 Dec Birdline Australia Weekly Update []
22 Dec Birdpedia - Australia - Weekly Digest ["Birdpedia - Australia Info" ]
21 Dec Re: RFI New Caledonia [David Adams ]
21 Dec BirdLife Victoria - Portland Pelagic Trip Report, 11 December 2014 [Chris Lester ]
21 Dec BirdLife Victoria Portland Pelagic Trips for January 2015 (and the first six months of 2015) [Chris Lester ]
21 Dec Re: Female King-parrots in Blayney, NSW? ["Greg and Val Clancy" ]
21 Dec RFI New Caledonia [Frank O'Connor ]
21 Dec White-threaded Needletail [Nick Talbot ]
20 Dec Re: Birdlog ANZ and iPhone battery issues [Peter Shute ]
20 Dec RFI: Hobart and surrounds [Phil via Birding-Aus ]
20 Dec Female King-parrots in Blayney, NSW? ["John McLaren" ]
20 Dec Re: Birdlog ANZ and iPhone battery issues [eBird ACT ]
20 Dec SIPO still on Lord Howe [inger vandyke ]
20 Dec Re: Purple turkey [Tim Dolby ]
20 Dec Purple turkey ["Tony Russell" ]
19 Dec Re: Birdlog ANZ and iPhone battery issues [Allan Richardson ]
19 Dec Port MacDonnell Pelagics 2015 [Colin Rogers ]
19 Dec Re: Birdlog ANZ and iPhone battery issues [Peter Shute ]
19 Dec Re: Birdlog ANZ and iPhone battery issues [David Burren ]
19 Dec Re: Birdlog ANZ and iPhone battery issues [eBird ACT ]
19 Dec Re: Birdlog ANZ and iPhone battery issues [Dave Torr ]
19 Dec Re: Birdlog ANZ and iPhone battery issues [Dave Torr ]
19 Dec Birdlog ANZ and iPhone battery issues [eBird ACT ]
19 Dec Re: Film Competition ["Alan Gillanders" ]
18 Dec Film Competition ["Alan Gillanders" ]
18 Dec Western Quail-thrush [Frank O'Connor ]
18 Dec Blythes Swift on Cocos ["Mike Carter" ]
18 Dec Western Quail-thrush [Graeme Chapman ]
18 Dec Western Quail-thrush [Graeme Chapman ]
18 Dec Eaglehawk Pelagic Trip Report, 22nd November 2014 AMENDED [Paul Brooks ]
18 Dec Eaglehawk Pelagic Trip Report, 6th December 2014 [Paul Brooks ]
17 Dec Re: Western Quail-thrush []
17 Dec Re: Western Quail-thrush [John Tongue ]
17 Dec Western Quail-thrush [Patrick Scully ]
17 Dec Pauline Reilly ["Rosemary Balmford" ]
17 Dec I-Pod speaker [Frank O'Connor ]
17 Dec Guide to India/Nepal,, ["Paul Doyle" ]
17 Dec Scaly- Breasted up close and personal ["Chris Lloyd" ]
16 Dec WTNT's on the GC [Cliff Booth ]
17 Dec Re: On the subject of birding tour costs [Dave Torr ]
17 Dec Re: On the subject of birding tour costs ["Alan Gillanders" ]
17 Dec Re: I-Pod speaker [Paul Taylor ]
16 Dec Re: I-Pod speaker [Peter Shute ]
16 Dec Re: On the subject of birding tour costs [Dave Torr ]
16 Dec Ruff Knights WA Twitchathon summary [Bruce Greatwich ]
16 Dec Re: WA Twitchathon preliminary results [Mark Newman ]
16 Dec Re: a BIG day out of Cairns yesterday!! [martin cachard ]
16 Dec White-throated Needletails over Kobble Creek, SEQ [Marie Tarrant ]
16 Dec Re: On the subject of birding tour costs [Steve Clark ]
16 Dec I-Pod speaker ["Greg Roberts" ]
16 Dec Re: On the subject of birding tour costs ["Experience the Wild" ]
16 Dec Re: On the subject of birding tour costs [Janine Duffy ]
16 Dec Re: On the subject of birding tour costs [Dave Torr ]
16 Dec On the subject of birding tour costs [Janine Duffy ]
15 Dec Lunch with some Scaly-breasts ["Donald G. Kimball" ]
16 Dec Re: Storm-Petrels - Proposed split into two families [Carl Clifford ]
16 Dec Help with Bird tracking and watching in and around Melbourne for Photography [Ujjal akl ]
16 Dec Port Stephens pelagics - 2015 dates [Mick Roderick ]
16 Dec Re: off topic. Carlton football Club contacts for dying Aboriginal elder [David Clark ]
16 Dec Re: Storm-Petrels - Proposed split into two families [SEC=UNOFFICIAL] ["Perkins, Harvey" ]
16 Dec Re: Storm-Petrels - Proposed split into two families [Michael Ramsey ]
16 Dec Storm-Petrels - Proposed split into two families [Frank O'Connor ]
16 Dec off topic. Carlton football Club contacts for dying Aboriginal elder [Denise Goodfellow ]
16 Dec WA Twitchathon preliminary results [John Graff ]
16 Dec a BIG day out of Cairns yesterday!! [martin cachard ]
16 Dec An interesting avian example of Batesian mimicry [Laurie Knight ]

Subject: RFI: egrets in Victoria/SE Australia
From: Martin.OBrien AT depi.vic.gov.au
Date: Mon, 22 Dec 2014 11:44:22 +1100
A request mainly for those birdos in Victoria.

I try to keep tabs on breeding by Eastern Great, Intermediate and Little 
egrets in Victoria as part of monitoring these threatened species 
productivity at their known breeding locations.

As these species breeding sites are generally difficult to access I often 
use the presence of birds in BREEDING plumage as a pointer to where and 
how much breeding might be occurring.  To get an idea of what theses 
egrets look like in their breeding plumage, have a look at Graeme 
Chapman's website for photos.

http://www.graemechapman.com.au/library/viewphotos.php?c=710

So my request for those people who will be getting out birding in SE 
Australia over the next few months is to let me know where and when you 
see any of these egret species in breeding plumage.

Photos would be great if possible.

Thanks in anticipation.

Martin O'Brien
Melbourne




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Subject: Birdline Australian Capital Territory Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 22 Dec 2014 07:04:14 +1000
   Birdline Australian Capital Territory

   Published sightings for the week ending 21 Dec 2014.

   Sat 20 Dec Caspian Tern Lake Burley Griffin--Central Basin
   Two Caspian Terns flew east along the north shore of the central basin
   of Lake Burley Griffin at 12.25 pm.
   Martin Edvardsson
   Fri 19 Dec Little Corella Hannah Community park (Fadden)
   Roosting Site for Corellas. Number coming to roosted had grown to about
   115 or more around 8:15pm on 19/12. View video here:
   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QLSLqjIyCAg&list=UUoDMSmS5IGByojOaC3X3E
   CQ
   Ryu Callaway
   Australian White Ibis Waramanga ACT
   About 7.45 pm, a flock of white ibis circled over a timbered reserve
   immediately behind our residence, then settled for about 20 minutes in
   an old yellow box E. melliodora, amidst a roost of noisy sulphur
   crested cockatoos. 25 counted. At about 8.10 pm 22 departed in a
   north-easterly direction leaving a small number behind. First ever
   sighting of this bird in 15+ years residence in this Weston area
   suburb. By contrast, Straw necked ibis occasionally seen foraging on
   nearby grassed school yards and other open grassy areas, usually in
   cooler months.
   Doug Laing
   Channel-billed Cuckoo Bibaringa, Cotter Rd (restricted access)
   At 0815 this morning I was alerted by the unmistakable raucous call of
   a Channel-billed Cuckoo. I then observed the bird flying southeast
   towards Chapman.
   Alastair Smith


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Subject: Birdline Western Australia Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 22 Dec 2014 07:07:11 +1000
   Birdline Western Australia

   Published sightings for the week ending 21 Dec 2014.

   Sat 20 Dec Black-winged Stilt (leucistic) Lake Claremont
   A single bird in the flock of 20+ birds in the NW corner of the lake.
   Ken Glasson


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Subject: Birdline Victoria Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 22 Dec 2014 07:06:38 +1000
   Birdline Victoria

   Published sightings for the week ending 21 Dec 2014.

   Sun 21 Dec Long-billed Dowitcher Lake Tutchewop
   At around 5:30 p.m., the Long-billed Dowitcher was sleeping amongst the
   strings of Sharp-tailed Sandpipers in the southeast corner of the lake.
   Logan Lalonde
   Dollarbird Seymour River Walk
   5 Dollarbirds calling loudly from both sides of the river & in a
   paddock tree. 2 appeared to be immature, ie with dull-coloured beak &
   feet. Several Little Friarbirds seen.
   Val La May
   Sat 20 Dec Eastern Koel Eltham
   Calling from treetops beside Kerrie Crscent, 6.30 to7.15
   Danny Rogers
   Eastern Koel Royal Botanic Gardens (Melbourne)
   Koel heard calling from tall trees near the Arid Garden (started from
   around 1745).
   Jason & Jo Caruso
   Long-billed Dowitcher Lake Tutchewop
   The Long-billed Dowitcher was observed between 1000 hours and 1330
   hours on the eastern shoreline (not the north-western shoreline) of the
   lake in company with a number of Sharp-tailed Sandpipers. The bird was
   located and as reported on Thursday 18/12/2014. The bird was also
   observed at this location by Laurie and Heather (bird observers and
   photographers) for some five hours the previous day (Friday
   19/12/2014). Also present at the lake were approximately 3000 Banded
   Stilts.
   Peter Gibbons and Maarten Hulzebosch
   White-winged Black Tern Western Treatment Plant--Beach Rd Boat Ramp
   (restricted access)
   Two birds with many Whiskered Tern and one Latham's Snipe on pond near
   gate.
   Tom Tarrant, Dr David Bird (from Canada)
   Long Billed Dowitcher Lake Tutchewop
   Seen at the NW end of lake at 10 am ~ Still in breeding plumage
   Giles Daubeney
   Fri 19 Dec Grey-tailed Tattler Western Treatment Plant (Werribee)
   At high tide (11.35am) a Grey-tailed Tattler was found on rocks between
   Beach Rd and Kirk Point. Also at this location were 13 Red Knots. Other
   interesting birds were Pectoral Sandpipers, one at T Section lagoon
   pond 5 and another one on the foreshore near the bird hide (at high
   tide). 11 Pacific Golden Plovers at Kirk Point, two Arctic Jaegers
   along the foreshore, a dark and a light morph. Also, 28 Glossy Ibis at
   Walsh's lagoons (first ponds to the left if you cross Little River).
   Maarten Hulzebosch
   Arctic Jaeger Avalon Beach
   Dark-phase bird harassing Silver Gulls
   Tom Tarrant, Brett Lane
   Thu 18 Dec White-throated Nightjar Chiltern-Mt Pilot National
   Park--Honeyeater Picnic Ground
   At exactly dusk, one White-throated Nightjar came swooping in to feed
   above Cyanide Dam, and it stayed for less than 10 seconds.
   Logan Lalonde
   Long Billed Dowitcher Lake Tutchewop
   seen on Eastern side of lake in with flock of Sharp Tailed Sandpipers.
   Des Palmer
   Eastern Koel Oak Park
   Koel heard calling several times this morning. Bird was heard from our
   house but was a fair distance away. Possibly in the tall gums/pines
   along the northern or western boundary of the Northern Golf Course.
   Jason & Jo Caruso
   Wed 17 Dec Eastern Koel Ivanhoe
   Koel heard calling several times morning, evening and night both 17th
   and 18th of December. The Koel was in a suburban area but near Darebin
   Parklands. Seen briefly in flight once.
   Robin Massey
   Dollarbird Seymour
   2 Dollarbirds seen along Goulburn River Walk at 11:00 am. Also several
   Little Friarbirds.
   Warren Palmer & Warwick Remington
   Scarlet Honeyeater Silvan Reservoir Park
   3 Scarlet Honeyeaters initially heard around the Greygum-Olinda Creek
   Track junction, after about 15 minutes of searching I was eventually
   able to locate a male actively feeding in the canopy. As I headed south
   down Greygum Track (towards the Overflow Carpark) I heard a further 5
   more calling from the canopy. Also good numbers of Red-browed
   Treecreepers around at present with at least 6 heard in their usual
   area around the Greygum-Olinda Creek Track junction and an adult, with
   juvenile in tow, providing excellent views near the Overflow Carpark
   Tim Nickholds
   Tue 16 Dec Eastern Koel Viewbank
   One calling pre-dawn
   Richard Loyn
   Eastern Koel Millgrove
   One Eastern Koel heard calling 7.15am around Wonga Rd Millgrove. Not
   sighted.
   PWatson
   Magpie Goose Edithvale-Seaford Wetlands--Edithvale
   6 Magpie Geese observed from viewing platform off Edithvale Rd.
   Greg Thompson
   Terek Sandpiper (1), Lesser Sand Plover (3), Grey-tailed Tattler (4)
   Ram Island, French Island
   All waders seen today along the beach and mud flat areas on the
   southern part of French Island near Ram Island. Terek Sandpiper,
   Pacific Golden Plovers and Lesser Sand Plovers were in a restricted,
   private property area.
   James Mustafa
   Magpie Geese Williams Landing Wetland
   Observed 3 Magpie Geese from the train at 5.15pm
   Mark Helle
   Grey Goshawk (white morph) Dandenong Ranges National Park--Grants
   Picnic Ground
   Seen gliding overhead about 9.30 am causing alarm among the
   Sulphur-crested Cockatoos.
   Ian Wilson
   Song Thrush Large residential allotment in Hoppers Crossing 3029
   At 0650 hours, I observed a single Song Thrush at a bird bath in my
   rear yard. I have observed this species only occasionally in this area.
   Peter Gibbons
   Mon 15 Dec Latham's Snipe Lake Colac Bird Sanctuary
   12+ Snipe flushed from grassy verge.
   Corrie & Ian Macartney,Will Bridgeman
   Red Knot Stockyard Pt.
   At least 12 Red Knot mixed in with other waders along the spit area. No
   sign of race affinis gull-billed tern or any sand plover species.
   James Mustafa
   Sun 14 Dec Square-tailed Kite Hicks Road Echuca east
   After the completion of the Birdlife Echuca and district AGM, and with
   just a few people still present, a Square-tailed Kite arrived in the
   area, and landed in a large Red Gum right next to the house where we
   held the meeting ! Over the next 45 minutes it ate a fledgling
   bird....species unknown, had a snooze, preened and finally did another
   couple of laps of the property before heading off to the west.
   Simon Starr et al
   Eastern Koel McLean Street Maffra, Vic
   Eastern Koel heard in tree in rear of yard in Mclean Street, Maffra
   Vic. No observation. Calling late evening Sat 13 Dec and early morning
   14 Dec. Calling again evening 14 Dec, sounding like similar location.
   Sharna Cole
   Sat 13 Dec Long-billed Dowitcher Lake Tutchewop
   Present on SW side of lake near some nest boxes around midday, in warm,
   near still conditions. It flew to the east around 2pm.
   Peter Shute, Bill Stent, Russell Woodford
   Fri 12 Dec Grass Owl Myall
   Grass Owl seen again in grass swamp area.
   Eric Finder, Malcolm Eyles
   Thu 11 Dec Australian Pratincole Speed
   Single Australian Pratincole seen soaring elegantly over the Sunraysia
   Highway about a kilometre south of Speed. Light sandy brown coloured
   bird with dark black underwings and lighter belly/breast clearly
   observed from the car. It continued east across a farming property that
   had been recently ploughed. Could not relocate in despite scoping.
   James Mustafa, Clancye Milne
   Wed 10 Dec Inland Dotterel (4), Pratincole sp. (1) Neds Corner Station
   After 6 visits and over 10 nights spent out looking for Inland Dotterel
   this year, finally managed to locate some birds along Old Mail Rd
   heading out towards to Lake Wallawalla. 3 birds originally located in
   the middle of the road (almost ran over first bird) and a 4th bird
   flushed from the side of the road when out of the car. Light brown with
   dark black stripe on face and breast, slight streaking in wings and
   dumpy, fat little bodies. The dotterels all ran off the road and could
   not be located once in the salt bush area. Also of interest was a bird
   I believe to be a Pratincole species which was located in the middle of
   the road near the entrance to Murray-Sunset (heading towards Lindsay
   Island). Light brown/tawny colour with dark/black wings when it
   elegantly flew up from the road. There has been very light spiting rain
   early evening over Neds Corner - I wonder if this has inspired the
   activity from the birds?
   James Mustafa
   Tue 9 Dec Little Button-quail, Red-chested Buttonquail, Stubble Quail
   Terrick Terrick National Park
   Two nights at Terrick unfortunately did not reveal any Plains-wanderer
   but did provide many experiences with Little Button-quail and Stubble
   Quail. Second night included a Red-chested Buttonquail, overall darker
   bird with rufousy flanks clearly observed when flushed. Large numbers
   of White-backed Swallow and Rainbow Bee-eater also observed in site.
   James Mustafa, Clancye Milne


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Subject: Birdline Tasmania Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 22 Dec 2014 07:06:07 +1000
   Birdline Tasmania

   Published sightings for the week ending 21 Dec 2014.

   Sun 21 Dec Lewin's Rail Oyster Cove, Putalina
   Three adult Lewin's Rails including two adults with two chicks observed
   since 11th December, feeding regularly along edges of creek between
   first footbridge and creek mouth.
   Els Wakefield
   Sat 20 Dec Latham's Snipe Kettering
   Single bird - passing through back yard.
   Rose Brown
   Sun 14 Dec Australian Owlet-nightjar Shag Bay Heritage Trail
   This bird was spotted while checking a tree hollow previously used as a
   nest site by Blue-winged Parrots in December 2013.
   Anne & Graham Collins
   Sat 13 Dec Common Sandpiper Ulverstone
   A single bird is still present at 'the fish pond' on the eastern end of
   Buttons Beach.
   Rob Hamilton


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Subject: Birdline South Australia Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 22 Dec 2014 07:05:37 +1000
   Birdline South Australia

   Published sightings for the week ending 21 Dec 2014.

   Wed 17 Dec Lewin's Rail Black Swamp (Currency Creek Winery)
   6 individuals heard calling within a 50m area where the trail crosses
   the watercourse by the rail bridge.
   Thomas Jaensch
   Mon 15 Dec Banded Stilt Lake Robe Game Reserve
   500 Banded Stilt in two groups - south side and further north.
   Malcolm Cousland
   Sun 14 Dec White-necked Heron Highland Valley
   On 14/12/14 I saw a White-Necked Heron flying southwest from a
   neighbour's dam at Highland Valley on the s.e. slopes of the Mt Lofty
   Ranges SA. I observed the bird through binoculars for about 45 seconds
   until it disappeared over a ridge. The species was clearly identified
   by its folded neck, dark back & wing plumage, white front & white spots
   on the leading edges of its wings. This is only the second sighting of
   this species I've had in 27 years here, the last being in September
   1994 after a very wet winter & before an extremely wet December.
   Currently, we're experiencing a very dry December after a very dry
   spring so I've observed the species in two weather extremes.
   Adrian Watkins


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Subject: Birdline Northern Territory Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 22 Dec 2014 07:05:28 +1000
   Birdline Northern Territory

   Published sightings for the week ending 21 Dec 2014.


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Subject: Birdline North Queensland Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 22 Dec 2014 07:05:14 +1000
   Birdline North Queensland

   Published sightings for the week ending 21 Dec 2014.

   Sun 21 Dec Buff-breasted Paradise Kingfisher Garden, West End,
   Townsville
   Bird sitting watching me have breakfast on the deck at 6am. Good views
   but gone by the time I got my camera. Only my second sighting in my
   garden (or in Townsville) in 27 odd years, the other sighting was about
   the same date as this one.
   Ed Pierce
   Sat 20 Dec White-browed Crake Bamaga: Lake Wicheura en route to East
   Coast 10 46S 142 33E 1' Cell
   One flushed from low reeds, calling when flew, to dense reed beds then
   walking along edge in scope. First sighting for the general area on
   eBird although I had heard one 6 months ago in a different location.
   Klaus Uhlenhut has recorded 3 specimens over 30 years.
   Rob Reed
   Fri 19 Dec Latham's Snipe and Large-tailed Nightjar Tyto Wetlands,
   Ingham
   Found a lone Latham's Snipe foraging at the waters edge of the first
   small dam. Then later in the evening came across a mother Large-tailed
   Nightjar and her fledgling chick. I also found another female sitting
   on two eggs. Also found was a 2-3 meter long Scrub Python.
   Andrew O'Brien
   Thu 18 Dec Pied Heron Cairns Botanical Gardens and Centenary Lakes
   One Pied Heron seen on the freshwater lake at Centenary Lakes, Cairns.
   The bird was quite tame. Fourteen Rajah Shelduck also present.
   Terry Reis
   Sun 14 Dec Rufous Owl Riverside Gardens, Douglas, Townsville
   4 Rufous Owl, mum, dad and 2 well-developed youngsters high in trees,
   riparian to Ross River.
   Ed Pierce


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Subject: Birdline New South Wales Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 22 Dec 2014 07:04:45 +1000
   Birdline New South Wales

   Published sightings for the week ending 21 Dec 2014.

   Sun 21 Dec Black Honeyeater (12), Painted Honeyeater (2), White-fronted
   Honeyeater (2), White-backed Swallow Deniliquin--southern woodlands
   Some of the standout highlights of the morning of day two on the
   Deniliquin two day Plains-wanderer trip included a nice flock of
   honeyeaters, consisting of 7 species including 12 Black and 2
   White-fronted Honeyeaters, an adult White-backed Swallow, and 2 Painted
   Honeyeaters in an undisclosed location.
   Logan Lalonde
   Red-backed Kingfisher, White-backed Swallow Eulah Creek
   Today is the day! The pair of Red-backed Kingfishers near the Bullawa
   Creek bridge, 15 km east of Narrabri, have successfully raised a brood
   of chicks and are releasing into this world a batch of
   "mini-kookaburras" (see photo). The first fledgling was out when I
   checked at 8:30 this morning and there were still calls coming from the
   nest tunnel, but I did not stick around to count how many there are in
   total. Just an aside on such an occasion: There are still some
   White-backed Swallows around, but no sign of breeding activity.
   Michael Dahlem
   Sat 20 Dec Stubble Quail Bundanoon
   A walk along Old Argyle Rd didn't produce a lot this afternoon, but I
   did hear a single Stubble Quail calling in grassy paddocks to the east
   of the road. Species 174 for town and my first record of Stubble Quail
   for the Southern Highlands.
   Lorne Johnson
   Common Tern, Grey Plover, Grey-tailed Tattler, Little Tern Boat
   Harbour, Kurnell
   High tide counts this morning at Boat Harbour, Kurnell included 90
   Common Tern, 1 Grey Plover, 1 Grey-tailed Tattler, 77 Little tern (of
   which only 4 br.), 33 Pacific Golden Plover, 199 Red-necked stint and
   19 Ruddy Turnstone.
   Bruce Roubin and Ken Gilmour
   Red-necked Avocet Namoi River, 20 km south of Narrabri
   In a permanent shallow wetland on the eastern side of the Namoi River
   (private property, no access; photo taken from roadside) 10 Red-necked
   Avocets have appeared recently (not seen there in late November).
   Michael Dahlem
   Australian Hobby, White Throated Needletail Warriewood
   This afternoon alerted by the Noisy Miner alarm calls I decided to look
   out my front door to see what was going on and as I did a Hobby flew
   over my house and above it were about 20 White Throated Needletails
   Jayden Walsh
   South Island Pied Oystercatcher Lord Howe Island
   Solo SIPO still hanging around the airport on Lord Howe Island and
   adjacent swampy area this afternoon.
   Martin Stokes
   Striated Heron Hen and Chicken Bay
   Nice to see a Striated Heron make an appearance amongst the Bar-tailed
   Godwits. Bird observed near boat ramp along Wymston Parade. No sign of
   the Red Knot that have been present recently.
   Greg McLachlan
   Pink-eared Duck Mill Stream, Botany
   2 Pink-eared Ducks feeding with a small flock of Hardheads and a hybrid
   Mallard on the Mill Stream near Foreshore Drive early this morning.
   This is my first sighting of Pink-eared Ducks here.
   Nigel Coghlan
   Eastern Curlew Deeban Spit Port Hacking
   Flock sized has increased by 3 to 21
   Julie Keating
   Fri 19 Dec Buller's Shearwater Sydney Harbour National Park--North Head
   1 Buller's Shearwater feeding with Wedge-tailed Shearwaters off north
   head this afternoon.
   michael ronan
   Thu 18 Dec White-browed Woodswallow Hunter Economic Zone (near Kurri
   Kurri)
   The White-browed Woodswallows are still in HEZ, so have been there for
   nearly 2 months now. Although I had found them nesting in early
   November (see report #220690), I could not see any direct evidence of
   successful breeding today, though I did see an adult flying off with an
   insect in its bill (and I was only there for a short time). Perhaps ~15
   birds seen. Sharing the airspace above where some of the White-broweds
   were perching was a flock of ~20 White-throated Needletails, about a
   dozen Dusky Woodswallows and Tree Martins. Several (~7 or 8)
   Black-chinned HE's present in the area too. A smattering of ironbark
   blossom has attracted flocks of Little Lorikeets. A pale Little Eagle
   seen displaying very high above the forest.
   Mick Roderick
   Pacific Swift Sandon Estuary, Yuraygir National Park
   5+ Swifts low overhead during stormy weather. Suddenly appeared and
   just as quickly disappeared. Probably a greater number but they were
   too quick to get a good count. Observers' first record of this species
   this season.
   Greg Clancy & Russell Jago
   Plumed Whistling-Duck (1) Sydney Olympic Park--Waterbird Refuge
   First record for SOP that I can find from my records. Managed some
   record shots through bins with phone. Sitting in with Grey/Chestnut
   Teal loafing on eastern corner. About 100 Red-necked Avocets. At Mason
   Park 20 Sharp-tailed and 2 Curlew Sandpipers plus 1 Red-kneed Dotterel.
   Dion Hobcroft
   Wed 17 Dec Plumed Whistling Duck, Swamp Harrier, Wood Duck Dairy Swamp,
   Central Coast Wetlands, Tuggerah
   This morning Vicki Barnes reported 40+ Plumed Whistling Ducks at the
   Dairy Swamp but by mid-afternoon, this had now risen to 78. This is the
   biggest group to visit this wetland, although there have been over 9
   previous reports. Other birds present included 47 Masked Lapwings, 23
   Wood Ducks, a Swamp Harrier and a Black-shouldered Kite.
   Alan Morris
   Tue 16 Dec Fork-tailed Swift, Brush Bronzewing, Chestnut-rumped
   Heathwren, Rockwarbler Royal National Park--Wattamolla
   As part of a good half-day spent in Royal yesterday (over 100 species
   recorded between dawn and 2pm), we spent early morning at Wattamolla.
   In between squally rain showers, some of us were lucky enough to see
   two Fork-tailed Swifts in a group of White-throated Needletails (report
   to be submitted separately to Mike T). Also at Wattamolla, we saw at
   least 6 Chestnut-rumped Heathwrens together in what we could only guess
   was a family group. A single Rockwarbler was its reliable self. On the
   road in to Wattamolla, a pair of Brush Bronzewings were a surprise
   sighting.
   Ashwin Rudder, Joshua Bergmark, Max Breckenridge & Nathan Ruser
   Freckled Duck, Australasian Shoveler and Pink-eared Duck Wentworth
   Swamp, Kurri Kurri, NSW.
   1 Freckled Duck, 8 Pink-eared Ducks and 4 Australasian Shovelers
   observed along with Red-necked Avocets. Lathams Snipe observed the week
   previous at same location.
   Daniel McKenzie
   Logrunner, Red-browed Treecreeper, Greater Sooty Owl, Powerful Owl
   Royal National Park--Lady Carrington Drive
   As part of a good half-day spent in Royal yesterday (over 100 species
   recorded between dawn and 2pm), we spent dawn at the southern end of
   Lady Carrington Drive. The dawn chorus was fruitful, with a Logrunner
   heard while it was too dark to see, and a Powerful Owl joining in with
   the Black-faced Monarchs and Rose Robins. Before dawn, a Greater Sooty
   Owl was heard among many calling Southern Boobooks. A Red-browed
   Treecreeper was another nice bird, but alas, also not seen.
   Ashwin Rudder, Joshua Bergmark, Max Breckenridge & Nathan Ruser
   White-winged Black Tern, Whiskered Tern, Brolga, Marsh Sandpiper,
   Red-kneed Dotterel Teal Lagoon, Everlasting Swamp National Park
   4+ non-breeding White-winged Black Terns in a flock of 200+ Whiskered
   Terns. Most Whiskered Terns were in breeding plumage but a few were in
   non-breeding plumage and according to Jeff Davies would be of the
   northern hemisphere race hybridus. 76+ Brolgas in groups of 10, 60 and
   3 pairs. Three Marsh Sandpipers and 2 Red-kneed Dotterels on the edge
   of Teal Lagoon. 3+ Little Grassbirds were calling from the reed beds as
   well.
   Greg Clancy, Dean Egan (NPWS), Warren Thompson and Joel Crowther
   Mon 15 Dec Red-necked Avocet. Hoary-headed Grebe, Freckled Duck
   Tuggerah STW
   This afternoon there were 82 Hoary-headed Grebes on the STW main pond,
   this is a very high number for this site and 3 Freckled Ducks. Over the
   back of the ponds there were 37 Avocets & 4 Black-winged Stilts, again
   Avocets are rare at this site, although they have been present now at
   the STW since 23/10/14. There were 2 Dollarbirds with at least one
   juvenile as well.
   Alan Morris
   Pacific Koel Parkes, NSW
   I have heard a koel calling a few times in the day yesterday and then
   all through the night last night corner of Mitchell and Hill Street.
   Will try to sight and photograph tonight. It seems out of its range and
   certainly wasn't getting any replies....but poor little bugger tried
   all night. (Moderator's Note: Single Koels have been reported from
   Parkes during the last year or two! AKM).
   Robert Shore
   Sun 14 Dec Black-necked Stork, Brolga, Comb-crested Jacana, Striped
   Honeyeater Imesons Swamp, Lawrence (now Everlasting Swamp NP)
   We observed for nearly 20 minutes two adult Black-necked Storks near
   Lawrence Rd where they hunted Black Swan cygnets in the very shallow
   water. One of the storks caught one cygnet and landed on the dry land.
   They later played with it like the act with mouse. At the end one of
   them swallowed it. Other birds: Brolga (4 - 3 flew over Clarence River,
   1 near junction of Lawrence Rd and Green Lane), Comb-crested jacana (1
   - small wetland near Lawrence completely covered by water hyacinths),
   Royal Spoonbill (35), White-necked Heron (12), Osprey (1 flying over
   Clarence River), Striped Honeyeater (3 calling from the patch of swamp
   oaks)
   Ted Wnorowski
   Sat 13 Dec Rock Warbler Umina Point Fire Trail, Brisbane Water NP
   I found 4 Rock Warblers near Look Out, over looking Pearl Beach
   luke ullrich


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Subject: Birdline Central & Southern Queensland Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 22 Dec 2014 07:04:24 +1000
   Birdline Central & Southern Queensland

   Published sightings for the week ending 21 Dec 2014.

   Sat 20 Dec Black Falcon Griffin 1' Cell
   Pair of Black Falcon over the house late am. Came in high from west
   then lost height heading towards Dohles Rocks. Bad record shot of one
   bird into the light. Large numbers of swifts around from late am on and
   off, with peaks of c100 Fork-tailed Swift in early afternoon and a very
   vocal flock of c1000 White-throated Needletail late afternoon circling
   high overhead before disappearing to west.
   Andy Jensen
   Fri 19 Dec Square-tailed Kite Velvet Street, Blacksoil
   Over patches of tall eucalypts, persistently gliding around tree
   canopies, sometimes lower.
   Roger Jaensch
   Fork-tailed Swifts Stafford, Brisbane
   1000s of swifts around this morning north of the city - mainly
   needletails, but I had c100 Fork-tailed Swifts in total mainly around
   Stafford. This an iPhone pic off the back of my camera.
   Rob Morris
   Fork-tailed Swift Meakin Park, Kingston, Logan City
   During a bird survey this morning as part of Logan City Council's
   revegetation project along Slacks Creek, I observed 2 or 3 Fork-tailed
   Swifts mixed in with a flock of approximately 15 White-throated
   Needletails. The birds were hawking over low eucalypts at around 5:30.
   Nice to see this species in SEQ.
   Elliot Leach
   Tue 16 Dec Square-tailed Kite D'Aguilar National Park--Mt Glorious
   Great views of a single bird circling low over road north of Brown's
   Road at 11a.m. Seen again at bike cafe just after 1p.m. Also Grey
   Goshawk at usual spot around Elmhaus Cafe.
   Judith Hoyle, Gavin O'Meara, Joshua Gordon-Douglas and Ron Dunglinson


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Subject: Birdline Australia Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 22 Dec 2014 07:03:50 +1000
   Birdline Australia

   Published sightings for the week ending 21 Dec 2014.

   Sun 14 Dec South Island Oystercatcher Lord Howe Island Airport
   I observed and photographed the SIPO feeding and flying between the
   airport and the nearby Mosely's swamp on Sunday the 14th and Friday the
   12th this past week. I was unable to find any Pectoral Sandpipers
   during this past week on Lord Howe Is.
   Jon Spicer-Bell


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Subject: Birdpedia - Australia - Weekly Digest
From: "Birdpedia - Australia Info" <info AT birdpedia.com>
Date: Mon, 22 Dec 2014 00:05:08 +1030
The following is a digest of Sightings Reported on Birdpedia for the period 
Monday, December 15, 2014 to Sunday, December 21, 2014: 


Area: SA

Date: Saturday, December 13, 2014

Location: Hansborough Bridge, River Light on Theile Highway SW of Eudunda

Brown Quail (Coturnix ypsilophora) (2+) Heard calling from tall grass and 
chenopod under gums north of bridge. 2 birds were then seen on verge on 
opposite side of road. They retreated into grass several times as cars passed 
re-emerging each time as I watched from parked car. Fifth personal SA record of 
2014 and second on 13/12 as they were seen on Saltfields tour led by John Hatch 
on Saturday morning (also Feb? tour I recall). 


Reported by: Jim Allen on Monday, December 15, 2014

---------------------------------------------

Date: Thursday, December 18, 2014

Location: Clayton Bay

Glossy Ibis (Plegadis falcinellus) (10) Two small flocks of Glossies flying 
over the western side of Island View Drive.Also present were 1000+ Great 
Cormorants, feeding in the 'Clayton Narrows' adjacent to Hindmarsh Island. 


Reported by: Nathaniel Doecke on Thursday, December 18, 2014

---------------------------------------------

Date: Thursday, December 18, 2014

Location: Tolderol Game Reserve Langhorne Creek

Glossy Ibis (Plegadis falcinellus) (15) This group of birds were feeding in the 
first pond past the pump house. 


Pink-eared Duck (Malacorhynchus membranaceus) (150) These ducks were feeding 
with a very large number of Grey Teal. 


Australasian Shoveler (Anas rhynchotis) (50) Same area as other ducks. 46 bird 
species observed in a 2hr visit. 


Reported by: Winston Syson on Thursday, December 18, 2014

---------------------------------------------

Need more information about a sighting? Login and contact the poster directly.

Receive sightings via email or SMS immediately they are posted. 

Not a member of Birdpedia? Membership is free and gives you access to 
information for over 230 countries. 


To sign up go to the Birdpedia Web Site (http://www.birdpedia.com/).

To find out more about Birdpedia and what it can do for you, see 'What is 
Birdpedia?' 


---------------------------------------------
                         



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Subject: Re: RFI New Caledonia
From: David Adams <dpadams AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 21 Dec 2014 20:10:22 +1100
> Two American friends and I will be visiting New Caledonia next October.
I  am
> trying to plan the trip, so I would very much appreciate any information.

So glad you asked! I'm posting to the list as I can't recommend New
Caledonia highly enough to Aussie birders. It's close, fantastically
beautiful and full of interesting landscapes and birds. The avifauna is
limited, but outstanding. Coming from here, the families are entirely
familiar (apart from the Kagu) and the individuals lovely. It's pretty
special to see a different variety of Friarbird, for example. For someone
coming straight from America, the families would be wholly exotic.

The roads and other infrastructure are of excellent quality (usually),
however he population density is quite low so services can be thin on the
ground. New Caledonia is not cheap. You can get by with English around
Noumea a bit but elsewhere, the European language in use is definitely
French.  We've been over twice and have managed a drive around Grande Terre
and a visit to Lifou. Briefly:

* It's okay to concentrate on the south end of Grande Terre as that's where
the most accessible birding sites are to be found.

* The international and domestic airports are in no way connected or close
and the flight schedules aren't aimed at getting you to or from an outer
island on a day you leave or arrive.

* Lifou is definitely, definitely worth more than a day. If any of you
snorkel, Lifou has *amazing* snorkeling spots. Fantastic reefs full of
fish. Some large and toothy fishes included (ulp)...but lots of life.

Overall, the island looks like a mixture of small-scale farms and bush
fragments. It's a French mining posession. The roads are so good because of
the nickel - the traffic or population wouldn't justify roads of the
quality you'll see.

> The main object of our trip is of course the Kagu, but I am told that
this is
> quite easy to find, and there are almost thirty birds I would like to
see.  A
> few other questions.

The Kagu is readily visible in Rivire Bleu which is also the only place
you have a chance at the Crow Honeyeater. It's one of the better spots for
birds, as you'll have gathered already. When we visited, it turned out that
you can camp at the very end of the park for a fee. There are no services
to speak of and my information is old enough to be suspect. You can't drive
in, but there's a bus available from the parking area. This would be the
optimal way to try for the Crow Honeyeater, given the park's normal hours
of operation.

We tracked down the (then) coordinator of the Kagu Recovery program five
years back and asked her about the Crow Honeyeater. That was my top
hoped-for bird. She'd worked in the park on the Kagu for four years and
could count clear views of the Crow Honeyeater on one hand. I see reports
of people finding it in a day trip, so I presume they're using tapes
(there's one recording of the Kagu available on CD possibly available on
island.) The recovery program for the Crow Honeyeater is....there isn't
one. I'd question hassling or disturbing them in any way, despite them
being a bird I would dearly love to see.

> 1. How long would you recommend we spend there?  I was thinking four or
five
> days on the main island, and a day trip to Lifou.

You could do fine with four or five days on Grande Terre, but give yourself
a bit more time (and a car) on Lifou. For Grande Terre, you'll have seen
trip reports listing the main sites. I used to have a report from our first
trip five years ago but let the domain lapse. I've reposted it here, in
case it's useful:

http://www.4dcompanion.com/Wombat_Country/trips/new_caledonia_2009/index.html

(Warning: Some links look stale.)

We've been back to Farino since and the manager we last saw didn't speak
English. Other than that, the site is still a fantastic place to spend a
few nights. You're right at the base of one of the best tracks in southern
Grande Terre - our bird list from there is is as good as from anywhere
else. This has been our best site for the Cloven-feathered Dove, a top bird
by any standard.                                                Also good
for other doves and both parakeets. (The Horned is another top bird.) It's
also a great access point for the Parc des Grandes Fougres (more below.)

Noumea will be a good base if you're trying to get to the domestic airport
or to drive out towards Yate and Rivire Bleu.

Through accidents of personal history, I've birded a few dozen islands in
the tropical Pacific. (And as a testament to my lack of skills...dipped on
an embarrassingly high percentage of the rarities and endemics.) I mention
this as it explains my perspective when saying that Lifou is *remarkable*.
When we were landing, what we saw were trees. Lots of trees. Doves
everywhere. I can't remember anywhere better for doves in the oceanic
Pacific. While a lot of these birds aren't endemic, they're usually hard to
see given human pressures (hunting and land use changes - lots of forest in
the Pacific is still getting converted to plantations or fields for sugar,
palm oil, kava, etc.) It's sort of like the situation with Coconut Crab.
They're a widespread species (historically), but where can you see them?
I've only ever seen them on Christmas Island. We found the white-eyes by
driving around and stopping at birdy-sounding places....we kind of slacked
 on hard-core birding because the snorkeling was so exceptionally good.

> 2. Does anyone have contact details of a local guide?  I am told that
birds
> such as the grassbird and the Crow Honeyeater can be tricky to find and a
> local guide would help.  We were thinking of hiring the local guide for
one
> maybe two days.

I can't help you with a guide. The only Grassbird we found was half-way
down the island on the way back. One of the Kagu Recovery team members that
helped out with "Oiseaux de la Chaine Centrale Province Nord de
Nouvelle-Caldonie" told me Grassbirds are much more common in the north.
Speaking of the north, we really wanted to drive around Grande Terre and
were happy we did. With that said, it doesn't easily improve your birding
chances, for the most part. Like many places in the Pacific, "public lands"
is a pretty alien concept. All of the land belongs to someone and you need
permission to visit. I don't know that this would be hard, but it would
take some effort...and languages could be an issue. I think that there are
a few dozen locally spoken Melanesian languages with French not always
spoken. (Speaking of local culture, the Centre Culturel Tjibaou in Noumea
is worth a visit, although not much for birds.) Driving around, we did
enjoy getting a sense of what was more common - and definitely enjoyed
seeing so many New Caledonian Crows.

> 3. I had thought that we would be based in Noumea, but I have heard that
some
> birds are easier to find further north.  Where?  And how many days would
be
> needed?  And I assume accommodation would be available close by?

I'll just mention Farino and the Parc des Grandes Fougres here a bit -
more details on the old report. We've been back since then and this park
remains wonderful. Farino is the right base for Parc des Grandes Fougres,
and I think that it's a must see. If you get up early enough and drive to
the park before dawn, you can hear the Kagu. The park entrance is along a
ridge with valleys on both sides. The Kagu use the bush for cover and the
side of hills for amplification. Amazing. Just amazing. We've done that
twice and the volume was super impressive once and very impressive the
other time ;-) There are lots of tracks of other good birds in the park as
well. I did spend quite some time tracking down a "Kagu" in the bush only
to finally be confronted by a North American Turkey. I didn't even know
they were on island. They are ;-)

For field guides, we've collected images and sounds before departure and
used "Birds of the Solomons, Vanuatu & New Caledonia." I've got here a copy
of "Birds of Melanesia" (Guy Dutson.) The Dutson book looks first rate to
me but I haven't field tested it. Multi-island books are always a bit of a
pain though...Honestly, the species aren't difficult to distinguish if you
can see them.

If you're interested in the overall natural history of New Caledonia, it's
worth checking for recent papers. For whatever reason (the selection of
cheeses and the fresh baguettes?), scientists seem to like New Caledonia.
It has off-the-chart levels of endemism in plants, rivaled by only a few
places. (I guess I shouldn't talk about that to someone from WA.) Their
endemism rates are high both by % (like Hawaii) and in absolute terms (not
like Hawaii.) I'm hopeless on plants so I can't say more. I did read (as
remembered fuzzily off the top of my head) that for a long time Grande
Terre was seen to be a piece of Gondwanan crust that's been floating around
since forever...having once been part of Aus. Later research argues that,
in fact, the island has been underwater for a great part of the time and
that the present pattern of endemism and families present (birds and
plants) are based on more typical oceanic island colonization patterns.
Either way, Grande Terre is beautiful and full of wonderful birds and
plants. The outer islands, by the way, are not geologically related -
they're typical oceanic volcanic remnants, not
weird-continental-crust-that-isn't-on-a-continent.

Have a fantastic trip and please post a trip report afterwards. There's not
enough birding-oriented information circulating on this magical destination.


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Subject: BirdLife Victoria - Portland Pelagic Trip Report, 11 December 2014
From: Chris Lester <gpicta AT vic.chariot.net.au>
Date: Sun, 21 Dec 2014 17:27:24 +1100
BirdLife Victoria Pelagic off Portland, Victoria, Sunday 11 December 2014

Participants: Scott Baker, Tim Bawden, David Burren, Paul Dodd, Mark 
Hall, Rosemary Lester, Rohan Mott, Mark Newman, Paul Newman, David 
Pendavingh, Ruth Woodrow, Chris Lester (organiser).

Crew: Shannon and Neville.

Activity: Departed Portland Harbour aboard the Southern Pride boat at 
07.00 heading south-west to the shelf. Went straight past the shelf to 
our first stop at 3842.402'S, 14122.235'E in 204 fathoms of water, 
where we berleyed from 09.40 till 11.00. We moved to the south-west to 
3845.291'S, 14122.959'E in 234 fathoms and stayed there from 11.20 
until 12.20. We moved back north-west and berleyed at 3844.019'S, 
14119.462'E in 400 fathoms from 12.40 until 13.20. Headed back in to 
the north-east, stopping at 3840.410'S, 14121.596'E in 103 fathoms 
from 13.40 until 14.10. We then headed into Portland passing Lawrence 
Rocks, where we had a good look, before returning and docking at 17.00.

Conditions: Initially, it was very overcast with some sunny breaks and 
the occasional light mist. There was a light wind of about 5 knots from 
the SW. The sea was less than 0.5 m with a swell of about 1 m. In the 
middle of the day, the wind rose to about 10 knots but the swell and sea 
stayed about the same. Then, the wind progressively went down to a 
slight breeze of less than 5 knots. The swell went down below 1 m with 
no sea. It progressively got finer and warmer with little cloud. Nice 
for comfort but not for the birds.

Summary: Below average diversity with only 16 identified species of 
seabird recorded during the trip and with the numbers of most regular 
species well down. The highlights were the distant Blue Whales and the 
Southern Royal Albatrosses. Most of the pelagic birds were at the first 
stop with very few at each of the three subsequent stops. This was 
disappointing as there were quite a few birds on the way out and a 
nearly immediate distant Cookalaria Petrel at the first stop, which 
promised good things. It might be explained by the day getting 
progressively finer with the wind dying down.

Mammals:

Common Dolphin: about 4 small groups on the way out and in.

Blue Whale: a pod of 2 or 3 spouting in the distance on the way out.

Australian Fur Seal: the normal numbers (about 50) loafing at Lawrence 
Rocks.

Birds:

Southern Royal Albatross: 2 (1). Pelagic.

Shy Albatross: 50 (30). All race cauta. Pelagic with quite a few inshore.

Yellow-nosed Albatross: 2 (1). Pelagic.

Fairy Prion: 20 (3). Inshore and pelagic.

White-chinned Petrel: 12 (5). Pelagic.

Flesh-footed Shearwater: 20 (6). Pelagic.

Sooty Shearwater: 2 (1). Pelagic.

Short-tailed Shearwater: 100 (40). Inshore and pelagic.

Unidentified Flutton's Shearwater: 3 (1). Distant views on the way out 
and in.

Great-winged Petrel: 20 (5). Both races, nominate and gouldi. Pelagic.

Unidentified Cookalaria Petrel: 1. At the first stop. Impression was 
Cook's but views weren't good enough to be definite.

Little Penguin: 1. On the way out.

Australasian Gannet: 50 (6) + several 1000 (LR). On the way out and in 
with lots on Lawrence Rocks.

Great Cormorant: 1. In Portland Harbour.

Black-faced Cormorant: 30 (LR). All on Lawrence Rocks.

Crested Tern: 1 + 50 (LR). 1 Pelagic with the rest on Lawrence Rocks.

Kelp Gull: 2 (1). 1 at Lawrence Rocks and 1 juvenile in Portland Harbour.

Silver Gull: 10 inshore and pelagic with 50 at Lawrence Rocks and 100 in 
Portland Harbour.

There were also 2 Welcome Swallows at Lawrence Rocks.


For details of future Portland trips, go to the BirdLife Australia web 
site at the bottom of the page on 
http://www.birdlife.org.au/locations/all-victoria-statewide/activities-vic

For reports of past BA-Vic and BirdLife Australia trips from Portland 
and Port Fairy, search the Birding-Aus archives for the trip reports at 
http://bioacoustics.cse.unsw.edu.au/archives/html/birding-aus/






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Subject: BirdLife Victoria Portland Pelagic Trips for January 2015 (and the first six months of 2015)
From: Chris Lester <gpicta AT vic.chariot.net.au>
Date: Sun, 21 Dec 2014 10:22:33 +1100
Dear Birding-Ausers,

I currently have two vacancies for the BirdLife Victoria Portland 
Pelagic Trip in January 2015 if anyone is interested.

I also have two spots left in each of April and June.  The other months 
are currently fully booked and I have good waiting lists for February 
and March but I don't have any emergencies for May yet.

I am not yet taking bookings for the second half of 2015 but expect to 
do so from the start of February.

-- 

Regards

Chris

For details of future Portland trips, go to the BirdLife Australia web site at 
the bottom of the page on 
http://www.birdlife.org.au/locations/all-victoria-statewide/activities-vic 


For reports of past BA-Vic and BirdLife Australia trips from Portland and Port 
Fairy, search the Birding-Aus archives for the trip reports at 
http://bioacoustics.cse.unsw.edu.au/archives/html/birding-aus/ 





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Subject: Re: Female King-parrots in Blayney, NSW?
From: "Greg and Val Clancy" <gclancy AT tpg.com.au>
Date: Sun, 21 Dec 2014 09:48:57 +1100
Hi John,

Yes an adult female Australian King-Parrot.

Regards
Greg
Dr Greg. P. Clancy
Ecologist and Birding-wildlife Guide
| PO Box 63 Coutts Crossing NSW 2460
| 02 6649 3153  | 0429 601 960
http://www.gregclancyecologistguide.com
http://gregswildliferamblings.blogspot.com.au/




-----Original Message----- 
From: John McLaren
Sent: Saturday, December 20, 2014 11:22 AM
To: Birding Australia
Subject: [Birding-Aus] Female King-parrots in Blayney, NSW?

Hi,

Can anyone tell me if this is a female Australian King-parrot. Photographed 
in our Blayney garden this morning...

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/288371182365341101/

Thanks,

John McLaren


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Subject: RFI New Caledonia
From: Frank O'Connor <foconnor AT iinet.net.au>
Date: Sun, 21 Dec 2014 10:33:33 +0800
Two American friends and I will be visiting New Caledonia next 
October.  I  am trying to plan the trip, so I would very much 
appreciate any information.

The main object of our trip is of course the Kagu, but I am told that 
this is quite easy to find, and there are almost thirty birds I would 
like to see.  A few other questions.

1. How long would you recommend we spend there?  I was thinking four 
or five days on the main island, and a day trip to Lifou.

2. Does anyone have contact details of a local guide?  I am told that 
birds such as the grassbird and the Crow Honeyeater can be tricky to 
find and a local guide would help.  We were thinking of hiring the 
local guide for one maybe two days.

3. I had thought that we would be based in Noumea, but I have heard 
that some birds are easier to find further north.  Where?  And how 
many days would be needed?  And I assume accommodation would be 
available close by?

4. Any hints for specific species?

Thanks


_________________________________________________________________
Frank O'Connor                          Birding WA 
http://birdingwa.iinet.net.au
Phone : (08) 9386 5694               Email : foconnor AT iinet.net.au 




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Subject: White-threaded Needletail
From: Nick Talbot <talbotnicholas AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 21 Dec 2014 11:20:20 +1100
Hi 
A flock of White-throated Needletail passed over Eleebana (Lake Macquarie) 
several times this morning. The maximum number around at any one time was 
around 50. Some reasonable photos taken of individual birds. 

Nick Talbot





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Subject: Re: Birdlog ANZ and iPhone battery issues
From: Peter Shute <pshute AT nuw.org.au>
Date: Sat, 20 Dec 2014 21:25:36 +1100
I've never thought of turning the brightness to manual. I guess outdoors in 
bright sunlight, the brightness might set itself very high. 


My kids once fiddled with my iPad and set the brightness to maximum. For the 
next few days until I realised, I could barely get enough charge into it to 
start each day with as much charge as the day before, let alone charge it 
fully. 


Peter Shute

Sent from my iPad

> On 20 Dec 2014, at 12:13 pm, eBird ACT  wrote:
> 
> I have had reasonable battery life since speaking with the Birdseye team 
yesterday; turn the brightness to manual and down and also turning off location 
services (in privacy settings) once the site is selected. 

> 
> 
> eBird.org/content/australia
> Global tool for birders, critical data for science
> 
> 
> eBird ACT
> ebirdact AT gmail.com
> 
> 
> 
> On 19 Dec 2014, at 13:17, Peter Shute  wrote:
> 
> The 6+ comes with iOS 8, which is supposed to track battery usage. If you go 
into Settings, General, Usage, then Battery Usage, it lists how many hours it's 
had of what it considers to be usage since the last charge, and how many hours 
of standby. It might be useful, next time this happens, to check what these 
figures are. It might just be that you're looking at the app a lot. 

> 
> It also lists the %battery usage for each app for the last 24 hours and the 
last 7 days. That might help you work out which app is doing it, although I 
don't totally agree with what it tells me on mine. 

> 
> If it turns out that it's just legitimate usage doing it then you might have 
to buy an external battery so you can charge it in the field. 

> 
> Peter Shute
> 
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Birding-Aus 
>> [mailto:birding-aus-bounces AT birding-aus.org] On Behalf Of eBird ACT
>> Sent: Friday, 19 December 2014 10:47 AM
>> To: Birding-aus
>> Subject: [Birding-Aus] Birdlog ANZ and iPhone battery issues
>> 
>> Good morning,  seasons greetings and please excuse the cross posting,
>> 
>> I would like to know if other users of the superb Birdlog ANZ 
>> app are having issues with the app draining their iPhone 
>> battery. I have used the app  on an iPhone 4S, 5S and now on 
>> a 6+, all with the same issue of rapid battery drain. Despite 
>> the much larger battery on the 6+, in 4 hours yesterday I was 
>> down to almost 20% battery. One of the reasons  I bought the 
>> 6+ was because of the larger battery. 
>> I have put the phone in  airplane mode, and turned off 
>> location services, but to me the former defeats the purpose 
>> of having a phone. 
>> 
>> I am currently communicating with the Birdseye team to try 
>> and trouble shoot my issues. So is this me or is this 
>> happening across the Birdlog ANZ user group?
> 
> 
>
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Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
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Subject: RFI: Hobart and surrounds
From: Phil via Birding-Aus <birding-aus AT birding-aus.org>
Date: Sat, 20 Dec 2014 17:50:00 +1100
Hi All

I know this is really last minute, but I find myself with family in Hobart for 
a week till the 27th December. Because it's a family holiday, my time is very 
limited, but I definitely could find a few hours in the morning and evening to 
get some birding in. Please could any local birders, or any one with any local 
information let me know on any spots to try? Alternatively, first prize would 
be if there are any locals or guides who would be willing to show a dead keen 
South African twitcher around? I am keen to see whatever specials I can, but 
even more keen just to get some good photography opportunities in if I can. 
Last question is if there is any opportunity to if any pelagic birding, even if 
commercial based? 


Thanks in advance.

Phil Penlington 
Www.birdpics.co.za


Sent from my iPhone


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Subject: Female King-parrots in Blayney, NSW?
From: "John McLaren" <jbmclaren1 AT bigpond.com>
Date: Sat, 20 Dec 2014 11:22:26 +1100
Hi,

Can anyone tell me if this is a female Australian King-parrot. Photographed in 
our Blayney garden this morning... 


https://www.pinterest.com/pin/288371182365341101/

Thanks,

John McLaren


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Subject: Re: Birdlog ANZ and iPhone battery issues
From: eBird ACT <ebirdact AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 20 Dec 2014 12:13:11 +1100
I have had reasonable battery life since speaking with the Birdseye team 
yesterday; turn the brightness to manual and down and also turning off location 
services (in privacy settings) once the site is selected. 



eBird.org/content/australia
Global tool for birders, critical data for science


eBird ACT
ebirdact AT gmail.com



On 19 Dec 2014, at 13:17, Peter Shute  wrote:

The 6+ comes with iOS 8, which is supposed to track battery usage. If you go 
into Settings, General, Usage, then Battery Usage, it lists how many hours it's 
had of what it considers to be usage since the last charge, and how many hours 
of standby. It might be useful, next time this happens, to check what these 
figures are. It might just be that you're looking at the app a lot. 


It also lists the %battery usage for each app for the last 24 hours and the 
last 7 days. That might help you work out which app is doing it, although I 
don't totally agree with what it tells me on mine. 


If it turns out that it's just legitimate usage doing it then you might have to 
buy an external battery so you can charge it in the field. 


Peter Shute

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Birding-Aus 
> [mailto:birding-aus-bounces AT birding-aus.org] On Behalf Of eBird ACT
> Sent: Friday, 19 December 2014 10:47 AM
> To: Birding-aus
> Subject: [Birding-Aus] Birdlog ANZ and iPhone battery issues
> 
> Good morning,  seasons greetings and please excuse the cross posting,
> 
> I would like to know if other users of the superb Birdlog ANZ 
> app are having issues with the app draining their iPhone 
> battery. I have used the app  on an iPhone 4S, 5S and now on 
> a 6+, all with the same issue of rapid battery drain. Despite 
> the much larger battery on the 6+, in 4 hours yesterday I was 
> down to almost 20% battery. One of the reasons  I bought the 
> 6+ was because of the larger battery. 
> I have put the phone in  airplane mode, and turned off 
> location services, but to me the former defeats the purpose 
> of having a phone. 
> 
> I am currently communicating with the Birdseye team to try 
> and trouble shoot my issues. So is this me or is this 
> happening across the Birdlog ANZ user group? 



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Subject: SIPO still on Lord Howe
From: inger vandyke <ingervandyke AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 20 Dec 2014 00:45:10 +0000
Hi All,

Just a quick email to let you know that the SIPO is still on Lord Howe. We 
spotted it yesterday (19 Dec) at 3pm just outside the arrivals area of the 
airport building. 


Have a great Christmas everyone!

Cheers

Inger
 		 	   		  


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Subject: Re: Purple turkey
From: Tim Dolby <Tim.Dolby AT vu.edu.au>
Date: Sat, 20 Dec 2014 00:21:20 +0000
Yes, certainly around Wyperfeld National Park in Victoria the local farmers use 
the terms Purple Turkey to describe Malleefowl. For instance in Yaapeet, the 
town immediately before the southern entrance to Wyperfeld, the local 
hairdresser is called the Purple Turkey. There is a wonderful mural of a Purple 
Turkey / Malleefowl out the front. 


Cheers,

Tim

________________________________________
From: Birding-Aus [birding-aus-bounces AT birding-aus.org] on behalf of Tony 
Russell [pratincole08 AT gmail.com] 

Sent: Saturday, December 20, 2014 9:48 AM
To: 'birding-aus'
Subject: [Birding-Aus] Purple turkey

I have some images of a bird labelled "Purple Turkey". It looks very much
like malleefowl to me. Any clues anyone ? Thank you.

Tony.


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Subject: Purple turkey
From: "Tony Russell" <pratincole08 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 20 Dec 2014 09:18:23 +1030
I have some images of a bird labelled "Purple Turkey". It looks very much
like malleefowl to me. Any clues anyone ? Thank you.

Tony.


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Subject: Re: Birdlog ANZ and iPhone battery issues
From: Allan Richardson <albirdo AT bigpond.net.au>
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2014 21:08:46 +1100
Hi Guys,

I use the excellent Bird Watcher Diary and it is always accurate on it’s 
location marks, even when there is no service, and it doesn’t drain the 
battery of my iPhone too quickly. 


However, it won’t last a full day of constant survey work (iPhone 4s), so I 
bought an accessory battery that will fully charge the phone more than 4 times. 


Allan Richardson
Morisset NSW

> On 19 Dec 2014, at 11:36 am, Dave Torr  wrote:
> 
> I cannot comment directly on either the app or on iPhones, but my
> observation on other devices is that use of "location services" - i.e. GPS
> - does cause a heavy load on the battery, although I have never quantified
> it.
> 
> On 19 December 2014 at 10:46, eBird ACT  wrote:
>> 
>> Good morning,  seasons greetings and please excuse the cross posting,
>> 
>> I would like to know if other users of the superb Birdlog ANZ app are
>> having issues with the app draining their iPhone battery. I have used the
>> app  on an iPhone 4S, 5S and now on a 6+, all with the same issue of rapid
>> battery drain. Despite the much larger battery on the 6+, in 4 hours
>> yesterday I was down to almost 20% battery. One of the reasons  I bought
>> the 6+ was because of the larger battery.
>> I have put the phone in  airplane mode, and turned off location services,
>> but to me the former defeats the purpose of having a phone.
>> 
>> I am currently communicating with the Birdseye team to try and trouble
>> shoot my issues. So is this me or is this happening across the Birdlog ANZ
>> user group?
>> 
>> Regards
>> 
>> Alastair
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>>
Birding-Aus mailing list >>
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >>
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >>
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >> >> >
>
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Subject: Port MacDonnell Pelagics 2015
From: Colin Rogers <twitchercolin AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2014 17:37:35 +1000
The dates are as follows:

1st February 2015
1st March 2015
12th April 2015
10th May 2015
24th May 2015
14th June 2015

Contact Stuart Hull or Colin Rogers for bookings.  


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Subject: Re: Birdlog ANZ and iPhone battery issues
From: Peter Shute <pshute AT nuw.org.au>
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2014 13:17:41 +1100
The 6+ comes with iOS 8, which is supposed to track battery usage. If you go 
into Settings, General, Usage, then Battery Usage, it lists how many hours it's 
had of what it considers to be usage since the last charge, and how many hours 
of standby. It might be useful, next time this happens, to check what these 
figures are. It might just be that you're looking at the app a lot. 


It also lists the %battery usage for each app for the last 24 hours and the 
last 7 days. That might help you work out which app is doing it, although I 
don't totally agree with what it tells me on mine. 


If it turns out that it's just legitimate usage doing it then you might have to 
buy an external battery so you can charge it in the field. 


Peter Shute

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Birding-Aus 
> [mailto:birding-aus-bounces AT birding-aus.org] On Behalf Of eBird ACT
> Sent: Friday, 19 December 2014 10:47 AM
> To: Birding-aus
> Subject: [Birding-Aus] Birdlog ANZ and iPhone battery issues
> 
> Good morning,  seasons greetings and please excuse the cross posting,
> 
> I would like to know if other users of the superb Birdlog ANZ 
> app are having issues with the app draining their iPhone 
> battery. I have used the app  on an iPhone 4S, 5S and now on 
> a 6+, all with the same issue of rapid battery drain. Despite 
> the much larger battery on the 6+, in 4 hours yesterday I was 
> down to almost 20% battery. One of the reasons  I bought the 
> 6+ was because of the larger battery. 
> I have put the phone in  airplane mode, and turned off 
> location services, but to me the former defeats the purpose 
> of having a phone. 
> 
> I am currently communicating with the Birdseye team to try 
> and trouble shoot my issues. So is this me or is this 
> happening across the Birdlog ANZ user group? 



Birding-Aus mailing list
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Subject: Re: Birdlog ANZ and iPhone battery issues
From: David Burren <david AT davidburren.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2014 12:54:02 +1100
On 19 Dec 2014, at 10:46 am, eBird ACT  wrote:
> 
> I would like to know if other users of the superb Birdlog ANZ app are having 
issues with the app draining their iPhone battery. I have used the app on an 
iPhone 4S, 5S and now on a 6+, all with the same issue of rapid battery drain. 
Despite the much larger battery on the 6+, in 4 hours yesterday I was down to 
almost 20% battery. One of the reasons I bought the 6+ was because of the 
larger battery. 

> I have put the phone in airplane mode, and turned off location services, but 
to me the former defeats the purpose of having a phone. 


I can't comment on the app itself, but using a phone away from mobile cell 
coverage is always going to suck power. 


On an iPhone if you turn on Airplane mode that turns off the WiFi, Bluetooth, 
and the mobile/cellular radio (which includes the GPS). So in that case there's 
no need to also turn off Location Services. 


If you want Location Services to be active, Airplane mode must be off (the 
phone will be looking for cell towers). However you can obviously turn off WiFi 
and Bluetooth if they're not going to be used (or you can turn them on after 
activating Airplane mode). 


But the biggest things which will suck your phone battery are the screen 
brightness plus 4G. The easiest explanation is that if you're away from a 4G 
coverage area the radio will waste a lot of energy looking for 4G towers. In 
the Cellular section in the iOS Settings app you can easily disable 4G (but you 
can't disable 3G/etc unless you disable Cellular Data altogether). If you 
disable Cellular Data you'll still receive phone calls and SMSes (but not 
iMessages which tend to get automagically used because they're cheaper). 


I hope this helps at least a little.
__
David Burren




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Subject: Re: Birdlog ANZ and iPhone battery issues
From: eBird ACT <ebirdact AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2014 11:39:22 +1100
Dave,
That was my initial theory too, but I am advised by the Birdseye team that once 
Birdlog has sourced your location, it no longer uses location services. 


Regards
Alastair 



On 19 Dec 2014, at 11:36, Dave Torr  wrote:

I cannot comment directly on either the app or on iPhones, but my
observation on other devices is that use of "location services" - i.e. GPS
- does cause a heavy load on the battery, although I have never quantified
it.

On 19 December 2014 at 10:46, eBird ACT  wrote:
> 
> Good morning,  seasons greetings and please excuse the cross posting,
> 
> I would like to know if other users of the superb Birdlog ANZ app are
> having issues with the app draining their iPhone battery. I have used the
> app  on an iPhone 4S, 5S and now on a 6+, all with the same issue of rapid
> battery drain. Despite the much larger battery on the 6+, in 4 hours
> yesterday I was down to almost 20% battery. One of the reasons  I bought
> the 6+ was because of the larger battery.
> I have put the phone in  airplane mode, and turned off location services,
> but to me the former defeats the purpose of having a phone.
> 
> I am currently communicating with the Birdseye team to try and trouble
> shoot my issues. So is this me or is this happening across the Birdlog ANZ
> user group?
> 
> Regards
> 
> Alastair
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
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Subject: Re: Birdlog ANZ and iPhone battery issues
From: Dave Torr <davidtorr AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2014 11:44:22 +1100
OK - but I assume that having the GPS turned on is still a drain as it gets
constant fixes - but I must admit this is pure speculation! If what they
say is true then I guess you turn GPS on until the app has a fix and then
turn it off and see if this makes a difference?

On 19 December 2014 at 11:39, eBird ACT  wrote:
>
> Dave,
> That was my initial theory too, but I am advised by the Birdseye team that
> once Birdlog has sourced your location, it no longer uses location services.
>
> Regards
> Alastair
>
>
>
> On 19 Dec 2014, at 11:36, Dave Torr  wrote:
>
> I cannot comment directly on either the app or on iPhones, but my
> observation on other devices is that use of "location services" - i.e. GPS
> - does cause a heavy load on the battery, although I have never quantified
> it.
>
> On 19 December 2014 at 10:46, eBird ACT  wrote:
> >
> > Good morning,  seasons greetings and please excuse the cross posting,
> >
> > I would like to know if other users of the superb Birdlog ANZ app are
> > having issues with the app draining their iPhone battery. I have used the
> > app  on an iPhone 4S, 5S and now on a 6+, all with the same issue of
> rapid
> > battery drain. Despite the much larger battery on the 6+, in 4 hours
> > yesterday I was down to almost 20% battery. One of the reasons  I bought
> > the 6+ was because of the larger battery.
> > I have put the phone in  airplane mode, and turned off location services,
> > but to me the former defeats the purpose of having a phone.
> >
> > I am currently communicating with the Birdseye team to try and trouble
> > shoot my issues. So is this me or is this happening across the Birdlog
> ANZ
> > user group?
> >
> > Regards
> >
> > Alastair
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > 
> >
Birding-Aus mailing list > >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org > >
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http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > > > > >
>
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Subject: Re: Birdlog ANZ and iPhone battery issues
From: Dave Torr <davidtorr AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2014 11:36:27 +1100
I cannot comment directly on either the app or on iPhones, but my
observation on other devices is that use of "location services" - i.e. GPS
- does cause a heavy load on the battery, although I have never quantified
it.

On 19 December 2014 at 10:46, eBird ACT  wrote:
>
> Good morning,  seasons greetings and please excuse the cross posting,
>
> I would like to know if other users of the superb Birdlog ANZ app are
> having issues with the app draining their iPhone battery. I have used the
> app  on an iPhone 4S, 5S and now on a 6+, all with the same issue of rapid
> battery drain. Despite the much larger battery on the 6+, in 4 hours
> yesterday I was down to almost 20% battery. One of the reasons  I bought
> the 6+ was because of the larger battery.
> I have put the phone in  airplane mode, and turned off location services,
> but to me the former defeats the purpose of having a phone.
>
> I am currently communicating with the Birdseye team to try and trouble
> shoot my issues. So is this me or is this happening across the Birdlog ANZ
> user group?
>
> Regards
>
> Alastair
>
>
>
>
>
> 
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
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Subject: Birdlog ANZ and iPhone battery issues
From: eBird ACT <ebirdact AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2014 10:46:35 +1100
Good morning,  seasons greetings and please excuse the cross posting,

I would like to know if other users of the superb Birdlog ANZ app are having 
issues with the app draining their iPhone battery. I have used the app on an 
iPhone 4S, 5S and now on a 6+, all with the same issue of rapid battery drain. 
Despite the much larger battery on the 6+, in 4 hours yesterday I was down to 
almost 20% battery. One of the reasons I bought the 6+ was because of the 
larger battery. 

I have put the phone in airplane mode, and turned off location services, but to 
me the former defeats the purpose of having a phone. 


I am currently communicating with the Birdseye team to try and trouble shoot my 
issues. So is this me or is this happening across the Birdlog ANZ user group? 


Regards

Alastair 







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Subject: Re: Film Competition
From: "Alan Gillanders" <alan AT alanswildlifetours.com.au>
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2014 08:21:26 +1000
Cheryl Ridge hit the jackpot for me. Many thanks Cheryl!

http://exploretnq.com.au/conditions

http://exploretnq.com.au/

Joyous, safe and peaceful tidings to you all.
Alan



Alan's Wildlife Tours
2 Mather Road
Yungaburra 4884

Phone 07 4095 3784
Mobile 0408 953 786
http://www.alanswildlifetours.com.au/
-----Original Message----- 
From: Alan Gillanders
Sent: Thursday, December 18, 2014 06:51 PM
To: Birding_Aus
Subject: [Birding-Aus] Film Competition

Greetings,
Some one, who I think was a birder, sent me questions and info about a film 
competition which would enable winners to take a holiday in north Queensland 
to make a film. I cannot find that email so if it was you could you resend 
it. I also cannot find the competition online so there may be others out 
there who don’t know about it too who could take a stab at the film of one 
minute to win a holiday up this way.
REgards,
Alan

Alan's Wildlife Tours
2 Mather Road
Yungaburra 4884

Phone 07 4095 3784
Mobile 0408 953 786
http://www.alanswildlifetours.com.au/


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Subject: Film Competition
From: "Alan Gillanders" <alan AT alanswildlifetours.com.au>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 18:51:36 +1000
Greetings,
Some one, who I think was a birder, sent me questions and info about a film 
competition which would enable winners to take a holiday in north Queensland to 
make a film. I cannot find that email so if it was you could you resend it. I 
also cannot find the competition online so there may be others out there who 
don’t know about it too who could take a stab at the film of one minute to 
win a holiday up this way. 

REgards,
Alan

Alan's Wildlife Tours
2 Mather Road
Yungaburra 4884

Phone 07 4095 3784
Mobile 0408 953 786
http://www.alanswildlifetours.com.au/


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Subject: Western Quail-thrush
From: Frank O'Connor <foconnor AT iinet.net.au>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 10:03:23 +0800
As John Tongue replied, it was split from the Chestnut-breasted 
Quail-thrush (note that Chestnut QT is now called Chestnut-backed QT).

It is found over a reasonably large area, but the stronghold for them 
is from Mt Magnet north past Meekatharra along the Great Northern 
Highway.  I used to find them quite easily around Cue, but recently 
while I have found them it has taken quite a while.  Recent good 
areas to see the bird have been just west of Mt Magnet on the road 
towards Yalgoo.  In the first 7kms.  They have also been seen on 
Kirkalocka Station where there is station stay accommodation.


_________________________________________________________________
Frank O'Connor                          Birding WA 
http://birdingwa.iinet.net.au
Phone : (08) 9386 5694               Email : foconnor AT iinet.net.au 




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Subject: Blythes Swift on Cocos
From: "Mike Carter" <pterodroma AT bigpond.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 12:31:26 +1100
On Richard Baxter's recent tour to Cocos (6-13 December) some 'Fork-tailed
Swifts' were seen and photographed. Four of that taxonomic group were raised
to specific status by Paul Leader in 2011 and those splits have now been
accepted by the IOC. On the basis of five characters, it is my opinion that
at least some of the birds we saw were Blythe's Swift Apus leuconyx contra
Pacific Swift A. pacificus, the common taxon occurring on mainland
Australia. A submission to BARC is in preparation. It is interesting to note
that according to Rasmusson & Anderton 2012 'Birds of South Asia', in the
area north of Cocos, only two of the Fork-tailed Swift complex are known to
occur, Blythe's and Salim Ali's Swift, with no records of our Pacific Swift.
This situation may be similar to the assumption made by David James and Ian
McAllan in their recent Review of the Birds of Christmas Island in
Australian Field Ornithology that Oriental-type Cuckoos occurring on
Christmas Island are in fact Himalayan Cuckoos based on their more western
distribution. 

 

Mike Carter, 03 9787 7136

30 Canadian Bay Road

Mount Eliza, VIC 3930, Australia  

 

 

 

 

    

 



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Subject: Western Quail-thrush
From: Graeme Chapman <naturalight AT graemechapman.com.au>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 12:12:48 +1100
Hello again,

I've only just remembered (I was at Kathleen Valley in 1970!!) that it's now 
known as Wanjarri Nature Reserve and you can still camp at the shearing shed.( 
contact DEC Kalgoorlie (08 9080 5555) 


 Probably worth a visit - that's where we also got Grey Honeyeaters

Cheers

Graeme


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Subject: Western Quail-thrush
From: Graeme Chapman <naturalight AT graemechapman.com.au>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 11:08:02 +1100
Hello Patrick,

Worth a look on my website www.graemechapman.com.au. Seems I'd better change 
the classification. 


The excellent Handbook of W. A. Birds has a good distribution map and lists 
lots of localities. Broadly the range is a wide band of the central interior 
from the Hamersley Range right across to the S.A./NT border (and beyond). 


Laverton would be a good starting point or a run along the Great Central Road. 
I photographed mine at Kathleen Valley about 50 km N of Leinster, 27 31 S 120 
34 E 


Cheers

Graeme




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Subject: Eaglehawk Pelagic Trip Report, 22nd November 2014 AMENDED
From: Paul Brooks <theleadboots AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 08:07:59 +1100
Inadvertently omitted Indian Yellow-nosed Albatross from the first report.

Participants:

Alan Clark, Karen Dick, Rob Hamilton, Phil Knott, Mona Loofs-Samorzewski,
Sean MacDonald, Glen Pacey, Ryan Steiner,  Els Wakefield, John Wilkinson
and Paul Brooks (organiser and report compiler)



Boat:

The Pauletta, skippered by John Males, with deckhand Adam.



Conditions and Activity:

Left port at 0705 hrs to circumnavigate the Hippolytes.  Light winds and
seas inshore gave way to 15-20 knot NNE winds offshore with a low swell and
seas of 0.5-2 metres.  We reached our first berley point beyond the shelf
break east of the Hippolytes a bit after 0900 hrs; the depth was 430
fathoms, winds were northerly at around 15 knots with seas up around 2
metres; this would be the story for much of the day.  Weather was overcast
and dull with some very light drizzle.  We travelled back up the slick at
1100 hrs before heading north and east to berley over 850 fathoms at 1125
hrs in very similar conditions.  The wind dropped out a bit when the sun
peeked out just after midday but picked up again when the clouds returned
at 1300 hrs.  After heading back up our second slick at 1300 hrs, we
motored straight back for port, stopping for one or more Humpback Whales
over the shelf before docking at 1520 hrs.  Water temperature was a fairly
constant 14.3 degrees from inshore to out wide.



Mammals:

Humpback Whale: at least 1 (possibly another) heading south in offshore
waters.  The depth sounder showed it travelling right beneath the boat.

Australian/New Zealand Fur Seal: About a dozen on the Hippolyte and 1 big
bull showed briefly at the back of the boat in pelagic waters.



Birds (IOC v 4.2 – max at one time in brackets):

Antipodean Albatross: 6 (2) All adult male Gibson’s, all in pelagic waters.



Southern Royal Albatross: 4 (1) 3 pelagic, 1 offshore in the afternoon.



NORTHERN ROYAL ALBATROSS: 2 (1) 1 in deep pelagic waters and a second well
inside the shelf break in the afternoon.



Black-browed Albatross: 2 (1) 2 juvenile birds in pelagic waters.  Another
Black-browed type seen in offshore waters in the morning by one observer.



Campbell Albatross: 3 (2) An adult and two immatures in pelagic waters.



Shy Albatross: c. 100 (43) 1 inshore in the morning, 9 offshore, the
remainder pelagic.  At least 3 juveniles amongst the throng.



SALVIN’S ALBATROSS: 2 (1) 2 immatures in pelagic waters.



Indian Yellow-nosed Albatross: 5 (2) 2 juveniles offshore; 2 juveniles and
an immature with an incomplete yellow bill stripe in pelagic waters.



Buller’s Albatross: 1 offshore in the afternoon.



SOUTHERN GIANT PETREL: 1 A spectacular white morph with no dark flecks in
its plumage (but dark eyes and bluish webbing to feet).  Close inshore in
the afternoon.



Northern Giant Petrel: 8 (5) 7 in pelagic waters, 1 inshore in the
afternoon.  2 adults, the remainder immature.



Fairy Prion: c. 250 (c. 70) 40-odd offshore in the morning, a dozen or so
in pelagic waters and large rafts offshore in the afternoon.



Great-winged Petrel: 1 in pelagic waters; race *gouldi*.



White-headed Petrel: 1 in pelagic waters.



White-chinned Petrel: c. 70 (39) 2 offshore in the morning, remainder
pelagic, many of which followed the boat between stops.



Sooty Shearwater: 3 Pelagic.



Short-tailed Shearwater: c. 5000 (c. 300) Omnipresent in all waters,
although nowhere near as common in offshore waters as last month.



Hutton’s Shearwater: 1 offshore in the afternoon.  Also a couple of
Flutton’s-type birds seen by one observer in pelagic waters.



Wilson’s Storm Petrel: c. 15 (7) 1 well offshore in the morning, remainder
pelagic.



White-faced Storm Petrel: 1 pelagic.



Black-faced Cormorant: c.420 (c. 150) 18 inshore in the morning, c. 400 on
the Hippolytes, 2 offshore in the morning and 1 pelagic.



Australasian Gannet: c. 105 (c. 40) 7 inshore in the morning, c. 80 on the
Hippolytes, 12 offshore in the morning and 4 pelagic.



White-bellied Sea Eagle: 1 flying west from the Hippolyte in the morning.



Silver Gull: c. 150 (c.30) Inshore and on the Hippolytes.



Pacific Gull: 2 (2) Adults on the Hippolyte.



Kelp Gull: c. 100 (c. 40) 21 inshore in the morning, c. 70 on the Hippolyte
and 8 offshore in the morning.



Caspian Tern: 1 flying north inshore in the morning; seen by one observer.
An uncommon sight on Eaglehawk trips.



Greater Crested Tern: c. 185 (c. 100) c. 65 inshore in the morning; c. 120
on Cheverton (Little Hippolyte) Rock, 7 offshore in the morning; 1 pelagic.



Skua sp.: A Brown Skua-type bird seen in inshore waters north of the
Hippolyte.



Parasitic Jaeger: 5 (2) 2 in pelagic waters (light morph), 3 offshore in
the afternoon (2 dark morph, 1 light morph)



PB


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Subject: Eaglehawk Pelagic Trip Report, 6th December 2014
From: Paul Brooks <theleadboots AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 08:03:00 +1100
Participants:

Penny Beaver, Ruth Brozek, Mike Double, Ian Halliday, Rob Hamilton, Golo
Maurer, John Tongue, Shirley Tongue, Peter Tongue, Kimberley Tongue,  Els
Wakefield, and Paul Brooks (organiser and report compiler)



Boat:

The Pauletta, skippered by John Males, with deckhand Adam.



Conditions and Activity:

Set out at 0705 hrs under overcast skies with some light drizzle. A light
southerly breeze blew with a swell around 1 m; light seas picked up
somewhat as we headed towards the Hippolytes. Nearing Cheverton Rock,
conditions became quite sloppy with some spray; conditions remained similar
as we headed east towards the shelf break. We berleyed with Atlantic salmon
frames and tuna oil beyond the shelf east of the Hippolyte in 320 fathoms
from 0930 hrs. The southerly breeze was around 15 knots with gusts to 20
knots; swell was low but the sloppy conditions continued with some waves to
3 metres keeping us on our toes Occasional squalls brought rain and higher
winds for periods. Drifted north into about 220 fathoms at 1150 hrs before
heading north to set up another slick at 1225 over 400 fathoms. Conditions
were similar with some waves to 4 metres. Drifted in to 340 fathoms before
setting sail for home at 1315 hrs, arriving at 1510 hrs. Water temperature
was around 15 deg C inshore, rising to 15.8 deg C out wide.  One seasick.



Mammals:

Australian/New Zealand Fur Seal: About a dozen on the Hippolytes and 1
female frolicking near the boat for a while out wide.



Birds (IOC v 4.2 – max at one time in brackets):

Little Penguin: 2 (2) Observed offshore by one observer.



Wandering-type Albatross: 1 A quite white, large bird with a large bill was
a good candidate for an *exulans* wanderer.



Antipodean Albatross: 8 (6) 7 adult male Gibson’s and 1 female Gibson’s,
all in pelagic waters.



Southern Royal Albatross: 2 (1) Pelagic.



Black-browed Albatross: 4 (4) 2 juveniles and 2 adults began following the
boat in offshore waters all the way to our first berley stop.



Campbell Albatross: 8 (8) At least this many – 7 adults on the water around
the boat at once with one sub-adult.



Shy Albatross: c. 60 (18) 5 inshore in the morning, 8 offshore, the
remainder pelagic.



Southern Giant Petrel: 1 immature in pelagic waters.



Northern Giant Petrel: 1 immature in pelagic waters.



Fairy Prion: 12 (3) 3 offshore in the morning, remainder pelagic.



Great-winged Petrel: 1 in pelagic waters; race *gouldi*.



White-headed Petrel: 4 (1) Pelagic waters.



MOTTLED PETREL: 5 (2) A couple of birds gave good views at close range.
All in pelagic waters.



GOULD’S PETREL: 12 (2) A couple of birds were quite curious, making
repeated, close passes of the boat.  Up to another dozen birds seen at a
distance.  All in pelagic waters.



COOK’S PETREL: 4 (1) Sighted our first almost immediately after pulling up
for our first stop.  All pelagic.



White-chinned Petrel: c. 50 (36) 3 offshore in the morning, remainder
pelagic, many of which followed the boat between stops.



Sooty Shearwater: c. 80 (c. 70) Completely replaced Short-tailed Shearwater
at our first berley stop, where there were up to 9 birds around the boat at
once.  While motoring between stops, we disturbed a raft of around 70
birds, a high number for an Eaglehawk trip.



Short-tailed Shearwater: c. 2000 (c. 300) Common from near the Hippolyte to
the shelf break but absent in pelagic waters.



Hutton’s Shearwater: 1 offshore in the afternoon.



Wilson’s Storm Petrel: 6 (3) All pelagic.



Grey-backed Storm Petrel: 3 (2) All pelagic.



White-faced Storm Petrel: 6 (3) All pelagic.



BLACK-BELLIED STORM PETREL: 2 (1) The first bird showed up within a minute
of us pulling up for our first stop.  The second bird showed well at our
second stop.



Common Diving Petrel: 1 Offshore in the afternoon.



Black-faced Cormorant: c.190 (c. 100) c. 30 inshore in the morning, c. 160
on the Hippolytes.



Australasian Gannet: c. 50 (c. 20) 18 inshore in the morning, c. 30 on the
Hippolytes and 2 pelagic.



Swamp Harrier: 1 over the Hippolyte.



Silver Gull: c. 100 (c.70) Inshore and on the Hippolytes; 1 pelagic.



Pacific Gull: 2 (2) Adults at the southern head of Pirates Bay.



Kelp Gull: c. 105 (c. 50) 27 inshore in the morning, c. 70 on the Hippolyte
and 6 offshore in the morning.



Greater Crested Tern: c. 31 (3) 2 inshore in the morning; 1 at the
Hippolytes, 2 offshore in the morning; remainder pelagic.



Jaeger sp.: 7 (2) Too distant to ID to species level - 6 birds in pelagic
waters, 1 offshore in the afternoon.  Good numbers for Eaglehawk.



Parasitic Jaeger: 2 (1) 1 dark morph and 1 light morph, both in pelagic
waters.



LONG-TAILED JAEGER: 2 (1) 1 dark morph and 1 light morph, both in pelagic
waters.



Forest Raven: 1 on the Hippolyte.



PB


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Subject: Re: Western Quail-thrush
From: <roscoedj AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 11:38:47 +0000
Hi Patrick,


Western Quail Thrush was split from the Chestnut-breasted Quail Thrush.


It’s mostly found in WA but leaks over the border into SA and NT.


It’s habitat is the rocky (Gibber) grounds through the Mulga country.


We recently spent a weekend up at Kirkalocka Station (just south of Mt Magnet) 
and found a good population nearby 😊 



Cheers,

Ross






Sent from Windows Mail





From: Patrick Scully
Sent: ‎Wednesday‎, ‎17‎ ‎December‎ ‎2014 ‎6‎:‎21‎ ‎PM
To: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org





Hello fellow birders,
I was reading the account of the WA Twitchathon and noticed a bit about Western 

Quail-thrush.  I checked the IOC list and sure enough it was there.  What
are the differences with the Western Quail-thrush? and where is it located
please.
Best wishes for the festive season and happy birding for 2015,
Patrick Scully


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Subject: Re: Western Quail-thrush
From: John Tongue <jspk AT iprimus.com.au>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 22:41:25 +1100
Hi Patrick,
Western was fairly recently split from Chestnut Breasted Quail-thrush, being 
what was formerly race marginatum. It's found in central WA. It has a brighter 
chestnut breasted, bordered above and below by more black. 


One we still need!  :)

Cheers,
John Tongue,
Devonport, Tas.


On 17/12/2014, at 9:21 PM, Patrick Scully  wrote:

> Hello fellow birders,
> I was reading the account of the WA Twitchathon and noticed a bit about 
Western 

> Quail-thrush.  I checked the IOC list and sure enough it was there.  What
> are the differences with the Western Quail-thrush? and where is it located
> please.
> Best wishes for the festive season and happy birding for 2015,
> Patrick Scully
> 
>
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Subject: Western Quail-thrush
From: Patrick Scully <scullyp3 AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 21:21:27 +1100
Hello fellow birders,
I was reading the account of the WA Twitchathon and noticed a bit about Western
Quail-thrush.  I checked the IOC list and sure enough it was there.  What
are the differences with the Western Quail-thrush? and where is it located
please.
Best wishes for the festive season and happy birding for 2015,
Patrick Scully


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Subject: Pauline Reilly
From: "Rosemary Balmford" <rbalmfor AT bigpond.net.au>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 14:53:41 +1100
I have your e-mail to Xenia Dennett asking for information about Pauline. I 
know of some relevant material, but will have to search for it, which may take 
some time as this is our busiest time of year. But we won’t forget you. 


Rosemary Balmford

rbalmfor AT bigpond.net.au


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Subject: I-Pod speaker
From: Frank O'Connor <foconnor AT iinet.net.au>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 12:43:04 +0800
I have a Bluetooth speaker, so no cable required for my iPhone 4S or 
iTouch.  Cost about $60 in the US back in April.  Circular and 
comparatively small (about 10cm diameter and 3cm deep).  Very easy to 
connect (go to settings, turn Bluetooth on, and then select the 
speaker).  No batteries, so it needs to be recharged through a USB 
port or charger, but it doesn't seem to use that much power so it has 
always lasted the day easily.  It seems to save power on the iPhone / 
iTouch compared to connecting it via a cable.  Your iPod should have 
Bluetooth capability. My iTouch does.

You can put it on the ground (or in the fork of a tree), back away 20 
metres and play the call in short bursts.  This worked brilliantly 
for King Rail, Clapper Rail, Northern Bobwhite, etc in the US.

I am not at home at the moment, so I can't remember the make and 
model.  JBW Wireless or something similar.  Bright red was the only 
colour available at the time.


_________________________________________________________________
Frank O'Connor                          Birding WA 
http://birdingwa.iinet.net.au
Phone : (08) 9386 5694               Email : foconnor AT iinet.net.au 




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Subject: Guide to India/Nepal,,
From: "Paul Doyle" <paulodoyle AT optusnet.com.au>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 13:16:26 +1100
Thanks to everyone who replied to my request for advice re. field guides for
India/Nepal.

For the record, I have decided to use Grimmett, Inskipp & Inksipp and it's
on its way to me now.

 

Regards,

Paul. 



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Subject: Scaly- Breasted up close and personal
From: "Chris Lloyd" <pezoporus AT bigpond.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 10:40:00 +1100
You could try Currumbin Bird Sanctuary on the Gold Coast or Paluma Caf out
from Townsville on the way to the Dam for other honeyeaters at your table.
They seem to prefer decaf, skinny soy lattes  must be sensitive new age
lorikeets. 

 

Ali Lloyd

 

 

 



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Subject: WTNT's on the GC
From: Cliff Booth <Cliff AT eklektik-consulting.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 23:12:48 +0000
Large number of WTNTs this morning around 8:00am driving along Neilson's road 
towards the Pacific highway. Difficult to ascertain accurate numbers since they 
were hawking over the road appearing above the traffic from the between the 
trees lining the highway from surrounding fields/houses/bush over a 1km 
stretch. Estimate at least 100 birds but could have been many more. Looked like 
a couple of FTS's thrown in for good measure. 


Cliff Booth


Sent from my iPad...so apologies for formatting errors.


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Subject: Re: On the subject of birding tour costs
From: Dave Torr <davidtorr AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 09:22:55 +1100
A tough dilemma! Let us not lose sight of the fact that the post which
triggered this debate (I guess) was one from an Indian complaining about
the prices of our guides. If you trawl the net you will see that a
"typical" $300 per day cost (the mid-point of the range Janine quoted) is
probably between a week's and a month's average wage in India! Whereas for
us it is much closer to an average daily wage. (Yes - I know you can prove
anything with statistics!)

On 17 December 2014 at 09:06, Alan Gillanders <
alan AT alanswildlifetours.com.au> wrote:
>
> Greetings,
> I sometimes feel guilty that I charge so little as that generally
> depresses prices, making it impossible for bright young birders to enter
> the industry as they will not be able to make a living.
>
> At other times I feel bad that people cannot afford to take my tours.
> Regards,
> Alan
>
>
> Alan's Wildlife Tours
> 2 Mather Road
> Yungaburra 4884
>
> Phone 07 4095 3784
> Mobile 0408 953 786
> http://www.alanswildlifetours.com.au/
>
> 
>
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Subject: Re: On the subject of birding tour costs
From: "Alan Gillanders" <alan AT alanswildlifetours.com.au>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 08:06:42 +1000
Greetings,
I sometimes feel guilty that I charge so little as that generally depresses 
prices, making it impossible for bright young birders to enter the industry 
as they will not be able to make a living.

At other times I feel bad that people cannot afford to take my tours.
Regards,
Alan


Alan's Wildlife Tours
2 Mather Road
Yungaburra 4884

Phone 07 4095 3784
Mobile 0408 953 786
http://www.alanswildlifetours.com.au/ 




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Subject: Re: I-Pod speaker
From: Paul Taylor <birder AT ozemail.com.au>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 00:06:47 +1100
> I've acquired a new I-Phone 6+ and have noticed that various external
> speakers that connect with older I-Phone models do not connect with
> this one.
> Has anyone else noticed this and found a solution?

Yes, no.

There are Lightning (new) to 30-pin (old) adapters - but most only allow 
charging.
Some adapter cables also have a 3.5mm plug for audio; I suspect that 
these only
provide charging and audio out - but no controls (volume, next/prev. 
track etc.)

The iPod Classic was the last of the 30-pin devices; I looked at getting 
one to
replace an iPod Nano 2nd gen. (the battery is dying) - but stocks were 
already low
(and prices high.)  When the time comes, I'll take my chances pulling it 
apart to
replace the battery.

-- 

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
    Paul Taylor                                  Veni, vidi, tici -
    birder AT ozemail.com.au                        I came, I saw, I ticked.




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Subject: Re: I-Pod speaker
From: Peter Shute <pshute AT nuw.org.au>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 22:01:14 +1100
I would have thought it had exactly the same 3.5mm plug as all the previous 
models, but this discussion has several people saying they found their old 
headphones wouldn't work properly until they pushed the plug in really hard: 

https://discussions.apple.com/thread/6546098

Peter Shute

Sent from my iPad

> On 16 Dec 2014, at 5:48 pm, Greg Roberts  wrote:
> 
> 
> 
> I've acquired a new I-Phone 6+ and have noticed that various external
> speakers that connect with older I-Phone models do not connect with
> this one.
> Has anyone else noticed this and found a solution?
> Greg Roberts 
> 
>
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Subject: Re: On the subject of birding tour costs
From: Dave Torr <davidtorr AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 21:35:39 +1100
Janine
I was just making the point that most Aussie things are expensive - not
just bird tours. Holidays in the UK and USA in the last couple of years
have been much cheaper per day than equivalents on Aus. But of course
recent changes in exchange rates will make us look cheaper to overseas
visitors, and discourage us from going overseas!
I cannot argue with you on costs and income, but of course many charge that
about that amount per day per person!
As I said - I do not regret spending money on the professional guides I
have used and wish you all had more business, which would indicate we might
get some leverage in showing birds and the environment are worth protecting
Dave
On 16 Dec 2014 17:19, "Janine Duffy"  wrote:

> Hi Dave
>
> You've outlined my point precisely. What makes you say Aussie bird tours
> are expensive? Several of the operators I know are charging $200 - 400 a
> day depending on number of participants. That includes their costs -
> vehicle, office, marketing, food sometimes. Most other Aussie professionals
> are getting paid that every day without any costs. And they have full time
> work, not the seasonal uncertainty of tour operators.
>
> I think comparisons with costs in  developing nations have skewed our idea
> of what it should cost.
>
> I'm not having a go, I'm just trying to explore this idea. Thanks for your
> reply, I appreciate it.
>
> Best, Janine
>
> Sent from my Motorola RAZR™ M on the Telstra Next G™ Network
>
>
> Dave Torr  wrote:
>
> Janine
> An interesting email - yes Aussie bird tours are expensive but then so are
> most Aussie holidays (and other things) compared to overseas equivalents
> for many reasons which have been done to death in many forums!
> I have certainly been on a number of "professional" Aussie bird tours when
> I was less experienced and - whilst they were not cheap - I always found
> they were fantastic. These days I do my own thing in Aus with my mates but
> if heading overseas I nearly always use a professional guide - in part
> because I think that if "locals" appreciate that there is money to be made
> out of "eco tourism" they are much more likely to try to protect what
> little of the natural environment remains.
> Dave
>
> On 16 December 2014 at 16:54, Janine Duffy  > wrote:
>>
>> Hi B-aus
>>
>> I write, partly in response to a recent email mentioning the cost of
>> birding tours, and partly as a general topic.
>>
>> Bird tour operators in Australia are generally experts in their field,
>> with many years of experience under their belts. They often run tours with
>> a very small number of participants, sometimes even private tours, at costs
>> that barely cover their expenses, let alone their time.
>>
>> They do this because the market simply doesn't pay. As a result, many
>> burn out after years of doing what they love. Others find creative ways of
>> maintaining their tour business, which sometimes means small windows of
>> availability, or slow replies to enquiries.
>>
>> We end up losing our best people from the industry. This is an industry
>> that should be able to employ people, contribute to local economies, and
>> invest in protecting the birds we all love.
>>
>> The answer to this problem is for us to modify our view on what a bird
>> tour is worth.  Is a day with a great birder worth the same as an engineers
>> time? Or a lawyer's? Doctor's? Manager's?
>>
>> As a long term tour operator (wildlife, not bird specific) I known the
>> costs. I know that most small, genuine tour operators in Australia are
>> excellent but under-valued and under-paid.
>>
>> A good bird tour operator gives you something that no lawyer, engineer or
>> manager can give you. That feeling of wonder, excitement, thrill at seeing
>> a wild creature you've never seen before. Do you remember that for the rest
>> of your life? Is that worth paying that guide a decent living wage? I think
>> it is.
>>
>> Janine
>>
>> Sent from my Motorola RAZR™ M on the Telstra Next G™ Network
>> 
>>
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Subject: Ruff Knights WA Twitchathon summary
From: Bruce Greatwich <roostapoppa AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 15:50:16 +0800
Hi all, it was an excellent twitchathon once again which we enjoyed
thoroughly. Below is a summary of the triumphs and tribulations of the Ruff
Knights (Stewart Ford, Bruce Greatwich, Nigel Jackett, Nathan Waugh), hope
you enjoy reading. Congratulations on the Western Whistlers on their
victory in the 24 hour and once again showing the south-west can conquer
the north-west!



We wound back our insanity (a little bit) from last year and decided an
excellent compromise to retain northern latitude birds would be to start
our twitchathon campaign in Carnarvon. However we took a large gamble in
that none of us had previously birded Carnarvon (except for a couple of us
who completed a tick and run for the Eurasian Wigeon a couple of years
ago). To compensate for this, we left Perth Thursday morning, allowing us a
full day of recce in Carnarvon, which proved to be invaluable.



A big thanks to local birding legend Les George, who we met up with on
Saturday morning and filled us in on what was hanging around town. We were
initially very concerned upon arriving in Carnarvon and recceing on Friday.
Birds that we thought would be simple were nowhere to be seen, and it was
blowing a steady 40+ km/hr constantly, certainly far from ideal. We decided
to start at Pelican Point, where a large flock of shorebirds were roosting
during the high tide. However having staked out all the shorebirds, half
the flock including all of the Bar-tailed Godwits, Great Knots and Red
Knots – about 500 birds all up - was flushed to the other side of the bay
by kite surfers 30 min prior to the start time. It was too late to relocate
so come 5pm we quickly ticked off the shorebirds that were left and the
twitchathon was on.



In hindsight we believe we broke even in Carnarvon which we felt was a
great result given the poor birding we encountered upon arrival. And we
managed some great highlights, White-bellied Sea-eagle, Osprey and Brahminy
Kite were ticked off in a single scan of the bay within 10 seconds of each
other, a massive result given we hadn't seen an Eagle or Osprey since
arriving in town! A Peregrine Falcon at the sewage works was great and is
rarely recorded in town according to Les, a male Chestnut Teal at the
sewage works made this an excellent stop. Slender-billed Thornbill was
ticked off from near the Golf Course and undoubtedly the bird of our
twitchathon (and strong contender for best bird) a Little Ringed Plover at
Chinaman’s Pool. We left Carnarvon on 83 birds, quite amazingly this was
the same total of birds we had encountered during recce upon arriving in
town. To get this in 2.5 hours was a great effort and we were pumped!



The long night drive followed, highlight being we managed to avoid hitting
any wildlife despite the constant kamikaze kangaroos. We did poorer then
expected on night birds, but managed Boobook, Owlet-nightjar, Frogmouth and
spotlighted a Torresian Crow on a radio tower (don’t worry, we got several
of them during the day too ;). We attempted to spotlight a Pectoral
Sandpiper on a sewage pond which we recorded on the way up. Unfortunately
we didn’t get it, fortunately one of our team members won a 6-pack because
of it.  We also dipped on a Western Quail-thrush that we’d spotlighted on
the drive up while looking for geckos!  A pre-dawn Spotted Nightjar would
have been the first time this species had been recorded by the Ruff
Knights, if only one of the team members had agreed.



We planned our "dawn chorus" stop to be in mulga woodland, and were greatly
rewarded by the single chirp of a Singing Honeyeater. Ah the serenity! When
mulga woodland is good it is great, but when it is bad it is a deafening
silence, and in a dry December it is certainly not good. Despite this, we
managed to grab specialist birds such as Bourke's and Mulga Parrots,
Chestnut-rumped, Inland and Slaty-backed Thornbills, Grey-crowned Babbler
and Western Bowerbird.



Continuing down the highway we ticked off the different habitats and
corresponding birds. Mallee-heath brought us Southern Scrub-robin,
Grey-fronted Honeyeater, White-eared Honeyeater and Blue-breasted
Fairy-wren. Wandoo gave us Yellow-plumed Honeyeater, Pallid Cuckoo, Western
Yellow Robin and Western Thornbill. Perth Hills gave us Red-winged
Fairy-wren, Red-capped Parrot and White-browed Scrub-wren, the Wheatbelt
gave us nothing despite us having recced a ‘dead cert’ site for Brown
Songlark on the way up. Once again we encountered our major flaw in our
route, bush birding through the middle parts of the day in 30 degree
sunshine, resulting in many simple bush bird dips during a mid-day black
hole where we encountered no new birds for over an hour.



From the hills we hit up the coastal plain. Nigel knows Herdy like the back
of his hand and as a result we quickly ticked off all the required birds,
notable exception being Great Cormorant. We whizzed past 12 hour
competitors Once-Bittern with some friendly heckling, and with a small
amount of time we headed to Lake Claremont and were rewarded with Spotted
and Spotless Crakes (also got Long-toed Stint and Marsh Sandpiper, great
birds but we already had them). The Little Bittern and Night-Heron were
still required but we ditched these and headed to the river for for a 2
minute watch for Great Cormorants and Fairy Terns, frustratedly dipping as
a black cormorant flying deliberately into the wind at distance could not
be confidently identified!



Our total stood at 180 which we suspected would not get us over the line,
with the Whistlers consistently recording in the low 180's over the
previous years. Down from our record of 188 from last year. Once again our
route was characterized by some really great birds and some really bad
dips, the trade-off for time driving versus time birding.  We improved
notably on the second day and in particularly through the Wandoo/Hills zone
compared to the previous year, however we missed too many critical species
in Carnarvon. Once again the arid zone was in poor condition, if we ever
hit that area in good condition we should pick up the nomads, putting the
200 barrier within our reach.



Some huge highlights including three crippling Peregrine views, the
Sea-eagle/Osprey/Brahminy Kite 10 second tick, the WA Thornbill Slam which
has probably never been done in 24 hours before (Slender-billed,
Chestnut-rumped, Inland, Slaty-backed, Yellow-rumped and Western), Bourke's
Parrots in the Mulga, Chestnut Teal in Carnarvon, road side Major
Mitchell's Cockatoo and obviously the Little Ringed Plover spotted by Nigel
at Chinaman’s pool in Carnarvon (Les George now reports 2 birds are
present). And the pies at Bindoon of course.



Notable dips, where do we begin? The Striated Heron we had pinned down an
hour before the start, Peaceful Dove, Scarlet Robin, Night-heron, Great
Cormorant, Brown and Rufous Songlark, White-fronted Honeyeater, Barn Owl,
Mistletoe-bird, Black-shouldered Kite, Western Spinebill, White-breasted
Woodswallow, Western Wattlebird, the list goes on!



We traveled 1,510 km for our 180 birds = 11.9 birds per 100 km. Far more
uneconomical than team SWAT and all others I would suggest. We really
enjoyed following some of the other teams on twitter too, particularly
during the difficult middle part of Sunday. Special mention must go to Wes
Bancroft (Stark Raven Mad) for some hilarious updates!



Once again we tested some new boundaries within the state, replicating less
than 30% of previous routes. Who knows what next year will bring for the
Ruff Knights :)


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Subject: Re: WA Twitchathon preliminary results
From: Mark Newman <mark.newman AT skippers.com.au>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 08:10:10 +0000
Hello

Some of you may or may not have been aware that this was going to be my last 
twitchathon as a Western Whistler & I had thought at the beginning it was 
possible for some records to tumble. 

I will just put some ups & downs & Steve as usual will put out a report later.

Highlights
Laying in a bush early Saturday morning on a recce looking straight at a Noisy 
Scrubbird as he called & called. A Wonderful clever bird. 

2 Barn Owls - our bogey bird. So pleased to see them finally.
3 Birds not on a twitch before , Barn Owl ,Little Bittern & White Backed 
Swallow. ( so over 5 years a grand total of 211 species ). 

3 Masked Lapwings now at Kalgan , maybe they have bred.
Juv White Bellied Sea Eagle doing a great impression of a Bustard walking thru 
a Paddock. We skidded to a halt hoping for at least a chance of a Bustard for 
best bird. 

The Night birding was excellent a clean sweep & also getting 6 waders & one 
duck in the night at Wagin. My favourite moment of the twitch. Also never 
thought I would actually be pleased to have a balaclava in Western Australia. 
Having a 20 min kip wearing it as it was about 6 degs ( felt colder ) at 
Dryandra & then be woken by Steve as the Masked Owl called flying over the 
fields. 

My first Brush Tailed Phascogale.
Excellent views of Crested Shrike Tit again.
We were behind at every stage of our route ( bar nightbirds ) compared to the 
last 2 years so we decided once we left Wearne Road that it was Boom or Bust 
time & we decided to head towards the City Lakes Monger, Herdsman & Claremont & 
leave out Bibra ,Yangebup & Ellis Brook. And I can see why some of you guys go 
to this lakes even with the traffic you can build up numbers with ease. We 
ticked off more than expected ( but no Freckled Duck ). 

Having nearly 2 locations for every species & having all the recce work pay 
off. 

McClarty for being the saviour at the end.
Breaking our record by 1 & finishing with 183.


Downs
On the Friday night recce for Night birds taking two out of state visitors with 
us & dipping all 6, Weather was poor but not even a call & looking like a 
couple of twats. 

Hitting 2 Roo's at one time & sadly killing them, Very sad in fact. Causing a 
bit of a delay. 

No Black Shouldered Kites again or Little Eagle.
Also Dipping both Godwits
Dipping Painted Button Quail especially after finding a male & 4 young a couple 
of days previous. 

No Turnstones at Woodman Point
Not having enough time to go to Len Howard for the Ruff ( after finding it & 
then checking every couple of days ) as we run short of time for McClarty. 

Nairns was awful ,only thing there were Silver Gulls.
Not being able to tick the Pheasant haha


Any way big thanks go to Steve with putting up with me for 5 years.
John for organising this fantastic event.
Ruff Knights for being very hard fanatical opponents.
Other competitors Robyn, Alan, Nick & Wes for being  such nice people.

My Kids finished their local twitch with 26 by pedalling around the local parks 
& they are my future now. 



Cheers

From: John Graff [mailto:jgraff2 AT hotmail.com]
Sent: Tuesday, 16 December 2014 8:50 AM
To: John Graff
Cc: birdswa AT googlegroups.com; Birding-Aus
Subject: WA Twitchathon preliminary results

Hi all,

Apologies for the delay, I returned from the field late yesterday afternoon. 
I'm still waiting to find out one team's score from the Armchair competition, 
but as there are starting to be queries about results, here are the current 
preliminary results: 


24 HOUR
183 - Western Whistlers
180 - The Ruff Knights
156 - S. W. A. T.
130 - Stark Raven Mad
127 - The Rainbow Avocets

12 HOUR
130 - Once Bittern
123 - Hunters & Collectors
100 - 12hr Stints
80 - Peeping Pardalotes
55 - Weebill Rock You (early withdrawal due to illness)

Armchair
75 - Blue and White Hoopoes
44 - Lazy Old Bustards
Pending - O.B.E. Team

The final full results, including best sighting and worst dip, will be out in 
the next couple of weeks (probably after Christmas) and presentations will be 
made at the January BirdLife WA meeting. Thanks again to everyone who 
participated, and hopefully everyone had a fairly enjoyable weekend! 


Cheers,
John


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Subject: Re: a BIG day out of Cairns yesterday!!
From: martin cachard <mcachard AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 18:51:45 +1100
one thing that i'd neglected to mention was how struck I am on how the Pipits 
look on those saline grasslands of Marina Plains. these are of race 'rogersi', 
the same bird that u see in the coastal Top End & the Gulf of Carpentaria in 
similar habitats...very heavily streaked underparts!! 

 
cheers, 
martin cachard, 
cairns
 

 
> From: mcachard AT hotmail.com
> To: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
> Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 10:41:17 +1100
> Subject: [Birding-Aus] a BIG day out of Cairns yesterday!!
> 
> hello all...
> thought i'd just share some observations from a very long day trip to the 
southern half of Cape York Peninsula yesterday with my birding friend Kev 
Bartram... 

>  
> running 2 hours late (what's new!!) I eventually got to Kev at Kingfisher 
Park at Julatten just after 5am yesterday... 

>  
> first stop was at Laura general store for some fuel at 7am where we were 
greeted by a rollicking Black-backed Butcherbird on the power lines singing 
50mtrs away!! a highlight was a group of 4 Varied Lorikeets whizzing across the 
rd between Hann River & Artemis - not a common species here but not unexpected 
given the myriad blossoming bloodwoods throughout, but a highlight all the 
same... 

> next we pulled up around Windmill Creek searching for Golden-shouldered 
Parrots, but alas no parrots to be found after an hour's search near the dams 
to the east side or rd...however more BB Butchers & good looks at Red-browed 
Pardalotes & Silver-crowned Friarbirds too were nice. 

>  
> back in the car & a short cruise up the station tracks through Artemis to 
Dixie looking for the parrots but no go again...a pair of calling Little 
Bronze-Cuckoos put in a nice appearance, along with a couple of very young 
Bee-eaters just out of the nest... 

>  
> onto the Musgrave-Lilyvale area for Red Goshawk but no nest tree & no nest!! 
cyclone damage form Ita, I suspect!! 

>  
> then we trudged further east for Marina Plains (one of my fave & unheralded 
remote sites up here it must be said!!)... great numbers of Brolgas (no Sarus) 
along the grasslands with Pipits, Bushlarks & Zitting Cisticolas busily going 
about their business. during our roadside stops for the cisticolas (very skulky 
they were!!), we had +5 Aust Pratincoles, & a very oblidging lone Oriental 
Pratincole which allowed a very close approach on foot!! stopping at the 
mangroves at the old barra fishing camp we got onto Rufous-banded Honeyeaters, 
Collared Kingfishers, Little Shrike-thrush, Mangrove Robin, more Zitters, 
Gull-billed Terns, & a flock of 14 Little Curlews on the rd back out along the 
grass plains - not a bad little stop that one!! 

>  
> next we continued east to Nifold Plains for some finch action...about 30 each 
of Black-throated & Double-barred Finches came in to drink but for the first 
time ever, no Star or Masked Finches there!! whilst awaiting the flocks beside 
the drying dam, we were paid a visit by the ranger to advise us that Lakefield 
NP was indeed closed as of today but he kindly allowed us to continue, so that 
we did...narrowly avoiding the odd pair of kamikaze Emus doing their level best 
to be collected for science by a dirty white landcruiser!!!! 

>  
> winding south through the park we were thwarted with an attempt for 
white-bellied Crimson Finch due to very the sticky wet black soil track before 
us...so back to the main rd for us with another dip!! 

>  
> continuing east along Battlecamp Rd we made a bee-line for McIvor River, 
arriving there at 5pm with a massive amount of Cyclone Ita damage to be 
seen...that means no big paperbark anymore in the causeway for the 
annually-nesting Papuan Frogmouths, Yellow Orioles, Figbirds, & Red-browed 
Finches!!! never the less within an hour we had Tropical Scrubwren, 
Black-winged Monarchs (include a very dull 6-10 month old bird), Shining 
Flycatchers, Azure Kingfisher, Brush Turkey (yellow-collared), Rose-crowned & 
Wompoo Fruit-Doves, White-browed Robins, Large-billed & Fairy Gerygones, Black 
Butcherbirds, Graceful, Yellow-spotted, Macleay's, & Dusky Honeyeaters... alas 
no White-streaked Honeyeaters though, but with all the blossom they would be 
there at the moment... 

>  
> it was time to thrash onwards to Cooktown before sundown to track down the 
Spotted Whisting-Ducks at Keating Lagoon...rushing to the hide, the Magpie 
Geese went up with a huge whirr taking with them some strange-ish sounding 
Whistling-Ducks which circled a few times to make a pass in the very last light 
revealing themselves as Spotted's - nice dark backs & much higher cheerier call 
notes!! what a day!!!! 

>  
> misses for the day apart from the obvious (GS Parrots...etc) were zero Leaden 
Flycatchers, & a very poor raptor diversity... total species count was over 140 
spp with over 1100kms of HOT driving!! so a great LOOOOONG day... 

>  
> cheers & thanx for reading,
> Martin Cachard, Cairns,
> (with visiting Kev Bartram from Victoria)
>  
>  
>  		 	   		  
> 
>
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Subject: White-throated Needletails over Kobble Creek, SEQ
From: Marie Tarrant <sittella AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 17:34:44 +1000
Between 4 - 5pm (Qld time) today several loose flocks of WTNTs (group
numbers ranging between 6 to approx 50 have been intermittently patrolling
the airspace along the timbered ranges here above Kobble Creek, SEQ.
Flight pattern has appeared relaxed.

-- 
Marie Tarrant
Kobble Creek,  Qld


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Subject: Re: On the subject of birding tour costs
From: Steve Clark <bukoba.steve AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 17:54:57 +1100
G’day all

Another way to look at it is to compare with the cost of other activities.

I just jumped onto a concert ticket website and found that someone called 
Taylor Swift is performing at a large stadium in Melbourne next year. The 
cheapest ticket is $91 and they range up to $610. 


The cheapest ticket to the Rugby League State of Origin game at the MCG next 
year is $60 and they range up to $270. 


Hiring a guide for a day’s birding in a new place is a luxury. I can’t 
afford (or am too mean) to use guides often but I paid $US500 for a day on the 
Lark Plains, northern Tanzania last August and got 29 lifers despite having 
birded the district fairy thoroughly on my own for 2 weeks. There are some 
places you will never find on your own. There are important cultural issues 
(land ownership etc) that you will never figure out in a short visit to a 
foreign country. There are birds you will miss on your own if you don’t know 
the calls. 


Guides can be expensive but the best are worth it. If anyone wants a 
recommendation for a guide in northern Tanzania get in touch with me. 


Cheers
Steve Clark
Hamilton, Vic  


> On 16 Dec 2014, at 5:22 pm, Experience the Wild 
 wrote: 

> 
> Hi Janine,
> 
> Thank you for articulating so nicely the value of professional birding tour. 
Compared to running tours generally, birding tours are hard work, as you know. 
To be a tour guide requires training, to be a birding guide requires both 
training and passion, but the latter can't be taught. As a guide I feel 
honoured when people trust me to deliver an experience worth paying for, and 
very grateful when they provide feedback through trip advisor that they did 
indeed have their expectations exceeded. 

> 
> Mike Jarvis
> www.experiencethewild.com.au
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Birding-Aus [mailto:birding-aus-bounces AT birding-aus.org] On Behalf Of 
Janine Duffy 

> Sent: Tuesday, 16 December 2014 3:24 PM
> To: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
> Subject: [Birding-Aus] On the subject of birding tour costs
> 
> Hi B-aus
> 
> I write, partly in response to a recent email mentioning the cost of birding 
tours, and partly as a general topic. 

> 
> Bird tour operators in Australia are generally experts in their field, with 
many years of experience under their belts. They often run tours with a very 
small number of participants, sometimes even private tours, at costs that 
barely cover their expenses, let alone their time. 

> 
> They do this because the market simply doesn't pay. As a result, many burn 
out after years of doing what they love. Others find creative ways of 
maintaining their tour business, which sometimes means small windows of 
availability, or slow replies to enquiries. 

> 
> We end up losing our best people from the industry. This is an industry that 
should be able to employ people, contribute to local economies, and invest in 
protecting the birds we all love. 

> 
> The answer to this problem is for us to modify our view on what a bird tour 
is worth. Is a day with a great birder worth the same as an engineers time? Or 
a lawyer's? Doctor's? Manager's? 

> 
> As a long term tour operator (wildlife, not bird specific) I known the costs. 
I know that most small, genuine tour operators in Australia are excellent but 
under-valued and under-paid. 

> 
> A good bird tour operator gives you something that no lawyer, engineer or 
manager can give you. That feeling of wonder, excitement, thrill at seeing a 
wild creature you've never seen before. Do you remember that for the rest of 
your life? Is that worth paying that guide a decent living wage? I think it is. 

> 
> Janine
> 
> Sent from my Motorola RAZR™ M on the Telstra Next G™ Network 

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Subject: I-Pod speaker
From: "Greg Roberts" <ninderry AT westnet.com.au>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 16:38:22 +1000

I've acquired a new I-Phone 6+ and have noticed that various external
speakers that connect with older I-Phone models do not connect with
this one.
Has anyone else noticed this and found a solution?
Greg Roberts 


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Subject: Re: On the subject of birding tour costs
From: "Experience the Wild" <mike AT experiencethewild.com.au>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 15:52:05 +0930
Hi Janine,

Thank you for articulating so nicely the value of professional birding tour. 
Compared to running tours generally, birding tours are hard work, as you know. 
To be a tour guide requires training, to be a birding guide requires both 
training and passion, but the latter can't be taught. As a guide I feel 
honoured when people trust me to deliver an experience worth paying for, and 
very grateful when they provide feedback through trip advisor that they did 
indeed have their expectations exceeded. 


Mike Jarvis
www.experiencethewild.com.au

-----Original Message-----
From: Birding-Aus [mailto:birding-aus-bounces AT birding-aus.org] On Behalf Of 
Janine Duffy 

Sent: Tuesday, 16 December 2014 3:24 PM
To: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
Subject: [Birding-Aus] On the subject of birding tour costs

Hi B-aus

I write, partly in response to a recent email mentioning the cost of birding 
tours, and partly as a general topic. 


Bird tour operators in Australia are generally experts in their field, with 
many years of experience under their belts. They often run tours with a very 
small number of participants, sometimes even private tours, at costs that 
barely cover their expenses, let alone their time. 


They do this because the market simply doesn't pay. As a result, many burn out 
after years of doing what they love. Others find creative ways of maintaining 
their tour business, which sometimes means small windows of availability, or 
slow replies to enquiries. 


We end up losing our best people from the industry. This is an industry that 
should be able to employ people, contribute to local economies, and invest in 
protecting the birds we all love. 


The answer to this problem is for us to modify our view on what a bird tour is 
worth. Is a day with a great birder worth the same as an engineers time? Or a 
lawyer's? Doctor's? Manager's? 


As a long term tour operator (wildlife, not bird specific) I known the costs. I 
know that most small, genuine tour operators in Australia are excellent but 
under-valued and under-paid. 


A good bird tour operator gives you something that no lawyer, engineer or 
manager can give you. That feeling of wonder, excitement, thrill at seeing a 
wild creature you've never seen before. Do you remember that for the rest of 
your life? Is that worth paying that guide a decent living wage? I think it is. 


Janine

Sent from my Motorola RAZR™ M on the Telstra Next G™ Network 

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Subject: Re: On the subject of birding tour costs
From: Janine Duffy <janine AT echidnawalkabout.com.au>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 17:18:41 +1100
Hi Dave

You've outlined my point precisely. What makes you say Aussie bird tours are 
expensive? Several of the operators I know are charging $200 - 400 a day 
depending on number of participants. That includes their costs - vehicle, 
office, marketing, food sometimes. Most other Aussie professionals are getting 
paid that every day without any costs. And they have full time work, not the 
seasonal uncertainty of tour operators. 


I think comparisons with costs in developing nations have skewed our idea of 
what it should cost. 


I'm not having a go, I'm just trying to explore this idea. Thanks for your 
reply, I appreciate it. 


Best, Janine

Sent from my Motorola RAZR™ M on the Telstra Next G™ Network

Dave Torr  wrote:

>Janine
>
>An interesting email - yes Aussie bird tours are expensive but then so are 
most Aussie holidays (and other things) compared to overseas equivalents for 
many reasons which have been done to death in many forums! 

>
>I have certainly been on a number of "professional" Aussie bird tours when I 
was less experienced and - whilst they were not cheap - I always found they 
were fantastic. These days I do my own thing in Aus with my mates but if 
heading overseas I nearly always use a professional guide - in part because I 
think that if "locals" appreciate that there is money to be made out of "eco 
tourism" they are much more likely to try to protect what little of the natural 
environment remains. 

>
>Dave
>
>
>On 16 December 2014 at 16:54, Janine Duffy  
wrote: 

>
>Hi B-aus
>
>I write, partly in response to a recent email mentioning the cost of birding 
tours, and partly as a general topic. 

>
>Bird tour operators in Australia are generally experts in their field, with 
many years of experience under their belts. They often run tours with a very 
small number of participants, sometimes even private tours, at costs that 
barely cover their expenses, let alone their time. 

>
>They do this because the market simply doesn't pay. As a result, many burn out 
after years of doing what they love. Others find creative ways of maintaining 
their tour business, which sometimes means small windows of availability, or 
slow replies to enquiries. 

>
>We end up losing our best people from the industry. This is an industry that 
should be able to employ people, contribute to local economies, and invest in 
protecting the birds we all love. 

>
>The answer to this problem is for us to modify our view on what a bird tour is 
worth.  Is a day with a great birder worth the same as an engineers time? Or a 
lawyer's? Doctor's? Manager's? 

>
>As a long term tour operator (wildlife, not bird specific) I known the costs. 
I know that most small, genuine tour operators in Australia are excellent but 
under-valued and under-paid. 

>
>A good bird tour operator gives you something that no lawyer, engineer or 
manager can give you. That feeling of wonder, excitement, thrill at seeing a 
wild creature you've never seen before. Do you remember that for the rest of 
your life? Is that worth paying that guide a decent living wage? I think it is. 

>
>Janine
>
>Sent from my Motorola RAZR™ M on the Telstra Next G™ Network
>
>
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Subject: Re: On the subject of birding tour costs
From: Dave Torr <davidtorr AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 16:59:51 +1100
Janine
An interesting email - yes Aussie bird tours are expensive but then so are
most Aussie holidays (and other things) compared to overseas equivalents
for many reasons which have been done to death in many forums!
I have certainly been on a number of "professional" Aussie bird tours when
I was less experienced and - whilst they were not cheap - I always found
they were fantastic. These days I do my own thing in Aus with my mates but
if heading overseas I nearly always use a professional guide - in part
because I think that if "locals" appreciate that there is money to be made
out of "eco tourism" they are much more likely to try to protect what
little of the natural environment remains.
Dave

On 16 December 2014 at 16:54, Janine Duffy 
wrote:
>
> Hi B-aus
>
> I write, partly in response to a recent email mentioning the cost of
> birding tours, and partly as a general topic.
>
> Bird tour operators in Australia are generally experts in their field,
> with many years of experience under their belts. They often run tours with
> a very small number of participants, sometimes even private tours, at costs
> that barely cover their expenses, let alone their time.
>
> They do this because the market simply doesn't pay. As a result, many burn
> out after years of doing what they love. Others find creative ways of
> maintaining their tour business, which sometimes means small windows of
> availability, or slow replies to enquiries.
>
> We end up losing our best people from the industry. This is an industry
> that should be able to employ people, contribute to local economies, and
> invest in protecting the birds we all love.
>
> The answer to this problem is for us to modify our view on what a bird
> tour is worth.  Is a day with a great birder worth the same as an engineers
> time? Or a lawyer's? Doctor's? Manager's?
>
> As a long term tour operator (wildlife, not bird specific) I known the
> costs. I know that most small, genuine tour operators in Australia are
> excellent but under-valued and under-paid.
>
> A good bird tour operator gives you something that no lawyer, engineer or
> manager can give you. That feeling of wonder, excitement, thrill at seeing
> a wild creature you've never seen before. Do you remember that for the rest
> of your life? Is that worth paying that guide a decent living wage? I think
> it is.
>
> Janine
>
> Sent from my Motorola RAZR™ M on the Telstra Next G™ Network
> 
>
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Subject: On the subject of birding tour costs
From: Janine Duffy <janine AT echidnawalkabout.com.au>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 16:54:01 +1100
Hi B-aus

I write, partly in response to a recent email mentioning the cost of birding 
tours, and partly as a general topic. 


Bird tour operators in Australia are generally experts in their field, with 
many years of experience under their belts. They often run tours with a very 
small number of participants, sometimes even private tours, at costs that 
barely cover their expenses, let alone their time. 


They do this because the market simply doesn't pay. As a result, many burn out 
after years of doing what they love. Others find creative ways of maintaining 
their tour business, which sometimes means small windows of availability, or 
slow replies to enquiries. 


We end up losing our best people from the industry. This is an industry that 
should be able to employ people, contribute to local economies, and invest in 
protecting the birds we all love. 


The answer to this problem is for us to modify our view on what a bird tour is 
worth. Is a day with a great birder worth the same as an engineers time? Or a 
lawyer's? Doctor's? Manager's? 


As a long term tour operator (wildlife, not bird specific) I known the costs. I 
know that most small, genuine tour operators in Australia are excellent but 
under-valued and under-paid. 


A good bird tour operator gives you something that no lawyer, engineer or 
manager can give you. That feeling of wonder, excitement, thrill at seeing a 
wild creature you've never seen before. Do you remember that for the rest of 
your life? Is that worth paying that guide a decent living wage? I think it is. 


Janine

Sent from my Motorola RAZR™ M on the Telstra Next G™ Network


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Subject: Lunch with some Scaly-breasts
From: "Donald G. Kimball" <ibwonet1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 20:22:49 -0800
Can't state with enough frequency how I so appreciate this site.  Someone
like me from overseas planning Australian adventures would be lost without
it.

Okay I am hoping to spend more time in Aus as soon as 2015.  I am planning
to be in the area of Cairns and Surrounds to Atherton Tablelands/Yungaburra
area.  Does anyone know of excellent areas to see Scaly-breasted Lorikeets
up close with any kind of regularity?

I was envisioning some sort of bed and breakfast or outdoor cafe with
nectar feeders or something that draws them there.  Anyone see anything
like this in those areas?

Blown away here as always as to how helpful this site is.

Cheers!

Don Kimball
Polytelis Media


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Subject: Re: Storm-Petrels - Proposed split into two families
From: Carl Clifford <carlsclifford AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 14:32:48 +1100
Thanks for the heads up on that site , Michael. Looks pretty useful.

Carl Clifford


> On 16 Dec 2014, at 1:44 pm, Michael Ramsey  wrote:
> 
> This is already known if you follow pages such as below: 
> 
> http://jboyd.net/Taxo/fam_index.html
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On 16 Dec 2014, at 13:27, "Frank O'Connor"  wrote:
>> 
>> 
>> I just looked up the IOC web site worldbirdnames.org and it looks like the 
storm-petrels will be split into two families in the next version 5.1 due in 
early 2015. 

>> 
>> Hydrobatidae - northern storm-petrels
>> Oceanitidae - southern storm-petrels
>> 
>> Not exactly certain where each genus will fall, but I guess we will find out 
in 2015. 

>> 
>> 
>> 
>> For those interested in families, it looks like Swallow-tailed Cotinga will 
be put back into Cotingidae (it was previously indeterminate) 

>> 
>> 
>> _________________________________________________________________
>> Frank O'Connor Birding WA http://birdingwa.iinet.net.au 

>> Phone : (08) 9386 5694               Email : foconnor AT iinet.net.au 
>> 
>> 
>>
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>
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Subject: Help with Bird tracking and watching in and around Melbourne for Photography
From: Ujjal akl <ghosh.ujjal AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 16:19:55 +1300
Hello  all

Good afternoon !!



I may introduce myself as an Indian Engineer now settled in Auckland , New
Zealand for almost 15 years  having keen interests in nature and bird
photography.

Just picked up your email id and phone numbers from the Internet.



I will be visiting Melbourne soon.



It has been one of my most cherished dreams to photograph the beautiful
birds (Superb Lyrebird , and the many types of colourful  Robins, Wrens,
Diamond Fire Tails, Golden Whistler birds & Cisticolas etc.  and other
colourful species ) in and around Melbourne for a day.



Tried to set up a tour with several Birding tour operators and seems they
are all either busy with other groups who were not keen to take in any
extra interested visitors. I am quite clueless as what best can be done as
I do not want miss this opportunity when I am in Melbourne.Also some of
them are very expensive.



Would  any one of you be able to help please - I am looking at either of
the following days - if you are available on any day  on    - 31st of
December or 2nd or 3rd of January -2105.



I would need  pick up (either from Melton if on the 31st or  from Wantirna
South if on the 2nd or the 3rd ) on the  and drop off at Wantirna South on
all days.



It will my most precious privilege if you could  please help me. I would be
most obliged  to provide for the costs of any national park fees, vehicle
hire and fuel and also for the lunch and refreshments all day.

Just seeking your help please. Would appreciate an early reply to :


ghosh.ujjal AT gmail.com

and

 ujjal.ghosh AT hussmann.com


Kind regards


 Sincerely

 Ujjal Ghosh


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Subject: Port Stephens pelagics - 2015 dates
From: Mick Roderick <mickhhb AT yahoo.com.au>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 03:04:31 +0000 (UTC)
Hi all,
I have set dates for the 2015 Port Stephens pelagics (and apologies for 
cross-postings). 

Note that there has been a rise in the fee for the charter which will need to 
be shared by participants. The Port Stephens trips will now cost $120 for a 
full charter. After 5 years without a price-rise I think we've done alright. 

If anyone is interested in any of the trips or wants more info on them, please 
contact me off-list (but see the link below for info on the trips too). 

The calendar of 2015 dates for pelagic trips out of Port Stephens with the M.V. 
Argonaut, are: ·        Sun 11th January - still 3 spaces available 
·        Sun 8th February·        Sun 22nd (because March is a 
good month I will use the 29th as a reschedule date if the 22nd is called off 
due to bad weather)·        Sun 19th April·        Sun 14th 
June·        Sun 9th August·        Sun 13st 
September·        Sun 11th October·        Sun 15th and Sun 
29th November The logistical info in a nutshell is that we depart from the 
public wharf at Nelson Bay at 7am, usually returning to port somewhere around 
5pm. The link below has all the necessary information and a map of the best 
place to park. A trip report from every Port Stephens pelagic can be found on 
the link off to the left. 
 http://www.sossa-international.org/forum/content.php?420-Port-Stephens-Pelagic-Trips 
 Feel free to pass this email on to your contacts. 

Mick 


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Subject: Re: off topic. Carlton football Club contacts for dying Aboriginal elder
From: David Clark <meathead.clark5 AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 13:49:00 +1100
Denise

I have made some enquiries and hopefully be able to give you some contacts.

If you are on Facebook, there is a NT Carlton Supporters page and someone
there may be able to help too.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/124937110858656/

Cheers

David

On Tue, Dec 16, 2014 at 1:09 PM, Denise Goodfellow <
goodfellow AT bigpond.com.au> wrote:
>
> Morning all
>
> Some of you may remember my writing over the years about my Aboriginal
> relatives - Rev. P. Nganjmirra and his wife, Stephanie Thompson, a Larrakia
> elder - I helped them start a little tourism project (the Baby Dreaming
> Project) in western Arnhem Land.  They recognised the importance of
> birdwatching, and with other elders throughout the area decided to set
> aside their best hunting billabong for birders.
>
> Rev. Nganjmirra died a few years ago.  But by then we knew that the
> writing was on the wall for Stephanie - she has the neurodegenerative
> Machado-Joseph disease.  Stephanie is in the final stages of the disease,
> and her last wish is to see Carlton play in Melbourne.  She will be coming
> down with her sister, Una, and two carers.
>
>  Does anyone on this list have any Carlton contacts?  It would be simply
> wonderful if she could meet with some of her heroes.
>
> Thanks
> Denise
>
> Denise Lawungkurr  Goodfellow
> PO Box 71
> Darwin River, NT, Australia 0841
>
> PhD candidate, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW.
>
> Founding Member: Ecotourism Australia
> Founding Member: Australian Federation of Graduate Women Northern Territory
> 043 8650 835
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> 
>
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Subject: Re: Storm-Petrels - Proposed split into two families [SEC=UNOFFICIAL]
From: "Perkins, Harvey" <Harvey.Perkins AT industry.gov.au>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 02:44:12 +0000
I was just looking at that myself, then moved on to Taxonomy in Flux 
http://jboyd.net/Taxo/List7.html#procellariiformes . 


Essentially, the Oceanitidae "Southern Storm-Petrels" include:

.Wilson's Storm-Petrel, Oceanites oceanicus
.Elliot's Storm-Petrel, Oceanites gracilis
.Pincoya Storm-Petrel, Oceanites pincoyae
.Polynesian Storm-Petrel, Nesofregetta fuliginosa
.Gray-backed Storm-Petrel, Garrodia nereis
.White-faced Storm-Petrel, Pelagodroma marina
.White-bellied Storm-Petrel, Fregetta grallaria
.Black-bellied Storm-Petrel, Fregetta tropica
.New Zealand Storm-Petrel, Fregetta maoriana

And the Hydrobatidae "Northern Storm-Petrels" 
http://jboyd.net/Taxo/Hydrobatidae.pdf include what used to be Hydrobates and 
Oceanodroma genera: 


.Cape Verde Storm-Petrel, Thalobata jabejabe
."Pacific Storm-Petrel", Thalobata cryptoleucura
.Monteiro's Storm-Petrel, Thalobata monteiroi
.Band-rumped Storm-Petrel / Madeiran Storm-Petrel, Thalobata castro
.Least Storm-Petrel, Halocyptena microsoma
.Wedge-rumped Storm-Petrel, Halocyptena tethys
.Black Storm-Petrel, Halocyptena melania
.Matsudaira's Storm-Petrel, Halocyptena matsudairae
.European Storm-Petrel / British Storm-Petrel, Hydrobates pelagicus
.Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel, Hydrobates furcatus
.Ringed Storm-Petrel / Hornby's Storm-Petrel, Cymochorea hornbyi
.Markham's Storm-Petrel, Cymochorea markhami
.Tristram's Storm-Petrel, Cymochorea tristrami
.Guadalupe Storm-Petrel, Cymochorea macrodactyla
.Ashy Storm-Petrel, Cymochorea homochroa
.Swinhoe's Storm-Petrel, Cymochorea monorhis
.Leach's Storm-Petrel, Cymochorea leucorhoa


Harvey


Dr Harvey Perkins
CRC Programme Liaison Officer
Phone +61 26213 7472
Email: Harvey.Perkins AT industry.gov.au




-----Original Message-----
From: Birding-Aus [mailto:birding-aus-bounces AT birding-aus.org] On Behalf Of 
Frank O'Connor 

Sent: Tuesday, 16 December 2014 1:27 PM
To: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
Subject: [Birding-Aus] Storm-Petrels - Proposed split into two families


I just looked up the IOC web site worldbirdnames.org and it looks like the 
storm-petrels will be split into two families in the next version 5.1 due in 
early 2015. 


Hydrobatidae - northern storm-petrels
Oceanitidae - southern storm-petrels

Not exactly certain where each genus will fall, but I guess we will find out in 
2015. 




For those interested in families, it looks like Swallow-tailed 
Cotinga will be put back into Cotingidae (it was previously indeterminate)


_________________________________________________________________
Frank O'Connor                          Birding WA 
http://birdingwa.iinet.net.au
Phone : (08) 9386 5694               Email : foconnor AT iinet.net.au 




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Subject: Re: Storm-Petrels - Proposed split into two families
From: Michael Ramsey <mickramsey AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 13:44:37 +1100
This is already known if you follow pages such as below: 

http://jboyd.net/Taxo/fam_index.html

Sent from my iPhone

> On 16 Dec 2014, at 13:27, "Frank O'Connor"  wrote:
> 
> 
> I just looked up the IOC web site worldbirdnames.org and it looks like the 
storm-petrels will be split into two families in the next version 5.1 due in 
early 2015. 

> 
> Hydrobatidae - northern storm-petrels
> Oceanitidae - southern storm-petrels
> 
> Not exactly certain where each genus will fall, but I guess we will find out 
in 2015. 

> 
> 
> 
> For those interested in families, it looks like Swallow-tailed Cotinga will 
be put back into Cotingidae (it was previously indeterminate) 

> 
> 
> _________________________________________________________________
> Frank O'Connor Birding WA http://birdingwa.iinet.net.au 

> Phone : (08) 9386 5694               Email : foconnor AT iinet.net.au 
> 
> 
>
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Subject: Storm-Petrels - Proposed split into two families
From: Frank O'Connor <foconnor AT iinet.net.au>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 10:27:28 +0800
I just looked up the IOC web site worldbirdnames.org and it looks 
like the storm-petrels will be split into two families in the next 
version 5.1 due in early 2015.

Hydrobatidae - northern storm-petrels
Oceanitidae - southern storm-petrels

Not exactly certain where each genus will fall, but I guess we will 
find out in 2015.



For those interested in families, it looks like Swallow-tailed 
Cotinga will be put back into Cotingidae (it was previously indeterminate)


_________________________________________________________________
Frank O'Connor                          Birding WA 
http://birdingwa.iinet.net.au
Phone : (08) 9386 5694               Email : foconnor AT iinet.net.au 




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Subject: off topic. Carlton football Club contacts for dying Aboriginal elder
From: Denise Goodfellow <goodfellow AT bigpond.com.au>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 11:39:11 +0930
Morning all

Some of you may remember my writing over the years about my Aboriginal 
relatives - Rev. P. Nganjmirra and his wife, Stephanie Thompson, a Larrakia 
elder - I helped them start a little tourism project (the Baby Dreaming 
Project) in western Arnhem Land. They recognised the importance of 
birdwatching, and with other elders throughout the area decided to set aside 
their best hunting billabong for birders. 


Rev. Nganjmirra died a few years ago. But by then we knew that the writing was 
on the wall for Stephanie - she has the neurodegenerative Machado-Joseph 
disease. Stephanie is in the final stages of the disease, and her last wish is 
to see Carlton play in Melbourne. She will be coming down with her sister, Una, 
and two carers. 


 Does anyone on this list have any Carlton contacts? It would be simply 
wonderful if she could meet with some of her heroes. 


Thanks
Denise

Denise Lawungkurr  Goodfellow
PO Box 71
Darwin River, NT, Australia 0841

PhD candidate, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW.

Founding Member: Ecotourism Australia
Founding Member: Australian Federation of Graduate Women Northern Territory
043 8650 835











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Subject: WA Twitchathon preliminary results
From: John Graff <jgraff2 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 08:50:21 +0800
Hi all,
 
Apologies for the delay, I returned from the field late yesterday afternoon. 
I'm still waiting to find out one team's score from the Armchair competition, 
but as there are starting to be queries about results, here are the current 
preliminary results: 

 
24 HOUR
183 - Western Whistlers
180 - The Ruff Knights
156 - S. W. A. T.
130 - Stark Raven Mad
127 - The Rainbow Avocets
 
12 HOUR
130 - Once Bittern
123 - Hunters & Collectors
100 - 12hr Stints
80 - Peeping Pardalotes
55 - Weebill Rock You (early withdrawal due to illness)
 
Armchair
75 - Blue and White Hoopoes 
44 - Lazy Old Bustards
Pending - O.B.E. Team
 
The final full results, including best sighting and worst dip, will be out in 
the next couple of weeks (probably after Christmas) and presentations will be 
made at the January BirdLife WA meeting. Thanks again to everyone who 
participated, and hopefully everyone had a fairly enjoyable weekend! 

 
Cheers,
John
 		 	   		  


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Subject: a BIG day out of Cairns yesterday!!
From: martin cachard <mcachard AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 10:41:17 +1100
hello all...
thought i'd just share some observations from a very long day trip to the 
southern half of Cape York Peninsula yesterday with my birding friend Kev 
Bartram... 

 
running 2 hours late (what's new!!) I eventually got to Kev at Kingfisher Park 
at Julatten just after 5am yesterday... 

 
first stop was at Laura general store for some fuel at 7am where we were 
greeted by a rollicking Black-backed Butcherbird on the power lines singing 
50mtrs away!! a highlight was a group of 4 Varied Lorikeets whizzing across the 
rd between Hann River & Artemis - not a common species here but not unexpected 
given the myriad blossoming bloodwoods throughout, but a highlight all the 
same... 

next we pulled up around Windmill Creek searching for Golden-shouldered 
Parrots, but alas no parrots to be found after an hour's search near the dams 
to the east side or rd...however more BB Butchers & good looks at Red-browed 
Pardalotes & Silver-crowned Friarbirds too were nice. 

 
back in the car & a short cruise up the station tracks through Artemis to Dixie 
looking for the parrots but no go again...a pair of calling Little 
Bronze-Cuckoos put in a nice appearance, along with a couple of very young 
Bee-eaters just out of the nest... 

 
onto the Musgrave-Lilyvale area for Red Goshawk but no nest tree & no nest!! 
cyclone damage form Ita, I suspect!! 

 
then we trudged further east for Marina Plains (one of my fave & unheralded 
remote sites up here it must be said!!)... great numbers of Brolgas (no Sarus) 
along the grasslands with Pipits, Bushlarks & Zitting Cisticolas busily going 
about their business. during our roadside stops for the cisticolas (very skulky 
they were!!), we had +5 Aust Pratincoles, & a very oblidging lone Oriental 
Pratincole which allowed a very close approach on foot!! stopping at the 
mangroves at the old barra fishing camp we got onto Rufous-banded Honeyeaters, 
Collared Kingfishers, Little Shrike-thrush, Mangrove Robin, more Zitters, 
Gull-billed Terns, & a flock of 14 Little Curlews on the rd back out along the 
grass plains - not a bad little stop that one!! 

 
next we continued east to Nifold Plains for some finch action...about 30 each 
of Black-throated & Double-barred Finches came in to drink but for the first 
time ever, no Star or Masked Finches there!! whilst awaiting the flocks beside 
the drying dam, we were paid a visit by the ranger to advise us that Lakefield 
NP was indeed closed as of today but he kindly allowed us to continue, so that 
we did...narrowly avoiding the odd pair of kamikaze Emus doing their level best 
to be collected for science by a dirty white landcruiser!!!! 

 
winding south through the park we were thwarted with an attempt for 
white-bellied Crimson Finch due to very the sticky wet black soil track before 
us...so back to the main rd for us with another dip!! 

 
continuing east along Battlecamp Rd we made a bee-line for McIvor River, 
arriving there at 5pm with a massive amount of Cyclone Ita damage to be 
seen...that means no big paperbark anymore in the causeway for the 
annually-nesting Papuan Frogmouths, Yellow Orioles, Figbirds, & Red-browed 
Finches!!! never the less within an hour we had Tropical Scrubwren, 
Black-winged Monarchs (include a very dull 6-10 month old bird), Shining 
Flycatchers, Azure Kingfisher, Brush Turkey (yellow-collared), Rose-crowned & 
Wompoo Fruit-Doves, White-browed Robins, Large-billed & Fairy Gerygones, Black 
Butcherbirds, Graceful, Yellow-spotted, Macleay's, & Dusky Honeyeaters... alas 
no White-streaked Honeyeaters though, but with all the blossom they would be 
there at the moment... 

 
 it was time to thrash onwards to Cooktown before sundown to track down the 
Spotted Whisting-Ducks at Keating Lagoon...rushing to the hide, the Magpie 
Geese went up with a huge whirr taking with them some strange-ish sounding 
Whistling-Ducks which circled a few times to make a pass in the very last light 
revealing themselves as Spotted's - nice dark backs & much higher cheerier call 
notes!! what a day!!!! 

 
misses for the day apart from the obvious (GS Parrots...etc) were zero Leaden 
Flycatchers, & a very poor raptor diversity... total species count was over 140 
spp with over 1100kms of HOT driving!! so a great LOOOOONG day... 

 
cheers & thanx for reading,
Martin Cachard, Cairns,
(with visiting Kev Bartram from Victoria)
 
 
 		 	   		  


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Subject: An interesting avian example of Batesian mimicry
From: Laurie Knight <l.knight AT optusnet.com.au>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 05:32:59 +1000
See 
http://www.sciencealert.com/watch-this-baby-bird-perfectly-mimics-a-toxic-caterpillar 


.


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