Birdingonthe.Net

Recent Postings from
The Australia Birding List

> Home > Mail
> Alerts

Updated on Thursday, October 2 at 01:31 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Inca Tern,©Sophie Webb

2 Oct Vacancies - Portland (Victoria) pelagic, Sun Oct 5 ["Paul Dodd" ]
2 Oct Helmeted Guineafowl [Neil and Liz Baker ]
2 Oct Re: RFI Helmeted Guineafowl in Australia [Tom Tarrant ]
2 Oct Re: RFI Helmeted Guineafowl in Australia [John Tongue ]
2 Oct Re: RFI Helmeted Guineafowl in Australia [Michael Ramsey ]
2 Oct Re: RFI Helmeted Guineafowl in Australia [Michael Tarburton ]
01 Oct RFI Helmeted Guineafowl in Australia [Trevor Hampel ]
1 Oct SwiftKey - warning not directly birding related [Carl Clifford ]
01 Oct Re: Spotted Whistling Duck [Kingfisher Park Birdwatchers Lodge ]
01 Oct Spotted Whistling Duck [Kingfisher Park Birdwatchers Lodge ]
01 Oct RFI - Purple-crowned Fairy-wren [Frank O'Connor ]
1 Oct Neville Lazarus ["calyptorhynchus ." ]
1 Oct RFI - Purple-crowned Fairy-wren [Steve Sass ]
30 Sep Eastern Koel visitors ["Adam \"Charlie\" Farley" ]
30 Sep Sooty Shearwaters in the News [Laurie Knight ]
29 Sep Re: Double-eyed fig parrot nest behaviour ["Donald G. Kimball" ]
30 Sep Cisticola near Marmor, Queensland - Zitting? [Elliot Leach ]
30 Sep Re: Double-eyed fig parrot nest behaviour ["Alan Gillanders" ]
29 Sep Swift Parrots?????? ["Donald G. Kimball" ]
29 Sep Re: Double-eyed fig parrot nest behaviour ["Donald G. Kimball" ]
29 Sep Swift Parrots [debbie worland ]
29 Sep Re: Double-eyed fig parrot nest behaviour ["Alan Gillanders" ]
29 Sep Australia wide bird weeks [Frank O'Connor ]
29 Sep Birdline North Queensland Weekly Update []
29 Sep Birdline Western Australia Weekly Update []
29 Sep Birdline Central & Southern Queensland Weekly Update []
29 Sep Birdline South Australia Weekly Update []
29 Sep Birdline Victoria Weekly Update []
29 Sep Birdline Tasmania Weekly Update []
29 Sep Birdline Northern Territory Weekly Update []
29 Sep Birdline New South Wales Weekly Update []
29 Sep Birdline Australian Capital Territory Weekly Update []
29 Sep Birdline Australia Weekly Update []
29 Sep Sooty owl in Bunya Mountains [Bob Lake ]
29 Sep Birdpedia - Australia - Weekly Digest ["Birdpedia - Australia Info" ]
28 Sep Re: The Sooty keeper of the Figs [Chris ]
28 Sep The Sooty keeper of the Figs [Laurie Knight ]
28 Sep Re: Where have all the Yellow tailed Black Cockatoos gone? [brian fleming ]
28 Sep Duck shooting video [Debbie Lustig ]
28 Sep Re: No Superb parrots at Nangar National Park. Parrotbloke still looking. [Thomas Wilson ]
28 Sep Re: Double-eyed fig parrot nest behaviour [Michael Tarburton ]
28 Sep McIvor River, Cooktown ["Phil & Sue Gregory" ]
28 Sep Where have all the Yellow tailed Black Cockatoos gone? ["Donald G. Kimball" ]
28 Sep Double-eyed fig parrot nest behaviour ["Donald G. Kimball" ]
28 Sep Re: Australia wide bird weeks [Fiona Anderson ]
28 Sep Australia wide bird weeks ["Dick Jenkin" ]
28 Sep Two male Satin Bowerbirds squaring off in a tree [David Adams ]
28 Sep Re: RFI December birding NSW [David Adams ]
28 Sep Re: RFI December birding NSW [Bill Stent ]
28 Sep Re: RFI December birding NSW [David Adams ]
28 Sep Peter Ginn's The Ultimate Companion for Birding in South Africa [Denise Goodfellow ]
27 Sep Golden-shouldered Parrots ["Phil & Sue Gregory" ]
27 Sep Re: Striated Grasswren taxonomy [martin cachard ]
27 Sep RFI: Kalkadoon Grasswren ["david robertson" ]
27 Sep Where did all the parrots go on Tablelands Road near Wentworth Blue Mts. ["Donald G. Kimball" ]
27 Sep Striated Grasswren taxonomy ["Crispin Marsh" ]
27 Sep Pale-headed Rosella at Brewarrina, Redthroat at Broken Hill [Greg Roberts ]
27 Sep Re: FW: Bird tautology ["Cas Liber" ]
27 Sep A depressing article! [Dave Torr ]
25 Sep RFI December birding NSW [Jim Rowoth ]
25 Sep Access to Hattah-Kulkyne camping []
26 Sep Re: FW: Bird tautology ["Alan Gillanders" ]
26 Sep Re: Bird tautology [Denise Goodfellow ]
25 Sep Re: Bird tautology [Tim Dolby ]
25 Sep Fwd: Bird tautology [Denise Goodfellow ]
25 Sep Access to Hattah-Kulkyne camping [Peter Shanley ]
25 Sep Re: FW: Bird tautology ["Stephen Ambrose" ]
25 Sep Strange colour plate in Where Song Began [John Leonard ]
25 Sep Re: FW: Bird tautology [Kev Lobotomi ]
25 Sep Re: FW: Bird tautology [Kevin and Lizzie ]
25 Sep Re: FW: Bird tautology ["Jeremy O'Wheel" ]
25 Sep Re: FW: Bird tautology [brian fleming ]
25 Sep Re: FW: Bird tautology ["Jeremy O'Wheel" ]
25 Sep Re: FW: Bird tautology [John Leonard ]
25 Sep Re: FW: Bird tautology ["Jeremy O'Wheel" ]
25 Sep Re: FW: Bird tautology [Peter Shute ]

Subject: Vacancies - Portland (Victoria) pelagic, Sun Oct 5
From: "Paul Dodd" <paul AT angrybluecat.com>
Date: Thu, 2 Oct 2014 16:00:05 +1000
Hi birders,

 

Due to a few last minute cancellations, I now have three vacancies on this
Sunday's pelagic from Portland in south-western Victoria. Cost will be
somewhere between $150 and $200 depending on the final number of
participants. Please drop me a line off-list if you're interested -
paul AT angrybluecat.com or 0419516669.

 

It is interesting to note that the springtime weather off Portland can make
for some interesting pelagics - with both cold weather and warmer weather
birds possible. Unfortunately the unpredictable nature of the weather makes
it very difficult to actually get out to sea. We make a final call on the
Friday evening prior to the departure - in other words, tomorrow evening!

 

Paul Dodd

Docklands, Victoria



Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Helmeted Guineafowl
From: Neil and Liz Baker <tzbirdatlas AT yahoo.co.uk>
Date: Thu, 2 Oct 2014 05:09:52 +0000 (UTC)
Hi guys (and ladies of course) Are you getting that desperate for a new tick 
? Do these birds have white heads ? even a strong hint of white would mark 
them as from feral stock and not from wild birds. We are not counting our 
"self sustaining" pop of Peafowl in Dar-es Salaam, surely there needs to be a 
limit somewhere. Neil Neil and Liz Baker, Tanzania Bird Atlas, P.O. Box 1605, 
Iringa, Tanzania. 

Mobiles: +255 785-311298 and +255 784-834273.
http://tanzaniabirdatlas.com
Subscribe to: tanzaniabirds-subscribe AT yahoogroups.com


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: RFI Helmeted Guineafowl in Australia
From: Tom Tarrant <aviceda AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 2 Oct 2014 13:56:33 +1000
Lake Samsonvale birds have never bred and the last time I was there (in
June) there was only 2 or 3 remaining.

Tom
On 02/10/2014 1:49 PM, "John Tongue"  wrote:

> We've heard various sites around the Atherton Tablelands, the hinterland
> around Mackay, and POSSIBLY Lake Samsonvale birds can be counted as truly
> feral.  We certainly ticked the ones we saw between Mackay and Eungella.
>
> Cheers,
> John Tongue
> Devonport
> On 02/10/2014, at 11:54 AM, Michael Ramsey  wrote:
>
> > I was at Moranbah inland from Mackay a week ago and there was a good
> sized flock of guinea fowl 30-40 strong by the oval and sewage ponds as
> well as another 10 or more
> > By the racecourse, all looked very good candidates as feral
> > Birds to
> > Me
> >
> > Sent from my iPhone
> >
> >> On 2 Oct 2014, at 11:09, "Michael Tarburton" <
> tarburton.m AT optusnet.com.au> wrote:
> >>
> >> G'day Trevor & list members
> >>
> >> There is a group of 80 Helmeted Guineafowl that have the run of the
> outback town of Chillagoe.  They had 2+ broods in July, have been there for
> some years.  They are certainly out-breeding the four Squatter pigeons that
> live around the Chillagoe golf Club.
> >>
> >> They also out-breed the wild Pea Fowl that now inhabit mainly the creek
> area.  But that is because they used to annoy the hospital folk when they
> chose to sleep in their trees, and they got the environment department to
> reduce their numbers.
> >>
> >> Happy hunting
> >>
> >> Mike
> >>
> >>
> >>> On 01/10/2014, at 10:55 PM, Trevor Hampel wrote:
> >>>
> >>> Hi birders,
> >>>
> >>> What is the current status of Helmeted Guineafowl in Australia?
> >>>
> >>> I don't count the dozen or so birds which occasionally wander over to
> our little patch of earth from my neighbour because they are kept in an
> enclosed yard every night and rarely wander more than 50m from home.
> >>>
> >>> However, when visiting the Western Plains Zoo in Dubbo a few weeks ago
> we saw a group of about 8 of this species wandering through one of the car
> parks. Is this a self-sustaining population? They didn't seem constrained
> by any form of enclosure.
> >>>
> >>> Thanks in advance,
> >>>
> >>> Trevor
> >>>
> >>> --
> >>> Trevor Hampel,
> >>> Murray Bridge,
> >>> South Australia.
> >>>
> >>> CHECK OUT MY BLOGS:
> >>>
> >>> Trevor's Birding: http://www.trevorsbirding.com/
> >>>
> >>> Trevor's Travels: http://www.trevorstravels.com/
> >>>
> >>> Trevor's Writing: http://www.trevorhampel.com/
> >>>
> >>> Twitter: http://twitter.com/TrevorHampel
> >>>
> >>> 
> >>>
Birding-Aus mailing list > >>>
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org > >>>
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: > >>>
> http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > >>> > >> > >> > >>
> >>
Birding-Aus mailing list > >>
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org > >>
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: > >>
> http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > >> > > > >
> >
Birding-Aus mailing list > >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org > >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: > >
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > > > > >
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > >

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: RFI Helmeted Guineafowl in Australia
From: John Tongue <jspk AT iprimus.com.au>
Date: Thu, 2 Oct 2014 13:48:23 +1000
We've heard various sites around the Atherton Tablelands, the hinterland around 
Mackay, and POSSIBLY Lake Samsonvale birds can be counted as truly feral. We 
certainly ticked the ones we saw between Mackay and Eungella. 


Cheers,
John Tongue
Devonport
On 02/10/2014, at 11:54 AM, Michael Ramsey  wrote:

> I was at Moranbah inland from Mackay a week ago and there was a good sized 
flock of guinea fowl 30-40 strong by the oval and sewage ponds as well as 
another 10 or more 

> By the racecourse, all looked very good candidates as feral
> Birds to
> Me
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
>> On 2 Oct 2014, at 11:09, "Michael Tarburton"  
wrote: 

>> 
>> G'day Trevor & list members
>> 
>> There is a group of 80 Helmeted Guineafowl that have the run of the outback 
town of Chillagoe. They had 2+ broods in July, have been there for some years. 
They are certainly out-breeding the four Squatter pigeons that live around the 
Chillagoe golf Club. 

>> 
>> They also out-breed the wild Pea Fowl that now inhabit mainly the creek 
area. But that is because they used to annoy the hospital folk when they chose 
to sleep in their trees, and they got the environment department to reduce 
their numbers. 

>> 
>> Happy hunting
>> 
>> Mike
>> 
>> 
>>> On 01/10/2014, at 10:55 PM, Trevor Hampel wrote:
>>> 
>>> Hi birders,
>>> 
>>> What is the current status of Helmeted Guineafowl in Australia?
>>> 
>>> I don't count the dozen or so birds which occasionally wander over to our 
little patch of earth from my neighbour because they are kept in an enclosed 
yard every night and rarely wander more than 50m from home. 

>>> 
>>> However, when visiting the Western Plains Zoo in Dubbo a few weeks ago we 
saw a group of about 8 of this species wandering through one of the car parks. 
Is this a self-sustaining population? They didn't seem constrained by any form 
of enclosure. 

>>> 
>>> Thanks in advance,
>>> 
>>> Trevor
>>> 
>>> -- 
>>> Trevor Hampel,
>>> Murray Bridge,
>>> South Australia.
>>> 
>>> CHECK OUT MY BLOGS:
>>> 
>>> Trevor's Birding: http://www.trevorsbirding.com/
>>> 
>>> Trevor's Travels: http://www.trevorstravels.com/
>>> 
>>> Trevor's Writing: http://www.trevorhampel.com/
>>> 
>>> Twitter: http://twitter.com/TrevorHampel
>>> 
>>> 
>>>
Birding-Aus mailing list >>>
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >>>
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >>>
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >>> >> >> >>
>>
Birding-Aus mailing list >>
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >>
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >>
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >> > >
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: RFI Helmeted Guineafowl in Australia
From: Michael Ramsey <mickramsey AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 2 Oct 2014 11:54:22 +1000
I was at Moranbah inland from Mackay a week ago and there was a good sized 
flock of guinea fowl 30-40 strong by the oval and sewage ponds as well as 
another 10 or more 

By the racecourse, all looked very good candidates as feral
Birds to
Me

Sent from my iPhone

> On 2 Oct 2014, at 11:09, "Michael Tarburton"  
wrote: 

> 
> G'day Trevor & list members
> 
> There is a group of 80 Helmeted Guineafowl that have the run of the outback 
town of Chillagoe. They had 2+ broods in July, have been there for some years. 
They are certainly out-breeding the four Squatter pigeons that live around the 
Chillagoe golf Club. 

> 
> They also out-breed the wild Pea Fowl that now inhabit mainly the creek area. 
But that is because they used to annoy the hospital folk when they chose to 
sleep in their trees, and they got the environment department to reduce their 
numbers. 

> 
> Happy hunting
> 
> Mike
> 
> 
>> On 01/10/2014, at 10:55 PM, Trevor Hampel wrote:
>> 
>> Hi birders,
>> 
>> What is the current status of Helmeted Guineafowl in Australia?
>> 
>> I don't count the dozen or so birds which occasionally wander over to our 
little patch of earth from my neighbour because they are kept in an enclosed 
yard every night and rarely wander more than 50m from home. 

>> 
>> However, when visiting the Western Plains Zoo in Dubbo a few weeks ago we 
saw a group of about 8 of this species wandering through one of the car parks. 
Is this a self-sustaining population? They didn't seem constrained by any form 
of enclosure. 

>> 
>> Thanks in advance,
>> 
>> Trevor
>> 
>> -- 
>> Trevor Hampel,
>> Murray Bridge,
>> South Australia.
>> 
>> CHECK OUT MY BLOGS:
>> 
>> Trevor's Birding: http://www.trevorsbirding.com/
>> 
>> Trevor's Travels: http://www.trevorstravels.com/
>> 
>> Trevor's Writing: http://www.trevorhampel.com/
>> 
>> Twitter: http://twitter.com/TrevorHampel
>> 
>> 
>>
Birding-Aus mailing list >>
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >>
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >>
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >> > > >
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: RFI Helmeted Guineafowl in Australia
From: Michael Tarburton <tarburton.m AT optusnet.com.au>
Date: Thu, 2 Oct 2014 10:56:36 +1000
G'day Trevor & list members

There is a group of 80 Helmeted Guineafowl that have the run of the  
outback town of Chillagoe.  They had 2+ broods in July, have been  
there for some years.  They are certainly out-breeding the four  
Squatter pigeons that live around the Chillagoe golf Club.

They also out-breed the wild Pea Fowl that now inhabit mainly the  
creek area.  But that is because they used to annoy the hospital folk  
when they chose to sleep in their trees, and they got the environment  
department to reduce their numbers.

Happy hunting

Mike


On 01/10/2014, at 10:55 PM, Trevor Hampel wrote:

> Hi birders,
>
> What is the current status of Helmeted Guineafowl in Australia?
>
> I don't count the dozen or so birds which occasionally wander over  
> to our little patch of earth from my neighbour because they are  
> kept in an enclosed yard every night and rarely wander more than  
> 50m from home.
>
> However, when visiting the Western Plains Zoo in Dubbo a few weeks  
> ago we saw a group of about 8 of this species wandering through one  
> of the car parks. Is this a self-sustaining population? They didn't  
> seem constrained by any form of enclosure.
>
> Thanks in advance,
>
> Trevor
>
> -- 
> Trevor Hampel,
> Murray Bridge,
> South Australia.
>
> CHECK OUT MY BLOGS:
>
> Trevor's Birding: http://www.trevorsbirding.com/
>
> Trevor's Travels: http://www.trevorstravels.com/
>
> Trevor's Writing: http://www.trevorhampel.com/
>
> Twitter: http://twitter.com/TrevorHampel
>
> 
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding- > aus.org >

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: RFI Helmeted Guineafowl in Australia
From: Trevor Hampel <trevor.hampel AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 01 Oct 2014 22:25:43 +0930
Hi birders,

What is the current status of Helmeted Guineafowl in Australia?

I don't count the dozen or so birds which occasionally wander over to 
our little patch of earth from my neighbour because they are kept in an 
enclosed yard every night and rarely wander more than 50m from home.

However, when visiting the Western Plains Zoo in Dubbo a few weeks ago 
we saw a group of about 8 of this species wandering through one of the 
car parks. Is this a self-sustaining population? They didn't seem 
constrained by any form of enclosure.

Thanks in advance,

Trevor

-- 
Trevor Hampel,
Murray Bridge,
South Australia.

CHECK OUT MY BLOGS:

Trevor's Birding: http://www.trevorsbirding.com/

Trevor's Travels: http://www.trevorstravels.com/

Trevor's Writing: http://www.trevorhampel.com/

Twitter: http://twitter.com/TrevorHampel



Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: SwiftKey - warning not directly birding related
From: Carl Clifford <carlsclifford AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 1 Oct 2014 22:07:33 +1000
Those on the list who do a lot of typing on their iOS or Android devices might 
find Swiftkey of interest. It is a predictive keyboard app that appears to 
actually work. Instead of just putting what it thinks you want on the screen, 
it gives you a choice of 3 suggestions in a bar across the top of the keyboard. 
I have just started using it, and am finding it quite good. The app learns from 
you as you type, and the suggested words become more and more accurate, the 
more you use the app. 


Well worth a try, especially at the price, which is free.

Carl Clifford 


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Spotted Whistling Duck
From: Kingfisher Park Birdwatchers Lodge <sootyowl AT bigpond.com>
Date: Wed, 01 Oct 2014 21:25:19 +1000
Hi Carl,
Birdlines appear to be working to read records but you still can't post 
any new sightings.

Cheers,
Keith & Lindsay.

     Keith & Lindsay Fisher
     Kingfisher Park Birdwatchers Lodge
     RN 6 Mt. Kooyong Road
     Julatten QLD 4871
     Ph : (07) 4094 1263
     Web Site: www.birdwatchers.com.au
     Blog: http://kingfisherparkbirdwatchers.blogspot.com/

On 1/10/2014 8:50 PM, Carl Clifford wrote:
> Hi Keith and Lindsay,
>
> Eremaea is up now.
>
> Cheers,
>
> Carl Clifford
>
>
>> On 1 Oct 2014, at 19:57, Kingfisher Park Birdwatchers Lodge 
 wrote: 

>>
>> Hi Folks,
>> Tried posting this record onto Eremaea Birdline but it appears to be down.
>> Two Spotted Whistling Duck were seen today at Keatings Lagoon Conservation 
Park near Cooktown Far North Queensland by local Dave Houghton. There has been 
at least one other record from this location. 

>>
>> Cheers,
>> Keith & Lindsay.
>>
>> -- 
>>     Keith & Lindsay Fisher
>>     Kingfisher Park Birdwatchers Lodge
>>     RN 6 Mt. Kooyong Road
>>     Julatten QLD 4871
>>     Ph : (07) 4094 1263
>>     Web Site: www.birdwatchers.com.au
>>     Blog: http://kingfisherparkbirdwatchers.blogspot.com/
>>
>>
>> 
>>
Birding-Aus mailing list >>
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >>
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >>
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >>

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Spotted Whistling Duck
From: Kingfisher Park Birdwatchers Lodge <sootyowl AT bigpond.com>
Date: Wed, 01 Oct 2014 19:57:48 +1000
Hi Folks,
Tried posting this record onto Eremaea Birdline but it appears to be down.
Two Spotted Whistling Duck were seen today at Keatings Lagoon 
Conservation Park near Cooktown Far North Queensland by local Dave 
Houghton. There has been at least one other record from this location.

Cheers,
Keith & Lindsay.

-- 
     Keith & Lindsay Fisher
     Kingfisher Park Birdwatchers Lodge
     RN 6 Mt. Kooyong Road
     Julatten QLD 4871
     Ph : (07) 4094 1263
     Web Site: www.birdwatchers.com.au
     Blog: http://kingfisherparkbirdwatchers.blogspot.com/




Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: RFI - Purple-crowned Fairy-wren
From: Frank O'Connor <foconnor AT iinet.net.au>
Date: Wed, 01 Oct 2014 17:38:28 +0800
Steven Sass asked about Purple-crowned Fairy-wrens close to Kununurra.

As far as I am aware, there are none.  The only place close to 
Kununurra that I have seen it has been on a boat trip on Lake Argyle 
down to the Ord River.  They were in an area of Jerusalem Thorn 
(Parkinsonia)  covered in wild passionfruit.

It would be easier to head across to the Northern Territory to the 
Victoria River crossing.  They are of course in the north Kimberley 
at places such as Miners Pool at Drysdale River Station.


_________________________________________________________________
Frank O'Connor                          Birding WA 
http://birdingwa.iinet.net.au
Phone : (08) 9386 5694               Email : foconnor AT iinet.net.au 




Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Neville Lazarus
From: "calyptorhynchus ." <calyptorhynchus AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 1 Oct 2014 19:15:56 +1000
Is Neville on this forum or does anyone have his contact details?

-- 
John Leonard


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: RFI - Purple-crowned Fairy-wren
From: Steve Sass <sassyskink AT yahoo.com.au>
Date: Wed, 1 Oct 2014 13:16:00 +0800
Hi all, 

Has anyone as locations to find Purple-crowned Fairy-wren around Kununurra town 
(ie within 10ks) 


Sent from my iPhone


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Eastern Koel visitors
From: "Adam \"Charlie\" Farley" <charliefarley AT email.com>
Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2014 23:06:15 +0200
   Hi. Just heard my first Koel of the season in Voyager Point (SW
   Sydney). I'm curious if they make many stops along the way. Anyone see
   them coming? Or know of any tagging operation?
   Adam
   --
   Sent from my Android phone with [1]mail.com Mail. Please excuse my
   brevity.

References

   1. http://mail.com/


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Sooty Shearwaters in the News
From: Laurie Knight <l.knight AT optusnet.com.au>
Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2014 17:02:14 +1000
Environmental Health News has been running a series titled Winged Warnings. The 
latest (15th) item looks at the fortunes of a long-distance migrator  

see: 
http://www.environmentalhealthnews.org/ehs/news/2014/aug/wingedwarnings14perilousvoyage 



Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Double-eyed fig parrot nest behaviour
From: "Donald G. Kimball" <ibwonet1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 21:08:04 -0700
The host tree is solid and living with green leaves.  There is a couple of
upper branches that have died and become soft enough for the Fig Parrots to
dig into.  This tree should be around for some time.  Hoping the Fig
Parrots still have enough space to create a new cavity next year!  Thanks
for all the helpful information here as always!

Don

On Mon, Sep 29, 2014 at 3:15 PM, Alan Gillanders <
alan AT alanswildlifetours.com.au> wrote:

>   As they use softer trees and they are already dead, it is unusual for
> the trees to last beyond two seasons and making it to four would be very
> surprising. if it was just a dead snag of a living tree that might be
> different.
> Alan
>
>
> Alan's Wildlife Tours
> 2 Mather Road
> Yungaburra 4884
>
> Phone 07 4095 3784
> Mobile 0408 953 786
> http://www.alanswildlifetours.com.au/
>
>  *From:* Donald G. Kimball 
> *Sent:* Tuesday, September 30, 2014 7:17 AM
> *To:* Alan Gillanders 
> *Cc:* birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
> *Subject:* Re: [Birding-Aus] Double-eyed fig parrot nest behaviour
>
>  Great information folks!  As per Allan Gillanders comment about them
> excavating new every year.  I noted that this active cavity was the third
> one from the top.  The oldest being decrepid and the dead snag actually
> broke off where it had been.  Hope to get back to Aus (next year?) and
> check it out.  Was so super excited to see my first active Fig Parrot nest!
>
> Don
>
> On Mon, Sep 29, 2014 at 12:03 AM, Alan Gillanders <
> alan AT alanswildlifetours.com.au> wrote:
>
>> It is my belief that they use new hollows every year. After the initial
>> excavations the female does all the work. Sometimes this is under strict
>> supervision but some male display more confidence in her ability. I have
>> never witnessed an old hollow being used a second time. During the nesting
>> season they collect eucalypt leaves from my trees and fly with them towards
>> the forest. As I have not seen them take those leaves into the nests I
>> refrain from saying they line the nests with them but...
>>
>> Regards,
>> Alan
>>
>>
>> Alan's Wildlife Tours
>> 2 Mather Road
>> Yungaburra 4884
>>
>> Phone 07 4095 3784
>> Mobile 0408 953 786
>> http://www.alanswildlifetours.com.au/
>> -----Original Message----- From: Donald G. Kimball
>> Sent: Sunday, September 28, 2014 3:34 PM
>> To: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
>> Subject: [Birding-Aus] Double-eyed fig parrot nest behaviour
>>
>>
>> I have had great fun watching a Fig Parrot at a nest cavity in Cairns over
>> the past couple of days.  I dont have a copy of Hanzab handy so I dont
>> have
>> a reference to answer this question.  Do Fig Parrots re-use the cavity
>> they
>> have excavated or create a new one each year?  Many thanks
>>
>> Don
>> 
>>
Birding-Aus mailing list >>
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >>
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >>
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >> >> >> >> ----- >> No virus found in this message. >> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com >> Version: 2014.0.4765 / Virus Database: 4025/8286 - Release Date: 09/27/14 >> > > > No virus found in this message. > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com > Version: 2014.0.4765 / Virus Database: 4025/8295 - Release Date: 09/29/14 > >

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Cisticola near Marmor, Queensland - Zitting?
From: Elliot Leach <elliot.leach AT griffithuni.edu.au>
Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2014 13:11:33 +1000
Hey everyone,

I saw a couple of cisticolas along the Bajool - Port Alma Rd that I thought
were quite interesting...

After doing some more research I'm now fairly sure they were Zitting
Cisticolas.

I posted some photos I took of one bird, a summary of my notes at the time
and then my rationale for thinking they were ZC (based on call and certain
plumage characteristics mentioned in HANZAB) on Feathers and Photos - see:


http://www.feathersandphotos.com.au/forum/showthread.php?32628-Cisticola-near-Marmor-Qld-Port-Alma-Rd 


If you have experience with this species I'd be interested to hear what you
have to say!

Cheers,

elliot


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Double-eyed fig parrot nest behaviour
From: "Alan Gillanders" <alan AT alanswildlifetours.com.au>
Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2014 08:15:20 +1000
As they use softer trees and they are already dead, it is unusual for the trees 
to last beyond two seasons and making it to four would be very surprising. if 
it was just a dead snag of a living tree that might be different. 

Alan


Alan's Wildlife Tours
2 Mather Road
Yungaburra 4884

Phone 07 4095 3784
Mobile 0408 953 786
http://www.alanswildlifetours.com.au/


From: Donald G. Kimball 
Sent: Tuesday, September 30, 2014 7:17 AM
To: Alan Gillanders 
Cc: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org 
Subject: Re: [Birding-Aus] Double-eyed fig parrot nest behaviour

Great information folks! As per Allan Gillanders comment about them excavating 
new every year. I noted that this active cavity was the third one from the top. 
The oldest being decrepid and the dead snag actually broke off where it had 
been. Hope to get back to Aus (next year?) and check it out. Was so super 
excited to see my first active Fig Parrot nest! 


Don

On Mon, Sep 29, 2014 at 12:03 AM, Alan Gillanders 
 wrote: 


 It is my belief that they use new hollows every year. After the initial 
excavations the female does all the work. Sometimes this is under strict 
supervision but some male display more confidence in her ability. I have never 
witnessed an old hollow being used a second time. During the nesting season 
they collect eucalypt leaves from my trees and fly with them towards the 
forest. As I have not seen them take those leaves into the nests I refrain from 
saying they line the nests with them but... 


  Regards,
  Alan


  Alan's Wildlife Tours
  2 Mather Road
  Yungaburra 4884

  Phone 07 4095 3784
  Mobile 0408 953 786
  http://www.alanswildlifetours.com.au/
  -----Original Message----- From: Donald G. Kimball
  Sent: Sunday, September 28, 2014 3:34 PM
  To: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
  Subject: [Birding-Aus] Double-eyed fig parrot nest behaviour 


  I have had great fun watching a Fig Parrot at a nest cavity in Cairns over
  the past couple of days.  I dont have a copy of Hanzab handy so I dont have
  a reference to answer this question.  Do Fig Parrots re-use the cavity they
  have excavated or create a new one each year?  Many thanks

  Don

  

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org ----- No virus found in this message. Checked by AVG - www.avg.com Version: 2014.0.4765 / Virus Database: 4025/8286 - Release Date: 09/27/14 No virus found in this message. Checked by AVG - www.avg.com Version: 2014.0.4765 / Virus Database: 4025/8295 - Release Date: 09/29/14

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Swift Parrots??????
From: "Donald G. Kimball" <ibwonet1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 14:14:40 -0700
I was searching for Turquoise Parrots a few days at Nangar National Park
near Eugowra NSW when out of nowhere a tightly formed flock of brilliant
green parrots whipped accross the sparsely treed field I was in.  They made
no noise whatsoever.  I noted pointed tails and green bodies but that was
it.  DEFINITELY not budgies. I saw the same flock later.  Again tightly
formed about 24 birds and shooting over a field at the forest edge not
pausing to land.  These birds did not strike me as musk lorikeets.  I have
filmed Swifties in Tassie but this flock never offered much of a view.
Could I have possibly seen Swift Parrot this late in Nangar?

Thanks

Don


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Double-eyed fig parrot nest behaviour
From: "Donald G. Kimball" <ibwonet1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 14:17:08 -0700
Great information folks!  As per Allan Gillanders comment about them
excavating new every year.  I noted that this active cavity was the third
one from the top.  The oldest being decrepid and the dead snag actually
broke off where it had been.  Hope to get back to Aus (next year?) and
check it out.  Was so super excited to see my first active Fig Parrot nest!

Don

On Mon, Sep 29, 2014 at 12:03 AM, Alan Gillanders <
alan AT alanswildlifetours.com.au> wrote:

> It is my belief that they use new hollows every year. After the initial
> excavations the female does all the work. Sometimes this is under strict
> supervision but some male display more confidence in her ability. I have
> never witnessed an old hollow being used a second time. During the nesting
> season they collect eucalypt leaves from my trees and fly with them towards
> the forest. As I have not seen them take those leaves into the nests I
> refrain from saying they line the nests with them but...
>
> Regards,
> Alan
>
>
> Alan's Wildlife Tours
> 2 Mather Road
> Yungaburra 4884
>
> Phone 07 4095 3784
> Mobile 0408 953 786
> http://www.alanswildlifetours.com.au/
> -----Original Message----- From: Donald G. Kimball
> Sent: Sunday, September 28, 2014 3:34 PM
> To: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
> Subject: [Birding-Aus] Double-eyed fig parrot nest behaviour
>
>
> I have had great fun watching a Fig Parrot at a nest cavity in Cairns over
> the past couple of days.  I dont have a copy of Hanzab handy so I dont have
> a reference to answer this question.  Do Fig Parrots re-use the cavity they
> have excavated or create a new one each year?  Many thanks
>
> Don
> 
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > > > > ----- > No virus found in this message. > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com > Version: 2014.0.4765 / Virus Database: 4025/8286 - Release Date: 09/27/14 >

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Swift Parrots
From: debbie worland <debbieworland AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 18:19:59 +1000
Just an update to let everyone know that the Swifties have been here at 
Muckleford Vic since 23/6/2014 and still small numbers here today. 

They have preferred to feed on lerp in River Red Gums even though there has 
been a late mass flowering of Yellow Gum in the area. 



Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Double-eyed fig parrot nest behaviour
From: "Alan Gillanders" <alan AT alanswildlifetours.com.au>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 17:03:33 +1000
It is my belief that they use new hollows every year. After the initial 
excavations the female does all the work. Sometimes this is under strict 
supervision but some male display more confidence in her ability. I have 
never witnessed an old hollow being used a second time. During the nesting 
season they collect eucalypt leaves from my trees and fly with them towards 
the forest. As I have not seen them take those leaves into the nests I 
refrain from saying they line the nests with them but...

Regards,
Alan


Alan's Wildlife Tours
2 Mather Road
Yungaburra 4884

Phone 07 4095 3784
Mobile 0408 953 786
http://www.alanswildlifetours.com.au/
-----Original Message----- 
From: Donald G. Kimball
Sent: Sunday, September 28, 2014 3:34 PM
To: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
Subject: [Birding-Aus] Double-eyed fig parrot nest behaviour

I have had great fun watching a Fig Parrot at a nest cavity in Cairns over
the past couple of days.  I dont have a copy of Hanzab handy so I dont have
a reference to answer this question.  Do Fig Parrots re-use the cavity they
have excavated or create a new one each year?  Many thanks

Don


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org ----- No virus found in this message. Checked by AVG - www.avg.com Version: 2014.0.4765 / Virus Database: 4025/8286 - Release Date: 09/27/14

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Australia wide bird weeks
From: Frank O'Connor <foconnor AT iinet.net.au>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 10:54:36 +0800
I don't know of a directory for all events, but BirdLife Australia 
has the capacity to list all events organised by their branches.  I 
am involved in BirdLife Western Australia, and I admit that we don't 
make full use of this facility. It has our regular excursions and 
monthly meetings listed, but we have many other events organised by 
our Community Education Committee, Great Western Woodlands surveys, 
shorebird counts, Rottnest surveys, other surveys, etc.

The National Bird Week is the last full week in October each year 
(Monday to Sunday).  This year it is October 20th to 26th.  Many BA 
branches are organising events, and nationally the Aussie Backyard 
Bird Count is being launched and this will become an annual event as 
part of NBW.  I encourage everyone to participate in this, but more 
importantly the aim is to attract many members of the general public, 
and so it is more important if you can promote this event at any opportunity.

BirdLife Western Australia is planning an open day at our office at 
Bold Park in Floreat on Sunday 19th October to launch the week, and 
to promote our activities with walks,talks (cockatoos, Western Ground 
Parrot, GWW, Wonder of Birds) and a sausage sizzle is planned.  There 
is a public walk at Herdsman Lake on Saturday 25th.  The CEC has an 
event on the Friday.  As part of the Rio Tinto Birdwatch event in the 
Pilbara, we will be promoting NBW and the ABBC.  Our country branches 
are planning walks for the public.


_________________________________________________________________
Frank O'Connor                          Birding WA 
http://birdingwa.iinet.net.au
Phone : (08) 9386 5694               Email : foconnor AT iinet.net.au 




Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Birdline North Queensland Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 29 Sep 2014 07:01:40 +1000
   Birdline North Queensland

   Published sightings for the week ending 28 Sep 2014.

   Mon 22 Sep Brush Cuckoo Coquette Point
   Two Brush Cuckoo in paper-bark swamp, first sighting for this season.
   Saw one heard the other in another tree.
   Yvonne Cunningham
   Sat 20 Sep Large-tailed Nightjar Julatten 10' Cell
   Calling on dusk, first recorded by us this season Also calling at same
   time was a Chestnut-breasted Cuckoo.
   Keith and Lindsay Fisher


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Birdline Western Australia Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 29 Sep 2014 07:02:20 +1000
   Birdline Western Australia

   Published sightings for the week ending 28 Sep 2014.

   Sat 27 Sep Terek Sandpiper Port Gregory
   Single bird in the small lake next to the road into Port Gregory.
   Bright orange legs and log upturned beak very distinctive. Photographs
   taken to confirm ID.
   Ross Jones
   Thu 25 Sep Gouldian Finch Wyndham Hospital
   After searching quite a few sites around Wyndham this morning managed
   to locate a flock of well over 50+ Gouldians coming in to drink from a
   puddle on the footpath near the Hospital
   Greg and Janice McKay
   Mon 22 Sep Green-headed Yellow Wagtail Cocos Keeling Islands
   This bird was with a group of 4 Eastern Yellow Wagtails at the Quarry
   on West Island. They have been around for the last 4 days.
   Pam Jones Geof Christie


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Birdline Central & Southern Queensland Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 29 Sep 2014 07:01:12 +1000
   Birdline Central & Southern Queensland

   Published sightings for the week ending 28 Sep 2014.

   Sun 28 Sep White-eared Monarch, Spectacled Monarch, Black-faced
   Monarch, Emerald Dove Gold Creek Reservoir
   2 White-eared Monarch, several Spectacled Monarch and 2 Black-faced
   Monarch in the same tree at the second creek crossing before the car
   park and an Emerald Dove nearby.
   Nikolas Haass & Raja Stephenson
   Sat 27 Sep Lewin's Rail, Marbled Frogmouth, Glossy Black-Cockatoo
   Lamington National Park--O'Reilly's
   Lewin's Rail in Moran's valley along the creek. Marbled Frogmouth, 2
   seen(hidden gully and near the glow worm cave) and others heard. 15
   Glossy Black-Cockatoos with young on Duck creek road. Also 2 Crested
   Shrike-tit, 1 Red-Browed Treecreeper on Duck Creek Rd and a Dollarbird
   in Moran's Valley.
   Jo & Matt Culican and Duncan Fowler (Oreilly's Bird Guide)
   Asian Dowitcher Toorbul--high tide roost
   Asian Dowitcher present at Artificial Roost. Assume that this could be
   same bird from the 15th September
   Dezmond Wells
   Yellow Chat (3) Port Alma Rd, near Gate 1 of Cheetham Salt Works
   Two adult males seen and heard singing at around 8:30 this morning. A
   duller looking bird was seen accompanying one of the males: we thought
   it was a female, though this pair was seen at quite a distance. Very
   exciting to finally connect with this species! Thanks to Wayne Houston
   for site info; full site list available on eBird.
   Elliot Leach; Jess Mackie
   Peregrine Falcon Stanley Rd, Coorparoo
   One Peregrine Falcon at about 10:50am, over the Norman Creek/Coorparoo
   Secondary College area, being given grief by two crows. Made several
   low passes and circled for over two minutes, going higher and higher
   before heading northwest in the direction of East Brisbane.
   Russell Yong
   Fri 26 Sep Little Bronze-Cuckoo, Apostlebird Anstead Bushland Reserve
   Clear close-up sighting of Cuckoo. Also, a flight of 3 Apostlebirds
   near the Mount Crosby Road - Hawkesbury Road junction. Single
   Apostlebird also sighted.
   Liz Gould and Peter Horler


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Birdline South Australia Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 29 Sep 2014 07:01:52 +1000
   Birdline South Australia

   Published sightings for the week ending 28 Sep 2014.

   Sun 28 Sep Cattle Egret Springbank wetland, Burton
   3, one in breeding plumage, flew in to join mixed flock on island
   sheltering in high winds. This wetland is part of a suburban park off
   Springbank Road and downstream (SW, 1km) of Kaurna Park wetland.
   Earlier flushed a single Latham Snipe from grassy flat near outlet from
   KP.
   Jim Allen
   Sat 20 Sep Peregrine Falcon Balaklava
   A pair mating briefly on top of grain silo.
   Paul Taylor


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Birdline Victoria Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 29 Sep 2014 07:02:05 +1000
   Birdline Victoria

   Published sightings for the week ending 28 Sep 2014.

   Sun 28 Sep White-winged chough Ford Park, Bellfield
   I first saw this single bird at this site on wednesday the 24th. I am
   surprised it is still there. It seems reasonably relaxed, allowing
   approach to about 10 metres. As can be seen from the photo it is a bit
   tatty. I wonder where it has come from.
   Ruth Minifie.
   Sat 27 Sep Painted Honeyeater Warby-Ovens National Park--Killawarra
   Forest
   At least one pair near waterhole past entrance in SE cnr of park
   -36.23186, 146.22687
   Tom Tarrant, Brett Lane
   Fri 26 Sep Yellow Tufted Honeyeater, Swift Parrot Chiltern-Mt Pilot
   National Park--Cyanide Dam
   At least two Yellow Tufted Honeyeaters present, chasing Red Wattlebird
   near Cyanide Dam. Two Swift Parrots landed in a nearby tree - amidst an
   Olive Backed Oriole and several Noisy Friarbirds.
   Andrew Williams
   Rainbow Bee-eater Indigo Valley
   Quite early for this neck of the woods. Visiting friends just south of
   the national park adjacent to the Chiltern Yackandandah Road when a
   single bird flew over head.
   Matt Weeks
   Beach Stone-Curlew Screw Creek, Inverloch, Victoria
   The Beach Stone-Curlew is still present at the Screw Creek outlet in
   Inverloch. Seen this morning from 7:15am at low tide.
   Andrew Allen
   Swift Parrots Sunbury
   Five birds seen flying between flowering Yellow Gums in the Kismet
   Estate (off Aldridge Drive) area. Also observed foraging on flowers of
   the gums. Low numbers have been present throughout the winter months.
   Gerard O'Neill
   Thu 25 Sep Rufous Whistler, Baillons Crake Western Treatment Plant
   (Werribee)
   Single male at Borrow Pits - not a bird I have seen very often at the
   WTP since the closure of Farm Rd. Also 2 Baillon's Crake at T-Section
   pond 4.
   Dave Torr, Christine Shelley, Bruce and Judy from USA
   Lathams Snipe,Lewins Rail and Australian Spotted Crake Liverpool rd
   Retarding Basin Kilsyth Sth
   Observed 2 Lathams Snipe identified rail and Crake from calls.Also
   observed White Necked Heron stand motionless for 10 mins before
   striking out and catching very large frog
   Des Palmer
   Tue 23 Sep Black-faced Woodswallow Point Danger
   Fiona Parkin and I had a single Black-faced Woodswallow hawking insects
   at Point Danger, Portland. This to my knowledge is a first for the
   Portland District. Cape Gannet was also present in the gannetry and
   White-bellied Sea Eagle over Lawrence Rocks.
   Robert Farnes
   Mon 22 Sep Turquoise Parrot, Painted Honeyeater, Rose Robin, Speckled
   Warbler Chiltern National Park
   Quite a few Turquoise Parrots throughout the Park. A calling Painted
   Honeyeater and a female Rose Robin, both initially pointed out by Rob
   Drummond, along with a pair of Speckled Warblers were at Bartley's
   Block.
   Chris and Rosemary Lester
   Banded Stilt (12), Brolga (2), Pink-eared Duck (60) Green Hill Lake
   Highlights were 12 Banded Stilts, about 60 Pink-eared Ducks, and 2
   Brolgas. Also Red-necked Avocets, Sharp-tailed Sandpipers (possibly a
   couple of Pectorals-will need to confirm), Red-kneed, Red-capped and
   Black-fronted Dotterels.
   Tristan Kennedy
   Sun 21 Sep Square-tailed Kite Private block, Clunes
   Four of us were held enraptured by fantastic views of a low, soaring
   Square-tailed Kite which landed several times in a large gum on the
   perimeter of the property. Hopefully scoping nesting sites! This was
   the first time seen here however we have seen one at distance near
   Dunach.
   Michael Gooch
   Powerful Owl, Crested Bellbird, Spot. Quail-thrush, Square-tail Kite,
   Diamond Firetail, 5 Cuckoo sp. Newstead area and Muckleford State
   Forest
   Wonderful box-ironbark Spring birding over the course of the weekend
   around Newstead visiting several sites including Muckleford SF and Rise
   & Shine Bushland Reserve. Highlights include Powerful Owl family of 2
   adults and 2 young beside the Loddon, Crested Bellbird in MSF, Spotted
   Quail-thrush on Plunketts Rd, 2 Square-tailed Kite at nest in MSF,
   Diamond Firetail at Rise & Shine BR. Black-eared Cuckoo heard along
   Plunketts Rd and seen at Rise & Shine BR. Cuckoos (Pallid, Horsfield's,
   Shining and Fan-tailed) heard and/or seen at most spots, all 5 in a
   short period on Plunketts Rd. Australian Owlet-Nightjar seen in MSF.
   Jackson Airey and members of the RFNC Inc. Spring camp-out
   Square-tailed Kite Hattah-Kulkyne National Park--Old Calder Hwy
   A particularly resplendent adult Square-tailed Kite soaring low over
   the mallee mid-morning as we left the area, near Warepil Lookout. Also
   had a pair of Striated Grasswren and three parties of Mallee Emu-wren
   along Nowingi and Konardin Tracks, heaps of other birds about and
   beautiful spring weather.
   Steve Davidson - The Melbourne Birder
   Cattle Egret Dandenong Creek Trail, 100m north of Jells Park
   About 30 Cattle Egret, some in breeding plumage feeding hungrily around
   cattle. Area is about 100 metres from the bridge as you leave Jells
   Park heading north on the Dandenong Creek Trail. First I have spotted
   this season.
   Wendy McWilliams
   Sat 20 Sep Banded Stilts, Red-necked Avocets and Red-necked Stints
   Moolap Salt Pans [old Cheetham Salt Works]
   On Saturday 20th and Sunday 21st AM a large flock of Banded Stilts
   [765] and Red-necked Avocets [665] were observed resting and feeding on
   salt pans adjacent to Portarlington Rd. Similarly on Sunday on an
   adjacent pond Red-necked Stints [350] were seen arriving from N
   direction and commenced vigorously feeding. This area is on private
   land and presently subject to a major commercial and residential
   proposal. This important wader habitat can be viewed from the rear of
   the pump house situated on Portarlington Rd just east of the CSIRO main
   entrance way. [scope and hand counter used in bird count ]
   David Tytherleigh and John Newman
   Grey Butcherbird J J Holland Park , Kensington
   single bird seen in trees close to park entrance at corner of Childers
   and Ormond Streets. I have seen singles of this species at this spot
   twice before but many months apart so thought sighting may be of
   interest to local birders.
   David A Richardson
   Thu 18 Sep Short-tailed Shearwater Pt Addis
   First returns of a small number of Short-tailed Shearwater off Pt Addis
   this morning.
   Steve Davidson - The Melbourne Birder


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Birdline Tasmania Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 29 Sep 2014 07:01:57 +1000
   Birdline Tasmania

   Published sightings for the week ending 28 Sep 2014.

   Thu 25 Sep Arctic Tern Copper Cove, Narawntapu National Park
   A beach washed bird found by Julie Serafin. Measurements and plumage
   fit this species as described in Handbook of Australian Seabirds by
   Serventy 1971. [Moderator's Note] Sorry for the confusion - this
   beach-washed bird was FOUND on the 5th of Sep, but the report was
   received on the 25th!
   Julie Serafin and Hazel Britton


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Birdline Northern Territory Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 29 Sep 2014 07:01:48 +1000
   Birdline Northern Territory

   Published sightings for the week ending 28 Sep 2014.


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Birdline New South Wales Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 29 Sep 2014 07:01:23 +1000
   Birdline New South Wales

   Published sightings for the week ending 28 Sep 2014.

   Sun 28 Sep Square-tailed Kite Chiltern Trail, Ingleside
   The lack of birds along the the track during early afternoon more than
   made up by a Square-tailed Kite making several low passes over the
   track-head at Chiltern Road.
   Robert Griffin et al
   Australian Koel Glebe Point Road, near Glebe Public School
   Male Australian Koel was harassed by a Noisy Miner and chased along
   Glebe Point Road in front of our car.
   Simon Gorta
   Musk Duck, Great Crested Grebe, Whiskered Tern, Possible Blue-billed
   Duck? Lake Wallace, Wallerawang
   At least 6 Whiskered Tern in breeding plumage fishing over the lake.
   Counted at least 40 each of Musk Duck and Gt Crested Grebe. Hundreds,
   if not thousands, of Eurasian Coot on the water. Party of approx 20
   Hoary-headed Grebe in the middle of the lake. 2 very small dark brown
   ducks asleep in the NE corner of the lake well beyond the barrage with
   heads tucked away, so could not see bills. Birds had a "domed"
   appearance in the water and I could not see any white towards rump - so
   may be Blue-billed Duck? (Would need to get much closer for a
   definitive view to be certain but worth checking out.)
   Tom Wilson
   Australasian Bittern Hexham Swamp
   Single heard booming all night long during a spotlighting foray. No
   Grass Owls.
   Joshua Bergmark, Nathan Ruser, Simon Gorta
   Black-faced Monarch, Sacred Kingfisher Bradley's Head (Sydney Harbour
   NP)
   A single Black-faced Monarch heard calling near Athol Hall this morning
   was a welcome surprise. Two calling Sacred Kingfishers were also my
   first of the season. A possible Scarlet Honeyeater was also heard (two
   note contact call) in this patch that is overflowing with small birds.
   Ashwin Rudder
   Sat 27 Sep Rock Warbler, Musk Duck Wollemi National Park--Dunns Swamp
   Rock Warbler seen twice heading into rock cavity with food items -
   nesting? Pair of Musk Duck on a northern arm of the lake away from the
   kayak activity. Male bird was being very aggressive to any Coots that
   got too close.
   Tom Wilson
   Spotted Harrier Cnr Castlereagh Hwy & Bylong Valley Way
   Single bird seen quartering over rough ground at the junction, then
   diving onto a prey item, settling briefly on an earth mound and setting
   off with string flight towards the east - possible prey item for mate
   or chicks?
   Tom Wilson
   Dollarbird Clarence Town
   A single Dollarbird perched on powerlines beside Clarence Town-Dungog
   Rd.
   Clive Meadows
   Black-faced Monarch, Leaden Flycatcher, Brush Cuckoo Dubbo Gully
   Mangrove Mountain
   On an outing for the Central Coast Bird Group we had 3 Black-faced
   Monarch and a pair of Leaden Flycatchers on our stop down the hill to
   the gully. We also had many Fan-tailed Cuckoos and Shining
   Bronze-Cuckoos with a Brush Cuckoo calling as well.
   Christina Port for Kay Pointer and the CCB group
   Buller's Shearwater Royal National Park--Wattamolla
   Seen my first Buller's Shearwater for the spring today also thousands
   of Short-tailed Shearwaters moving down the coast including an albino
   or fully leukistic individual. [Moderator's note (NH): This is a very
   an exceptionally early date for Buller's Shearwater]
   michael ronan.
   Bush Stone-curlew Barham
   Two Bush Stone-curlews observed in a grassy carpark near the centre of
   town, potentially attempting breeding at this site. Both birds were
   observed on the 26th and 27th, one of which was squatting in the same
   location when observed several times over the two days (sitting on
   eggs?). Have never seen this species so close to dense housing before
   in south-eastern Australia. Perhaps attracted to the good source of
   invertebrate prey around the street lights.
   Karl Just
   Mallard Western Plains Zoo, Dubbo
   A solitary male Mallard hanging out with some Pacific Black Ducks on
   the billabong camp lake. I have been a keeper at the zoo for 5 1/2
   year's now and this is the first Mallard I've seen.
   Andrew O'Brien
   Rose-crowned Fruit-Dove Myall Lakes National Park--Mungo Brush
   2 Rose-crowned Fruit-Doves heard, one of which subsequently observed
   multiple times (quite skittish, but vocal) near the northern tip of the
   loop trail. Cabbage Tree Palms fruiting prolifically, many Green
   Catbirds, Topknot Pigeons and White-headed Pigeons also seen.
   Joshua Bergmark, Nathan Ruser, Simon Gorta
   Spectacled Monarch Caniaba, Lismore NSW
   First sighting for season.
   paul griffin
   Grey Goshawk Luddenham
   Single white morph seen being mobbed by Magpie-larks and Australian
   Magpies. Also great views when perched in a tree.
   Peter Bracken
   Fri 26 Sep Eurasian Coot Swan Lake, Cudmirrah, near Sussex Inlet
   Kayaked out mid afternoon to investigate a massive congregation of
   black birds on Swan Lake. They were all Eurasian Coots in one long
   narrow raft, and a conservative estimate would be 3,000 to 5,000.
   Attached is a photo of a small portion, perhaps a little blurred due to
   the rolling of the kayak. They were under attack by a White-breasted
   Sea-Eagle who successfully took two in separate sweeps, this following
   on directly from the same raptor flying overhead with a captured Black
   Swan and depositing it in its nest. A short drive early next morning to
   obtain a better photo was futile, with only a handful of Eurasian Coots
   remaining in the lake.
   Cameron Ward
   Superb Parrot, Blue-faced Honeyeater Orange Botanic Gardens
   Approx 25 Superb Parrots were feeding in cut grass between the gardens
   car park and the main road approx 5pm. A single Blue-faced Honeyeater
   was seen in the gardens near the entrance gate.
   Tom Wilson
   Australian Koel Kariong
   A male Australian Koel seen flying south. I don't think he was
   stopping. I haven't heard calling here yet.
   Christina Port
   Australian Shelduck Werai
   Lone Australian Shelduck in paddock by Mount Broughton Road
   mid-afternoon (not far from a dam and rivulet). Shelducks are rarely
   seen in the Southern Highlands.
   Lorne Johnson
   Thu 25 Sep Sooty Oystercatcher, Pied Oystercatcher, Grey Goshawk (white
   phase) Cudmirrah Beach (Berrara end)
   7 Sooty Oystercatchers (photo of six attached), 2 Pied Oystercatchers
   and a lone white phase Grey Goshawk were the highlights in this scenic
   area of Cudmirrah Beach.
   Cameron Ward, Janette Ward
   Hooded Plover Cudmirrah Beach (Sussex Inlet end)
   2 Hooded Plovers about half a kilometre along from the Sussex Inlet
   Surf Club. Despite all the signs warning of their presence people are
   letting their dogs run free (off leads) along this beach. Distant
   record photo attached.
   Cameron Ward, Janette Ward
   Freckled Duck Lithgow Wastewater Treatment Plant
   2 Freckled Duck on middle pond in with many Australasian Shoveler,
   Pink-eared Duck, Hardhead, Wood and Black Duck, both teal and grebes -
   approx 5pm
   Tom Wilson
   Grey Goshawk Wingham Brush Nature Reserve
   Grey morph Grey Goshawk perched in dead tree on far bank of Manning
   River. Mobbed by three Torresian Crows and flew over to the Brush.
   Nicholas Beswick
   Swift Parrots West bound McDonalds, M4 Motorway (near blacktown)
   Four Swift Parrots were seen preening and squawking westbound McDonalds
   carpark on the M4 motorway. There is a planting of flowering ironbarks
   in the patch between the mcdonalds and the service station; they were
   in there. Sorry, no photo, it was windy, cold and raining when I saw
   them carrying on, obviously excited by this miserable tasmanian-style
   weather. So western sydney birders.... Perhaps a patch of birding
   mid-commute?
   Henry Cook
   Grey Plover Manyana - -35.268411, 150.508458
   Grey Plover - Whimbrel, Hooded Plovers, Red Capped Plovers, Pied
   Oystercatchers, Egrets and Cormorants were some of the highlights at
   Manyana side of Lake Conjola entrance.
   Charles Dove
   Dollarbird Sawtell
   First return for season - about usual date here - catching its breath
   after migration on traditional spot on powerlines in main street.
   Peter Higgins
   Dollarbird Woodfield Avenue Bundeena
   We both heard a Dollarbird calling this morning. First we've heard for
   this locality this season.
   Deryk and Leslie Engel
   Wed 24 Sep Glossy Black-Cockatoo, Red-browed Treecreeper, Scarlet Robin
   Capertee Village
   2 Glossy Black-Cockatoos (both males) seen feeding on a private
   property just south of Capertee village (but were observed from outside
   the locked property gate). In the woodland accessible from the
   Castlereagh Highway a male Scarlet Robin and 2 Red-browed Treecreepers
   were seen, along with a Wonga Pigeon, and singing White-throated
   Gerygones
   Tom Wilson
   Powerful Owl Royal Botanic Gardens (Sydney)
   The Powerful Owl seems to have transferred its roosting allegiance to
   the large Black Bean near the gap in the Macquarie Wall [to the left of
   the "Spring Walk" as you walk away from the cafetaria complex]. It was
   reported there on the 22nd [but apparently failed to show up on the
   23rd].
   Ted Nixon
   Dollarbird, Spangled Drongo, Regent Bowerbird Halliday's Pt 10' Cell
   Dollarbird in trees behind Black Head beach, also 3 Spangled Drongos,
   Shining Bronze-cuckoo and female Regent Bowerbird. Grey morph Eastern
   Reef Heron on rocks by Pebbly Beach
   Nicholas Beswick
   Spectacled Monarch, Wompoo Fruit-dove Lower Pappinbarra
   The first Spectacled Monarchs of the season seen this morning, They
   could have been here earlier as I have been away for ten days. Wompoo
   Fruit-doves are also back after a few weeks absence.
   Ian Kerr
   Tue 23 Sep Australian Koel Balmoral
   This morning heard my first Australian Koel calls of the season, from
   the large Moreton Bay fig tree next to the Bathers' Pavilion, Balmoral
   Sylvia Griffin
   Rainbow Bee-eater, White-browed Woodswallow, Brown Goshawk Pearsons
   Lookout, Capertee
   A flock of over 40Rainbow Bee-eaters passed overhead approx 9:45am. 2
   White-browed Woodswallows seen circling close to lookout. Dusky
   Woodswallows also seen from lookout. A party of 3 Brown Goshawk (1
   male, 2 female) was seen circling low over the woodland. A Wedge-tailed
   Eagle also seen from here.
   Tom Wilson
   Little Eagle, Speckled Warbler, White-browed Babbler Capertee
   Valley--Coco Creek
   Speckled Warbler seen on side of road approx 10:30am. Little Eagle
   passed overhead just after. A gang (6-8) of White-browed Babblers was
   working through the trees about 100 metres on the Capertee side of the
   bridge.
   Tom Wilson
   Black-chinned Honeyeater, Diamond Firetail, Turquoise Parrot Capertee
   Valley--Crown Station Rd
   Singles of Black-chinned Honeyeater and Diamond Firetail seen at the
   mailboxes (Site 6 on the Capertee Valley Bird Routes brochure) - approx
   11am. 2 Turquoise Parrots flew overhead and a single was seen close to
   the side of the road about 100 metres back towards Glen Davis Rd. Also
   at site 6 were 6 Jacky Winters, 8 Double-barred Finches, 2 Rufous
   Songlark
   Tom Wilson
   Southern Boobook Pacific Baza 105 Wallalong Cres West Pymble and Quarry
   Creek Lane Cove National Park
   Thought you might be interested in the following sightings at Wallalong
   Cres West Pymble and the area of Lane Cove National park (Quarry Creek)
   directly below. (56 h 0326788 UTM 6262115) Southern Boobook Owl
   roosting quite low down just below our back verandah in a King Fern
   (Angiopteris avecta) from 1 September on and off to 22 September.
   Pacific Baza (2) on 22 September 2014. Mating and actively displaying
   about 20 m south of the above (in Quarry Creek Bushland, Lane Cove
   National Park.
   Noela Jones (Birdlife member)
   Stubble Quail, Horsfield's Bushlark, White-backed Swallow Bureen (south
   of Denman, Hunter Valley)
   There were Stubble Quails calling in the lucerne paddocks around Bureen
   yesterday afternoon. I haven't seen any reported for a while and these
   are the first I've heard in the Hunter since May. Horsfield's Bushlarks
   were vocal here and several other places nearby (e.g. Martindale,
   Yarrawa). There were 2 White-backed Swallows amongst the 100+ Fairy
   Martins over Bureen Creek and several Rainbow Bee-eaters are excavating
   already.
   Mick Roderick
   Painted Honeyeater Giants Creek (Upper Hunter Valley)
   Whilst the Regent Honeyeaters appear now to have departed Giants Creek
   (in fact, even have the Noisy Friars) there were 2 Painted Honeyeaters
   heard (and one seen) just west of where the Regents had been. I cannot
   see records of them in Giants Creek on any atlas. There is no mistletoe
   in flower or bud in the area. Of relevance I also called into Medhurst
   Bridge and found a few Painteds there - as reported by John Weigel the
   Amyema quandang in the wattles is not flowering, but I found yesterday
   that instead they are using the Amyema cambagei in the River Oaks.
   Mick Roderick
   Red-backed Kingfisher Rushforth Rd South Grafton
   sighted at 11.30am today at same position as reported by Greg Clancy.
   Observed flying down from power line and taking insects. Very active.
   Location was at the southern end of the badly eroded creek about half a
   kilometre before entrance to property Ballandean..
   Warren Thompson
   Dollarbird, Bassian Thrush, Koel, Channel-billed Cuckoo (3), Pacific
   Baza Warriewood Wetlands and Irrawong Reserve
   You can tell spring is definately underway with many migratory species
   back in the valley. Also many scarlet Honeyeaters and several Eastern
   Rosellas. Also of note was a Brown Antechinus running around my feet
   for ten minutes! At one point I sat down on a step nearby and it
   climbed to eye level about 10cm away from me and just looked at me!
   (Moderator's Note: This is the first Dollarbird for the Greater Sydney
   area.AKM)
   Jayden Walsh
   Redthroat, Black Honeyeater, Chirruping Wedgebill, Crimson Chat Broken
   Hill
   Lots of good birds about the town, Redthroat common
   Greg Roberts
   Mon 22 Sep Grey Plover, Topnot Pigeon Lake Conjola Estuary
   Single Grey Plover observed at fairly close distance on expansive sand
   flats in the lake at present. It was moulting out of breeding plumage,
   but still had distinctive black front. Flock of 20+ Topnot Pigeons in
   the coastal scrub feeding on the many fruiting lilypilly trees. Both
   species not seen by us in over 30 years of visitation to this area.
   Wolinski and Richardson families
   Common Blackbird and Topknot Pigeon Royal National Park--Wattle Flat
   About 8 Topknot Pigeons and a male Blackbird
   Marie Lister and Athena Georgiou
   Spotted Quail-Thrush Conjola National Park - Cudmirrah Section
   Seen in regenerating section of Blackbutt Road on left hand side,
   approximately 500m west of the intersection of Slaty Box Road.
   Lesley May
   Eastern Bristlebird, Pilotbird, Beautiful Firetail, Southern Emu Wren
   Barren Grounds Nature Reserve
   Early morning walk along the Griffiths Trail at Barren Grounds NR and
   back again later in the afternoon. Most of the 'specialties' found
   within a few hundred metres of the carpark. Eastern Bristlebirds are
   quite vocal. No Ground Parrots seen or heard. Still very cool early in
   the morning and the birds were relatively quiet, even at dawn. Based on
   previous visits and audio recordings from this site it is much more
   'birdy' later in the year from late October onwards.
   Marc Anderson
   Superb Parrot Tarcutta floodplain crossing on Hume Highway
   Sighted 2 Superb Parrots in flight crossing the highway, one of them
   kindly redecorating my windscreen while passing. Sighted plenty of
   other species while driving from Sydney to Albury including 3 x
   Square-tailed Kites, 5 Wedge-tailed Eagles (one trying to catch a
   rabbit on the freeway ahead of me), 1 Black-shouldered Kite and 1
   Black-faced Monarch.
   Andrew Whitaker
   Swift Parrot, Painted Honeyeater, Black-chinned Honeyeater, Turquoise
   Parrot Wilpinjong Creek, Murragamba
   Two Swift Parrots feeding on fruiting mistletoe or lerp in Rough-barked
   Apple and Blakeley's Red Gum on creek (no flower in red gums, just
   bud). Calling alerted to their presence. Theh were very 'flighty' and
   flew off twice before sundset could not relocate them. Passing through
   just for a day? Unfortunately on private property so there is no
   access. It is worth keeping a look out in the area. Three Painted
   Honeyeaters in fruiting mistletoe, two Turquoise Parrot and one
   Black-chinned Honeyeater nearby.
   Kurtis Lindsay
   Red-backed Kingfisher Rushforth Road, South Grafton
   Kingfisher still present this afternoon at the same location where it
   was observed on Thursday 18th. Also observed by local birdos on Friday
   and Saturday.
   Greg Clancy
   Painted Honeyeater Medhurst Bridge, Martindale Valley (Mid Hunter
   Valley)
   Up to 12 Painted Honeyeaters seen this morning at this well known site
   (the mistletoe at the site is Amyema quandang, which is growing in a
   bi-pinnate wattle, but apparently isn't flowering strongly). Maximum
   number of birds seen at once was 8.
   John Weigel per Mick Roderick
   Forest Kingfisher Caniaba, Lismore NSW
   FK (male) first sighting for season.
   paul griffin
   Australian Koel Greenwich [Gore Cove area]
   Taking my cue from Simon Gorta's posting of 20/9: one heard calling at
   7 a.m. [my first this spring, locally]
   Ted Nixon
   Sun 21 Sep Black-necked Stork Pacific HWY Grafton NSW
   2 Black-necked Storks in waterway alongside Pacific Highway. First time
   I've seen these birds! (Moderator's Note: There are at least 10
   breeding pairs in the Clarence Valley so a pair at Grafton are not
   unusual. AKM)
   Adrian O'Hara
   Diamond Firetail, Zebra Finch, Rufous Songlark, Brown Falcon 5 km SE
   Baldry on the Baldry-Molong Rd
   A pair of Diamond Firetails were found at a site where plantations of
   Spotted Gums had been planted to control salt problems in soil. Also
   present were 4 Zebra Finches, Rufous Songlarks and Fairy Martins, and a
   Brown Falcon. These were the only Diamond Firetails seen at 30 sites in
   and around the Parkes Shire in a 3 day survey.
   Alan Morris + 22 menbers of Birding NSW Central Coast Group
   Speckled Warbler, Brown Treecreeper, Black-chinned Honeyeater Spring
   Creek Picnic Area, Goobang NP, 35 km NE Parkes
   Highlights of a 2 hour morning stop at the Spring Creek Picnic Area by
   members of the CCGBNSW, included a Spiny-cheeked Honeyeater, 2 Speckled
   Warblers, 2 Black-chinned Honeyeaters, nesting Brown Treecreepers,
   Choughs & Grey-shrike-thrushes, a Brown Goshawk and a Collared
   Sparrowhawk, Inland Thornbill, both White-throated and Western
   Gerygones, 2 Wedge-tailed Eagles, 2 Little Lorikeets, White-browed
   Babblers, Crested Shrike-tits and Rufous Songlark.
   Alan Morris + 22 others
   Buller's Albatross, Wandering type Albatros. wattamolla royal national
   park.
   Good numbers of albatross off wattamolla today including 45 Shy
   Albatross,about the same number of Black-browed Albatross.1 Wandering
   type Albatross, 3 Buller's Albatross and 1 Indian Yellow-nosed
   Albatross also 4 giant petrel I didn't get close enough views to
   identify witch species and 1 Fairy Prion.
   michael ronan.
   Top Knot Pigeons Deep Creek Reserve, Narrabeen
   Same walk as mentioned by Jayden Walsh. I arrived before other spotters
   & lost count as to how many TKP's took flight from the car park region.
   Estimate 50 plus. Light drizzle & cool
   Paddy de Klerk
   Sat 20 Sep Black Kite, Freckled Duck, Sacred Kingfisher, Gum Swamp,
   Forbes
   Highlights from a 90 minute stint at Gum Swamp by members of the
   BNSWCCG, included 11 Freckled Duck, 5 Sacred Kingfishers some calling,
   4 Black Kites, Sea-Eagle on nest, 1 Black-tailed Native-hen, nesting
   Choughs and Grey-crowned Babblers, Rainbow Bee-eaters, Australian
   Shovelers and Hoary-headed Grebes.
   Alan Morris & 22 others
   Glossy Black-Cockatoo Butterleaf State Forest / Glen Elgin area
   A total of ten birds sighted. Two groups of three (family groups) and
   two pairs. All feeding on Oak [Casuarina sp.]. All within a 50ha area.
   David Charley
   Fri 19 Sep Whiskered Tern, Australian Shelduck, Avocet, Freckled Duck
   Parkes Waste Water Treatment Park
   Highlights of a 2 hour stint at the Parkes STW by members of the
   Central Coast Group, Birding NSW included 9 Whiskered Terns, 2
   Australian Shelducks, 10 Red-necked Avocet, 3 Sharp-tailed Sandpipers,
   1 Black-tailed Native Hen, 1 Glossy Ibis, 3 Superb Parrots, 1 Freckled
   Duck, 10+ Australian Shovellers, 1 Rufous Songlark, a Swamp Harrier,
   Whistling Kite & 200+ Pink-eared Ducks and many Grey Teal etc.
   Alan Morris + 22 others
   Red-wing Parrot 19km west of Glenn Innes
   3 parrot observed on buds in roadside trees. Eastern edge of range.
   David Charley
   Thu 18 Sep Superb Parrot Holmwood HSD Bumberry, 30 km E of Parkes on
   Orange Road.
   Group of three Superb Parrots flew across the road and landed in a
   flowering Yellow Box
   Doug Hocking per Alan Morris


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Birdline Australian Capital Territory Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 29 Sep 2014 07:01:06 +1000
   Birdline Australian Capital Territory

   Published sightings for the week ending 28 Sep 2014.

   Tue 23 Sep White-winged Triller Mt Ainslie Nature Reserve--Campbell
   Park
   A single male White winged Triller. The first I have seen this spring
   Roger Williams


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Birdline Australia Weekly Update
From: notifications AT eremaea.com
Date: 29 Sep 2014 07:00:53 +1000
   Birdline Australia

   Published sightings for the week ending 28 Sep 2014.

   Thu 25 Sep Gouldian Finch Wyndham Hospital
   After searching quite a few sites around Wyndham this morning managed
   to locate a flock of well over 50+ Gouldians coming in to drink from a
   puddle on the footpath near the Hospital
   Greg and Janice McKay
   Mon 22 Sep Green-headed Yellow Wagtail Cocos Keeling Islands
   This bird was with a group of 4 Eastern Yellow Wagtails at the Quarry
   on West Island. They have been around for the last 4 days.
   Pam Jones Geof Christie


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Sooty owl in Bunya Mountains
From: Bob Lake <boblake72 AT live.com.au>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 06:11:08 +1000
I was interested to read Laurie Knight’s comments on the Bunya Mountains’ 
Sooty owl. More than 25 years ago we built one of the first homes on the top of 
the mountain and lived there for six years. We walked straight out of our house 
into the forest and, almost every day, walked through the fig that Laurie 
mentions. There was a Sooty owl in residence at that time although, strangely 
– considering that there were few people around in the late 80s – it was 
always much higher up. The owl became so familiar to us that I used to imitate 
its call as I approached – and it responded. Our daily conversations were 
quite a talking point. It must, of course, be a different owl today ... 
possibly a grandchild of my owl ... but it does appear that the territory is 
handed down from generation to generation. 

Bob Lake.


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Birdpedia - Australia - Weekly Digest
From: "Birdpedia - Australia Info" <info AT birdpedia.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 00:05:06 +0930
The following is a digest of Sightings Reported on Birdpedia for the period 
Monday, September 22, 2014 to Sunday, September 28, 2014: 


Area: SA

Date: Thursday, September 18, 2014

Location: Vivonne Bay Kangaroo Island

Hooded Plover (Thinornis rubricollis) (9) one adult bird carried red flag YN, 
and a metal band . On beach east to Eleanor River mouth. Seen again on 
following days 


Caspian Tern (Sterna caspia) (2) one pair visited Harriet River mouth on 
19/9/14 and following days 


Australian Shelduck (Tadorna tadornoides) (2) one pair flew along beach from 
Vivonne Bay C P, where they nest, to the Eleanor River estuary. Also seen there 
following day, with grey teal and black swans. 


Freckled Duck (Stictonetta naevosa) (150) still monopolising Duck Lagoon. most 
resting during the day on dead logs. 


Reported by: Heather Connolly on Friday, September 26, 2014

---------------------------------------------

Date: Monday, September 22, 2014

Location: Dog Lane Nr Tolderol end.

Little Eagle (Hieraaetus morphnoides) (1) A beautiful pale bird giving great 
view , a late sighting record I know but anyone out that way may like to be on 
the lookout. 


Reported by: William Brooker on Saturday, September 27, 2014

---------------------------------------------

Date: Thursday, September 25, 2014

Location: Goolwa Ponds Hassel Rd Goolwa

Blue-billed Duck (Oxyura australis) (2) Birds were on the main pond to the 
right of the bird hide. 


White-necked Heron (Ardea pacifica) (1) Bird was flying between ponds along 
with a White-faced Heron. 


Reported by: Winston Syson on Friday, September 26, 2014

---------------------------------------------

Date: Thursday, September 25, 2014

Location: Bashams Beach Port Elliot

Hooded Plover (Thinornis rubricollis) (2) Birds were 150Mts west of car park. 
Both birds were flagged orange. Id letters were noted. 


Reported by: Winston Syson on Friday, September 26, 2014

---------------------------------------------

Date: Thursday, September 25, 2014

Location: Barrage Road Goolwa. 500mts North of the Barrage

Buff-banded Rail (Gallirallus philippensis) (2) Birds were crossing the road

Sacred Kingfisher (Todiramphus sanctus) (1) Single bird was on power lines at 
the side of Barrage Rd in the same area as the Rails. 


Reported by: Winston Syson on Friday, September 26, 2014

---------------------------------------------

Date: Friday, September 26, 2014

Location: Dam Park, Fantail Court, Wynn Vale

Southern Boobook (Ninox boobook) (2) One calling, seen in tree by side of the 
road. A second calling from some distance away. 


Reported by: David Cox on Sunday, September 28, 2014

---------------------------------------------

Date: Friday, September 26, 2014

Location: Private dam on Old Sellicks Hill Road near Myponga.

Collared Sparrowhawk (Accipiter cirrocephalus) (1) I was fishing on this dam in 
my kayak when a dusky moorhen flew directly over my head, from behind me, with 
a Sparrowhawk only a metre or two behind it! the chase ended when the moorhen 
splash dived into the water and dove under a bank-side willow tree and the 
bemused hawk swung up into the branches of a nearby Gum tree. 

High drama, but surely unusual behaviour for a sparrowhawk more known for 
weaving in and out of trees and scooping off the smaller birds for its diet. I 
wonder if it would be powerful enough to catch a waterhen as their modus 
operandi is to grasp its normal small bird prey in its talons using it's long 
legs as a tool? 


Reported by: Anthony John Bainbridge on Friday, September 26, 2014

---------------------------------------------

Date: Friday, September 26, 2014

Location: Highbury

Dusky Woodswallow (Artamus cyanopterus) (1) Returned to the Highbury Linear 
Park area adjacent to the Hills Face/Torrens Gorge. A pair have been seen here 
for the last couple of years. 


Reported by: Graham Crooks on Friday, September 26, 2014

---------------------------------------------

Need more information about a sighting? Login and contact the poster directly.

Receive sightings via email or SMS immediately they are posted. 

Not a member of Birdpedia? Membership is free and gives you access to 
information for over 230 countries. 


To sign up go to the Birdpedia Web Site (http://www.birdpedia.com/).

To find out more about Birdpedia and what it can do for you, see 'What is 
Birdpedia?' 


---------------------------------------------
                         



Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: The Sooty keeper of the Figs
From: Chris <chris.sanderson AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 22:40:11 +0800
Hi Laurie,

That bird had been there for years before I saw it there in 2010. However, I 
only saw it on my fourth visit to the site, and a local ranger said the bird is 
there only about 25% of the time so it has other roosts. 


Cheers,
Chris

Sent from my iPhone

> On 28 Sep 2014, at 17:19, Laurie Knight  wrote:
> 
> G’day
> 
> I spent a couple of days on the Bunya Mts (Qld) last week. Although it was 
school holiday time, the campgrounds weren’t packed on week nights, and the 
walking tracks were fairly quiet away from the Dandabah hot spots. The dawn 
choruses were pretty good, with the pittas and riflebirds calling regularly. 

> 
> Yesterday morning, I was out before the noisy crowd and looked up while 
passing through the well known fig (a few hundred metres from Dandabah). While 
there were no telltale droppings on the boardwalk through the tree, a Sooty Owl 
(as featured on the info board inside the tree) was quietly roosting on an 
internal branch about 15 metres up. I was surprised to see it, given that 
hundreds of people would have passed through the tree on a daily basis that 
week. 

> 
> I imagine that most people pass through the tree without noticing the bird 
and it has become accustomed to people so that it doesn’t flush. I think that 
as long as people don’t shine lights at it or use call playback, that bird 
might be a reliable feature there. I was certainly able to get good photos 
without using a flash at 8 am. 

> 
> Regards, Laurie.
> 
> 
> 
> 
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: The Sooty keeper of the Figs
From: Laurie Knight <l.knight AT optusnet.com.au>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 19:19:54 +1000
Gday

I spent a couple of days on the Bunya Mts (Qld) last week. Although it was 
school holiday time, the campgrounds werent packed on week nights, and the 
walking tracks were fairly quiet away from the Dandabah hot spots. The dawn 
choruses were pretty good, with the pittas and riflebirds calling regularly. 


Yesterday morning, I was out before the noisy crowd and looked up while passing 
through the well known fig (a few hundred metres from Dandabah). While there 
were no telltale droppings on the boardwalk through the tree, a Sooty Owl (as 
featured on the info board inside the tree) was quietly roosting on an internal 
branch about 15 metres up. I was surprised to see it, given that hundreds of 
people would have passed through the tree on a daily basis that week. 


I imagine that most people pass through the tree without noticing the bird and 
it has become accustomed to people so that it doesnt flush. I think that as 
long as people dont shine lights at it or use call playback, that bird might 
be a reliable feature there. I was certainly able to get good photos without 
using a flash at 8 am. 


Regards, Laurie.





Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Where have all the Yellow tailed Black Cockatoos gone?
From: brian fleming <flambeau AT labyrinth.net.au>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 19:49:44 +1000
Last Sunday there were seven at Banyule Flats Reserve, Heidelberg, Vic.
Family Group - 1 male with red eye-rings, 1 female seen feeding one of 
two young birds. Much squealing and grating and digging for grubs in 
wattles on the Yarra bank.

Anthea Fleming

On 28/09/2014 3:36 PM, Donald G. Kimball wrote:
> Was hoping someone might give me a bit of a guess as to why I saw no Yellow
> tailed black cockatoos in the Penrith Blue Mountain region this period.  Is
> Sept a month where they are just totally elsewhere?  Puzzled would love
> some imput.
>
> Thanks
>
>
> Don
> 
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > > > > > ----- > No virus found in this message. > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com > Version: 2015.0.5315 / Virus Database: 4158/8285 - Release Date: 09/27/14

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Duck shooting video
From: Debbie Lustig <debbielustig123 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 19:02:29 +1000
The Coalition Against Duck Shooting (CADS) has released this video, in time for 
the Victorian state election: 

http://youtu.be/5GP-2R_lK5o
The Labor Opposition in Victoria supports duck shooting. 
The video contains footage of injured and dead birds that some may find 
distressing. 



 		 	   		  


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: No Superb parrots at Nangar National Park. Parrotbloke still looking.
From: Thomas Wilson <wilsonsinoz AT optusnet.com.au>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 17:41:44 +1000
Don
if you (or anybody else who's heading in that direction) are looking for Superb 
Parrots, they were outside the OBG in abundance (25+) on the afternoon of 26 
September. They were feeding on something in recently cut grass on a small bank 
between the car park and the road. 

As for Turqs, I saw 3 in the Capertee Valley on 23 Sept - all seen near Crown 
Station Road (1 about 1/2 way up, 2 at the site with the mail boxes where the 
road divides). 

Cheers
Tom Wilson
 
> From: rgiller AT optusnet.com.au
> To: ibwonet1 AT gmail.com; birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
> Date: Wed, 24 Sep 2014 16:31:47 +1000
> Subject: Re: [Birding-Aus] No Superb parrots at Nangar National Park. 
Parrotbloke still looking. 

> 
> Hi Don,
> I found Superb Parrots at the Orange Botanic Gardens on Sept. 17., although 
> they may have moved on since then.
> Cheers
> Roger.
> 
> 
> -----Original Message----- 
> From: Donald G. Kimball
> Sent: Tuesday, September 23, 2014 1:02 PM
> To: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
> Subject: [Birding-Aus] No Superb parrots at Nangar National Park. 
> Parrotbloke still looking.
> 
> After a long drive spent all last night and this morning at Nangar National
> Park.  Staked out at a small dam where I filmed them in February of 2009.
> None anywhere to be seen.  Lots of green lush growth and abundant Eastern
> Rosellas.  Am I missing something about Turquoise biology?  Maybe they are
> elsewhere this time of year?  One cant be successful every time I reckon.
> But was disappointed no Turq's this trip.
> 
> 
> 
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Double-eyed fig parrot nest behaviour
From: Michael Tarburton <tarburton.m AT optusnet.com.au>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 17:02:31 +1000
G'day Don

HANZAB says:

Breeding very poorly known & no major studies.  Does say one current  
nest tree had two older hollows presumed to be from previous years.

So looks like there is an opportunity for someone in Cairns to do  
some useful follow up work on that nest site.

Cheers


Mike


On 28/09/2014, at 3:34 PM, Donald G. Kimball wrote:

> I have had great fun watching a Fig Parrot at a nest cavity in  
> Cairns over
> the past couple of days.  I dont have a copy of Hanzab handy so I  
> dont have
> a reference to answer this question.  Do Fig Parrots re-use the  
> cavity they
> have excavated or create a new one each year?  Many thanks
>




Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: McIvor River, Cooktown
From: "Phil & Sue Gregory" <oreornis AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 17:50:47 +1000
I had my first visit to the McIvor River off Battle Camp Road north of Cooktown 
on Sept 27 following our rock art tour that morning with Willie Gordon from 
what was Guurrbi Tours (but is now Adventure North Australia), an interesting 
cultural perspective with some unique insights into the history of some of the 
paintings, well worth doing if you are around Cooktown. 

Anyway, McIvor River was well worth a look even in the heat of the early 
afternoon, with the 24km gravel road section in good condition. White-browed 
Robin was vocal and easy to see, they seem to have either gone or become very 
hard at the former classic site at Big Mitchell Creek no doubt due to the 
ridiculous amount of burning there that is turning the country into a desert. I 
had brief views of Spectacled Monarch and suspect they may be the white-bellied 
taxon albiventris, but the best sighting for me was Tropical Scrubwren of that 
odd race dubius that is very like Large-billed Scrubwren but has narrow white 
wingbars. Sadly I did not hear them call, I know the northern birds sound 
nothing like Large-billed and would have liked to have heard these southern 
ones. Fairy Gerygone was common here, as was Graceful Honeyeater. 

No sign yet of those odd monarchs that the guide books all call Black-winged 
Monarch- all I can say is why do they sound like Black-faced, and how come New 
Guinea Black-winged are hill forest birds and sound nothing like these? Sure a 
lot to be learned about them, and I'd love to know if anyone has actually seen 
this Australian taxon in New Guinea. I am unable to trace any 
records......Martin Cachard is the guru here with the McIvor River birds of 
course. 

Good birding
Phil Gregory

Website 1: Http://www.sicklebillsafaris.com
Website 2: Http://www.cassowary-house.com.au




Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Where have all the Yellow tailed Black Cockatoos gone?
From: "Donald G. Kimball" <ibwonet1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 15:36:19 +1000
Was hoping someone might give me a bit of a guess as to why I saw no Yellow
tailed black cockatoos in the Penrith Blue Mountain region this period.  Is
Sept a month where they are just totally elsewhere?  Puzzled would love
some imput.

Thanks


Don


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Double-eyed fig parrot nest behaviour
From: "Donald G. Kimball" <ibwonet1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 15:34:33 +1000
I have had great fun watching a Fig Parrot at a nest cavity in Cairns over
the past couple of days.  I dont have a copy of Hanzab handy so I dont have
a reference to answer this question.  Do Fig Parrots re-use the cavity they
have excavated or create a new one each year?  Many thanks

Don


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Australia wide bird weeks
From: Fiona Anderson <fea2003 AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 15:46:43 +1000
Hi Dick,

As you will know ausbird.com.au provides a directory of all things related to 
birding in Australia. However, up until now, we have never had a specific page 
devoted entirely to birding events. At this very time we are in the process of 
setting one up. 


To anyone else who reads this, we would welcome any information that you feel 
would be relevant on such a site. Any non profit event would be posted on the 
directory at no cost. For commercial enterprises there is a very nominal charge 
to just cover the costs associated with running it. 


We would very much appreciate any help you could give us.

Regards, 
Fiona Anderson and Klaus Uhlenhut
Email. :  admin AT ausbird.com.au or admin AT ausbird.com

Sent from my iPad

> On 28 Sep 2014, at 3:32 pm, "Dick Jenkin"  wrote:
> 
> Hi all
> 
> 
> 
> I am wondering if someone could point me in the direction of a resource that
> would list an annual event calendar of Australia wide bird weeks and events
> ?
> 
> 
> 
> Thanks in advance
> 
> 
> 
> Dick Jenkin
> 
> 
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Australia wide bird weeks
From: "Dick Jenkin" <richardnjenkin AT bigpond.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 14:51:43 +1000
Hi all

 

I am wondering if someone could point me in the direction of a resource that
would list an annual event calendar of Australia wide bird weeks and events
?

 

Thanks in advance

 

Dick Jenkin



Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Two male Satin Bowerbirds squaring off in a tree
From: David Adams <dpadams AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 08:48:26 +1000
During a walk yesterday afternoon, I heard a Satin Bowerbird up a tree.
That's not at all unusual here (NSW Far South Coast) as they're resident
birds. I've heard some bower advertising calls this season, but not a lot.
In this case, it was the complicated rolling-burbling call I think of as
typical for this species.

I was surprised when I looked up to the top of the tree (bare branches
above a canopy of lower branches) to see two all black birds. At least one
was calling and hoping around - vaguely reminding me of Riflebird display,
of all things. After  a few minutes, an immature/female flew in and both
adult males flew off.

I'm guessing that this is some kind of a boundary "negotiation" behavior
between adult males. Having never seen it before, I figured I'd confirm
rather than assume.

Thanks for any comments.


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: RFI December birding NSW
From: David Adams <dpadams AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 08:26:36 +1000
D'oh! I meant to send that off privately. Oh well. In any case, I hope that
others have managed to give Jim some tips on the Sydney-Orange route as I
don't know it at all.


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: RFI December birding NSW
From: Bill Stent <billstent AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 08:01:13 +1000
I gotta say, that's the best response to an RFI ever! Well done.

Bill

On 28/09/2014, at 7:37 AM, David Adams  wrote:

> On Fri, Sep 26, 2014 at 12:15 PM, Jim Rowoth  wrote:
> 
>> I'm new to this list, so I hope this is an appropriate post.  Can anyone
>> recommend any "must-see" birding locations between Sydney and Orange in
>> early December?  I will be in NSW for one week--first time ever in Oz--then
>> and looking for tips on how to maximize my birding time, while visiting
>> family in the Orange area.  You can respond off-list at
>> rowoth AT sbcglobal.net.  Thanks!
> 
> 
> Hello, I'll leave it to others to give you specifics on Sydney to Orange
> but thought I'd write with some general orientation points.
> 
> I grew up in the US and used to live in Santa Cruz county, so I can
> remember what it's like to encounter the birds of Australia for the first
> time. Wow! The birds here are fantastic and apart from raptors, owls, and
> shorebirds are pretty much *entirely* different to the birds of North
> America. There are lots and lots of families here that you don't have there
> and vice versa. Some names look the same, like "robins" and "babblers", but
> they're not the same. There are more affinities between here and Asia than
> anywhere else, but even there, the families are pretty different a lot of
> the time.
> 
> There's a lot of good news about your first week of birding in Aus:
> 
> * Parrots! Best place on earth for parrots. There are more kinds in South
> America, but good luck seeing them. Here they're everywhere, in huge
> varieties and are often visible.
> 
> * Honeyeaters. Another huge, lovely and highly variable family - one of our
> dominant groups.
> 
> * Abundance and variety. Birds here are pretty much everywhere - they're
> just in the landscape. People in the countryside with no interest in birds
> can still rattle off detailed observations and life histories for dozens of
> species. Just because they see the birds all of the time.
> 
> Yeah, you should have a great time. Fair warning: Heading inland in high
> season summertime is likely to be stinking hot. Coming from Stockton, you
> should already know how to deal with that: dawn and dusk, sheltered places
> and riverine habitats. Ah, here in Aus flowering trees are a much, much,
> much bigger deal for birders than in the US. There are many species
> (perhaps particularly the inland species) that are entirely nomadic. They
> can be anywhere in a huge range, depending on where resources are to be
> found. So, you'll have a thousand birds of one kind because the right gum
> (eucalypt) tree is in blossom, and then not see them again for a year.
> Australia does not have the same regular series of seasons as the countries
> of the northern hemisphere. Backing up for a second, be wary of range maps
> in field guides as they often depict where a species *might* be found.
> There may be a fairly small population somewhere in a huge territory,
> rather than "these birds are distributed within this area evenly." With
> only a week, you'll probably have your hands full just figuring out all of
> the "common" birds you see. (I love "common" birds. They're only common
> when you're in the right place!)
> 
> Hey, keep your eyes peeled for Apostlebirds, one of the all-time great
> Aussie birds. They're pretty exclusively inland/dry-country birds and
> travel around in little gangs. They works as a team to take care of the
> nest and raise the young. Very playful, very smart. Their in a tiny family
> with only one other Australian member, the White-winged Chough (no relation
> to the Choughs of Europe and Asia, they're in with the Crows/Ravens.) Out
> in that country I think you should also get Babblers (the Aussie ones are
> great!) good parrots (they're all good, to be fair) and one of the more
> cryptic Bowerbirds....but I don't know Orange....and bird distributions can
> be remarkably variable over short distances here.
> 
> If you're looking in to field guides, a few suggestions:
> 
> * There are four major general paper guides and people seem to recommend
> the one they start out with. With that said, this one is the best ;-)
> 
> 
http://www.amazon.com/Field-Guide-Birds-Australia-9th/dp/0732291933/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1411853230&sr=1-1&keywords=The+Field+Guide+to+the+Birds+of+Australia 

> 
> Nothing is as good as, say, your Sibley guides but Pizzey is probably about
> as good as your Nat Geo...although bigger. For an entirely new local with
> new families, I think paper guides are great as they give you something to
> flip through to try and narrow down what you're seeing. If you like digital
> guides, there are two available:
> 
> Pizzey
> 
https://itunes.apple.com/au/app/pizzey-knight-birds-australia/id714625973?mt=8 

> 
> Morcombe
> 
https://itunes.apple.com/au/app/michael-morcombe-david-stewart/id539890367?mt=8 

> 
> I gave you the iTunes links as these are the versions I use (and because
> you seem to be writing from a Mac), but both apps have Android versions.
> The apps are both good but I end up using Pizzey more often. Still, the
> sound collections are different and either guide is decent. I've never been
> in love with Morcombe's illustrations (others like them fine) and Pizzey
> has decent photos as well as good plates...so I guess that's why I use it
> more. In any case with only a week, you may be just as happy with a paper
> guide. Oh, books, etc. are far cheaper in the US than here. For example,
> that Pizzey paper guide that's around $US 25 at Amazon retails here for $AU
> 45 + shipping. Lucky for you, the $A is slipping down, making Australia
> cheaper to travel in with $US. It's anyone's guess, but the pundits say the
> $A has a lot more room to fall. (I've seen the $US buy from .48 $A up to
> 2.02 in 12 years. That's pretty extreme! The $A is something like the
> world's 4th most traded currency as speculators love it. Makes things a bit
> tough at times when you live here.)
> 
> Anyway, there's some background and good wishes. I think Australia is a
> wonderful country for visiting birders and hope that you have a great time.
> Enjoy the Kookaburras! Another communal/nest-helping species with the most
> wonderful call. They're also the world's largest Kingfishers, so you have
> to love them.
> 
> Let me know if you have follow-up questions or want any info on mammal
> guides.
> 
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: RFI December birding NSW
From: David Adams <dpadams AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 07:37:32 +1000
On Fri, Sep 26, 2014 at 12:15 PM, Jim Rowoth  wrote:

> I'm new to this list, so I hope this is an appropriate post.  Can anyone
> recommend any "must-see" birding locations between Sydney and Orange in
> early December?  I will be in NSW for one week--first time ever in Oz--then
> and looking for tips on how to maximize my birding time, while visiting
> family in the Orange area.  You can respond off-list at
> rowoth AT sbcglobal.net.  Thanks!


Hello, I'll leave it to others to give you specifics on Sydney to Orange
but thought I'd write with some general orientation points.

I grew up in the US and used to live in Santa Cruz county, so I can
remember what it's like to encounter the birds of Australia for the first
time. Wow! The birds here are fantastic and apart from raptors, owls, and
shorebirds are pretty much *entirely* different to the birds of North
America. There are lots and lots of families here that you don't have there
and vice versa. Some names look the same, like "robins" and "babblers", but
they're not the same. There are more affinities between here and Asia than
anywhere else, but even there, the families are pretty different a lot of
the time.

There's a lot of good news about your first week of birding in Aus:

* Parrots! Best place on earth for parrots. There are more kinds in South
America, but good luck seeing them. Here they're everywhere, in huge
varieties and are often visible.

* Honeyeaters. Another huge, lovely and highly variable family - one of our
dominant groups.

* Abundance and variety. Birds here are pretty much everywhere - they're
just in the landscape. People in the countryside with no interest in birds
can still rattle off detailed observations and life histories for dozens of
species. Just because they see the birds all of the time.

Yeah, you should have a great time. Fair warning: Heading inland in high
season summertime is likely to be stinking hot. Coming from Stockton, you
should already know how to deal with that: dawn and dusk, sheltered places
and riverine habitats. Ah, here in Aus flowering trees are a much, much,
much bigger deal for birders than in the US. There are many species
(perhaps particularly the inland species) that are entirely nomadic. They
can be anywhere in a huge range, depending on where resources are to be
found. So, you'll have a thousand birds of one kind because the right gum
(eucalypt) tree is in blossom, and then not see them again for a year.
Australia does not have the same regular series of seasons as the countries
of the northern hemisphere. Backing up for a second, be wary of range maps
in field guides as they often depict where a species *might* be found.
There may be a fairly small population somewhere in a huge territory,
rather than "these birds are distributed within this area evenly." With
only a week, you'll probably have your hands full just figuring out all of
the "common" birds you see. (I love "common" birds. They're only common
when you're in the right place!)

Hey, keep your eyes peeled for Apostlebirds, one of the all-time great
Aussie birds. They're pretty exclusively inland/dry-country birds and
travel around in little gangs. They works as a team to take care of the
nest and raise the young. Very playful, very smart. Their in a tiny family
with only one other Australian member, the White-winged Chough (no relation
to the Choughs of Europe and Asia, they're in with the Crows/Ravens.) Out
in that country I think you should also get Babblers (the Aussie ones are
great!) good parrots (they're all good, to be fair) and one of the more
cryptic Bowerbirds....but I don't know Orange....and bird distributions can
be remarkably variable over short distances here.

If you're looking in to field guides, a few suggestions:

* There are four major general paper guides and people seem to recommend
the one they start out with. With that said, this one is the best ;-)


http://www.amazon.com/Field-Guide-Birds-Australia-9th/dp/0732291933/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1411853230&sr=1-1&keywords=The+Field+Guide+to+the+Birds+of+Australia 


Nothing is as good as, say, your Sibley guides but Pizzey is probably about
as good as your Nat Geo...although bigger. For an entirely new local with
new families, I think paper guides are great as they give you something to
flip through to try and narrow down what you're seeing. If you like digital
guides, there are two available:

Pizzey
https://itunes.apple.com/au/app/pizzey-knight-birds-australia/id714625973?mt=8

Morcombe
https://itunes.apple.com/au/app/michael-morcombe-david-stewart/id539890367?mt=8

I gave you the iTunes links as these are the versions I use (and because
you seem to be writing from a Mac), but both apps have Android versions.
The apps are both good but I end up using Pizzey more often. Still, the
sound collections are different and either guide is decent. I've never been
in love with Morcombe's illustrations (others like them fine) and Pizzey
has decent photos as well as good plates...so I guess that's why I use it
more. In any case with only a week, you may be just as happy with a paper
guide. Oh, books, etc. are far cheaper in the US than here. For example,
that Pizzey paper guide that's around $US 25 at Amazon retails here for $AU
45 + shipping. Lucky for you, the $A is slipping down, making Australia
cheaper to travel in with $US. It's anyone's guess, but the pundits say the
$A has a lot more room to fall. (I've seen the $US buy from .48 $A up to
2.02 in 12 years. That's pretty extreme! The $A is something like the
world's 4th most traded currency as speculators love it. Makes things a bit
tough at times when you live here.)

Anyway, there's some background and good wishes. I think Australia is a
wonderful country for visiting birders and hope that you have a great time.
Enjoy the Kookaburras! Another communal/nest-helping species with the most
wonderful call. They're also the world's largest Kingfishers, so you have
to love them.

Let me know if you have follow-up questions or want any info on mammal
guides.


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Peter Ginn's The Ultimate Companion for Birding in South Africa
From: Denise Goodfellow <goodfellow AT bigpond.com.au>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 01:07:15 +0930
These two volumes by Peter Ginn and Geoff McIlleron, cover all 960 South 
African birds. Ive had a look at some of the 1400 photographs it contains and 
they are stunning! There are maps on each page as well. It comes with a free 
e-book as well. Handy for those who dont wish to lug along heavy volumes. 


 The book is available on www.birdbook.co.za (it is not being sold through 
bookshops because this would increase the price by a minimum of 45% - 60%). 


All profits from the books are going to a registered non-profit organisation 
that provides educational toys for underprivileged creches throughout South 
Africa. 


As Peters friend, Pat Nurse says, they "need to get this out to friends and 
family through all forms of social media!!! So please pass the word along. 


Incidentally I have no financial interest in this publication.

 
Denise Lawungkurr  Goodfellow
PO Box 71
Darwin River, NT, Australia 0841

PhD candidate, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW.

Founding Member: Ecotourism Australia
Founding Member: Australian Federation of Graduate Women Northern Territory
043 8650 835











Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Golden-shouldered Parrots
From: "Phil & Sue Gregory" <oreornis AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 20:52:45 +1000
Just back from a birding and rock art foray up to Musgrave and Lakefield, We 
looked for Golden-shouldered parrots on one afternoon and two early mornings, 
only finding them on the final morning Sept 24 and then with considerable 
difficulty, not a great time of year to locate this species. Sue Shepard from 
Artemis Station was very helpful as always, our thanks to her. 


Anyway, we found at least 7 of the parrots, tracked by their high-pitched 
calls- I have posted two cuts on IBC (Internet Bird Collection) and Xenocanto, 
neither of which had any for this species- one is the surprisingly Pale-headed 
Rosella-like flight and anxiety call, the other the feeding and contact call. I 
was surprised to find the birds feeding in what looks to be some kind of wattle 
tree, nibbling away at the yellow-green flower stalks, and not feeding on the 
ground at all like all my previous sightings have been. A limited search of the 
literature (HBW, and Australian Parrots by Forshaw) basically lists grass seeds 
of various species as the food sources and makes no mention of wattles being 
used. I had the wrong search image and was basically looking for them to fly up 
off the ground, it was only by hearing the calls that we found the very 
unobtrusive birds feeding in the trees. There were at least 6 female plumage 
birds including one with almost no tail which I suspected might be a juvenile, 
it was always with a female plumaged bird- I will post shots of these on the 
IBC shortly plus a video clip of a fine adult male feeding in the wattles. 

Phil Gregory

Website 1: Http://www.sicklebillsafaris.com
Website 2: Http://www.cassowary-house.com.au



Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Striated Grasswren taxonomy
From: martin cachard <mcachard AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 20:15:55 +1030
hi Peter,
 
i'm no taxonomist by any means but I personally believe there is some merit in 
splitting this species complex on a habitat preference basis... 

it's a rather simplified way to look at it I know, but I've always looked at 
the sand-hill birds as being distinct from the rocky/stony substrate birds - 
this was one of the main factors I believe behind the Short-tailed being split 
originally from Striated group that we are talking about. 

so this would put rowleyi & whitei (rocky substrate dwellers) as distinct from 
striatus & oweni (sand-hill dwellers). 

given the geographical distance between populations of rowleyi & whitei then 
this alone should warrant their case for being split from one another, however 
i'm less convinced that oweni should be split into species level from striatus 
as the ranges probably meet & maybe their differentiation is more clinal & 
gradual as a result... 

 
this is just a field worker's point of view from a common sensical angle 
without any science behind it... 

 
just a thought...
cheers,
martin cachard,
cairns
 
 

 
> From: crispin_marsh AT scp.com.au
> To: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
> Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 12:10:29 +1000
> Subject: [Birding-Aus] Striated Grasswren taxonomy
> 
> Dear Birders,
> Some time ago on this forum Murray Lord drew attention to a paper proposing a 
split in the Grasswren taxonomy including that of Striated Grasswren. The 
Striated Grasswren splits the species four ways  Rowleyi (Rusty Grasswren) 
from western Queensland; whitei (Pilbara Grasswren); oweni (Sandhill 
Grasswren) whose range is South Australia west of Port Augusta up through 
southern NT and the eastern side of WA; which leaves striatus as occurring in 
the mallee country of eastern SA, NSW and Vic. 

> 
> 
> This proposal has apparently been considered by IOC and rejected at this 
stage. The Diary section of the IOC website has an entry reading 

> Aug 30  Decline Striated Grasswren splits pending improved sampling. 
> 
> Can any of our readers enlighten me on what this actually means. Are the IOC 
looking for more physical samples of SGs to have their DNA sampled or are they 
looking for sampling of more loci of the DNA or are they after something else 
altogether? Does anyone know if there is interest in the scientific community 
in doing whatever else is asked for by IOC? If so when might such work get 
published? 

> 
> Obviously it is still a good idea for we twitchers to keep an eye out for the 
sub-species as there is a good chance that at some time in the future they will 
be elevated to full species 

> 
> Regards
> Peter Marsh
> 
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: RFI: Kalkadoon Grasswren
From: "david robertson" <drdeath AT picknowl.com.au>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 17:36:46 +0930
We will be returning from Cape York via western Queensland later in the year
(hopefully).  I would love to have another try at finding the Kalkadoon
Grasswren.  All suggestions welcome (grid references preferred!)

David Robertson

Adelaide



---
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection 
is active. 

http://www.avast.com


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Where did all the parrots go on Tablelands Road near Wentworth Blue Mts.
From: "Donald G. Kimball" <ibwonet1 AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 13:09:41 +1000
In February of 2009 Tablelands road was a jackpot for me as I filmed.
Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoos calling everywhere and flying about.  Several
views of Gang-gangs.  Even some fantastic encounters with Glossy-black
Cockatoos.  This time weather was cold , I heard one very distant
Yellow-tailed black.  No Gangs whatever, and some Crimsons but not a great
deal of them.  The only lovely thing was connecting again with Glossies and
watching and listening to them feed for over an hour!  I heard fires might
be an issue but maybe its time of year?  ?????

Thanks for imput.

PS:  Found a double eyed fig parrot nest today in Cairns!  the highlight of
my day.

Don


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Striated Grasswren taxonomy
From: "Crispin Marsh" <crispin_marsh AT scp.com.au>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 12:10:29 +1000
Dear Birders,
Some time ago on this forum Murray Lord drew attention to a paper proposing a 
split in the Grasswren taxonomy including that of Striated Grasswren. The 
Striated Grasswren splits the species four ways – Rowleyi (‘Rusty 
Grasswren’) from western Queensland; whitei (‘Pilbara Grasswren’); oweni 
(‘Sandhill Grasswren’) whose range is South Australia west of Port Augusta 
up through southern NT and the eastern side of WA; which leaves striatus as 
occurring in the mallee country of eastern SA, NSW and Vic. 



This proposal has apparently been considered by IOC and rejected at this stage. 
The ‘Diary’ section of the IOC website has an entry reading 

“Aug 30  Decline Striated Grasswren splits pending improved sampling”. 

Can any of our readers enlighten me on what this actually means. Are the IOC 
looking for more physical samples of SGs to have their DNA sampled or are they 
looking for sampling of more loci of the DNA or are they after something else 
altogether? Does anyone know if there is interest in the scientific community 
in doing whatever else is asked for by IOC? If so when might such work get 
published? 


Obviously it is still a good idea for we twitchers to keep an eye out for the 
sub-species as there is a good chance that at some time in the future they will 
be elevated to full species 


Regards
Peter Marsh


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Pale-headed Rosella at Brewarrina, Redthroat at Broken Hill
From: Greg Roberts <friarbird.roberts AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 11:45:20 +1000
Among the birds I've seen over the past couple of days about Brewarrina in
western NSW have been a couple of Pale-headed Rosellas; I would have this
was well outside the range of this species. This has proved a good site for
parrots, with species including Pink Cockatoo, Red-tailed Black Cockatoo
and Blue Bonnet.

More here: *http://tinyurl.com/labjlau *


I had earlier spent some time around Broken Hill and was surprised at how
common and conspicuous Redthroats were in the area. This can be a difficult
species and especially tricky to photograph.

More here: *http://tinyurl.com/nmo5oz6 *

Greg Roberts


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: FW: Bird tautology
From: "Cas Liber" <casliber AT bigpond.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 08:58:41 +1000
I took my young son on one of the little train rides around the Royal
Botanic Gardens in Sydney and the guide kept calling the white ibises
"ibis-birds", which I found a little grating to my ears and I have to resist
the urge to say something...
Cas




Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: A depressing article!
From: Dave Torr <davidtorr AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Sep 2014 08:57:56 +1000
http://www.theage.com.au/environment/great-shorebird-migration-under-threat-20140926-10m1xt.html 



Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: RFI December birding NSW
From: Jim Rowoth <rowoth AT sbcglobal.net>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 19:15:40 -0700
Im new to this list, so I hope this is an appropriate post. Can anyone 
recommend any must-see birding locations between Sydney and Orange in early 
December? I will be in NSW for one weekfirst time ever in Ozthen and looking 
for tips on how to maximize my birding time, while visiting family in the 
Orange area. You can respond off-list at rowoth AT sbcglobal.net. Thanks! 


Jim Rowoth
Stockton CA
USA




Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Access to Hattah-Kulkyne camping
From: <calamanthus5 AT bigpond.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 23:32:18 +0000
Peter,

I suggest that you check directly with the rangers at Hattah. There is 
currently a large amount of environmental water being pumped into the lakes. 
The last I heard (last June) was that pumping would continue until about 
November. 



We were there for a brief stop in mid August. At that time both Hattah & 
Mournpall campgrounds were closed. The Hattah campground was largely under 
water. The water was up to the edge of the day visitor car park. The road to 
Lake Mournpall was closed at the information centre (12km south of the lake). 
It would have been flooded at the low points a few km north of the info centre. 



For those roads in the park that are open a Subaru should be ok. I used to 
drive a Subaru Liberty and never had problems on any of the roads in Hattah NP 
but I haven’t been along the Konardin track for a few years. 



It may be possible to camp along the Murray, not too far from the park.


This use of environmental water should result in some great birding in the 
coming months as food supplies build up in the lakes. 



Cheers,

Euan Moore.

 

Message: 16
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 21:17:20 +1000
From: Peter Shanley 
To: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
Subject: [Birding-Aus] Access to Hattah-Kulkyne camping
Message-ID: 
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=windows-1252

Hi all,

I only have a conventional vehicle (Subaru Impreza - All Wheel Drive but no 
clearance). Does anyone know if that means I can?t get in to the only 
campground open at Hattah-Kulkyne at the moment (said to be Lake Mournpall 
campground via Konardin Track). 


Cheers

Peter Shanley
Melbourne


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: FW: Bird tautology
From: "Alan Gillanders" <alan AT alanswildlifetours.com.au>
Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 08:51:20 +1000
Stephen,
Thanks for your information and reasoned response. I would have had to look 
most of that up (and was planning to do so in response to some of the stuff 
posted to this forum). It is a long time since I read about it.

I still think that Eutheria is a bit of a reach, even for an arrogant 
species which is declared to be very wise; eu- meaning good, right, true and 
proper.
Regards,
Alan

Alan's Wildlife Tours
2 Mather Road
Yungaburra 4884

Phone 07 4095 3784
Mobile 0408 953 786
http://www.alanswildlifetours.com.au/
-----Original Message----- 
From: Stephen Ambrose
Sent: Thursday, September 25, 2014 8:09 PM
To: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: [Birding-Aus] FW: Bird tautology




Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Bird tautology
From: Denise Goodfellow <goodfellow AT bigpond.com.au>
Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2014 06:03:35 +0930
No because koala doesnt mean bear, although where tautology could be 
applied to a term where the meaning is not immediately clear, I dont know. 


Denise

Denise Lawungkurr  Goodfellow
PO Box 71
Darwin River, NT, Australia 0841

PhD candidate, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW.

Founding Member: Ecotourism Australia
Founding Member: Australian Federation of Graduate Women Northern Territory
043 8650 835









On 25 Sep 2014, at 11:32 pm, Tim Dolby  wrote:

> I'm confused - Koala Bear - is that tautology? As in 'How much can a Koala 
bear?' 

> 
> Cheers,
> 
> Tim
> ________________________________________
> From: Birding-Aus [birding-aus-bounces AT birding-aus.org] on behalf of Neil 
Cheshire [diomedea1 AT bigpond.com] 

> Sent: Wednesday, September 24, 2014 7:40 PM
> To: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
> Subject: [Birding-Aus] Bird tautology
> 
> Has anyone else noticed the annoying trend of adding the word 'bird' or 
'birds' to common bird names such as tern, cormorant etc. This evening's 
introduction to 'Wild Britain' mentions "nightjar birds" I have even seen it in 
a circular from the South Australian Dept. of Environment and Natural Resources 
which referred to "little tern birds". There appears to be cultural cringe/PC 
that does not want to offend or bewilder anyone who may be unaware that a tern, 
cormorant etc is in fact a bird! 

> End of rant
> 
> Neil Cheshire
> Encounter Bay,
> South Australia.
> 
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > > This email, including any attachment, is intended solely for the use of the intended recipient. It is confidential and may contain personal information or be subject to legal professional privilege. If you are not the intended recipient any use, disclosure, reproduction or storage of it is unauthorised. If you have received this email in error, please advise the sender via return email and delete it from your system immediately. Victoria University does not warrant that this email is free from viruses or defects and accepts no liability for any damage caused by such viruses or defects. > >
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: Bird tautology
From: Tim Dolby <Tim.Dolby AT vu.edu.au>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 14:02:27 +0000
I'm confused - Koala Bear - is that tautology? As in 'How much can a Koala 
bear?' 


Cheers,

Tim
________________________________________
From: Birding-Aus [birding-aus-bounces AT birding-aus.org] on behalf of Neil 
Cheshire [diomedea1 AT bigpond.com] 

Sent: Wednesday, September 24, 2014 7:40 PM
To: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
Subject: [Birding-Aus] Bird tautology

Has anyone else noticed the annoying trend of adding the word 'bird' or 'birds' 
to common bird names such as tern, cormorant etc. This evening's introduction 
to 'Wild Britain' mentions "nightjar birds" I have even seen it in a circular 
from the South Australian Dept. of Environment and Natural Resources which 
referred to "little tern birds". There appears to be cultural cringe/PC that 
does not want to offend or bewilder anyone who may be unaware that a tern, 
cormorant etc is in fact a bird! 

End of rant

Neil Cheshire
Encounter Bay,
South Australia.


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org This email, including any attachment, is intended solely for the use of the intended recipient. It is confidential and may contain personal information or be subject to legal professional privilege. If you are not the intended recipient any use, disclosure, reproduction or storage of it is unauthorised. If you have received this email in error, please advise the sender via return email and delete it from your system immediately. Victoria University does not warrant that this email is free from viruses or defects and accepts no liability for any damage caused by such viruses or defects.

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Fwd: Bird tautology
From: Denise Goodfellow <goodfellow AT bigpond.com.au>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 21:10:36 +0930
> 
> I wrote a little about the topic of the marsupial placenta in my 1993 book, 
"Fauna of Kakadu and the Top End", a publication still used as a text by the 
University of NSW. 

> 
> Denise
> 
> Denise Lawungkurr  Goodfellow
> PO Box 71
> Darwin River, NT, Australia 0841
> 
> PhD candidate, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW.
> 
> Founding Member: Ecotourism Australia
> Founding Member: Australian Federation of Graduate Women Northern Territory
> 043 8650 835
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> On 25 Sep 2014, at 7:39 pm, Stephen Ambrose  wrote:
> 
>> Marsupial embryos are attached to the wall of the uterus by a placenta in
>> the very early stages of development. The outer layer of cells in the
>> fertilised, dividing egg is called the trophoblast.  When the egg implants
>> itself in the uterine wall, the trophoblast begins to differentiate into the
>> different tissue layers that form the placenta and invade the maternal
>> decidua (uterine lining).  In eutherians (true placentals) the trophoblast
>> secretes chemicals (e.g. phosphocholine) that help the embryo avoid
>> detection by the maternal immune system, and develops suppressor cells which
>> inhibit the actions of maternal antigens that enter the body of the foetus.
>> Therefore, the foetus of eutherian mammals can remain implanted in the
>> uterus during its major phase of growth.  On the other hand, the trophoblast
>> of metatherians (marsupials) has not evolved all the mechanisms to suppress
>> the actions of maternal antigens that occur on the surface of the uterine
>> lining. Therefore, although a marsupial placenta develops, there can only be
>> a brief period of attachment, otherwise the mother's immune system would
>> eventually kill the foetus. Hence, the need for marsupial embryos to leave
>> the uterus and develop as pouch young. 
>> 
>> The placenta in marsupials is derived from the part of the trophoblast that
>> forms the embryo's yolk sac. Hence, it is called the yolk sac placenta.  In
>> eutherians, the placenta is derived from the allantois, which is another
>> embryonic sac that grows behind the yolk sac. Therefore, the eutherian
>> placenta is known as the allantoic placenta. The difference in the origins
>> of the eutherian and marsupial placentas probably explains why the latter
>> lacks some of the mechanisms to effectively combat the mother's immune
>> system.
>> 
>> So strictly speaking, marsupials should be regarded as placental mammals and
>> I favour the use of the following clades (taxonomic groupings): Eutheria
>> (allantoic placental mammals), Metatheria (marsupials) and Prototheria
>> (monotremes). 
>> 
>> Stephen Ambrose
>> Ryde NSW
>> 
>> 
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Birding-Aus [mailto:birding-aus-bounces AT birding-aus.org] On Behalf Of
>> Jeremy O'Wheel
>> Sent: Thursday, 25 September 2014 2:42 PM
>> To: brian fleming
>> Cc: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
>> Subject: Re: [Birding-Aus] FW: Bird tautology
>> 
>> Marsupials aren't "placental mammals" either, although I think they do have
>> a placenta of sorts (but very small).  Placental mammals are mammals in the
>> infra class "Placentalia".
>> 
>> Jeremy
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>>
Birding-Aus mailing list >>
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >>
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >>
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >> >

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Access to Hattah-Kulkyne camping
From: Peter Shanley <shanleyreunion AT optusnet.com.au>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 21:17:20 +1000
Hi all,

I only have a conventional vehicle (Subaru Impreza - All Wheel Drive but no 
clearance). Does anyone know if that means I cant get in to the only 
campground open at Hattah-Kulkyne at the moment (said to be Lake Mournpall 
campground via Konardin Track). 


Cheers

Peter Shanley
Melbourne


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: FW: Bird tautology
From: "Stephen Ambrose" <stephen AT ambecol.com.au>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 20:09:18 +1000
Marsupial embryos are attached to the wall of the uterus by a placenta in
the very early stages of development. The outer layer of cells in the
fertilised, dividing egg is called the trophoblast.  When the egg implants
itself in the uterine wall, the trophoblast begins to differentiate into the
different tissue layers that form the placenta and invade the maternal
decidua (uterine lining).  In eutherians (true placentals) the trophoblast
secretes chemicals (e.g. phosphocholine) that help the embryo avoid
detection by the maternal immune system, and develops suppressor cells which
inhibit the actions of maternal antigens that enter the body of the foetus.
Therefore, the foetus of eutherian mammals can remain implanted in the
uterus during its major phase of growth.  On the other hand, the trophoblast
of metatherians (marsupials) has not evolved all the mechanisms to suppress
the actions of maternal antigens that occur on the surface of the uterine
lining. Therefore, although a marsupial placenta develops, there can only be
a brief period of attachment, otherwise the mother's immune system would
eventually kill the foetus. Hence, the need for marsupial embryos to leave
the uterus and develop as pouch young. 

The placenta in marsupials is derived from the part of the trophoblast that
forms the embryo's yolk sac. Hence, it is called the yolk sac placenta.  In
eutherians, the placenta is derived from the allantois, which is another
embryonic sac that grows behind the yolk sac. Therefore, the eutherian
placenta is known as the allantoic placenta. The difference in the origins
of the eutherian and marsupial placentas probably explains why the latter
lacks some of the mechanisms to effectively combat the mother's immune
system.

So strictly speaking, marsupials should be regarded as placental mammals and
I favour the use of the following clades (taxonomic groupings): Eutheria
(allantoic placental mammals), Metatheria (marsupials) and Prototheria
(monotremes). 

Stephen Ambrose
Ryde NSW


-----Original Message-----
From: Birding-Aus [mailto:birding-aus-bounces AT birding-aus.org] On Behalf Of
Jeremy O'Wheel
Sent: Thursday, 25 September 2014 2:42 PM
To: brian fleming
Cc: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: [Birding-Aus] FW: Bird tautology

Marsupials aren't "placental mammals" either, although I think they do have
a placenta of sorts (but very small).  Placental mammals are mammals in the
infra class "Placentalia".

Jeremy






Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Strange colour plate in Where Song Began
From: John Leonard <calyptorhynchus AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 18:35:55 +1000
Just reading Where Song Began by Tim Low and enjoying it. Just bewildered by 
the last colour plate, why has the wandering albatross been photoshopped to 
have a grey belly and underwings? 


John Leonard




Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: FW: Bird tautology
From: Kev Lobotomi <kevlobotomi AT hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 16:54:57 +1000
I guess a classic aussie colloquialism would be eagle hawk for the wedge tailed 
eagle. There is nothing hawk about this eagle it's a full sized eagle eagle! 
Kev 


--- Original Message ---

From: "brian fleming" 
Sent: 25 September 2014 2:32 PM
To: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: [Birding-Aus] FW: Bird tautology

On 25/09/2014 1:37 PM, John Leonard wrote:
> Anyone who doesn't know a cuckoo is a bird is a ........
>
> John Leonard
Drongo?

Incidentally, not all mammals are placental - Platypus and Echidna are
mammals.

Brian Fleming



Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: FW: Bird tautology
From: Kevin and Lizzie <dikkops AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 14:39:01 +0930
To be fair to Wild Britain, the programme itself didn't refer to nightjar
birds (or swallow birds or hobby birds) on any of the numerous occasions
they were mentioned in the commentary.  And the footage of each was
stunning.

The only significant bird naming error was to call a Red-legged Partridge a
Red Partridge, a usage which is neither scientific nor colloquial.  A
pedant might complain that the nightjars, swallows and hobbies weren't
specifically referred to as European, Barn or Eurasian respectively, but it
wasn't necessary given that they are the only regularly occurring examples
of each in Britain.

Kevin Stracey


Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: FW: Bird tautology
From: "Jeremy O'Wheel" <owheelj AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 14:41:47 +1000
Marsupials aren't "placental mammals" either, although I think they do have
a placenta of sorts (but very small).  Placental mammals are mammals in the
infra class "Placentalia".

Jeremy

On 25 September 2014 14:26, brian fleming  wrote:

> On 25/09/2014 1:37 PM, John Leonard wrote:
>
>> Anyone who doesn't know a cuckoo is a bird is a ........
>>
>> John Leonard
>>
> Drongo?
>
> Incidentally, not all mammals are placental - Platypus and Echidna are
> mammals.
>
> Brian Fleming
>
>
> 
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > >

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: FW: Bird tautology
From: brian fleming <flambeau AT labyrinth.net.au>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 14:26:49 +1000
On 25/09/2014 1:37 PM, John Leonard wrote:
> Anyone who doesn't know a cuckoo is a bird is a ........
>
> John Leonard
Drongo?

Incidentally, not all mammals are placental - Platypus and Echidna are 
mammals.

Brian Fleming



Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: FW: Bird tautology
From: "Jeremy O'Wheel" <owheelj AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 13:59:36 +1000
I believe the examples offered by Neil were Wild Britain talking about
"nightjar birds" and the South Australian Department of Environment and
Natural resources referring to "little tern birds".  "Cuckoo bird" sounds
like a colloquialism to me.

On 25 September 2014 13:37, John Leonard  wrote:

> Anyone who doesn't know a cuckoo is a bird is a ........
>
> John Leonard
>
> > On 25 Sep 2014, at 1:27 pm, "Jeremy O'Wheel"  wrote:
> >
> > I'm not really sure what this has to do with political correctness.  Do
> you
> > honestly think there are people offended if birds are referred to without
> > specifically labelling "bird" after their name?  It just seems like an
> > attempt to make it clearer what sort of animal they're talking about to
> me,
> > which is good an example of good communication skills.  You gain nothing
> by
> > being only accessible to people with a knowledge of birds.
> >
> > Jeremy
> >
> >> On 25 September 2014 10:15, Peter Shute  wrote:
> >>
> >> There might be more to it than adding clarity. Some people seem to like
> to
> >> do it in normal speech with some common bird names that most people
> would
> >> know are birds. E.g. jay bird, cuckoo bird.
> >>
> >> Peter Shute
> >>
> >>> -----Original Message-----
> >>> From: Birding-Aus
> >>> [mailto:birding-aus-bounces AT birding-aus.org] On Behalf Of
> >>> Philip Veerman
> >>> Sent: Thursday, 25 September 2014 10:00 AM
> >>> To: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
> >>> Subject: [Birding-Aus] FW: Bird tautology
> >>>
> >>> Yes but does it matter a lot? It is to aid communication for
> >>> those who do not know automatically that tern and the others
> >>> you mention already are bird names. Some of the names are too
> >>> short and obscure without a qualifier. Why should anyone who
> >>> doesn't happen to know, think official names like Redthroat
> >>> is a bird or Luzon Bleeding Heart, that isn't even given a
> >>> useful name like Luzon Bleeding Heart Pigeon. But it would
> >>> surely be hypocrisy to be too critical on this as we also use
> >>> "bird" as part of many official
> >>> names: lyrebird, butcherbird, bowerbird, antbird, grassbird, bird of
> >>> paradise,   etc. What is really strange is that the same
> >>> situation is used
> >>> for so many frogs and fish (maybe more than not), but as far
> >>> as I know, it is never used for any mammal. We never get Red
> >>> Fox Mammal, Phascogale Mammal, Echidna Mammal, Blue Whale
> >>> Mammal, etc.
> >>>
> >>> Philip
> >>>
> >>> -----Original Message-----
> >>> From: Birding-Aus
> >>> [mailto:birding-aus-bounces AT birding-aus.org] On Behalf Of
> >>> Neil Cheshire
> >>> Sent: Wednesday, 24 September 2014 7:41 PM
> >>> To: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
> >>> Subject: [Birding-Aus] Bird tautology
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> Has anyone else noticed the annoying trend of adding the word
> >>> 'bird' or 'birds' to common bird names such as tern,
> >>> cormorant etc. This evening's introduction to 'Wild Britain'
> >>> mentions "nightjar birds" I have even seen it in a circular
> >>> from the South Australian Dept. of Environment and Natural
> >>> Resources which referred to "little tern birds". There
> >>> appears to be cultural cringe/PC that does not want to offend
> >>> or bewilder anyone who may be unaware that a tern, cormorant
> >>> etc is in fact a bird! End of rant
> >>>
> >>> Neil Cheshire
> >>> Encounter Bay,
> >>> South Australia.
> >>> 
> >>>
Birding-Aus mailing list > >>>
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org > >>>
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: > >>>
> >>> http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > >>> > >>> > >>> > >>>
> >>>
Birding-Aus mailing list > >>>
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org > >>>
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: > >>>
> >>> http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > >>> > >>
> >>
Birding-Aus mailing list > >>
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org > >>
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: > >>
> http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > >> > >
> >
Birding-Aus mailing list > >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org > >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: > >
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > > > >
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > >

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: FW: Bird tautology
From: John Leonard <calyptorhynchus AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 13:37:05 +1000
Anyone who doesn't know a cuckoo is a bird is a ........

John Leonard

> On 25 Sep 2014, at 1:27 pm, "Jeremy O'Wheel"  wrote:
> 
> I'm not really sure what this has to do with political correctness.  Do you
> honestly think there are people offended if birds are referred to without
> specifically labelling "bird" after their name?  It just seems like an
> attempt to make it clearer what sort of animal they're talking about to me,
> which is good an example of good communication skills.  You gain nothing by
> being only accessible to people with a knowledge of birds.
> 
> Jeremy
> 
>> On 25 September 2014 10:15, Peter Shute  wrote:
>> 
>> There might be more to it than adding clarity. Some people seem to like to
>> do it in normal speech with some common bird names that most people would
>> know are birds. E.g. jay bird, cuckoo bird.
>> 
>> Peter Shute
>> 
>>> -----Original Message-----
>>> From: Birding-Aus
>>> [mailto:birding-aus-bounces AT birding-aus.org] On Behalf Of
>>> Philip Veerman
>>> Sent: Thursday, 25 September 2014 10:00 AM
>>> To: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
>>> Subject: [Birding-Aus] FW: Bird tautology
>>> 
>>> Yes but does it matter a lot? It is to aid communication for
>>> those who do not know automatically that tern and the others
>>> you mention already are bird names. Some of the names are too
>>> short and obscure without a qualifier. Why should anyone who
>>> doesn't happen to know, think official names like Redthroat
>>> is a bird or Luzon Bleeding Heart, that isn't even given a
>>> useful name like Luzon Bleeding Heart Pigeon. But it would
>>> surely be hypocrisy to be too critical on this as we also use
>>> "bird" as part of many official
>>> names: lyrebird, butcherbird, bowerbird, antbird, grassbird, bird of
>>> paradise,   etc. What is really strange is that the same
>>> situation is used
>>> for so many frogs and fish (maybe more than not), but as far
>>> as I know, it is never used for any mammal. We never get Red
>>> Fox Mammal, Phascogale Mammal, Echidna Mammal, Blue Whale
>>> Mammal, etc.
>>> 
>>> Philip
>>> 
>>> -----Original Message-----
>>> From: Birding-Aus
>>> [mailto:birding-aus-bounces AT birding-aus.org] On Behalf Of
>>> Neil Cheshire
>>> Sent: Wednesday, 24 September 2014 7:41 PM
>>> To: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
>>> Subject: [Birding-Aus] Bird tautology
>>> 
>>> 
>>> Has anyone else noticed the annoying trend of adding the word
>>> 'bird' or 'birds' to common bird names such as tern,
>>> cormorant etc. This evening's introduction to 'Wild Britain'
>>> mentions "nightjar birds" I have even seen it in a circular
>>> from the South Australian Dept. of Environment and Natural
>>> Resources which referred to "little tern birds". There
>>> appears to be cultural cringe/PC that does not want to offend
>>> or bewilder anyone who may be unaware that a tern, cormorant
>>> etc is in fact a bird! End of rant
>>> 
>>> Neil Cheshire
>>> Encounter Bay,
>>> South Australia.
>>> 
>>>
Birding-Aus mailing list >>>
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >>>
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >>>
>>> http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >>> >>> >>> >>>
>>>
Birding-Aus mailing list >>>
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >>>
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >>>
>>> http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >>> >>
>>
Birding-Aus mailing list >>
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >>
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >>
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >> >
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org >

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: FW: Bird tautology
From: "Jeremy O'Wheel" <owheelj AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 13:27:16 +1000
I'm not really sure what this has to do with political correctness.  Do you
honestly think there are people offended if birds are referred to without
specifically labelling "bird" after their name?  It just seems like an
attempt to make it clearer what sort of animal they're talking about to me,
which is good an example of good communication skills.  You gain nothing by
being only accessible to people with a knowledge of birds.

Jeremy

On 25 September 2014 10:15, Peter Shute  wrote:

> There might be more to it than adding clarity. Some people seem to like to
> do it in normal speech with some common bird names that most people would
> know are birds. E.g. jay bird, cuckoo bird.
>
> Peter Shute
>
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Birding-Aus
> > [mailto:birding-aus-bounces AT birding-aus.org] On Behalf Of
> > Philip Veerman
> > Sent: Thursday, 25 September 2014 10:00 AM
> > To: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
> > Subject: [Birding-Aus] FW: Bird tautology
> >
> > Yes but does it matter a lot? It is to aid communication for
> > those who do not know automatically that tern and the others
> > you mention already are bird names. Some of the names are too
> > short and obscure without a qualifier. Why should anyone who
> > doesn't happen to know, think official names like Redthroat
> > is a bird or Luzon Bleeding Heart, that isn't even given a
> > useful name like Luzon Bleeding Heart Pigeon. But it would
> > surely be hypocrisy to be too critical on this as we also use
> > "bird" as part of many official
> > names: lyrebird, butcherbird, bowerbird, antbird, grassbird, bird of
> > paradise,   etc. What is really strange is that the same
> > situation is used
> > for so many frogs and fish (maybe more than not), but as far
> > as I know, it is never used for any mammal. We never get Red
> > Fox Mammal, Phascogale Mammal, Echidna Mammal, Blue Whale
> > Mammal, etc.
> >
> > Philip
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Birding-Aus
> > [mailto:birding-aus-bounces AT birding-aus.org] On Behalf Of
> > Neil Cheshire
> > Sent: Wednesday, 24 September 2014 7:41 PM
> > To: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
> > Subject: [Birding-Aus] Bird tautology
> >
> >
> > Has anyone else noticed the annoying trend of adding the word
> > 'bird' or 'birds' to common bird names such as tern,
> > cormorant etc. This evening's introduction to 'Wild Britain'
> > mentions "nightjar birds" I have even seen it in a circular
> > from the South Australian Dept. of Environment and Natural
> > Resources which referred to "little tern birds". There
> > appears to be cultural cringe/PC that does not want to offend
> > or bewilder anyone who may be unaware that a tern, cormorant
> > etc is in fact a bird! End of rant
> >
> > Neil Cheshire
> > Encounter Bay,
> > South Australia.
> > 
> >
Birding-Aus mailing list > >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org > >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: > >
> > http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > > > > > > > >
> >
Birding-Aus mailing list > >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org > >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: > >
> > http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > > > > >
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > >

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org
Subject: Re: FW: Bird tautology
From: Peter Shute <pshute AT nuw.org.au>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 10:15:36 +1000
There might be more to it than adding clarity. Some people seem to like to do 
it in normal speech with some common bird names that most people would know are 
birds. E.g. jay bird, cuckoo bird. 


Peter Shute 

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Birding-Aus 
> [mailto:birding-aus-bounces AT birding-aus.org] On Behalf Of 
> Philip Veerman
> Sent: Thursday, 25 September 2014 10:00 AM
> To: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
> Subject: [Birding-Aus] FW: Bird tautology
> 
> Yes but does it matter a lot? It is to aid communication for 
> those who do not know automatically that tern and the others 
> you mention already are bird names. Some of the names are too 
> short and obscure without a qualifier. Why should anyone who 
> doesn't happen to know, think official names like Redthroat 
> is a bird or Luzon Bleeding Heart, that isn't even given a 
> useful name like Luzon Bleeding Heart Pigeon. But it would 
> surely be hypocrisy to be too critical on this as we also use 
> "bird" as part of many official
> names: lyrebird, butcherbird, bowerbird, antbird, grassbird, bird of
> paradise,   etc. What is really strange is that the same 
> situation is used
> for so many frogs and fish (maybe more than not), but as far 
> as I know, it is never used for any mammal. We never get Red 
> Fox Mammal, Phascogale Mammal, Echidna Mammal, Blue Whale 
> Mammal, etc. 
> 
> Philip
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Birding-Aus 
> [mailto:birding-aus-bounces AT birding-aus.org] On Behalf Of 
> Neil Cheshire
> Sent: Wednesday, 24 September 2014 7:41 PM
> To: birding-aus AT birding-aus.org
> Subject: [Birding-Aus] Bird tautology
> 
> 
> Has anyone else noticed the annoying trend of adding the word 
> 'bird' or 'birds' to common bird names such as tern, 
> cormorant etc. This evening's introduction to 'Wild Britain' 
> mentions "nightjar birds" I have even seen it in a circular 
> from the South Australian Dept. of Environment and Natural 
> Resources which referred to "little tern birds". There 
> appears to be cultural cringe/PC that does not want to offend 
> or bewilder anyone who may be unaware that a tern, cormorant 
> etc is in fact a bird! End of rant
> 
> Neil Cheshire
> Encounter Bay,
> South Australia.
> 
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
> http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > > > >
>
Birding-Aus mailing list >
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org >
To change settings or unsubscribe visit: >
> http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org > >

Birding-Aus mailing list
Birding-Aus AT birding-aus.org
To change settings or unsubscribe visit:
http://birding-aus.org/mailman/listinfo/birding-aus_birding-aus.org