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Updated on Thursday, July 24 at 08:57 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Giant Wrens,©BirdQuest

24 Jul Anchorage--Black Turnstone and Osprey ["Aaron Bowman ampbowman AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
24 Jul Gulf of AK Result ["joe staab staabjoe AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
23 Jul Caspian Terns ["Louann Feldmann louannf AT alaska.net [AKBirding]" ]
23 Jul Re: Possible Western Gull in Seward ["Floyd Hayes floyd_hayes AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
23 Jul Solitary Sandpiper ["avocet AT gci.net [AKBirding]" ]
23 Jul Gulls at the Mouth Kenai River Monday ["swinak AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
22 Jul Possible Western Gulls in Seward ["Floyd Hayes floyd_hayes AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
21 Jul St. Paul Island bird report: July 14-20, 2014 ["Scott Schuette SSchuette01 AT hotmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
21 Jul Varied Thrush ["rose123ak AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
21 Jul Palmer Creek near Hope report for 7-20-2014 ["tarbox AT ptialaska.net [AKBirding]" ]
21 Jul Re: Young Merlins in Anchorage ["jtam AT gci.net [AKBirding]" ]
20 Jul Kenai Caspian Tern ["kenaibirder AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
19 Jul Young Merlins in Anchorage ["jtam AT gci.net [AKBirding]" ]
18 Jul Friday, July 18, 2014 One thing after another! ["c_griz AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
17 Jul warblers ["Louann Feldmann louannf AT alaska.net [AKBirding]" ]
17 Jul Re: Homer mystery "Black" bird ["bob payne bobbobpayne AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
17 Jul Homer/Kachemak Bay Bird Alert Information: 7-12-14 ["'Lani Raymond' lani67 AT alaska.net [AKBirding]" ]
15 Jul Hummingbirds - new place to look ["steve_scordino AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
14 Jul St. Paul Island bird report: July 7-13, 2014 ["Scott Schuette SSchuette01 AT hotmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
13 Jul Visting Alaska July 20-30 ["Floyd Hayes floyd_hayes AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
13 Jul Great Shorebird Diversity ["wkeys AT gci.net [AKBirding]" ]
13 Jul Re: Flocking shorbirds in Port Heiden ["Kate McLaughlin mclenvironmental AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
12 Jul Osprey at Otto Lake ["erik.hendrickson755 AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
12 Jul Flocking shorbirds in Port Heiden ["ejnorris AT sbcglobal.net [AKBirding]" ]
12 Jul Birding Juneau - Guide ["gpelphrey AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
11 Jul Courageous Mallard ["Anthony Newcomer onekoolkid0 AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
11 Jul Nest boxes in Anchorage ["jtam AT gci.net [AKBirding]" ]
11 Jul Homer Spit ["tkreiser AT gci.net [AKBirding]" ]
10 Jul One Legged Godwit ["wkeys AT gci.net [AKBirding]" ]
10 Jul Anchorage--birding of late ["Aaron Bowman ampbowman AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
10 Jul Re: Homer mystery "Black" bird ["'Eskelin, Todd' todd_eskelin AT fws.gov [AKBirding]" ]
10 Jul Kenai Flats Slaty-backed Gulls ["kenaibirder AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
10 Jul Peregrine Falcon in Spenard ["wkeys AT gci.net [AKBirding]" ]
09 Jul Requesting info on marked Hudsonian Godwits ["rosejswift AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
9 Jul Black-bellied Plover ["David Sonneborn davidsonne AT aol.com [AKBirding]" ]
09 Jul Sunday, July 6, 2014 Rufous Hummingbird banding project ["c_griz AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
08 Jul Alaska Cell Phone Coverage ["gpelphrey AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
8 Jul Anchorage--5 Caspian Terns on mudflats ["Aaron Bowman ampbowman AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
08 Jul Hudsonian Godwits at Chester Creek mouth ["rearguard AT clearwire.net [AKBirding]" ]
08 Jul Westchester shorebirds ["Chris Maack cmaack AT gci.net [AKBirding]" ]
08 Jul Arctic Warblers on the Denali Highway ["erik.hendrickson755 AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
7 Jul St. Paul Island bird report: June 30-July 6, 2014 ["Scott Schuette SSchuette01 AT hotmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
7 Jul Homer Spit ["David Sonneborn davidsonne AT aol.com [AKBirding]" ]
6 Jul Re: Homer mystery "Black" bird ["David Sonneborn davidsonne AT aol.com [AKBirding]" ]
06 Jul Homer Bird ["swinak AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
06 Jul Note on Homer mystery bird ["sealion AT xyz.net [AKBirding]" ]
06 Jul Homer mystery "Black" bird ["sealion AT xyz.net [AKBirding]" ]
03 Jul Connors Lake Loon Cam now video streaming in Anchorage ["jtam AT gci.net [AKBirding]" ]
03 Jul Northern Flicker - Potter Marsh ["sjanik23 AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
3 Jul RT loon ["David Sonneborn davidsonne AT aol.com [AKBirding]" ]
1 Jul St. Paul Island bird report: June 23-29, 2014 ["Scott Schuette SSchuette01 AT hotmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
30 Jun Fw: Black-tailed Godwit - Three-mile creek (West side of Cook Inlet) ["Peter Scully peterandrewscullyii AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
30 Jun 6-28-29-2014 ["tarbox AT ptialaska.net [AKBirding]" ]
29 Jun Emperor Geese in Barrow ["gwwarbler AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
28 Jun Westchester Lagoon-Friday Night ["davidsonne AT aol.com [AKBirding]" ]
27 Jun Recent Kenai Highlights ["kenaibirder AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
27 Jun Homer/Kachemak Bay Bird Alert Information: 6-24-14 ["'Lani Raymond' lani67 AT alaska.net [AKBirding]" ]
26 Jun robin eating a mouse! ["mossy seaside AT xyz.net [AKBirding]" ]
26 Jun Thursday, June 26, 2014 Arctic Tern Fracas! ["c_griz AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
25 Jun White-winged Crossbills ["swinak AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
24 Jun Semipalmated Plover ["wkeys AT gci.net [AKBirding]" ]
24 Jun Tuesday, June 24, 2014 Seward Hudsonian Godwit ["c_griz AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
24 Jun Re: Nesting Semipalmated Plover plus ["Bob Winckler winckler AT mtaonline.net [AKBirding]" ]
24 Jun St. Paul Island bird report: June 16-22, 2014 ["Scott Schuette SSchuette01 AT hotmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
24 Jun June 19, 2014 Bird Tour to the Chiswell Islands ["c_griz AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
23 Jun Re: fewer birds this year? ["S Friend sjfriend AT horizonsatellite.com [AKBirding]" ]
23 Jun Re: fewer birds this year? ["Tom Murtiashaw tmurtiashaw AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
23 Jun Re: fewer birds this year? ["Frank Clemens rearguard AT clearwire.net [AKBirding]" ]
23 Jun fewer birds this year? ["Beth Peluso bpeluso AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
23 Jun Talkeetna Song Sparrow ["cmannix AT mtaonline.net [AKBirding]" ]
23 Jun Leucistic American Robin in Homer ["sealion AT xyz.net [AKBirding]" ]
23 Jun Sunday, June 22, 2014 Summer Sandpipers and Angry Eagles ["c_griz AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
22 Jun WHITE-WINGED CROSSBILL at Hillside Park in Anchroage ["Keith Confer kconfer12 AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
22 Jun Seward Alcids(10) ["joe staab staabjoe AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
22 Jun Seward Eurasian Collared Dove update ["c_griz AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
21 Jun Homer/Kachemak Bay Birders' trip to the Wynn Nature Center: 6-21-14 ["'Lani Raymond' lani67 AT alaska.net [AKBirding]" ]

Subject: Anchorage--Black Turnstone and Osprey
From: "Aaron Bowman ampbowman AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 17:32:23 -0800
Yesterday on the Wednesday evening Westchester bird walk we saw an
increasing number of young shorebirds including one young PECTORAL
SANDPIPER...early I thought!  The other highlight was a beautiful adult
BLACK TURNSTONE on the bank of the Fish Creek.
Late this afternoon while absentmindedly swinging in my hammock I tracked
an OSPREY circling and drifting with the wind to the south over my house
here in Spenard.

Let the late summer (humm, Autumn?) birding begin!

Aaron Bowman
Subject: Gulf of AK Result
From: "joe staab staabjoe AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 15:57:53 -0700
Greetings all,
 
4 birders from Anc., Juneau and Seward took the ferry Kennicot  from Juneau to 
Whittier July 22 thru 24. Here is an abbreviated list of birds seen. 
Black-footed Albatross(78), Pink-Footed Shearwater(7), Buller's Shearwater(2), 
Cassin's & Rino Auklets, Aleutian Terns, Ancient Murrelets, Leach's & 
Fork-Tailed Storm-Petrels, all 3 Jaegers, along with the regular common birds 
of the area. 

 
In Yakutat there were Eurasian-Collared Doves flying overhead, along with Barn 
Swallows at the dock. 

 
In Juneau the Red-eyed Vireo and nest were located.
 
Joe Staab, Seward AK
. .
Subject: Caspian Terns
From: "Louann Feldmann louannf AT alaska.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 22:36:06 -0800
I saw 3 this afternoon about 5 pm at the tide line with the gulls on the 
north side of the outlet for Chester Creek.  In spite of the sun the 
best view was outside of the Westchester Park north tunnel. They 
occasionally flew to reposition as the tide was coming in, but flew away 
about 6:15 and I didn't see them again.  Nice views while they lasted, 
though.  Louann


------------------------------------
Posted by: Louann Feldmann 
------------------------------------

Remember -- Be nice!
------------------------------------

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Subject: Re: Possible Western Gull in Seward
From: "Floyd Hayes floyd_hayes AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 21:12:31 -0700
After scrutinizing my photos a bit more this morning, there appears to be a 
slight purplish tinge in a small section of where the orbital ring would be. If 
it fairly accurately depicts the orbital ring coloration, it's not a Western 
Gull. I'll try to post it when I get my computer on wifi again. 


Floyd Hayes
Angwin, CA

------------------------------------
Posted by: Floyd Hayes 
------------------------------------

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------------------------------------

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Subject: Solitary Sandpiper
From: "avocet AT gci.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 23 Jul 2014 00:14:13 -0700
A single solitary sandpiper was seen about 05:30 at the mouth of Fish Creek on 
the Cook Inlet side of the Bridge. It was on the mudflats close to the bridge. 
Another wonderful day. 

 

 Tom Evans
 Anchorage
 

 P.S. I now have a cell phone so I can call others and be contacted in the 
field. 
Subject: Gulls at the Mouth Kenai River Monday
From: "swinak AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 23 Jul 2014 00:04:38 -0700
Saw a Slaty-backed gull and a Glaucous Gull at the mouth of the Kenai River 
Monday morning. 


 

 Steve W.

  
Subject: Possible Western Gulls in Seward
From: "Floyd Hayes floyd_hayes AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 22:16:42 -0700
This morning I spotted a couple of possible WESTERN GULLS in the harbor at 
Seward and got a few fair photos of one as my ship cruised past them. I just 
uploaded a photo in an album titled "Possible Western Gull in Seward." I've 
tried turning it into a Slaty-backed Gull or Thayer's Gull, but to me it looks 
more like a Western Gull. Being from California and visiting Alaska for the 
first time, I was far more interested in many of the other birds I saw today, 
but I thought I'd better report this. 



Floyd Hayes
Angwin, CA, USA
Subject: St. Paul Island bird report: July 14-20, 2014
From: "Scott Schuette SSchuette01 AT hotmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 22:43:38 -0800
Hello
Birders, this is the St. Paul Island bird report for the week of July 
14th-20th, 

2014, sponsored by St. Paul Island Tour. The following sequence of sightings is
in taxonomic order; an asterisk denotes a species of less than annual 
occurrence 

or one of particular note. 2014
Species count: 123Weekly
Species Count: 55 Birds
Mentioned: TUNDRA
SWAN (ssp. bewickii and columbianus)MallardGreater
ScaupKing
EiderBuffleheadRed-breasted
MerganserPacific
LoonCOMMON
LOONShort-tailed
ShearwaterBALD
EAGLEPacific
Golden-PloverLESSER
SAND-PLOVERGRAY-TAILED
TATTLERWandering
TattlerBar-tailed
GodwitRuddy
TurnstoneSHARP-TAILED
SANDPIPERRED-NECKED
STINTRock
Sandpiper (ssp. tschuktschorum)Baird’s
SandpiperPectoral
SandpiperWestern
SandpiperLong-billed
DowitcherWilson’s
SnipeRed
PhalaropeParasitic
JaegerLong-tailed
JaegerSLATY-BACKED
GULLGlaucous
GullCommon
Redpoll WEATHER A
lack of low pressure systems continued this week with a high pressure system
present early in the week and a lack of any weather system the second half of
the week.  Winds were predominantly light
(below 15 MPH) and most regularly out of the west though north, east, and south
winds made an appearance as well. 
Temperatures remained at, or above average, with little rain and a touch
of fog in the early mornings or late evenings some days. WATERFOWL The
seven TUNDRA SWANS continued through the 20th along with continuing
Mallard, Bufflehead, Greater Scaup, King Eider, and Red-breasted Merganser. 
SEABIRDS 

& GULLS A
SLATY-BACKED GULL was found on the 20th while a Glaucous Gull was
noted on the 18th along with a Long-tailed Jaeger and two Parasitic
Jaegers.  A high count of four COMMON
LOONS was made on the 15th with a single Pacific Loon on the 20th
the only other sighting of the week.  A
few Short-tailed Shearwaters were noted on the 18th this week. SHOREBIRDS The
LESSER SAND-PLOVER continued through the 20th while the SHARP-TAILED
SANDPIPER was found until the 18th, the season’s first GRAY-TAILED
TATTLER was located on the 19th, and a RED-NECKED STINT appeared on
the 15th.  The most unusual
American shorebird this week was a Baird’s Sandpiper present on the 18th
and 19th while other migrants included one or two Pacific
Golden-Plovers on the 14th and 15th, a Bar-tailed Godwit
from the 19th-20th, a Western Sandpiper from the 18th-20th,
and the first Long-billed Dowitchers of the fall with two or three seen from
the 18th-20th.  A
few Pectoral Sandpipers were present from the 14th-16th
with a large influx 30-50 birds daily from the 18th-20th
which is well above average for the month of July. Other migrant shorebirds 
noted this week 

included the lingering Wilson’s Snipe through the 18th, the first
moderate push of Red Phalaropes with a few hundred on the 18th, ever
increasing numbers of Ruddy Turnstones (350+ on the 20th) and
Wandering Tattlers (3-5 on the 20th), and a single non-Pribilof Rock
Sandpiper on the 15th. LANDBIRDS
& PASSERINES Similar
to last week the only landbirds noted were the continuing BALD EAGLE and a few
Common Redpolls with no more than two seen on a single day. Breeding
or resident species currently present on the island: Northern
PintailGreen-winged
(and Common) TealHarlequin
DuckLong-tailed
DuckNorthern
FulmarRed-faced
Cormorant

Pelagic CormorantSemipalmated
PloverLeast
Sandpiper

Rock Sandpiper (ssp. ptilocnemis)Red-necked
Phalarope

Black-legged Kittiwake

Red-legged Kittiwake

Glaucous-winged GullCommon
Murre

Thick-billed Murre

Pigeon GuillemotAncient
MurreletParakeet
AukletLeast
AukletCrested
AukletHorned
PuffinTufted
PuffinPacific
Wren (ssp. alascensis)

Lapland Longspur

Snow Bunting

Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch (ssp. umbrina)





























































































































































This
is Scott Schuette, Cory Gregory, and Glen Davis, the 2014 St. Paul Island Tour
guides, wishing you good birding. For tour information or to make travel
arrangements visit our website http://www.alaskabirding.com
or call 1-877-424-5637. 		 	   		  
Subject: Varied Thrush
From: "rose123ak AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 21 Jul 2014 18:10:23 -0700
Has anyone spotted a Varied Thrush area? If so please let me know. 

 Robin
Subject: Palmer Creek near Hope report for 7-20-2014
From: "tarbox AT ptialaska.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 21 Jul 2014 12:14:46 -0700
Ten Keen Peninsula Bird Club members went to Palmer Creek near Hope yesterday 
and the following is what we saw along the road and hiking trail at the end of 
the road. Bird numbers were down but diversity was good. The weather was a 
little cold in the morning but the sun came out in the afternoon. We also 
stopped at Tern Lake and there was a Common Loon with chick, Arctic terns, 
Red-necked grebe, Mew gulls, Robins, Juncos, and a female duck too far away to 
figure out what it was. 

 
 AK - KEN - Palmer Creek Road, Kenai Peninsula, US-AK
Jul 20, 2014 10:45 AM - 2:45 PM
Protocol: Traveling
12.0 mile(s)
23 species

Spotted Sandpiper  1
Wilson's Snipe  1
Mew Gull  4
Alder Flycatcher  1
Gray Jay  2
Black-billed Magpie  2
Common Raven  1
Tree Swallow  2
Black-capped Chickadee  1
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  1
Hermit Thrush  1
American Robin  12
Yellow Warbler  2
Wilson's Warbler  20
Savannah Sparrow  6
Fox Sparrow  1
White-crowned Sparrow  8
Golden-crowned Sparrow  12
Dark-eyed Junco  2
Pine Grosbeak  4
White-winged Crossbill  4
Common Redpoll  40
Pine Siskin  1

View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19175990 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19175990 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org 
http://ebird.org/) 


Subject: Re: Young Merlins in Anchorage
From: "jtam AT gci.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 21 Jul 2014 11:42:56 -0700
The homeowner says that the young merlins are about to fledge.  

Jean Tam
Anchorage
Subject: Kenai Caspian Tern
From: "kenaibirder AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 20 Jul 2014 15:55:55 -0700
On Saturday at 9:45 PM we snuck into the Port of Kenai to do some quick 
hit-and-run birding after most dip-netters had departed the area for the 
evening. We were rewarded with the raucous calling and overflight of a single 
CASPIAN TERN. Though the birding is usually very good at this time of year on 
the Kenai Flats, considering the post-breeding dispersal of many birds, 20,000 
dip-netters can make a reasonable person want to steer clear of the area too. 

 

 Toby and Laura Burke
 Kenai, AK
 



 

Subject: Young Merlins in Anchorage
From: "jtam AT gci.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 19 Jul 2014 14:35:57 -0700
A friend who lives at 1521 W 15th Ave. says that merlins have a nest in a 
nearby spruce tree. Three chicks have hatched. 


Jean Tam
Anchorage
 

Subject: Friday, July 18, 2014 One thing after another!
From: "c_griz AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 18 Jul 2014 23:02:33 -0700
Seward, Alaska

 
  
 Sunrise 5:06 am, sunset 10:59 pm, for a total length of day of 17 hours and 53 
minutes. Tomorrow will be 4 minutes and 4 seconds shorter. 

  
 After several overcast days that promised rain without delivering and temps in 
the mid 50s, the clouds took a break and let that blue sky and sunshine reign 
instead. A soft south breeze with a high of 64Âş was a lovely and welcome 
combination. Late in the afternoon, I sallied forth to see what I could see. 

  
 It turned out to be a Larid afternoon, short for gulls and terns. A dainty 
little gull with a black bill and matching black earrings flew overhead and 
landed just offshore in the brown, silty waves (lots of glacier melt going on.) 
A BONAPARTE'S GULL, perhaps the same one I spotted last month. I've only seen 
one at a time this summer; they are not common here like they are in Anchorage. 
When the little gull flew off, the black band on the tail and distinctive black 
markings on the wings flashed. 

  
 As I followed the gull's flight, I caught sight of a life and death drama 
being played out high over the bay. An adult BALD EAGLE and GLAUCOUS-WINGED 
GULL rapidly exchanged positions of pursuit. The eagle gained the upper hand 
and the gull gave flight as they raced across the sky, ever lower. At times, 
they were in perfect synchrony, as if choreographed. Finally, with both birds' 
beaks open and panting, the gull pulled away. The eagle broke off and flew to 
the beach where it landed in the water to cool off. ARCTIC TERNS immediately 
bombarded it, trying to drive it off, to no avail. Too tired. 

  
 A random glance at other Arctic Terns in the distance made me jump! The 
ratcheting Arctic Terns were escorting a jumbo tern with a huge red bill and 
black-tipped wings. I've been looking for a CASPIAN TERN all summer, and here 
it was! It didn't linger over the feisty smaller terns' territory, but took 
leisurely loops and soon disappeared. No one messes with Arctic Terns! 

  
 As I headed back, small groups of invisible LEAST SANDPIPERS flushed out of 
the seaweed wrack. They blend in so well, it's hard to spot them until they 
move. Migration is well underway as the season races along. 

  
 Happy Birding!
 Carol Griswold
 Seward Sporadic Bird Report Reporter
 for photos, please visit my blog at http://sporadicbird.blogspot.com
 
 Sporadic Bird http://sporadicbird.blogspot.com
 
 
 http://sporadicbird.blogspot.com 
 
 Sporadic Bird http://sporadicbird.blogspot.com Seward, Alaska Sunrise 4:32 am, 
sunset 11:27 pm for a total day length of 18 hours and 55 minutes. Tomorrow 
will be 21 seconds shorter! 

 
 
 
 View on sporadicbird.blogspot... http://sporadicbird.blogspot.com 
 Preview by Yahoo 
 
 
 

Subject: warblers
From: "Louann Feldmann louannf AT alaska.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 13:07:18 -0800
This was a good morning to view warblers behind Potter Marsh. Besides 
the usual Yellow-rumped, Wilson's and Orange- crowned, I was treated to 
good views of a cooperative Northern Waterthrush across the road from 
that large pond that is nearly hidden while driving by because of all 
the roadside overgrowth.  Of course the Alder Flycatchers showed up 
also.  Louann Feldmann


------------------------------------
Posted by: Louann Feldmann 
------------------------------------

Remember -- Be nice!
------------------------------------

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Subject: Re: Homer mystery "Black" bird
From: "bob payne bobbobpayne AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 15:41:33 -0400
The photos look to me like Red-winged Blackbird. The bill shape, head shape
(not as round as
rusty), size, wing length (about same as under-tail coverts), the faint tan
streaks above the eye,
tan on face and at base of bill, and in the more ventral view the edges of
the breast and belly feathers
all are like some female red-wings (not Alaska birds, more like the dark
central California birds, which this photo
is not as the bill is too long and narrow) and dark first-year male
Red-winged Blackbirds (new Sibley,
"Dark 1st summer", his body proportions are so on target!). The pale areas
of the underparts feathers
 at first glance suggest wet gloss, but the feather barbs are clear and
don't seem to be matted in wetness,
especially the belly feathers. Scruffy looking bird, maybe a worn July
bird, maybe wet.

Rusty Blackbirds would a pale eye and a more slender bill and a more
rounded crown.
Head shape (not flat crown and forehead) and bill shape (straight not
curved through the length) are unlike grackles.
Song Sparrows would have a shorter bill, bigger rounder head, and shorter
wings (well short of undertail coverts).

Bob Payne
Subject: Homer/Kachemak Bay Bird Alert Information: 7-12-14
From: "'Lani Raymond' lani67 AT alaska.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 06:56:01 -0800
KACHEMAK BAY BIRD ALERT INFORMATION: July 12, 2014
(Sorry this is a little late getting posted.)

The mystery surrounding a dark 8-9” bird photographed by David Hanson on the 
Spit near Spit Sisters on June 6th continues. Some folks are very intent on 
finding a conclusive ID of this bird! Indications that this had been a caged 
bird would be that it looked very disheveled and had worn, ragged tail 
feathers, that it had just a single yellow band, and that the lower mandible is 
shorter than the top one. If anyone has seen this bird (or by miracle might 
have photographed it!), please let us know. Any input as to species would be 
very welcome. Proposed species have been: juv. Common Grackle, Melodious 
Blackbird, Shiny Cowbird, juv. Rusty Blackbird, Starling, Song Sparrow. Gary 
Lyon's post on AKBirding with photos was posted July 6th. We have promised 
“unlimited fame” for an absolute identification, by the way! 


A juv. RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD was reported at Mt. View and Kachemak Way on the 
12th. The report said it briefly chased a Black-capped Chickadee. 


At the Barge Basin on the 10th there were SURFBIRDS, BLACK TURNSTONES (30), and 
Dowitchers (12). SURFBIRDS also on the Harbor Jetty. At mid-spit CASPIAN TERNS 
(1) and BRANT (4) were seen on the 7th / 8th. CASPIAN TERNS were also been seen 
on Glacier Spit on the 4th. 


A BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER was seen in Beluga Slough on the 7th.

Reported at Mud Bay on the 4th: WHIMBREL (10), DOWTICHER (1), YELLOWLEGS (14), 
peeps mostly WESAs (80). 


Please report cranes or crane families or groups to Cranewatch, 235-6262 or 
reports AT cranewatch.org. The following information is what they need from you: 
location, time and date, what they were doing, how many, and your email and/or 
phone number. 


IT’S A GREAT DAY TO BIRD! 


Subject: Hummingbirds - new place to look
From: "steve_scordino AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 15 Jul 2014 08:15:37 -0700
I was at the Wildlife Conservation Center near Portage this last weekend and 
noticed that they have hummingbird feeders up at the entrance. I asked the 
people working the booth if they see hummingbirds very often and was told they 
are there quite often. I didn't have control of my schedule to wait to see one, 
but it looks like it is another site within the Anchorage municipality to see 
hummingbirds. 


To recap an earlier conversation on here, hummingbirds have also been visiting 
the flowers at the entrance to the Alyeska resort. 


Personally, I haven't seen hummingbirds at either site, but hopefully someone 
will find this information useful. Plus, the Wildlife Conservation Center is a 
good place to see Northwestern Crows and is a cool place overall. 

 

Subject: St. Paul Island bird report: July 7-13, 2014
From: "Scott Schuette SSchuette01 AT hotmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 18:23:20 -0800
Hello
Birders, this is the St. Paul Island bird report for the week of July 7th-13th,
2014, sponsored by St. Paul Island Tour. The following sequence of sightings is
in taxonomic order; an asterisk denotes a species of less than annual 
occurrence 

or one of particular note.

 

2014
Species count: 120

Weekly
Species Count: 57

 

Birds
Mentioned:

 

TUNDRA
SWAN (ssp. bewickii and columbianus)

Mallard

Greater
Scaup

King
Eider

Black
Scoter

Bufflehead

Red-breasted
Merganser

RED-THROATED
LOON

COMMON
LOON

Yellow-billed
Loon

Red-necked
Grebe

Short-tailed
Shearwater

Fork-tailed
Storm-Petrel

BALD
EAGLE

LESSER
SAND-PLOVER

Wandering
Tattler

Ruddy
Turnstone

SHARP-TAILED
SANDPIPER

RED-NECKED
STINT

Dunlin

Rock
Sandpiper (ssp. tschuktschorum)

Pectoral
Sandpiper

Western
Sandpiper

Short-billed
Dowitcher

Wilson’s
Snipe

Red
Phalarope

Parasitic
Jaeger

RHINOCEROS
AUKLET

SLATY-BACKED
GULL

Glaucous
Gull

Arctic
Tern

Common
Redpoll

 

WEATHER

 

On
the 10th it was rainy, on the 11th and 12th it
was windy, and on every other day of the week it was sunny, calm and extremely
pleasant to be outside.  The continued period
of high pressure in the mid-Bering Sea has kept most of the real weather at bay
and allowed us to really enjoy our summer of late with temps in the 60s some
days.  The only wind to speak of was on
the 11th and 12th out of the west-northwest while the
rest of the week saw light southerly or easterly winds.

 

WATERFOWL

 

The
only newly arrived waterfowl this week were a Mallard on the 12th
and two Black Scoters on the 11th while small numbers of Greater
Scaup, King Eider, Bufflehead, and Red-breasted Merganser continued from
earlier in the season.  The long-staying
TUNDRA SWANS were still present this week with both subspecies seen on the 8th
and a single “Whistling” Swan noted on the 9th and 11th.

 

SEABIRDS
& GULLS

 

A
SLATY-BACKED GULL appeared on the 13th while a Glaucous Gull and
Arctic Tern were noted on the 11th and single Parasitic Jaegers were
seen on the 7th and 12th. 
The season’s first Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel was seen on the 9th
along with the week’s only Short-tailed Shearwaters and a RHINOCEROS AUKLET was
found on the 11th.  Loons were
seen regularly this week with a RED-THROATED seen on the 8th, 9th,
and 12th, three COMMONS on the 10th, and single
Yellow-billeds on the 9th and 11th.  A Red-necked Grebe was found on the 7th.

 

SHOREBIRDS

 

The
real beginning of the fall shorebird season began this week with the highlights
being a LESSER SAND-PLOVER on the 12th, a SHARP-TAILED SANDPIPER
from the 8th-13th, and a RED-NECKED STINT from the 8th-11th. Other new migrants 
noted this week included a 

Dunlin on the 8th, a Western Sandpiper on the 8th,
Pectoral Sandpipers (one on the 8th and seven on the 13th),
and a “Mainland” Rock Sandpiper on the 12th. Wilson’s Snipe and Short-billed 
Dowitcher 

continued through the end of the week along with a few Red Phalaropes. 
Increasing numbers of Wandering Tattlers and 

Ruddy Turnstones were also noted throughout the week.

 

LANDBIRDS
& PASSERINES

 

The
continuing BALD EAGLE was seen this week with the only other migrant landbird
noted being Common Redpoll which was normally seen in small numbers daily
though a very large flock of 45 was found on the 11th.

 

Breeding
or resident species currently present on the island:

 

Northern
Pintail

Green-winged
(and Common) Teal

Harlequin
Duck

Long-tailed
Duck

Northern
Fulmar

Red-faced
Cormorant

Pelagic Cormorant

Semipalmated
Plover

Least
Sandpiper

Rock Sandpiper (ssp. ptilocnemis)

Red-necked
Phalarope

Black-legged Kittiwake

Red-legged Kittiwake

Glaucous-winged Gull

Common
Murre

Thick-billed Murre

Pigeon Guillemot

Ancient
Murrelet

Parakeet
Auklet

Least
Auklet

Crested
Auklet

Horned
Puffin

Tufted
Puffin

Pacific
Wren (ssp. alascensis)

Lapland Longspur

Snow Bunting

Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch (ssp. umbrina)





This
is Scott Schuette, Cory Gregory, and Glen Davis, the 2014 St. Paul Island Tour
guides, wishing you good birding. For tour information or to make travel
arrangements visit our website http://www.alaskabirding.com
or call 1-877-424-5637. 		 	   		  
Subject: Visting Alaska July 20-30
From: "Floyd Hayes floyd_hayes AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2014 17:12:14 -0700
I'm taking a small group of students from California to Alaska during July 
20-30. We'll be staying in RV parks in Seward during July 21-24 and Denali 
during July 24-29. Any tips (as private messages) for finding some of the rarer 
species would be appreciated. 


Floyd E. Hayes
Professor of Biology 
Department of Biology, Pacific Union College 
1 Angwin Ave., Angwin, CA 94508, USA 
Tel: 707-965-6401; Fax: 707-965-7577 
Website: web2.puc.edu/Faculty/Floyd_Hayes
Subject: Great Shorebird Diversity
From: "wkeys AT gci.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 13 Jul 2014 14:27:53 -0700
 This morning's High Tide was fabulous! In the past 2 days, shorebird diversity 
was low--around 1500 Short-billed Dowitchers and around a dozen Hudsonian 
Godwits with some Legs thrown in. This morning was way different. 

 The 32 foot tide brought birds right up to the fence line at the North 
Westchester Tunnel for the closest looks of the summer. Craig and I spent a lot 
of time on a totally weird bird that was so black and white mottled that it 
looked leucistic. When Aaron looked at it, at least he was kind enough to say, 
"That's really strange. What's that?" before he said "It's a surfbird." 

 We thought it might be a very young bird, but a perusal of the Shorebird tomes 
later says it was more likely a molting adult in a stage of molt that's not 
even approached by any photos in the Big Shorebird guides. 

 Along side of him was a Solitary Sandpiper, and a Godwit in a plumage state 
that's also not even close to anything in the Big Guides. We're assuming a 
young Hudsonian, but the smooth brown plumage is also a little bit of a 
mystery. 

 

      So keep you're eyes peeled.  They're starting to come barreling in.
 

 w keys
 spenard
       
Subject: Re: Flocking shorbirds in Port Heiden
From: "Kate McLaughlin mclenvironmental AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2014 08:32:41 -0700
Looking at what is happening with my hummingbird banding numbers, I'd say the 
birds are definitely moving out a few weeks early!  I should be still banding 
babies, but the peak was 2 weeks ago.  

 
Interesting to note, a 2-3 earlier spring migration, followed by a 2-3 week 
early out-migration.  Wonder if that means the snows will be earlier too this 
year? 

 
Another interesting sighting yesterday, the salmonberries are ripe and while 
picking berries at the airstrip yesterday, I kept hearing a soft purring 
trill.  Finally spotted several BOHEMIAN WAXWINGS.  I guess they were also 
gorging on the berries.  I've never seen these birds out here, only on the 
mainland, and only in the winter. 

 
Kate

 
McLaughlin Environmental Services
PO Box 8043
Chenega Bay, Alaska 99574
907/573-2006
http://www.akenvironmentalservices.com/



On Saturday, July 12, 2014 6:23 PM, "ejnorris AT sbcglobal.net [AKBirding]" 
 wrote: 

  


  
Hi Birders, 

I have a general question regarding shorebird flocking that I've been observing 
the past couple weeks. I've been in Port Heiden on the Alaska Peninsula since 
June 18th and have watched flocks of Whimbrel and flocks of western and 
semipalmated sandpiper growing progressively larger and larger. There are 
hundreds of whimbrel flocking up out here (I first observed them flocking June 
29 which was a Sunday which are the only days I have off). And there is a flock 
of hundreds of western and semi-palmated sandpipers. They stay flocked up all 
day and don't appear to be breading right now. However, I've seen other 
westers/semipalmated/rock sandpipers and whimbrel which do appear to be paired 
off and acting like they have nests/young around. It seems SO early to have 
these shore birds flocking up this time of year. Are these juveniles which have 
migrated but are not breeding? I was out here in 2012 from June-October and 
don't at all recall the numbers of whimbrel 

 or the flocking behavior of the sandpipers this early in the season. Any 
thoughts or speculations are appreciated! 


In general I also see:
Marbled Godwit
Greater Yellowlegs
Snipe
Short-billed Dowitcher
Rock sandpiper
Western sandpiper
Semipalmated Sandpiper
Semipalmated Plover
Long-tailed Jaeger
Parasitic Jaeger
Black-legged kittiwake
Bonaparte's gull
Glaucous gull
Pacific golden-plover
Black-bellied plover
All three scoter species
Greater scaup
Yellow warbler
Orange-crowned warbler
Wilson's warbler
Tree swallow
Bank swallow
American pipit
American Robin
Common Redpoll
White crowned sparrow
Golden crowned sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Lap-land longspur
Merlin
Bald eagle



Thanks!

-Beth Norris
ejnorris AT sbcglobal.net
Anchorage AK
Working in Port Heiden AK  
 
Subject: Osprey at Otto Lake
From: "erik.hendrickson755 AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 12 Jul 2014 23:54:33 -0700
Probably reflecting signs of avian movement as reported in other postings, 
there was an OSPREY at Otto Lake Saturday evening. The osprey made at least two 
dives while I watched, but missed its prey each time (Otto Lake freezes solid 
each winter, there is no inlet or outlet, so all fish are stocked.) 

 

 Otto Lake is about 5 hours north of Anchorage, and 2 hours south of Fairbanks 
on the Parks Highway (one mile west of milepost 247). A nice place to stop and 
look for birds. 

 

 Erik Hendrickson
 Healy, AK

Subject: Flocking shorbirds in Port Heiden
From: "ejnorris AT sbcglobal.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 12 Jul 2014 19:20:32 -0700
Hi Birders, 
 

 I have a general question regarding shorebird flocking that I've been 
observing the past couple weeks. I've been in Port Heiden on the Alaska 
Peninsula since June 18th and have watched flocks of Whimbrel and flocks of 
western and semipalmated sandpiper growing progressively larger and larger. 
There are hundreds of whimbrel flocking up out here (I first observed them 
flocking June 29 which was a Sunday which are the only days I have off). And 
there is a flock of hundreds of western and semi-palmated sandpipers. They stay 
flocked up all day and don't appear to be breading right now. However, I've 
seen other westers/semipalmated/rock sandpipers and whimbrel which do appear to 
be paired off and acting like they have nests/young around. It seems SO early 
to have these shore birds flocking up this time of year. Are these juveniles 
which have migrated but are not breeding? I was out here in 2012 from 
June-October and don't at all recall the numbers of whimbrel or the flocking 
behavior of the sandpipers this early in the season. Any thoughts or 
speculations are appreciated! 

 

 In general I also see:
 Marbled Godwit
 Greater Yellowlegs
 Snipe
 Short-billed Dowitcher
 Rock sandpiper
 Western sandpiper
 Semipalmated Sandpiper
 Semipalmated Plover
 Long-tailed Jaeger
 Parasitic Jaeger
 Black-legged kittiwake
 Bonaparte's gull
 Glaucous gull
 Pacific golden-plover
 Black-bellied plover
 All three scoter species
 Greater scaup
 Yellow warbler
 Orange-crowned warbler
 Wilson's warbler
 Tree swallow
 Bank swallow
 American pipit
 American Robin
 Common Redpoll
 White crowned sparrow
 Golden crowned sparrow
 Savannah Sparrow
 Lap-land longspur
 Merlin
 Bald eagle
 

 

 

 Thanks!
 

 -Beth Norris
 ejnorris AT sbcglobal.net
 Anchorage AK
 Working in Port Heiden AK
Subject: Birding Juneau - Guide
From: "gpelphrey AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 12 Jul 2014 08:05:56 -0700
I will be in Juneau Sunday July 27th - while our cruise ship is docked there. 
I'll be there from 9AM to 9PM and would like to do some birding there. I'm 
wondering what advice y'all might have for me -good spots, good target birds, 
recommendations for a guide for the day? It may be somewhat dependent on the 
weather - of course - but it sounds like we might need a car to get from our 
ship to the better Juneau birding spots. 

 

 Your insight much appreciated!
 

 Gary - from Austin, Texas
Subject: Courageous Mallard
From: "Anthony Newcomer onekoolkid0 AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 11 Jul 2014 23:51:59 -0800
It's been a while since I posted on this site. Anyway, not long ago someone 
posted about a courageous mother Mallard protecting her ducklings from a Mew 
gull. Earlier this evening I witnessed the same courage from a mother Mallard. 
I went out to Fire lake to try my hand at pike fishing. No luck at that but 
witnessed a pike trying to get an easy meal. The fish was large and looked like 
a serpent. Anyway, the fish was unsuccessful and while all the the little ones 
scurried one direction, the mother attacked with her head down appearing like a 
torpedo. Pretty impressive stuff if you ask me. 


Sent from my iPhone

------------------------------------
Posted by: Anthony Newcomer 
------------------------------------

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Subject: Nest boxes in Anchorage
From: "jtam AT gci.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 11 Jul 2014 22:44:41 -0700
After checking our nest boxes, this looks like another poor nesting season 
following last year's bust. Our swallow box has been unused for the past two 
years after being used for the previous 10+ years. The box on the trail into 
the bog was abandoned with dead Boreal Chickadee young inside. Two swallow 
boxes in Mountain View were also abandoned with dead swallow chicks inside 
both. None of our nest boxes have produced fledglings this year. Wondering if 
anybody has had better nesting success. 


We are still waiting for the Pacific Loon chicks to hatch on Connors Lake. 
Should be any day between now and next Wednesday. Watch at 
http://www.ustream.tv/channel/adn-loon-cam 
http://www.ustream.tv/channel/adn-loon-cam 


Jean Tam
Connors Bog
Anchorage, AK
 

Subject: Homer Spit
From: "tkreiser AT gci.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 11 Jul 2014 19:33:19 -0700
Birding around the Barge Basin Thursday afternoon, found a mixed group of about 
30 Black Turnstones, 12 Dowitchers, and also Surfbirds. Also saw a few 
Surfbirds, and Seagull chicks, at the harbor entrance. 

 
 
Subject: One Legged Godwit
From: "wkeys AT gci.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 10 Jul 2014 21:38:11 -0700
 The highlight at The Audubon Bench tonight at high tide was a one-legged 
Godwit. It just happened to fly in while I was on the scope and dangled one 
leg. It landed on the one leg, and then looked like every other roosting 
Godwit. 

 Not a lot other than the usual suspects, but I'll take any excitement I can 
get. 

 

 w keys
 spenard
Subject: Anchorage--birding of late
From: "Aaron Bowman ampbowman AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 10 Jul 2014 12:56:29 -0800
There have been a lot of birds around town lately to the point I just wish
I had a bit more birding time. A couple days ago when I took some visiting
family down to Carr-Gotstein (where else would I go) I saw a fly-by male
BLACK SCOTER heading up the Turnagain toward the PW Sound. Yesterday when I
went out there again there were both Yellowlegs in decent numbers a few
Dowitcher sp. and a WHIMBREL out farther on the flats.  Yesterday we had a
rainy Audubon walk at Westchester and the Coastal Trail.  On the lagoon
there was a male WHITE-WINGED SCOTER and a COMMON LOON. SEMIPALMATED
PLOVERS were flocking up in nearly invisible groups (until they move) and
the ARCTIC TERNS were busy feeding their young on the flats.

For all birders interested in volunteering at a local Anchorage birding
event, there is the annual Anchorage Coastal Trail Bike and Bird Day coming
up on August 3rd.  See below if you would like to help out with this
event.  Would be great to see you out there.

Aaron Bowman


 *Volunteers needed!*

Audubon Alaska is gearing up for their third annual *Bike and Bird Day* on
the Coastal Trail.  This event will be on *August 3th* and will take place
between 1:00pm and 5:00pm, but volunteers will be helpful from 11:00am
until clean-up.  There will be about 6 stations set up along the trail from
Elderberry Park to Lyn Ary Park.  At these stations volunteers will help
with bird identification, assist with binoculars and spotting scopes, hand
out information and talk about how the trail is on the Anchorage Coastal
Important Bird Area (IBA).  This event is set up to be family friendly and
open to the public using the trails.

Please contact Aaron Bowman at abowman AT audubon.org or 907-276-7034 if you
would like to volunteer at these stations or with the set up and take-down.

Thank you!
Subject: Re: Homer mystery "Black" bird
From: "'Eskelin, Todd' todd_eskelin AT fws.gov [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 10 Jul 2014 12:35:15 -0800
Sometime in the past couple years I was sent a photo of a song sparrow from
the spit that was illegally banded with a yellow zip-tie. Looks like the
same bird to me. Good catch Aaron and Dave in teasing out this ID.

Todd Eskelin


On Sun, Jul 6, 2014 at 9:18 PM, David Sonneborn davidsonne AT aol.com
[AKBirding]  wrote:

>
>
> I'm in agreemt with Aaron that it's a wet maybe soiled Song Sparrow
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Jul 6, 2014, at 7:58 PM, "sealion AT xyz.net [AKBirding]" <
> AKBirding AT yahoogroups.com> wrote:
>
>
>
> Greetings fellow birders not from Homer,
>
> This bird is apparently a released captive that was photographed in June
> on the Homer Spit by a visitor, David Hanson. So far "guesses" are Shining
> Cowbird and juv. Common Grackle, Martin Renner has reported that he thinks
> it is indigenous to another continent. Dave Sonneborn has seen the photos
> but not yet commented. I guess Kachemak Birders needs to offer a large
> prize for the one who gets it ID'd correctly! How about unlimited fame?
> Please join in the discussion.
>
>
>
> Below is a recent message from David Hanson to Lani, Kachemak Birders
> "enabler". He provided links to the photos that he has of this bird and
> his eBird post.
>
>
>
> Bird on!
> Gary Lyon
> Homer
>
>
>
> ----Original Message----- From: David Hanson
> Sent: Sunday, July 06, 2014 6:29 AM
> To: Lani Raymond
> Subject: "Black Bird"
>
> Hi Lani, just thought I would let someone up there know I did a bird
> report on just that bird just for history until otherwise ID’d I called it
> a Rusty Blackbird which I do not believe it is. This bird has a very dark
> eye and a Rusty has a light eye. Anyway if there is any interest up there
> here is the bird report it is in. If I knew who the bird person for that
> area was I would send it to them. Ebird does not flag a Rusty there so it
> might not get any attention. I would be very interested in getting it
> correct if anyone has any ideas. Here is also a link to our photos from the
> entire trip this leads to the picture of this bird. I did not have any
> showing the back of the bird so pretty much what you got initially was it.
>
> http://smu.gs/1qUlriM
>
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19004761
>
> David Hanson
> 281-303-0166 hm
> 281-813-2657 Cell=
>
>   
>



-- 
Todd Eskelin
Fish and Wildlife Biologist (Subsistence)
Kenai National Wildlife Refuge
Subject: Kenai Flats Slaty-backed Gulls
From: "kenaibirder AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 10 Jul 2014 13:03:59 -0700
Yesterday (7/9) I observed two adult SLATY-BACKED GULLS on the Kenai Flats. 
They were seen together as close as 50 feet from each other. A word of caution 
to birders, the City of Kenai with a recently enacted ordinance (2756-2014) has 
made it a criminal offense to tresspass (AS 11.46.330) over City-owned portions 
of the Kenai Flats for any reason during the July Kenai River dip-net season. 
Beware this will effect where you can and can not bird on the Flats. 

  
 Toby Burke
 Kenai, AK
Subject: Peregrine Falcon in Spenard
From: "wkeys AT gci.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 10 Jul 2014 13:00:32 -0700
Wednesday night about 9:45 pm, a Peregrine flew down Spenard Road while being 
squawked at by an unknown passerine. It was a pretty unlikely location for a 
Peregrine, but I guess everybody loves Margaritas. 

 

 w keys
 spenard
 

 

Subject: Requesting info on marked Hudsonian Godwits
From: "rosejswift AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 09 Jul 2014 15:13:42 -0700
My name is Rose Swift and I'm a graduate student at the Cornell Lab of 
Ornithology. I'm working with Nathan Senner on breeding Hudsonian Godwits 
(HUGO) in Beluga, AK for my PhD. Our breeding population is marked with colored 
bands and engraved leg flags that allow individual identification. 

 

 If you see a flagged HUGO while birding, any information you could gather 
would be helpful to me. Noting the location of the color band, metal band, and 
flag; the color of the band and flag; and the engraved flag code can provide me 
with important information documenting the timing of southward migration. 

 

 You can email me at rjs484 AT cornell.edu if you see a flagged bird or if you 
have any questions. 

 

 Thanks in advance and happy birding!
 Rose Swift
 

 

Subject: Black-bellied Plover
From: "David Sonneborn davidsonne AT aol.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 9 Jul 2014 11:29:30 -0800
There was a Black-bellied Plover yesterday evening at
Beluga Slough
Dave S

Sent from my iPhone


------------------------------------
Posted by: David Sonneborn 
------------------------------------

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Subject: Sunday, July 6, 2014 Rufous Hummingbird banding project
From: "c_griz AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 09 Jul 2014 11:34:13 -0700
Seward, Alaska

 
  
 Stacy Jon Peterson and his well-trained family set up a hummingbird banding 
station at Ava's this weekend. To catch the hummers, a hummingbird feeder was 
placed inside a specially designed cage. The only door was held open by a long 
piece of fishing line attached to the attendant, either one of the two Peterson 
kids. When a hummingbird ventured inside, down came the wire screen door. Then 
it was just a matter of catching the little hummer and delivering it to the 
banding table. 

  
 The first hummingbird of the morning was actually a female that was banded 
about the same time last year! The rest of the day's 5 hummers were previously 
unbanded, including 3 males of this year's hatch. 

  
 After a brief inspection, the bird was weighed, measured, and banded with a 
miniscule leg band. Think toothpick for a leg size, the skinny kind. Then the 
top of the head was marked with a dab of water-soluble marker to ensure quick 
recognition and release if recaptured. 

  
 A lucky volunteer gets to release the miniature jewel, placed gently on an 
open palm. I could feel his tiny heart beating so fast it was just a vibration, 
"hummmmm." After a short time, zing! off he shot with stories about being 
abducted by aliens, with a band on his leg and white paint on his head to prove 
it. 

  
 Eleven wondrous Rufous Hummingbirds were banded at Ava's over the course of 
two days. If you are lucky to have hummers, clean and refill your hummer feeder 
4:1 sugar water solution often so it's nice and clean for the newly fledged 
hummers and their hungry moms. 

  
 In addition to the hummers, once again, it's baby bird time at Ava's: DOWNY 
and HAIRY WOODPECKERS, PINE GROSBEAKS, BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEES, TREE and 
VIOLET-GREEN SWALLOWS, SONG SPARROWS and RED-BREASTED NUTHATCHES. PINE SISKINS, 
which were rare this past winter, nested nearby. It was so nice to see and hear 
them again, with fledglings. 

 

 In addition to the hummers, once again, it's baby bird time at Ava's: DOWNY 
and HAIRY WOODPECKERS, PINE GROSBEAKS, BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEES, TREE and 
VIOLET-GREEN SWALLOWS, SONG SPARROWS and RED-BREASTED NUTHATCHES. PINE SISKINS, 
which were rare this past winter, nested nearby. It was so nice to see and hear 
them again, with fledglings. 

  
 Another treat was a brief appearance of at least two CROSSBILLS. They flew off 
before I could identify the species, but WHITE-WINGED CROSSBILLS have been in 
the area for the past several weeks. Robin C reported the first RED CROSSBILLS 
of the year recently, over by the Seward Elementary School, so both species are 
in the area. 

  
 Stop by Ava's for a bird fix; it's just buzzing with action. If you can, 
please bring black oil sunflower seeds to help her keep up with all those 
hungry birds. She has found this to be the preferred food, summer and winter. 

  
 Happy Birding!
 Carol Griswold
 
 Seward Sporadic Bird Report Reporter
 for photos, please visit my blog at http://sporadicbird.blogspot.com/ 
http://sporadicbird.blogspot.com/ http://sporadicbird.blogspot.com/ 
http://sporadicbird.blogspot.com/ 

 
  
 

Subject: Alaska Cell Phone Coverage
From: "gpelphrey AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 08 Jul 2014 16:10:46 -0700
All, I am greatly looking forward to my upcoming - 1st - trip to Alaska. We 
will spend about 10 days in Anchorage / Denali / Seward / Homer before taking a 
one way inside passage cruise to Vancouver. I am hoping to use my iPhone for 
BirdsEye app , ebird, and other web-based usage while there...in addition to 
calling and checking email. 

 

 Any insight into t-mobile coverage or coverage in general would be very 
helpful. 

 

 Thanks all!
 

 Gary - from Austin, Texas
Subject: Anchorage--5 Caspian Terns on mudflats
From: "Aaron Bowman ampbowman AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 8 Jul 2014 14:58:11 -0800
5 Caspian Terns are now on the flats just to the E. Of the chester creek
outflow.

Aaron Bowman
Subject: Hudsonian Godwits at Chester Creek mouth
From: "rearguard AT clearwire.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 08 Jul 2014 10:02:50 -0700
Monday the 7th just after the high tide turned in the afternoon, I saw a flock 
of 400 Hudsonian Godwits. I initially saw them fly (just over my head as I was 
coming to the outlet on the path) to the island. I went back and took some pics 
but they were so densely packed I couldn't count them, even from the pics. They 
flew back out to the flats where I caught up with them again and was able to 
get a few pics of them in flight. In one of those images I counted 409! 

 

 -Frank Clemens
Subject: Westchester shorebirds
From: "Chris Maack cmaack AT gci.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 08 Jul 2014 10:32:41 -0800
Betty Friest and I were at the Audubon bench outside the south tunnel yesterday 
between tides, about 2 hours before the high tide and didn't expect to see 
much. But a huge mixed flock of dowitchers and godwits zoomed in and settled 
along the edge of the green slime of the mudflats. Quite a few young terns were 
out there also. 


Nice to see a red-necked grebe chick on the back of its parent on the lagoon.

Chris Maack
Anchorage
Subject: Arctic Warblers on the Denali Highway
From: "erik.hendrickson755 AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 08 Jul 2014 00:52:15 -0700
I searched the Denali Highway for ARCTIC WARBLERS hoping to find some out west 
towards Cantwell. As previously reported, they seem to be plentiful this year, 
but I could not find any west of Clearwater Creek (78 miles west of Cantwell, 
56 miles east of Paxson). There were several at this location. 


Erik Hendrickson
Healy, AK
 

Subject: St. Paul Island bird report: June 30-July 6, 2014
From: "Scott Schuette SSchuette01 AT hotmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 7 Jul 2014 13:37:58 -0800
Hello
Birders, this is the St. Paul Island bird report for the week of June 30th-July
6th, 2014, sponsored by St. Paul Island Tour. The following sequence
of sightings is in taxonomic order; an asterisk denotes a species of less than
annual occurrence or one of particular note.

 

2014
Species count: 117

Weekly
Species Count: 47

 

Birds
Mentioned:

 

TUNDRA
SWAN (ssp. bewickii and columbianus)

Greater
Scaup

King
Eider

Bufflehead

Red-breasted
Merganser

RED-THROATED
LOON

COMMON
LOON

Pacific
Loon

Short-tailed
Shearwater

BALD
EAGLE

Wandering
Tattler

Ruddy
Turnstone

Dunlin

Western
Sandpiper

Short-billed
Dowitcher

Wilson’s
Snipe

Red
Phalarope

Pomarine
Jaeger

Parasitic
Jaeger

Herring
Gull

Eastern
Yellow Wagtail

Common
Redpoll

 

WEATHER

 

The
weather this week was extremely calm. 
The winds were predominantly out of the east or southeast though never
got above 10 MPH and thus were rarely noticed while there was a bit of rain in
the morning on the 3rd, 4th, and 6th. Morning fog also was present a couple 
days 

this week though it burned away by noon each day with most days becoming mostly
cloudy and little sunshine to speak of. 
One can only hope things get a bit more interesting soon as long,
extended periods of high pressure do not make for many bird sightings.

 

WATERFOWL

 

The
seven long-staying TUNDRA SWANS were still present on the 6th with a
female Bufflehead on the 5th and 6th being the most
unusual arrival this week.  Up to 12
Greater Scaup were still present while scattered King Eider were also noted
around the island during the week.  Two
or three Red-breasted Mergansers were seen on the 5th and 6th.

 

SEABIRDS
& GULLS

 

A
couple Short-tailed Shearwaters were seen early in the week on the 30th
and 2nd while one Pomarine Jaeger was noted on the 5th
and single Parasitic Jaegers were seen on the 30th and 2nd. A Herring Gull was 
seen on the 2nd. Loons were seen sporadically late in the week 

with a RED-THROATED on the 6th, single Pacifics on the 5th
and 6th, and a COMMON on the 6th.

 

SHOREBIRDS

 

A
few shorebirds continued from last week or arrived this week with at least
three Short-billed Dowitchers found through the 6th, a single Wilson’s
Snipe still present on the 6th, and two Western Sandpipers remaining
through the 1st along with a single Dunlin. The last Red Phalarope was noted on 
the 1st 

while small numbers of Ruddy Turnstones were present on the 5th and
6th and a newly arrived Wandering Tattler was seen on the 6th.

 

LANDBIRDS
& PASSERINES

 

It
was the first quiet week in a while for this group, with the only migrant
passerines being the continuing Eastern Yellow Wagtail through the 1st
and a single Common Redpoll on the 30th. The BALD EAGLE was last seen on the 
6th. 


 

Breeding
or resident species currently present on the island:

 

Northern
Pintail

Green-winged
(and Common) Teal

Harlequin
Duck

Long-tailed
Duck

Northern
Fulmar

Red-faced
Cormorant

Pelagic Cormorant

Semipalmated
Plover

Least
Sandpiper

Rock Sandpiper (ssp. ptilocnemis)

Red-necked
Phalarope

Black-legged Kittiwake

Red-legged Kittiwake

Glaucous-winged Gull

Common
Murre

Thick-billed Murre

Pigeon Guillemot

Ancient
Murrelet

Parakeet
Auklet

Least
Auklet

Crested
Auklet

Horned
Puffin

Tufted
Puffin

Pacific
Wren (ssp. alascensis)

Lapland Longspur

Snow Bunting

Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch (ssp. umbrina)





This is Scott Schuette, Cory Gregory, and Glen
Davis, the 2014 St. Paul Island Tour guides, wishing you good birding. For tour
information or to make travel arrangements visit our website 
http://www.alaskabirding.com 

or call 1-877-424-5637. 		 	   		  
Subject: Homer Spit
From: "David Sonneborn davidsonne AT aol.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 7 Jul 2014 13:23:06 -0800
1 Caspian Tern
4 Brant
About half way pit the spit 
Dave S

Sent from my iPhone


------------------------------------
Posted by: David Sonneborn 
------------------------------------

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Subject: Re: Homer mystery "Black" bird
From: "David Sonneborn davidsonne AT aol.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 6 Jul 2014 21:18:06 -0800
I'm in agreemt with Aaron that it's a wet maybe soiled Song Sparrow

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 6, 2014, at 7:58 PM, "sealion AT xyz.net [AKBirding]" 
 wrote: 

> 
> Greetings fellow birders not from Homer,
> 
> This bird is apparently a released captive that was photographed in June on 
the Homer Spit by a visitor, David Hanson. So far "guesses" are Shining Cowbird 
and juv. Common Grackle, Martin Renner has reported that he thinks it is 
indigenous to another continent. Dave Sonneborn has seen the photos but not yet 
commented. I guess Kachemak Birders needs to offer a large prize for the one 
who gets it ID'd correctly! How about unlimited fame? Please join in the 
discussion. 

>  
> 
> Below is a recent message from David Hanson to Lani, Kachemak Birders 
"enabler". He provided links to the photos that he has of this bird and his 
eBird post. 

> 
>  
> 
> Bird on!
> Gary Lyon
> Homer
> 
>  
> ----Original Message----- From: David Hanson 
> Sent: Sunday, July 06, 2014 6:29 AM 
> To: Lani Raymond 
> Subject: "Black Bird" 
> 
> Hi Lani, just thought I would let someone up there know I did a bird report 
on just that bird just for history until otherwise ID’d I called it a Rusty 
Blackbird which I do not believe it is. This bird has a very dark eye and a 
Rusty has a light eye. Anyway if there is any interest up there here is the 
bird report it is in. If I knew who the bird person for that area was I would 
send it to them. Ebird does not flag a Rusty there so it might not get any 
attention. I would be very interested in getting it correct if anyone has any 
ideas. Here is also a link to our photos from the entire trip this leads to the 
picture of this bird. I did not have any showing the back of the bird so pretty 
much what you got initially was it. 

> 
> http://smu.gs/1qUlriM 
> 
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19004761 
> 
> David Hanson 
> 281-303-0166 hm 
> 281-813-2657 Cell=
> 
> 
Subject: Homer Bird
From: "swinak AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 06 Jul 2014 22:07:54 -0700
Here's something to get your hopes up...
http://beautyofbirds.com/legbands.html http://beautyofbirds.com/legbands.html
 

 Note the country of origin for a yellow band. 

 

 Good luck.
 

 Steve w.

Subject: Note on Homer mystery bird
From: "sealion AT xyz.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 06 Jul 2014 21:19:16 -0700
This is Gary again. Please note that the roof shingle exposure that this bird 
is on is 6 inches. That makes the bird about 8-9 inches long. Also please note 
that it has a yellow band on it's left leg. 

  
 Gary
Subject: Homer mystery "Black" bird
From: "sealion AT xyz.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 06 Jul 2014 20:58:42 -0700
 Greetings fellow birders not from Homer,

This bird is apparently a released captive that was photographed in June on the 
Homer Spit by a visitor, David Hanson. So far "guesses" are Shining Cowbird and 
juv. Common Grackle, Martin Renner has reported that he thinks it is indigenous 
to another continent. Dave Sonneborn has seen the photos but not yet commented. 
I guess Kachemak Birders needs to offer a large prize for the one who gets it 
ID'd correctly! How about unlimited fame? Please join in the discussion. 

  
 Below is a recent message from David Hanson to Lani, Kachemak Birders 
"enabler". He provided links to the photos that he has of this bird and his 
eBird post. 

  
 Bird on!
Gary Lyon
Homer

 
  
 ----Original Message----- From: David Hanson 
Sent: Sunday, July 06, 2014 6:29 AM 
To: Lani Raymond 
Subject: "Black Bird" 
 
Hi Lani, just thought I would let someone up there know I did a bird report on 
just that bird just for history until otherwise ID’d I called it a Rusty 
Blackbird which I do not believe it is. This bird has a very dark eye and a 
Rusty has a light eye. Anyway if there is any interest up there here is the 
bird report it is in. If I knew who the bird person for that area was I would 
send it to them. Ebird does not flag a Rusty there so it might not get any 
attention. I would be very interested in getting it correct if anyone has any 
ideas. Here is also a link to our photos from the entire trip this leads to the 
picture of this bird. I did not have any showing the back of the bird so pretty 
much what you got initially was it. 

 
http://smu.gs/1qUlriM http://smu.gs/1qUlriM 
 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19004761 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19004761 

 
David Hanson 
281-303-0166 hm 
281-813-2657 Cell= 
Subject: Connors Lake Loon Cam now video streaming in Anchorage
From: "jtam AT gci.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 03 Jul 2014 23:48:05 -0700
The banded female Pacific Loon, who has been the star of the Connors Lake Loon 
Cam since 2003, arrived as usual this spring but did not lay eggs, which is 
what happened last year. So, I was very surprised to see two eggs in the nest 
on June 21. Evidently, a new female had arrived on the lake and laid the eggs. 
The pair of Pacific Loons has been incubating, and chicks should hatch in a 
week or two. 


The Anchorage Daily News/Alaska Dispatch is hosting the live video stream for 
us this season, but they cannot afford to provide ad-free viewing, so viewers 
will have to put up with ads every few minutes. The video stream is available 
at http://www.ustream.tv/channel/adn-loon-cam 
http://www.ustream.tv/channel/adn-loon-cam 


Sorry, but I have not been able to get the audio to work. If anyone out there 
knows about UStream and can help me, please let me know. 


Thanks,
Jean Tam
Connors Lake Loon Cam Project
Anchorage Audubon Society
 

 

Subject: Northern Flicker - Potter Marsh
From: "sjanik23 AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 03 Jul 2014 15:22:38 -0700
Saw a Northern Flicker (Yellow Shafter) this morning at Potter Marsh. Flew low 
over the boardwalk near the drainage culverts. 

 

 Steve Janik
Subject: RT loon
From: "David Sonneborn davidsonne AT aol.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 3 Jul 2014 11:57:16 -0800
There are a pair of Red-throated Loons on Westchester
7/3
Dave S

Sent from my iPhone


------------------------------------
Posted by: David Sonneborn 
------------------------------------

Remember -- Be nice!
------------------------------------

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Subject: St. Paul Island bird report: June 23-29, 2014
From: "Scott Schuette SSchuette01 AT hotmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 1 Jul 2014 00:17:40 -0800
Hello
Birders, this is the St. Paul Island bird report for the week of June 
23rd-29th, 

2014, sponsored by St. Paul Island Tour. The following sequence of sightings is
in taxonomic order; an asterisk denotes a species of less than annual 
occurrence 

or one of particular note.

 

2014
Species count: 117

Weekly
Species Count: 49

 

Birds
Mentioned:

 

TUNDRA
SWAN (ssp. bewickii and columbianus)

Mallard

Greater
Scaup

King
Eider

**SURF
SCOTER

Red-breasted
Merganser

Pacific
Loon

COMMON
LOON

Short-tailed
Shearwater

BALD
EAGLE

Wandering
Tattler

Ruddy
Turnstone

Dunlin

Western
Sandpiper

Short-billed
Dowitcher

Wilson’s
Snipe

Red
Phalarope

Parasitic
Jaeger

Long-tailed
Jaeger

Arctic
Tern

*COMMON
CUCKOO

Eastern
Yellow Wagtail

**GRAY
WAGTAIL

Common
Redpoll

*HAWFINCH

 

WEATHER

 

The
week’s weather was quite variable though one of the themes was the lack of
measureable precipitation.  Early in the
week (23rd-27th) the winds were mostly out of the north
at low speeds with moderate temperatures and a general lack of fog. On the 28th 
and 29th a 

weak low pressure system passed to the north of the island and brought with it
moderate southwest and west winds and a little more stratus hanging over the
island.

 

WATERFOWL

 

A
single SURF SCOTER was located on the 24th providing the ninth
Pribilof record while on the 28th and 29th the number
present had swelled to three.  The
continuing seven TUNDRA SWANS were still present through the 29th while
single Mallard were seen on the 23rd and 27th, a
Red-breasted Merganser was seen on the 29th, up to eight Greater
Scaup continued through the 29th, and small numbers of King Eider
were seen daily throughout the week.

 

SEABIRDS
& GULLS

 

A
COMMON LOON was noted on the 27th while Pacific Loon was seen on the
23rd and 26th.  A
few Short-tailed Shearwaters were seen on the 28th while a single
Parasitic and Long-tailed Jaeger were also seen on the 28th. Arctic Tern was 
seen on the 25th 

and 27th.

 

SHOREBIRDS

 

A
surprisingly diverse group of shorebirds were seen this week though whether
they were early fall or late spring migrants remains in question. A single 
Wandering Tattler was located on the 

25th while a few Ruddy Turnstones were seen on the 26th
and 28th.  One to three Red
Phalaropes continued through the 26th while a Wilson’s Snipe was
seen on the 25th-27th. 
A Dunlin was present on the 25th along with a Western
Sandpiper while three to four Short-billed Dowitchers were seen from the 
23rd-25th. 


 

LANDBIRDS
& PASSERINES

 

The
new highlight for the week was a HAWFINCH that was briefly seen on the 29th
while a GRAY WAGTAIL, which may have been a new individual, was noted on the 
24th 

and a COMMON CUCKOO, which again may have been a new individual, was located on
the 29th.  The BALD EAGLE
continued through the 29th with a few scattered Common Redpolls
around the island all week and an Eastern Yellow Wagtail seen on the 29th.

 

Breeding
or resident species currently present on the island:

 

Northern
Pintail

Green-winged
(and Common) Teal

Harlequin
Duck

Long-tailed
Duck

Northern
Fulmar

Red-faced
Cormorant

Pelagic Cormorant

Semipalmated
Plover

Least
Sandpiper

Rock Sandpiper (ssp. ptilocnemis)

Red-necked
Phalarope

Black-legged Kittiwake

Red-legged Kittiwake

Glaucous-winged Gull

Common
Murre

Thick-billed Murre

Pigeon Guillemot

Ancient
Murrelet

Parakeet
Auklet

Least
Auklet

Crested
Auklet

Horned
Puffin

Tufted
Puffin

Pacific
Wren (ssp. alascensis)

Lapland Longspur

Snow Bunting

Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch (ssp. umbrina)





This
is Scott Schuette, Cory Gregory, and Glen Davis, the 2014 St. Paul Island Tour
guides, wishing you good birding. For tour information or to make travel
arrangements visit our website http://www.alaskabirding.com
or call 1-877-424-5637. 		 	   		  
Subject: Fw: Black-tailed Godwit - Three-mile creek (West side of Cook Inlet)
From: "Peter Scully peterandrewscullyii AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 30 Jun 2014 14:48:55 -0700
Forwarding an ebird checklist with photos of a Black-tailed Godwit from 
Three-mile Creek on the west side of Cook Inlet, roughly opposite Anchorage.  
Checklist is by Ben Legasse 

 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S18953937
Subject: 6-28-29-2014
From: "tarbox AT ptialaska.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 30 Jun 2014 12:58:45 -0700
Four of us just returned from driving the Denali Highway and I thought I would 
give a quick trip report in case someone is headed up that direction. The 
birding was fantastic and we had over 50 species of birds recorded in two days. 
Some of the highlights are 1) Arctic warblers are very abundant this year. We 
found them at numerous spots but between mile 20 and 36 they were right next to 
the road. Every stop we could hear and see them singing. 2) we saw 8 
long-tailed jaegers and they were most abundant at mile 12.5 were four were 
seen diving on a bald eagle – they were here both days so I suspect a nesting 
area 3) yellow warblers and white crowned sparrows were also abundant 4) Grey 
cheeked thrushes were also singing and easy to find. Again the area from mile 
12.5 to 36 was a good area 5) we did see two golden eagles at close range – 
50 feet 6) cliff swallows were at every bridge crossing and bank swallows were 
on a cut bank at mile 41 7) waterfowl were very abundant between mile 42 and 55 
and the area called Waterfowl lakes was great 8) blackpoll warblers were found 
in abundance at Waterfall lakes and right next to the road. Their call is hard 
to hear but if you play their call they did respond. We limited our calling but 
at Waterfowl lakes they were right next to the road. We found them at other 
spots also but had great views at this spot. 9) red-neck phalaropes were on a 
number of small ponds and 10) Wilson warblers were also fairly easy to find. 
The Tangle lake area was good for all warblers. 

 
  
 Ken
 

Subject: Emperor Geese in Barrow
From: "gwwarbler AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 29 Jun 2014 16:34:40 -0700
Hi all, 

 Tayler Brooks and I are up birding in Barrow for a couple of days, and early 
this morning found a pair of Emperor Geese well out on the spit, about a mile 
before the point. They flew back towards town and out of site around 4 AM. 
Ebird has no records of this species from here, and it looks to be well out of 
range. Have any of your seen the species in Barrow? 

 

 Otherwise the birding has been pretty typical. Lots and lots of Pomarine 
Jaegers are nesting all over the tundra, and Snowy Owl numbers are excellent. 
We had a few Baird's Sandpipers displaying out on the spit, and good numbers of 
Yellow-billed Loons both flying over and on the water at the large lake at the 
base of the spit. No Black Guillemots that I could find. 

 

 Good birding to all,
 

 Andrew Spencer
 Centennial, CO
 

Subject: Westchester Lagoon-Friday Night
From: "davidsonne AT aol.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 28 Jun 2014 03:01:20 -0400 (EDT)
There are lots of the regular suspects showing up (right on  
time)-Short-billed Dowitchers, Hudsonian Godwits, both yellowlegs. Of most 
interest this 

evening was a hybrid Green-winged Teal x Common Teal hybrid.
Dave Sonneborn
Subject: Recent Kenai Highlights
From: "kenaibirder AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 27 Jun 2014 13:34:37 -0700
On Thursday evening (6/26) at the Kenai Flats from the boat launch at the Port 
of Kenai we located an adult SLATY-BACKED GULL. From Boat Launch Road in the 
distant freshwater ponds to the south there was a drake BLUE-WINGED TEAL with 
20 or more drake Green-winged Teal. Forty WHIMBREL were also present on the 
Flats. From the greater Marathon Road area there were two OSPREY and a SOLITARY 
SANDPIPER. This past Sunday a COMMON YELLOWTHROAT was calling incessantly and 
then briefly seen near a small pond at mile 10 K-Beach Road on a Breeding Bird 
Survey (BBS) route. Several attempts to relocate the bird have proven 
fruitless. While returning from Seward (6/14) after viewing the Eurasian 
Collared-Dove a pair of DUSKY (occidentalis) CANADA GEESE with goslings were 
found in the pond complex along the Seward Highway on the north side of the 
Snow River. Often several Dusky pairs and nests can be found there annually. As 
Duskies nest in low densities in the greater Prince William Sound this should 
not be considered extraordinary. Remarkably though, one year we also found a 
pair of parvipes nesting there. In the course of only two weeks WHITE-WINGED 
CROSSBILLS on the western Kenai Peninsula have gone from non-existent to 
common. They were present on 40% of 200 recently surveyed BBS points. COMMON 
REDPOLLS are abundant in the lowlands this summer being present on greater than 
50% of the 200 BBS points. 

 

 Toby and Laura Burke
 Kenai, AK
 

Subject: Homer/Kachemak Bay Bird Alert Information: 6-24-14
From: "'Lani Raymond' lani67 AT alaska.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 27 Jun 2014 07:01:57 -0800
KACHEMAK BAY BIRD ALERT INFORMATION:  June 24, 2014

Nice weather here in Homer and on Kachemak Bay. Interesting that some 
shorebirds are already here again. Lots of bird parents feeding young! 

A leucistic AMERICAN ROBIN was first reported on the 16th flying across the 
road about a quarter mile up East Hill Rd. (near the Garden of Eden lodging 
sign). Many people have seen it since then as it seems to be crossing the road 
frequently to feed its young. There is a photo on the Kachemak Bay Birders' 
website and for more information on leucistic birds in general 
http://www.bto.org/volunteer-surveys/gbw/gardens-wildlife/garden-birds/behaviour/plumage/leucism. 


The mystery caged bird escapee that was seen and photographed on the Spit near 
the Spit Sisters on the 6th was not seen again. No one has made a positive ID 
yet from the photos. Proposed were juv. Common Grackle, Shiny Cowbird, Starling 
and some others. It is not known if the bird is from North America or somewhere 
else, however unlikely that would be. From the photo (with the roof shingles) 
it was determined that the bird is roughly 8 inches long. The feathers looked 
very rough and disheveled. Some thought it had been oiled because of the color 
also, but apparently not. It would be nice to know what it is and if anyone 
sees it again out there, please let us know. 


Crane colts have been reported in the last couple weeks. There are two families 
in Beluga Slough. One family down near Beluga Lodge and the other at the bottom 
of the trail down from Islands and Ocean. That trail is reported to have many 
birds right now: SWAINSON'S and HERMIT THRUSH; MERLIN; GOLDEN-CROWNED, SONG, 
and SAVANNAH SPARROWS; VIOLET-GREEN and TREE SWALLOWS; Yellowlegs sp. A good 
place to go, it was reported, to practice birding by ear. 


Out on the Bay, Karl Stoltzfus reports more murrelets now, both Kittlitz's and 
Marbled. But fewer birds are being seen on Gull Island he said. He saw a 
SABINE'S GULL on the 10 and said he sees them nearly every year. (Worth a 
second look even if you think it's a Bonaparte's.) Birds being seen on most 
trips include: ALEUTIAN and ARCTIC TERNS; HORNED and TUFTED PUFFINS; COMMON 
MURRE; PIGEON GUILLEMOT; GLAUCOUS and HERRING GULLS; COMMON and YELLOW-BILLED 
LOONS; BARROW'S GOLDENEYE; HARLEQUIN DUCK; BLACK OYSTERCATCHER; DOUBLE-CRESTED 
and PELAGIC CORMORANTS. (No Red-faced Cormorants have been reported this year.) 
Check out Karl's blog for recent trips. 


Three WESTERN SANDPIPERS were seen and photographed in the Mud Bay on the 20th.

The Kachemak Bay Birders' trip to the Wynn Nature Center on the 21st was 
dampened by rain, but the following were seen or heard: ALDER FLYCATCHER; 
SWAINSON'S, VARIED and HERMIT THRUSH; AMERICAN ROBIN; ORANGE-CROWNED and 
WILSON'S WARBLERS; GRAY JAY; BOREAL CHICKADEE; FOX and GOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROW. 


                                            IT’S A GREAT DAY TO BIRD! 
Subject: robin eating a mouse!
From: "mossy seaside AT xyz.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Jun 2014 23:08:18 -0800
Ok so now I've seen it all! A robin on the driveway trying for minutes to 
dismember a dead lemming on the driveway, obviously too big and heavy to carry 
to the nest to feed the young, but not giving up on trying to chop it into bits 
with its beak or smashing down on the gravel and flipping it to and fro in the 
air, hoping to make it more bite sized! A robin eating a mammal. Has anyone 
else ever seen this? 

Mossy Kilcher, Homer

------------------------------------
Posted by: mossy 
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Subject: Thursday, June 26, 2014 Arctic Tern Fracas!
From: "c_griz AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 26 Jun 2014 23:55:10 -0700
Seward, Alaska

  
 Sunrise 4:34 am, sunset 11:26 pm, for a total day length of 18 hours and 25 
minutes. Tomorrow will be 1 minute and 6 seconds shorter. 

  
 Cool cloudy weather continues with occasional sprinkles and sunshine, temps in 
the mid 50s. The forecast, if it is to be believed, is for 72Âş on Saturday 
with more sunshine on Sunday. We shall see! 

  
 It was a pleasure, as always, to watch the graceful ARCTIC TERNS today, full 
of moxie, zipping after BALD EAGLES and RAVENS like fighter jet escorts at the 
border. One caught a rather impressive fish and paraded that fish around and 
around, crying exultantly, openly bragging, long after the poor fish was 
asphyxiated. I hope that eventually the tern remembered to haul it back to any 
chicks, waiting hungrily for delivery. 

  
 Another tern dove with a big splash and caught a minute fish, smaller than a 
chick snack. To my astonishment, another tern dove down and ATTACKED the 
fisher, grabbed one of its outer tail feathers with its strong red bill and 
pulled hard. The attacked tern struggled to fly away. Weighed down by the 
intruder, it almost went into the water. You can imagine the racket as both 
birds screamed, one in surprise and indignation, the other hurling bad, bad 
tern words. Maybe both were. 

  
 It was over in a trice; the attacker released the feathers and the victim flew 
free, feathers intact, still holding the tiny fish between its clenched bill. I 
have never witnessed a tern attack another tern. I cannot conceive why. 
Certainly, it wasn't because of the fish, which was no prize. Very puzzling. 
But what a drama! 

  
 Happy Birding!
 Carol Griswold
 Seward Sporadic Bird Report Reporter
 for dramatic photos, please visit my blog at http://sporadicbird.blogspot.com/ 

 
 
 

Subject: White-winged Crossbills
From: "swinak AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 25 Jun 2014 18:31:06 -0700
Wed evening. Anchorage, near Huffman & Birch. Haven't seen a White-winged 
Crossbill in quite some time, just had a flock of 14 in the trees around my 
house. 


Steve
Subject: Semipalmated Plover
From: "wkeys AT gci.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 24 Jun 2014 23:43:02 -0700
Unfortunately, the Plover nest did not make it through the high tide. About 3 
days before the highest tide, the nest was still high and dry as a little tiny 
island, but the two highest days did it in. We were all pulling for the little 
guy, but there's no stopping the high tide. 


w keys
spenard


 

Subject: Tuesday, June 24, 2014 Seward Hudsonian Godwit
From: "c_griz AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 24 Jun 2014 21:50:53 -0700
Seward, Alaska

  
 A surprising discovery today was a HUDSONIAN GODWIT feeding at the tide's 
edge. Its bill was bicolored, with a black tip, and the rest a very dull and 
vague pink. The sides were barred with black,light rufous, and gray. I think it 
was a female. When it flew, (sorry!) the black tail, white rump, and narrow 
white stripes flashed. I did not see the color of the wing linings, which are 
dark in Hudsonians. 

  
 I understand that at least recently there were many on the island in 
Westchester Lagoon in Anchorage. Is it possible that they are already migrating 
south en route to Amazonian Colombia and thence to Isla Chiloe off the coast of 
Chile? 

  
 Nathan Senner's phD research links at:
 
 

  
 There's always something interesting happening on the Nature Channel!
  
 Happy Birding!
 Carol Griswold
 
 Seward Sporadic Bird Report Reporter
 for photos, please visit my blog at http://sporadicbird.blogspot.com/
 http://sporadicbird.blogspot.com/ http://sporadicbird.blogspot.com/

 

Subject: Re: Nesting Semipalmated Plover plus
From: "Bob Winckler winckler AT mtaonline.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 24 Jun 2014 20:13:23 -0800
Hi Birders,

For some reason, I've been unable to upload photos to this website for the last 
couple of weeks, but today I was able to upload photos again so I've just 
uploaded two photos to the msbirder photo album. 


The first photo shows the Semipalmated Plover (SEPL) nest that John Wenger 
discovered and posted about (#10133) back on June 3rd. I was able to photograph 
the nest on June 6th. I believe that there's only been one posting about the 
SEPL nest since then (#10175 by alaskafencer), on June 13th. 


Does anyone know if the plover nest made it through the 31.79 foot high tide 
that was scheduled for 9:17AM last Sunday (June 15th)? The bridge from 
Westchester Lagoon out to the nest collapsed Monday morning and I haven't seen 
or heard any news about the plover nest since then. Does anyone know if the 
plover nest made it through the June 15th Sunday high tide? 


Several birders have requested that I share the following story of what I 
observed at Westchester Lagoon. The second photo that I uploaded shows a female 
Mallard and her 12 ducklings that I photographed at Westchester on June 6th. 
Unfortunately, after photographing the Mallards, I put away my camera and 
started back to my car. What happened next was amazing, and I just wonder if 
anyone else has observed such behavior by a female Mallard. 


Mallard hens w/ducklings are not unusual. However, the Mallard female (that I 
photographed with her 12 ducklings) did something that I've never observed 
before and have never heard about. After swimming with her 12 ducklings around 
the western end of Westchester Lagoon, she turned and headed with her ducklings 
in tow toward the large island nearest to the parking area. About a quarter of 
the way to the island (about 150 feet from the western shore), a flock of six 
Mew Gulls started hovering over the ducklings and several gulls started trying 
to grab the ducklings. The Mallard female charged at each gull as they 
attempted to grab a duckling and drove all of the gulls away, except one. That 
gull hovered directly over the female Mallard and the ducklings and then 
started a dive at the ducklings from about 10-15 feet in the air. As the gull 
started its dive, the female Mallard flew straight up out of the water (about 
4-5 ft. into the air) and grabbed the diving gull by its neck and brought the 
gull down into the water and held it under for a few seconds. When the gull 
surfaced, it immediately flew up and away and didn't return. The Mallard female 
then herded her ducklings over to the shore. Amazing to watch and me with my 
camera put away! Has anyone observed such aggressive female Mallard behavior 
before? 

Cheers,
Bob Winckler
Wasilla

------------------------------------
Posted by: Bob Winckler 
------------------------------------

Remember -- Be nice!
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Subject: St. Paul Island bird report: June 16-22, 2014
From: "Scott Schuette SSchuette01 AT hotmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 24 Jun 2014 13:12:40 -0800
Hello
Birders, this is the St. Paul Island bird report for the week of June 
16th-22nd, 

2014, sponsored by St. Paul Island Tour. The following sequence of sightings is
in taxonomic order; an asterisk denotes a species of less than annual 
occurrence 

or one of particular note.

 

2014
Species count: 115

Weekly
Species Count: 59

 

Birds
Mentioned:

 

**TAIGA
BEAN-GOOSE

SNOW
GOOSE

Cackling
Goose (ssp. leucopareia and minima)

TUNDRA
SWAN (ssp. bewickii and columbianus)

Mallard

Greater
Scaup

King
Eider

Bufflehead

Red-breasted
Merganser

RED-THROATED
LOON

Pacific
Loon

*DOUBLE-CRESTED
CORMORANT

BALD
EAGLE

Wandering
Tattler

Ruddy
Turnstone

RUFF

Short-billed
Dowitcher

Wilson’s
Snipe

Red
Phalarope

Pomarine
Jaeger

Parasitic
Jaeger

Long-tailed
Jaeger

Herring
Gull

Arctic
Tern

*COMMON
CUCKOO

**ORIENTAL
CUCKOO

**COMMON
HOUSE MARTIN

*SIBERIAN
RUBYTHROAT

Eastern
Yellow Wagtail

Wilson’s
Warbler

**COMMON
ROSEFINCH

Common
Redpoll

 

WEATHER

 

The
early part of the week was dominated by light to strong westerlies in
association with a weak low pressure system that passed north of the Pribilofs
while the second half of the week saw mostly sunny skies and light winds. 
Conditions were about average through the 18th 

with temperatures above average from the 19th-22nd
(temperatures into the low 50s) and lots of sun most days.

 

WATERFOWL

 

The
week’s highlight was a TAIGA BEAN-GOOSE (the 9th Pribilof record)
seen briefly on the 17th in the company of a SNOW GOOSE while the
seven TUNDRA SWANS continued through the 22nd. Other migrant species noted this 
week 

included a flock of 13 Cackling Geese on the 16th and 19th,
a Mallard on the 22nd, up to 11 Greater Scaup all week, a single
King Eider on the 17th, a Bufflehead through the 17th,
and a pair of Red-breasted Mergansers on the 17th and 22nd.

 

SEABIRDS
& GULLS

 

The
RED-THROATED LOON continued through the 19th while a Pacific Loon
was seen on the 22nd as well. 
The DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT was late noted on the 18th with
a Herring Gull seen on the 22nd and an Arctic Tern seen on the 17th. All three 
jaegers were seen early in the week 

with Pomarine on the 17th, Parasitic on the 17th, and Long-tailed
on the 16th.

 

SHOREBIRDS

 

Shorebird
migration appears to have waned as very few new migrants were noted this
week.  One of the RUFFs from last week
continued until the 17th while a Wilson’s Snipe was also seen that
day.  The most interesting new arrivals
were three to four Short-billed Dowitchers that were seen on the 21st
and 22nd while scattered sightings of Wandering Tattler, Ruddy
Turnstone, and Red Phalarope were also made this week.

 

LANDBIRDS
& PASSERINES

 

It
was another exciting week from this group with the discovery of a COMMON
ROSEFINCH (7th Pribilof record) from the 17th-19th,
a COMMON HOUSE-MARTIN (8th Pribilof record) on the 19th,
and a SIBERIAN RUBYTHROAT (first record since 2011) on the 18th. Also found 
this week were an additional two 

COMMON CUCKOOS bringing the season total to five or six, while the ORIENTAL
CUCKOO continued through the 16th. 
Other species noted this week included a Wilson’s Warbler on the 19th,
an Eastern Yellow Wagtail on the 19th, the continuing BALD EAGLE through
the 22nd, and Common Redpolls on the 16th and 19th.

 

Breeding
or resident species currently present on the island:

 

Northern
Pintail

Green-winged
(and Common) Teal

Harlequin
Duck

Long-tailed
Duck

Northern
Fulmar

Red-faced
Cormorant

Pelagic Cormorant

Semipalmated
Plover

Least
Sandpiper

Rock Sandpiper (ssp. ptilocnemis)

Red-necked
Phalarope

Black-legged Kittiwake

Red-legged Kittiwake

Glaucous-winged Gull

Common
Murre

Thick-billed Murre

Pigeon Guillemot

Ancient
Murrelet

Parakeet
Auklet

Least
Auklet

Crested
Auklet

Horned
Puffin

Tufted
Puffin

Pacific
Wren (ssp. alascensis)

Lapland Longspur

Snow Bunting

Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch (ssp. umbrina)





This
is Scott Schuette, Cory Gregory, and Glen Davis, the 2014 St. Paul Island Tour
guides, wishing you good birding. For tour information or to make travel
arrangements visit our website http://www.alaskabirding.com
or call 1-877-424-5637. 		 	   		  
Subject: June 19, 2014 Bird Tour to the Chiswell Islands
From: "c_griz AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 24 Jun 2014 11:59:57 -0700
Version:1.0 StartHTML:0000000188 EndHTML:0000008965 StartFragment:0000002411 
EndFragment:0000008929 
SourceURL:file://localhost/Users/carolgriswold/Desktop/06-19-14%20boat%20trip.doc 

 Seward, Alaska
  
 On Thursday, June 19, I joined Captain Eric Clock of Semaka Charters on the 
Seafarer with six birders, including the leaders Ed Harper and Susan Scott of 
Sandpiper Journeys Tours. 

  
 The 9-hour trip featured the rugged coast of Resurrection Bay, the glaciers 
and spectacular scenery of Aialik Bay, and the famed Chiswell Islands in the 
Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge. 

  
 Some highlights of the trip included watching a tiny PARAKEET AUKLET; a 
RED-FACED CORMORANT that flew around the boat several times, flashing not only 
its large white flank patches, but also its very red-orange-blue face; upwards 
of 40-50 RHINOCEROS AUKLETS feasting on herring detected by the fish finder; a 
BALD EAGLE striding purposefully up a grassy slope topping a cliff; a 
GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL we clocked at 26 knots, flying with the boat; a branded 
Steller sea lion, resting harbor seals, mammoth humpback whales, and a pod of 4 
stunning orcas with a precious calf. 

  
 I learned from the Alaska Sealife Center that the branded sea lion gave birth 
on the rookery at Chiswell Island this summer on June 3. The researcher thought 
she must have been taking a break during a foraging trip as she was observed 
the next morning by remote cameras at the rookery tending to her pup. The mom 
was born on Chiswell 7 years ago, and gave birth for her first time in 2012 at 
the age of 5. This is her second pup. Any reports, especially with photos 
documenting branded sea lions are greatly appreciated by the researchers at the 
ASLC. 

  
 Another research project, conducted by the International Pacific Halibut 
Commission, concerns the management of Pacific halibut. The Victoria, British 
Columbia fishing vessel, Waterfall, flying both the Canada and USA flags, was 
heading out into the Gulf of Alaska as we turned homeward into Resurrection 
Bay. 

  
 Captain Eric was very flexible in his route, accommodated any reasonable 
request to check out potential hot spots, lingered there once found, and told 
great sea stories. It was wonderful to share this wild Kenai Fjords coast with 
the excited and appreciative birders/photographers. 

  
 Here's my list, there may be a few species missing:
  
 HARLEQUIN DUCK
 BARROW'S GOLDENEYE
 DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT
 RED-FACED CORMORANT
 PELAGIC CORMORANT
 BALD EAGLE
 BLACK OYSTERCATCHER
 BLACK-LEGGED KITTIWAKE
 GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL
 ARCTIC TERN
 COMMON MURRE
 PIGEON GUILLEMOT
 MARBLED MURRELET
 PARAKEET AUKLET
 RHINOCEROS AUKLET
 HORNED PUFFIN
 TUFTED PUFFIN
 NORTHWESTERN CROW
 COMMON RAVEN
 SWALLOW SP
 HERMIT THRUSH
 FOX SPARROW
 SONG SPARROW
 ROCK PIGEON
  
 Happy Birding!
 Carol Griswold
 Seward Sporadic Bird Report Reporter
 for photos please visit my blog at < http://sporadicbird.blogspot.com/>
 
 http://sporadicbird.blogspot.com/
 

Subject: Re: fewer birds this year?
From: "S Friend sjfriend AT horizonsatellite.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 23 Jun 2014 14:48:34 -0800
I too have noticed fewer numbers this year of many species but not all. Below I 
will list which is which. 


Fewer seen / heard on my property:
Warblers, all but Orange-crowned.
Pine siskins
Common redpoll
Varied Thrush
Crossbills, both
Red-breasted Nuthatch
Brown Creepers
Lincoln Sparrows
Fox Sparrows 

Same or increase:
Hermit Thrush
Swainsons Thrush
Robin
Orange-crowned warbler
Alder Flycatcher 
Olive-sided Flycatcher
Grey Jays
Golden-crowned Sparrows

A few winter species may have had feed issues. We had a light spruce cone crop. 
Worse were the alder cones. The alders have been hit hard by some type of leaf 
blight (at least that what it looks like). Also had a light snow year as well. 
In mid March we average over 2.5 feet of snow coverage. This year we had 6 
inches with bare areas. 


Another possible issue is loose pets. 8 years ago when we moved here there were 
no dogs or cats running around. About 4 years back we started seeing dogs. Then 
2 years ago the cats showed up. I know where the dogs belong but the cats are a 
mystery, no one claims them and we only have a few neighbors in the area. 


This is the view from my deck. Very possible that there are many other issues 
involved as well but these are what I believe are part of my decrease. 


Steven Friend
6 miles above Anchor Point

-------- Original message --------
Subject: [AK Birding] fewer birds this year? 
From: "Beth Peluso bpeluso AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" 
 

To: AK Birding Group  
CC:  

I've had a number of calls at the Audubon office this past month or so from 
people asking about why they are seeing fewer birds this year. I'm curious if 
folks on this list have observed that as well, and if anyone has thoughts about 
the causes. My first guess is the harsh spring last year, but I'm interested 
what others think. 


thanks!
Beth Peluso
Fairbanks
Subject: Re: fewer birds this year?
From: "Tom Murtiashaw tmurtiashaw AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 23 Jun 2014 14:30:52 -0800
We did not have any redpolls at our feeders this past winter, and pine siskins 
are no shows this spring/summer. The violet-green swallow numbers are also 
significantly lower this year in our neighborhood. Do not know why. 


Tom Murtiashaw
Eagle River, AK

Sent from my iPhone

On Jun 23, 2014, at 10:28 AM, "Beth Peluso bpeluso AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" 
 wrote: 


> I've had a number of calls at the Audubon office this past month or so from 
people asking about why they are seeing fewer birds this year. I'm curious if 
folks on this list have observed that as well, and if anyone has thoughts about 
the causes. My first guess is the harsh spring last year, but I'm interested 
what others think. 

> 
> thanks!
> Beth Peluso
> Fairbanks
> 
Subject: Re: fewer birds this year?
From: "Frank Clemens rearguard AT clearwire.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 23 Jun 2014 11:00:19 -0800
What species tend to be asked about? I would expect different causes for 
different groups of birds. I was out on a lightly used road in the Meadow Lakes 
area that I tend to frequent during the summer and was surprised at the lack of 
White-crowned Sparrows. Are there other regions that are reporting higher than 
normal numbers to suggest that territories may be shifting? 




> On Jun 23, 2014, at 10:28 AM, "Beth Peluso bpeluso AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" 
 wrote: 

> 
> I've had a number of calls at the Audubon office this past month or so from 
people asking about why they are seeing fewer birds this year. I'm curious if 
folks on this list have observed that as well, and if anyone has thoughts about 
the causes. My first guess is the harsh spring last year, but I'm interested 
what others think. 

> 
> thanks!
> Beth Peluso
> Fairbanks
> 
Subject: fewer birds this year?
From: "Beth Peluso bpeluso AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 23 Jun 2014 11:28:34 -0700
I've had a number of calls at the Audubon office this past month or so from 
people asking about why they are seeing fewer birds this year. I'm curious if 
folks on this list have observed that as well, and if anyone has thoughts about 
the causes. My first guess is the harsh spring last year, but I'm interested 
what others think. 


thanks!
Beth Peluso
Fairbanks
Subject: Talkeetna Song Sparrow
From: "cmannix AT mtaonline.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 23 Jun 2014 08:59:04 -0700
Barbara and I saw a Song Sparrow near the se corner of Z Lake in Talkeetna 
Lakes Park in Talkeetna. That is a new bird for us in the area, as sightings 
are few and far between. It was a lighter variety, not one of the "Sooty" 
varieties from further south. Also on Z Lake were a pair of Pacific loons, and 
a female White-winged Scoter, and, in the vicinity of the lake were Rusty 
Blackbirds, Alder and Olive-sided Flycatchers and more. 

 Chris Mannix
 Talkeetna
Subject: Leucistic American Robin in Homer
From: "sealion AT xyz.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 23 Jun 2014 01:21:00 -0700
I have seen this bird three times now. It is cooperative and fairly easy to 
find. It appears to be feeding young at a nearby stand of spruce. I was able to 
get a photo with my iPhone from about 12' last night, June 21. The photo is 
posted at kachemakbaybirders.org. The photo shows the bird as white, in reality 
it is a very pale gray with a darker head and neck, yellow bill. 

  
 This Robin is found about .25 miles going up East Hill Road in Homer. It flies 
across the road between the "Garden of Eden" B&B sign and the sharp turn in the 
road at Hoedel's Lodging. The nest appears to be on the downhill side of the 
road in a stand of spruce, maybe 75 feet off the road, left side of the two 
green cabins. 

  
 This area, like many wooded places this time of year, has a lot of bird song 
from Warblers, Thrushes, Sparrows and etc. 

  
 Bird on!
 Gary Lyon
Subject: Sunday, June 22, 2014 Summer Sandpipers and Angry Eagles
From: "c_griz AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 23 Jun 2014 01:04:37 -0700
Seward, Alaska

 
  
 Sunrise 4:32 am, sunset 11:27 pm for a total day length of 18 hours and 55 
minutes. Tomorrow will be 21 seconds shorter! 

  
 Although the forecast has been for rain the past week, somehow it has only 
rained overnight or just for parts of the day, leaving much of the day 
unexpectedly sunny and bright. Everything is green and blooming, including 
tree-size lilacs and honeysuckle bushes in town. The hummingbirds have many 
choices with all these flowers plus wildflowers and annuals in hanging baskets. 
The very pleasant temps linger in the fifties to low sixties. 

  
 A walk along the tide flats proved surprisingly productive today. Two GREATER 
YELLOWLEGS poked and prodded along the tideline. One struck an enviable yoga 
pose as it preened; a master at ease. A SPOTTED SANDPIPER flew up, calling, 
then settled down to feed, teetering dramatically like a tightrope walker on 
the flat, stable mudFLAT. 

 I wonder why so many shorebirds do that? 
  
 Three small bits scampered ahead along a streamlet. I looked closer and 
discovered about 13 WESTERN SANDPIPERS, 1 LEAST SANDPIPER, and 1 SEMIPALMATED 
SANDPIPER, all adults in breeding plumage. These birds could represent failed 
nests, not sure. I believe it is too early for the juveniles to be present; at 
least I haven't seen any yet. 

  
 While I was engrossed in watching these tiny peeps, I heard a screeching 
racket and looked up to see a BALD EAGLE flying straight towards me, carrying a 
fish carcass. I clicked madly, trying to track the fast-flying, angry bird. 
Suddenly, another pair of talons appeared in my zoom lens; another Bald Eagle 
grabbed onto the prize and ripped some of it off. No wonder the eagle was 
furious! 

  
 The fantastic scene was too close to fit in my lens as they flew right 
overhead. The marauder peeled off with the stolen goods while the first eagle 
headed for home with the remains of the remains. ARCTIC TERNS and MEW GULLS 
peppered the eagle with insults and threats all the way through their 
territory. I can imagine the exasperated eagle complaining to the eaglets and 
spouse, "What a day!" as it tossed dinner into the nest. 

  
 The second summer BONAPARTE'S GULL fished for sticklebacks and other tidbits 
in a very shallow stream. To date, I've only seen one among all the other 
gulls. 

  
 I heard an ALDER FLYCATCHER calling from, yes, alders, and heard the winnowing 
of a WILSON'S SNIPE. SAVANNAH, SONG, and LINCOLN SPARROWS' songs rang out. 
ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLERS, YELLOW WARBLERS, VARIED THRUSH, HERMIT THRUSH, and 
ROBINS sang from the willows and cottonwoods. A pretty fine summer afternoon! 

  
 Happy Birding!
 Carol Griswold
 
 Seward Sporadic Bird Report Reporter
 

 for photos, please visit my blog at http://sporadicbird.blogspot.com
 Sporadic Bird http://sporadicbird.blogspot.com/

 
 
 http://sporadicbird.blogspot.com/ 
 
 Sporadic Bird http://sporadicbird.blogspot.com/ Seward, Alaska Sunrise 4:34 
am, sunset 11:21 pm for a total day length of 18 hours 46 minutes. 

 
 
 
 View on sporadicbird.blogspot... http://sporadicbird.blogspot.com/ 
 Preview by Yahoo 
 
 
 

Subject: WHITE-WINGED CROSSBILL at Hillside Park in Anchroage
From: "Keith Confer kconfer12 AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 22 Jun 2014 17:17:47 -0800
There was a very snappy male WHITE-WINGED CROSSBILL singing from the top of a 
Spruce Tree about 300 meters north of the Gasline trail gate at about 3:00 PM 
today. 


They've been a bit rare this year, so I thought I'd let everyone know.

KC

------------------------------------
Posted by: Keith Confer 
------------------------------------

Remember -- Be nice!
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Subject: Seward Alcids(10)
From: "joe staab staabjoe AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 22 Jun 2014 07:46:35 -0700
Greetings all,
 
Been out to the Chiswell's and Aialik glacier and scored lots of alcids 
including 3 murrelets, 2 murres 2puffins, pigeon guillemot, and both Rhino and 
parakeet auklets. Also seen were Humpback and Fin-backed whales, pods of Orcas 

 
Joe   www.ravenshavenbandb.com.
Subject: Seward Eurasian Collared Dove update
From: "c_griz AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 22 Jun 2014 01:21:54 -0700
The Seward EURASIAN COLLARED DOVE was last seen on Tuesday evening, June 17 
around 6 pm. It has not been seen since, despite intensive efforts by some avid 
birders. Nor has it been served up under glass, lightly seasoned, contrary to 
some rumors. I will post if I hear any news. 

 

 Happy Birding!
 Carol Griswold
 
 Seward Sporadic Bird Report Reporter
 

Subject: Homer/Kachemak Bay Birders' trip to the Wynn Nature Center: 6-21-14
From: "'Lani Raymond' lani67 AT alaska.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 21 Jun 2014 18:03:36 -0800
Kachemak Bay Birders and leader Michael Craig were wearing raingear this 
morning at the Wynn Nature Center as the weather moved from sprinkles to rain 
to nearly downpour by the time we had completed our walk. Fewer mosquitoes in 
the rain but birds were not too active either unfortunately, and the 
pitter-patter sounds of raindrops on our hoods didn’t help our hearing. (We 
Kachemak Bay Birders would never complain, however.) 


We enjoyed hearing several Hermit Thrush and Varied Thrush that could be heard 
singing nearly the whole time, and it was a treat to hear the very strong, 
beautiful Swainson’s Thrush singing for a while close-by. 


What we saw and heard at the Wynn:
GRAY JAY
BOREAL CHICKADEE
ALDER FLYCATCHER
AMERICAN ROBIN
SWAINSON’S THRUSH
VARIED THRUSH
HERMIT THRUSH
WILSON’S WARBLER
ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER
FOX SPARROW
GOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROW

Yes, we were wet birders but it was a Great Day To Bird!! As always. And I 
could put in a little plug for the many delightful flowers which were happily 
being watered at the time. 


At least one participant saw the leucistic American Robin flying across the 
road near the bottom of East Hill Rd. It was right there, as previously posted 
on our website, a quarter mile up East Hill Rd.