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Updated on Tuesday, August 19 at 10:15 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Greater Sage Grouse,©BirdQuest

19 Aug Gambell: RED-legged Kittiwake, miscellanea ["Paul Lehman lehman.paul1 AT verizon.net [AKBirding]" ]
18 Aug St. Paul Island bird report: August 11-17, 2014 ["Scott Schuette SSchuette01 AT hotmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
18 Aug Backyard Birding Bonanza ["pdarneson AT hotmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
18 Aug Stilt Sandpipers Continue at Kasilof River ["kenaibirder AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
17 Aug Sanderling at Carr-Gottstein ["pat AT pourchot.com [AKBirding]" ]
17 Aug Stilt Sandpiper - CarrGott- Anchorage ["Peter Scully peterandrewscullyii AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
17 Aug Homer/Kachemak Bay Bird Alert Information: 8-17-14 ["'Lani Raymond' lani67 AT alaska.net [AKBirding]" ]
17 Aug Stilt Sandpipers - Anchorage ["Peter Scully peterandrewscullyii AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
17 Aug Re: Stilt Sandpiper - CarrGott- Anchorage ["Peter Scully peterandrewscullyii AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
16 Aug Western Kenai Peninsula Shorebirds ["kenaibirder AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
16 Aug Anchorage--Carr-Gottstein Sanderling ["Aaron Bowman ampbowman AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
16 Aug Gambell: arrival (mine), 2 C. Ringed Plovers, regular migrants ["Paul Lehman lehman.paul1 AT verizon.net [AKBirding]" ]
15 Aug Anchorage-- Carr-Gottstein park today ["Aaron Bowman ampbowman AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
15 Aug RE: Homer: Stilt Sandpiper, Sanderlings, Solitary Sandpipers ["'Field, Carmen M (DFG)' carmen.field AT alaska.gov [AKBirding]" ]
15 Aug Homer: Stilt Sandpiper, Sanderlings, Solitary Sandpipers ["Aaron Lang birdingak AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
15 Aug Tuesday August 12, 2014 Storm Birds: Red-necked Phalaropes and a Sanderling ["c_griz AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
14 Aug Barrens trip ["Ginger Moore ginger AT kbaywhales.com [AKBirding]" ]
14 Aug No Girdwood eagle ["Aaron Bowman ampbowman AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
14 Aug Seward Caspian Tern and Sanderling ["c_griz AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
13 Aug Re: the putative eagle ["Aaron Bowman ampbowman AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
14 Aug Re: the putative eagle ["cathyfoerster AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
13 Aug the putative eagle ["davidsonne AT aol.com [AKBirding]" ]
13 Aug MIXED FLOCKS ["wkeys AT gci.net [AKBirding]" ]
12 Aug interesting eagle ["davidsonne AT aol.com [AKBirding]" ]
11 Aug St. Paul Island bird report: August 4-10, 2014 ["Scott Schuette SSchuette01 AT hotmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
10 Aug Northern Wheatear - Arctic Valley ["Buzz Scher bscher AT rmconsult.com [AKBirding]" ]
9 Aug Re: Steller Eider update ["Jen Nafzgar jenlinkhart AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
09 Aug Steller Eider update ["collman AT gci.net [AKBirding]" ]
09 Aug Seward Steller's Eider update ["c_griz AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
8 Aug Barren Island trip ["Ginger Moore ginger AT kbaywhales.com [AKBirding]" ]
7 Aug Re: BT Curlew ["Otto Lake erik.hendrickson755 AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
07 Aug Steller's Eider Seward AK ["tjbluebird AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
07 Aug Steller's Eider Currently in Seward ["tjbluebird AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
07 Aug snipes ["Louann Feldmann louannf AT alaska.net [AKBirding]" ]
07 Aug Feral Rock Doves in Anchorage ["gary_rasmussen2002 AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
7 Aug BT Curlew ["David Sonneborn davidsonne AT aol.com [AKBirding]" ]
6 Aug Anchor River ["David Sonneborn davidsonne AT aol.com [AKBirding]" ]
06 Aug STELLER'S EIDER hen- Seward ["sadie.ulman AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
5 Aug St. Paul Island bird report: July 28-August 3, 2014 ["Scott Schuette SSchuette01 AT hotmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
04 Aug Cordova Report ["wkeys AT gci.net [AKBirding]" ]
04 Aug Raven Kiss ["c_griz AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
04 Aug Rufous Hummingbird in Anchorage ["wkeys AT gci.net [AKBirding]" ]
3 Aug ID help please ["echecs AT alaska.net [AKBirding]" ]
3 Aug ID help please ["echecs AT alaska.net [AKBirding]" ]
01 Aug compiling spring/summer data from Gambell and St. Lawrence Island ["Paul Lehman lehman.paul1 AT verizon.net [AKBirding]" ]
1 Aug Homer/Kachemak Bay Bird Alert Information: 7-31-14 ["'Lani Raymond' lani67 AT alaska.net [AKBirding]" ]
31 Jul Cordova ["David Sonneborn davidsonne AT aol.com [AKBirding]" ]
30 Jul Tuesday, July 29, 2014 Primrose Trail Shorebird Surprises ["c_griz AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
29 Jul new sighting - Nikiski ["echecs AT alaska.net [AKBirding]" ]
29 Jul Anchorage Coastal Trail Bike and Bird Day ["Aaron Bowman ampbowman AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
28 Jul St. Paul Island bird report: July 21-27, 2014 ["Scott Schuette SSchuette01 AT hotmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
24 Jul Anchorage--Black Turnstone and Osprey ["Aaron Bowman ampbowman AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
24 Jul Gulf of AK Result ["joe staab staabjoe AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
23 Jul Caspian Terns ["Louann Feldmann louannf AT alaska.net [AKBirding]" ]
23 Jul Re: Possible Western Gull in Seward ["Floyd Hayes floyd_hayes AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
23 Jul Solitary Sandpiper ["avocet AT gci.net [AKBirding]" ]
23 Jul Gulls at the Mouth Kenai River Monday ["swinak AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
22 Jul Possible Western Gulls in Seward ["Floyd Hayes floyd_hayes AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
21 Jul St. Paul Island bird report: July 14-20, 2014 ["Scott Schuette SSchuette01 AT hotmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
21 Jul Varied Thrush ["rose123ak AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
21 Jul Palmer Creek near Hope report for 7-20-2014 ["tarbox AT ptialaska.net [AKBirding]" ]
21 Jul Re: Young Merlins in Anchorage ["jtam AT gci.net [AKBirding]" ]
20 Jul Kenai Caspian Tern ["kenaibirder AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
19 Jul Young Merlins in Anchorage ["jtam AT gci.net [AKBirding]" ]
18 Jul Friday, July 18, 2014 One thing after another! ["c_griz AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
17 Jul warblers ["Louann Feldmann louannf AT alaska.net [AKBirding]" ]
17 Jul Re: Homer mystery "Black" bird ["bob payne bobbobpayne AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
17 Jul Homer/Kachemak Bay Bird Alert Information: 7-12-14 ["'Lani Raymond' lani67 AT alaska.net [AKBirding]" ]
15 Jul Hummingbirds - new place to look ["steve_scordino AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
14 Jul St. Paul Island bird report: July 7-13, 2014 ["Scott Schuette SSchuette01 AT hotmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
13 Jul Visting Alaska July 20-30 ["Floyd Hayes floyd_hayes AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
13 Jul Great Shorebird Diversity ["wkeys AT gci.net [AKBirding]" ]
13 Jul Re: Flocking shorbirds in Port Heiden ["Kate McLaughlin mclenvironmental AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" ]
12 Jul Osprey at Otto Lake ["erik.hendrickson755 AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" ]
12 Jul Flocking shorbirds in Port Heiden ["ejnorris AT sbcglobal.net [AKBirding]" ]
12 Jul Birding Juneau - Guide ["gpelphrey AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" ]

Subject: Gambell: RED-legged Kittiwake, miscellanea
From: "Paul Lehman lehman.paul1 AT verizon.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 19:47:22 -0700
On Tuesday afternoon the 19th here at Gambell, we (Barrett Pierce and I) 
were doing a bit of seawatching and photographing the scads of 
mixed-alcid flocks flying by when a second-cycle RED-LEGGED KITTIWAKE 
came flying by right in front of us. This is the first fall record for 
Gambell, and the only other record from shore here, ever, is of a single 
late-spring bird perhaps some 15-20 years ago. We are well north, of 
course, from the species' normal range in the southern Bering and 
Aleutians. However, a recent telemetry study of Red-leggeds breeding on 
the Pribilofs has shown that some number of birds head NORTH in very 
late fall and are found in offshore waters in the northern Bering only a 
bit to the south and west of here in Nov/Dec, and then those birds head 
southwest to off s. Kamchatka where they spend Jan/Feb, before returning 
east to the Pribilofs in early spring.  Pretty amazing.

In other news we have now had a total of 4 juvenile COMMON RINGED 
PLOVERS the past several days, and today we had a high count of 22 WHITE 
WAGTAILS (including a single flock of 12), the highest count since the 
early 1990s. The first several juvenile SHARP-TAILED SANDPIPERS of the 
season (early by a few days) arrived on the 17th, a single juvenile 
RED-NECKED STINT (rare but annual) turned up, and several all-time early 
arrival dates have been set (no surprise given I arrived earlier than 
normal!!) including those for "Black" Brant and Black Scoter. The only 
AK mainland stray so far has been a single ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER (rare 
but annual in fall)--not a good showing so far.  It is still a few days 
"too early" for the start of typical Asian landbird potential.

The Red-legged Kittiwake was my #231 for Gambell, but my reign as Grand 
Poo-ba on the offshore Bering Sea islands is about to end, as Scott 
Schuette down on St. Paul just got his #229 there yesterday (a Red 
Knot)--so the clock is ticking.....loudly.

--Paul Lehman


------------------------------------
Posted by: Paul Lehman 
------------------------------------

Remember -- Be nice!
------------------------------------

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Subject: St. Paul Island bird report: August 11-17, 2014
From: "Scott Schuette SSchuette01 AT hotmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 23:11:26 -0800
Hello
Birders, this is the St. Paul Island bird report for the week of August 
11th-17th, 

2014, sponsored by St. Paul Island Tour. The following sequence of sightings is
in taxonomic order; an asterisk denotes a species of less than annual 
occurrence 

or one of particular note.

 

2014
Species Count: 125

Weekly
Species Count: 57

 

Birds
Mentioned:

 

TUNDRA
SWAN (ssp. bewickii and columbianus)

Greater
Scaup

King
Eider

Bufflehead

COMMON
LOON

Yellow-billed
Loon

Short-tailed
Shearwater

BALD
EAGLE

Pacific
Golden-Plover

GRAY-TAILED
TATTLER

Wandering
Tattler

Ruddy
Turnstone

RUFF

SHARP-TAILED
SANDPIPER

RED-NECKED
STINT

Sanderling

Rock
Sandpiper (ssp. tschuktschorum)

Pectoral
Sandpiper

*SEMIPALMATED
SANDPIPER

Western
Sandpiper

Long-billed
Dowitcher

Wilsons
Snipe

Red
Phalarope

Sabines
Gull

Herring
Gull

SLATY-BACKED
GULL

Glaucous
Gull

Northern
Wheatear

Eastern
Yellow Wagtail

American
Pipit (ssp. pacificus)

Wilsons
Warbler

Fox
Sparrow (Sooty)

Common
Redpoll

 

WEATHER

 

A
second low pressure system of the season passed by to the south of the
Pribilofs early this week providing moderate east and north winds from the 11th
to the 13th.  High pressure
returned by the end of the week and along with it were light winds, mostly out
of the west.  The first three days of the
week saw small amounts of rain (0.37 inches total) while the final four days of
the week were nice and dry with no precipitation or fog to speak of. 
Temperatures continue to be well above 

average with the final four days of the week having highs of 59, 60, 59, and 60
degrees F respectively.

 

WATERFOWL

 

The
slow times continue with at least six continuing TUNDRA SWANS still present on
the 17th while small numbers of King Eiders continue around the
island, a Greater Scaup continued through the 13th, and the female Bufflehead
was still present on the 17th.

 

SEABIRDS
& GULLS

 

Two
Yellow-billed Loons were found on the 14th while a single COMMON
LOON was seen on the 16th.  The
seasons first Sabines Gull was noted on the 12th while at least
three SLATY-BACKED GULLS were seen daily this week along with a Herring Gull on
the 17th and a Glaucous Gull on the 13th and 15th. Small numbers of 
Short-tailed Shearwaters 

were seen daily during the first half of the week.

 

SHOREBIRDS

 

Increasing
numbers of juvenile shorebirds began showing up this week with a second
SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER on the 17th, one to two RED-NECKED STINTS
from the 12th on, three SHARP-TAILED SANDPIPERS on the 16th,
and a Long-billed Dowitcher on the 16th and 17th. Also noted this week was a 
RUFF on the 12th 

and a GRAY-TAILED TATTLER on the 16th. New for the season was an adult 
Sanderling on 

the 16th while Western Sandpiper numbers began to build through the
week with a daily high of 28 on the 17th though Pectoral Sandpiper
numbers stayed low with a peak count of five on the 11th and 13th. Small 
numbers of Pacific Golden-Plovers were 

seen daily along with Wandering Tattlers, large numbers of Ruddy Turnstones, a
couple Mainland Rock Sandpipers, the continuing Wilsons Snipe on the 13th,
and a few dozen Red Phalaropes daily.

 

LANDBIRDS
& PASSERINES

 

The
first push of passerine migrants this fall began on the 14th with a
record early arrival date for Fox Sparrow (Sooty) and picked up on the 15th
and 16th when a minimum of six Northern Wheatears, two Eastern
Yellow Wagtails, six American Pipits, five Wilsons Warblers, and a second Fox
Sparrow were found.  Also noted this week
was a Common Redpoll with fledglings on the 16th providing the first
nesting evidence for that species on St. Paul this summer. Our over-summering 
BALD EAGLE was joined by a 

second (an adult) on the 15th.

 

Breeding
or resident species present on/around the island:

 

Northern
Pintail

Green-winged
(and Common) Teal

Harlequin
Duck

Long-tailed
Duck

Northern
Fulmar

Red-faced
Cormorant

Pelagic Cormorant

Semipalmated
Plover

Least
Sandpiper

Rock Sandpiper (ssp. ptilocnemis)

Red-necked
Phalarope

Black-legged Kittiwake

Red-legged Kittiwake

Glaucous-winged Gull

Common
Murre

Thick-billed Murre

Pigeon Guillemot

Ancient
Murrelet

Parakeet
Auklet

Least
Auklet

Crested
Auklet

Horned
Puffin

Tufted
Puffin

Pacific
Wren (ssp. alascensis)

Lapland Longspur

Snow Bunting

Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch (ssp. umbrina)





This is Scott Schuette and Cory Gregory, the 2014
St. Paul Island Tour guides, wishing you good birding. For tour information or
to make travel arrangements visit our website http://www.alaskabirding.com
or call 1-877-424-5637. 		 	   		  
Subject: Backyard Birding Bonanza
From: "pdarneson AT hotmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 18 Aug 2014 01:56:38 -0700
 There were so many birds in my backyard on Sunday I went outside to get some 
photos. There were the usual BC and Boreal Chickadees, RB Nuthatches, Downy 
Woodpeckers, and DE Juncos In addition there were Orange-crowned, Wilson's, 
Yellow-rumped, and Blackpoll Warblers, RC Kinglets, WC Sparrows, Co Redpolls, 
an Am Robin, and an Alder Flycatcher (1st time I'd seen one there). A flock of 
Canada Geese flew over. I was getting some nice shots until a Sharp-shinned 
Hawk showed up and everybody hurriedly left. 
Subject: Stilt Sandpipers Continue at Kasilof River
From: "kenaibirder AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 18 Aug 2014 00:10:13 -0700
Thirteen today (8/17) on the evening tide at the mouth of the Kasilof River, 
five on 8/15, and two on 8/13. The most we've previously seen on the Kenai 
Peninsula is a flock of 7. We've had Stilt Sandpipers seven out of the last ten 
Falls (only once in Spring, one individual May 2013). The Stilts have been seen 
among up to 100 Greater Yellowlegs, 400 Lesser Yellowlegs, and 100 Short-billed 
Dowitchers though those number vary day-to-day (lower of late). 

 
 Toby and Laura Burke
 Kenai, AK
Subject: Sanderling at Carr-Gottstein
From: "pat AT pourchot.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 17 Aug 2014 22:12:11 -0700
Single Sanderling at high tide today (still a hike on mudflats) north of 
Carr-Gottstein Park in general vicinity described by Aaron Bowman. Loosely 
associated with several semi-palmated sandpipers and flock of semi-palmated 
plovers. 

 Pat Pourchot
 Anchorage
Subject: Stilt Sandpiper - CarrGott- Anchorage
From: "Peter Scully peterandrewscullyii AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 13:20:26 -0800
Pond north of push pile.

Sent from my iPhone

On Aug 16, 2014, at 5:47 PM, "Aaron Bowman ampbowman AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" 
 wrote: 


> On a trip down to Carr-Gottstein Park today with Enric F. there were 
> many of the same birds as yesterday.  After a closer look today the 
> "American Golden Plover" I saw yesterday it either changed somehow into 
> a BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER over night or was a completely different bird. I 
> tend to think I made some miscalculations yesterday with my rather 
> sub-par viewing conditions (that is what I will blame it on anyway).
> A SOLITARY SANDPIPER called as it flew over, and after walking about a 
> mile out onto the flats (a literal mile to the NW) we had good looks at 
> a SANDERLING.
> Below is a link to a photo of that bird.
> Other birds of note were about 10 SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS, 6 PECTORAL 
> SANDPIPERS a flock of 15 or so BANK SWALLOWS that looked to be on the 
> move, and a SHARP-SHINED HAWK turning the table and reversing the attack 
> on a magpie.
> 
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/87588360 AT N05/14754438750/
> 
> Aaron Bowman
> Anchorage
> 
> 
Subject: Homer/Kachemak Bay Bird Alert Information: 8-17-14
From: "'Lani Raymond' lani67 AT alaska.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 17:38:41 -0800
KACHEMAK BAY BIRD ALERT INFORMATION: August 17, 2014

On the 15th a juv. STILT SANDPIPER and a SOLITARY SANDPIPER were seen at 
Mariner Lagoon.  At Mud Bay: GREATER YELLOWLEGS (12), LESSER YELLOWLEGS (6), 
PECTORAL SANDPIPER, WESTERN SANDPIPER, SHORT-BILLLED DOWITCHER (6), BLACK 
BELLIED PLOVER, SEMIPALMATED PLOVER.  At the Harbor Jetty: SURFBIRDS, 
WANDERING TATTLERS, and SEMIPALMATED PLOVER. And at the end of the Spit 
there were SANDERLINGS (11).

Also on the 15th a SOLITARY SANDPIPER, SPOTTED SANDPIPER and ALDER 
FLYCATCHERS at Beluga Slough. On the 13th three MERLIN were seen at the 
upper end of Beluga Lake (all three seen in the air at the same time) and 
one was seen mid-Spit plus several reports from town.  There is now only one 
cygnet with the pair of TRUMPETER SWANS on Beluga Lake.  One other adult has 
been seen a few times recently also usually at the other end of the lake.

On the 1st there was a notable sighting of a MARBLED GODWIT at Mud Bay, and 
the report included probable SANDERLINGS and others.   And just east of 
there on the 4th there was a report of a COMMON LOON with 5 chicks out in 
the water but close enough to shore to get a good look at them.

Out on the Bay at Gull Island on the 13th a pair of PARASITIC JAEGERS was 
seen and some small groups of BLACK OYSTERCATCHERS, the largest was group of 
five.  Rafts totalling about 175 murrelets were seen at  the mouth of Tutka 
Bay  and PIGEON GUILLEMOTS (12) at  Sadie Cove on the 9th.

Some of the cranes are gathering now and the largest group reported to me so 
far was 58, which was out East End Rd about 5 miles.  Crane reports are 
still important. Please report crane family presence and/or groups or 
individuals to Cranewatch, 235-6262 or reports AT cranewatch.org.


ITS  A GREAT DAY TO BIRD!  As is every day here by our beautiful Bay. 



------------------------------------

------------------------------------

Remember -- Be nice!
------------------------------------

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Subject: Stilt Sandpipers - Anchorage
From: "Peter Scully peterandrewscullyii AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 17:20:16 -0700
There were 5 Stilt Sandpipers in the pond just north of the push pile at 
Carr-Gottstein this afternoon. I tried to send this email from my phone 
earlier, but evidently it got lost somewhere in the interwebs. 

-Peter
Subject: Re: Stilt Sandpiper - CarrGott- Anchorage
From: "Peter Scully peterandrewscullyii AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2014 13:25:43 -0800
Make that 3 Stilt Sandpipers.

Sent from my iPhone

On Aug 17, 2014, at 1:20 PM, Peter Scully  
wrote: 


> Pond north of push pile.
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
> 
> On Aug 16, 2014, at 5:47 PM, "Aaron Bowman ampbowman AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" 
 wrote: 

> 
>> On a trip down to Carr-Gottstein Park today with Enric F. there were 
>> many of the same birds as yesterday. After a closer look today the 
>> "American Golden Plover" I saw yesterday it either changed somehow into 
>> a BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER over night or was a completely different bird. I 
>> tend to think I made some miscalculations yesterday with my rather 
>> sub-par viewing conditions (that is what I will blame it on anyway).
>> A SOLITARY SANDPIPER called as it flew over, and after walking about a 
>> mile out onto the flats (a literal mile to the NW) we had good looks at 
>> a SANDERLING.
>> Below is a link to a photo of that bird.
>> Other birds of note were about 10 SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS, 6 PECTORAL 
>> SANDPIPERS a flock of 15 or so BANK SWALLOWS that looked to be on the 
>> move, and a SHARP-SHINED HAWK turning the table and reversing the attack 
>> on a magpie.
>> 
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/87588360 AT N05/14754438750/
>> 
>> Aaron Bowman
>> Anchorage
>> 
>> 
Subject: Western Kenai Peninsula Shorebirds
From: "kenaibirder AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 16 Aug 2014 19:20:34 -0700
During the past ten days or so the Kasilof Flats has yielded at least 24 
species of shorebirds including 2 Stilt Sandpipers on the 13th and 5 on the 
15th, 2 Sanderling on the 7th and 1 on the 15th, 1 Pectoral Sandpiper since the 
7th, 1 Rock Sandpiper and 1 Ruddy Turnstone among assorted Black Turnstones and 
Surfbirds also since the 7th. Anchor Point SRA on the 12th had a flock of 40 
Sanderling, 10,000+ Red-necked Phalaropes streaming south, 1 Rock Sandpiper and 
1 Ruddy Turnstone among assorted Black Turnstones and Surfbirds, 1 Pectoral 
Sandpiper, and 1 Solitary Sandpiper in the ponds behind the parking lot. The 
Kenai Flats had 1 Stilt Sandpiper on the 15th among Lesser Yellowlegs in the 
wetlands on the east side of Bridge Access Road. With standing water more 
widespread than usual Solitary Sandpipers are encountered daily in the greater 
Kenai area as well as Spotted Sandpipers. Staging Wilson's Snipe are abundant 
as they usually are during the first half of August. 

 
 Toby and Laura Burke
 Kenai, AK
Subject: Anchorage--Carr-Gottstein Sanderling
From: "Aaron Bowman ampbowman AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2014 17:47:58 -0800
On a trip down to Carr-Gottstein Park today with Enric F. there were 
many of the same birds as yesterday.  After a closer look today the 
"American Golden Plover" I saw yesterday it either changed somehow into 
a BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER over night or was a completely different bird.  I 
tend to think I made some miscalculations yesterday with my rather 
sub-par viewing conditions (that is what I will blame it on anyway).
A SOLITARY SANDPIPER called as it flew over, and after walking about a 
mile out onto the flats (a literal mile to the NW) we had good looks at 
a SANDERLING.
Below is a link to a photo of that bird.
Other birds of note were about 10 SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS, 6 PECTORAL 
SANDPIPERS a flock of 15 or so BANK SWALLOWS that looked to be on the 
move, and a SHARP-SHINED HAWK turning the table and reversing the attack 
on a magpie.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/87588360 AT N05/14754438750/

Aaron Bowman
Anchorage



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Subject: Gambell: arrival (mine), 2 C. Ringed Plovers, regular migrants
From: "Paul Lehman lehman.paul1 AT verizon.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2014 15:55:36 -0700
I arrived at Gambell AK yesterday, after a 24-hour fog delay--for my 
annual, protracted fall stay--this year scheduled to last for over 6 
weeks, until October 1. This arrival is about a week earlier than my 
usual.  In addition, about 10 other independent birders will come and go 
during the season for various lengths of time, and there will be one 
tour group here in early September as well. While delayed in Nome on 
Thursday we had 2 ARCTIC LOONS at the usual stretch of Safety Sound, 
near mile 28, and there's still an active colony of 40+ Aleutian Terns 
near the airport.  But overall bird numbers seemed fairly low compared 
to normal for mid-August.

Here at Gambell, today (16 Aug) we've had 2 separate juvenile COMMON 
RINGED PLOVERS (with close-up photos), which are pretty much annual in 
August (but rarer than in late spring, given the adults have all 
departed already), one-year-old Slaty-backed Gull, and an OK number of 
typical "trans-Beringian" migrants for mid-August: 9 Arctic Warblers, 1 
Bluethroat, 27 Northern Wheatears, 26 Eastern Yellow Wagtails, 8 White 
Wagtails (local breeders), and 2 Red-throated Pipits.  Before we 
arrived, local resident Clarence Irrigoo photo'd a rare-but-annual 
hudsonicus WHIMBREL on 5 August and record-early local arrival migrant 
American Pipits on 10 August.

And it's a balmy 52 degrees.

--Paul Lehman


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Subject: Anchorage-- Carr-Gottstein park today
From: "Aaron Bowman ampbowman AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 15 Aug 2014 17:29:12 -0800
This afternoon I went over to Carr-Gottstein Park with my son to check 
on the shorebirds. Most were extreamly distant, but the noticable were 
GREATER, LESSER YELLOWLEGS, PECTORAL SANDPIPERS in small numbers, a 
couple peeps and a possible Sanderling.  But these were really far out 
and in the wind.  I would have considered a slog to get a closer look 
but I forgot my rubber boots! While watching the distant shorebirds I 
had to account for the wind's influence on their posture as so many of 
them appeared short and hunched over only to stand up tall and turn into 
a yellowlegs.
An AMERICAN GOLDEN PLOVER was also way out there, thankfully in 
surprisingly bright plumage to make a distant ID possible.
Groups of waterfowl and SANDHILL CRANES were gathering toward the 
Campbell Creek estuary area.

A rainy tool around on the bike at the little guy's nap time this AM 
produced a good variety of birds in mixed flocks in the N corner of 
Westchester, ORANGE-CROWNED, BLACKPOLL, WILSON'S, and YELLOW WARBLERS 
seemed to be the most common with a few SWAINSON'S THRUSHES in the flock 
as well.  The nap-time was short and thus my flock checking ended abruptly.

Aaron


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Subject: RE: Homer: Stilt Sandpiper, Sanderlings, Solitary Sandpipers
From: "'Field, Carmen M (DFG)' carmen.field AT alaska.gov [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 15 Aug 2014 20:42:01 +0000
Thanks for the birding report, Aaron. I found a single Spotted Sandpiper near 
the mouth of Beluga Slough at 11:30am today (8/15), to add to your shorebird 
tally. And a lone Trumpeter Swan hanging out with cranes in a tidal creek just 
east of the Islands & Ocean boardwalk. ☺ 


Carmen Field
Homer


From: AKBirding AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:AKBirding AT yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of 
Aaron Lang birdingak AT gmail.com [AKBirding] 

Sent: Friday, August 15, 2014 11:02 AM
To: AK Birding
Subject: [AK Birding] Homer: Stilt Sandpiper, Sanderlings, Solitary Sandpipers


It was a good morning for shorebirds at this morning's high tide in Homer. The 
highlight was a juvenile STILT SANDPIPER at Mariner Lagoon! It was feeding in 
the open in a small pool near the edge of some dense vegetations. I heard 
fly-over, but did not see, a SOLITARY SANDPIPER. 


At Mud Bay were: 12 GREATER YELLOWLEGS, 6 LESSER YELLOWLEGS, 1 PECTORAL 
SANDPIPER, 1 WESTERN SANDPIPER, a distant flock of 20 peeps 6 SHORT-BILLED 
DOWITCHERS, 1 BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER and 2 SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS. 

There was a flock of 11 SANDERLINGS at the end of the Spit and a walk through 
Beluga Slough produced one SOLITARY SANDPIPER. 


Three ALDER FLYCATCHERS were still around in the elderberries at the edge of 
Beluga Slough near the Islands and Oceans trail. 


Good birding,

Aaron Lang
Homer

Subject: Homer: Stilt Sandpiper, Sanderlings, Solitary Sandpipers
From: "Aaron Lang birdingak AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 15 Aug 2014 11:02:13 -0800
It was a good morning for shorebirds at this morning's high tide in Homer.
The highlight was a juvenile STILT SANDPIPER at Mariner Lagoon! It was
feeding in the open in a small pool near the edge of some dense
vegetations. I heard fly-over, but did not see, a SOLITARY SANDPIPER.

At Mud Bay were: 12 GREATER YELLOWLEGS, 6 LESSER YELLOWLEGS, 1 PECTORAL
SANDPIPER, 1 WESTERN SANDPIPER, a distant flock of 20 peeps 6 SHORT-BILLED
DOWITCHERS, 1 BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER and 2 SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS.

There was a flock of 11 SANDERLINGS at the end of the Spit and a walk
through Beluga Slough produced one SOLITARY SANDPIPER.

Three ALDER FLYCATCHERS were still around in the elderberries at the edge
of Beluga Slough near the Islands and Oceans trail.

Good birding,

Aaron Lang
Homer
Subject: Tuesday August 12, 2014 Storm Birds: Red-necked Phalaropes and a Sanderling
From: "c_griz AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 15 Aug 2014 01:05:03 -0700
Seward, Alaska

 
 A series of storms rolled in from the Pacific this week delivering heavy rain, 
sullen gray clouds, rough seas, and… storm birds. I ventured out around 8 pm 
to have a look at the dramatic weather and swollen streams. Snug in my car, I 
scanned the little beach just south of the harbor uplands, windshield wipers 
banging away. A few rugged fishermen were still flailing away at the tide's 
edge at the mouth of Scheffler Creek, trying to snag a big one for the Silver 
Salmon Derby. 

 
 I had to roll down the window despite the rain to get a better look at about a 
dozen RED-NECKED PHALAROPES packed into the corner of the beach by the 
breakwater below, busily feeding in the surging wrack. Whenever a wet fisherman 
walked over, they blew away, but returned as soon as the coast was clear. It 
was really fun to watch them, and I was grateful for the big towel to wipe 
things down. 

 
 Looking up the beach, I spotted two well-camouflaged juvenile SEMIPALMATED 
PLOVERS standing stoically, looking ready for bedtime. A dark gray, almost 
invisible WANDERING TATTLER poked through the intertidal rocks. Then, a little 
light-colored ball appeared, foraging up and down the piles of wave-tossed 
seaweed. At least the belly was white; the back was a mixture of grays and 
browns. But in the dim and fading light, the shorebird really showed up. I shot 
off a bunch of photos, and managed to get a few of the bird next to a LEAST 
SANDPIPER for size (bigger), and a SEMIPALMATED PLOVER (about the same.) At one 
point, a similar-sized RED-NECKED PHALAROPE body bumped the bird, just bonked 
it out of his way! 

 
 I wasn't sure who this one was, so I sent a bunch of photos to the experts on 
the 'net. Thanks to Buzz and Dave for letting me know it was a SANDERLING. 
Seward just doesn't get this species very often, and in molt, it's confusing. 
Look for the size, bold white wing stripe when it flies, black legs and 
straight black bill. 

 
 The next day, I went back twice to try to relocate the storm birds, but the 
little beach was absolutely empty of birds, and full of fishermen and visitors. 

 
 In other news, at noon I watched a female or juvenile HARRIER flying over the 
roiling surf at Fourth of July beach, and then head to the safety of the shore 
where it disappeared. The STELLER'S EIDER male blended in (almost) with his 
HARLEQUIN friends. A DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT dove, then surfaced, looking huge 
and black with an upturned golden bill. Tiny MARBLED MURRELETS piped and dove 
nearby. Two SPOTTED SANDPIPERS worked along the tide's edge. A female BELTED 
KINGFISHER flew high above with a giant fish in her bill, bigger than her head. 
I don't know how she will ever eat it! 

 
 In town, a SHARP-SHINNED HAWK spiraled up until it became a speck bird. 
TOWNSEND'S WARBLERS chipped from the spruce trees with CHESTNUT-BACKED 
CHICKADEES. All in all, despite the bouts of heavy, hard rain, it was quite an 
exciting birdy day. 

 
 Happy Birding!
 Carol Griswold
 Seward Sporadic Bird Report Reporter
 for photos of the storm birds, please visit my blog at
 http://sporadicbird.blogspot.com/ http://sporadicbird.blogspot.com/  

 
 
Subject: Barrens trip
From: "Ginger Moore ginger AT kbaywhales.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 18:34:27 -0800
So just in case no one go my email, the Barren Island trip was cxl. I would 
like to thank all interested and we will try again next year hopefully in July 
when there is better weather. 



Ginger Moore
Rainbow Tours
ginger AT kbaywhales.com











Subject: No Girdwood eagle
From: "Aaron Bowman ampbowman AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 18:56:01 -0800
I took a rather rainy trip down to Girdwood and Twenty Mile River today 
in search for the eagle. I turned up nothing like what I saw in the 
photo.  A number of Bald Eagles, a Harlan's Red-tailed Hawk around 
Gridwood and a very dark western Red-tailed Hawk like bird a bit farther 
down the road toward Twenty-Mile.  There were a good number (15+) of 
eagles across the arm toward Hope, but with the distance and in the poor 
visibility I could only make out that most were certainly Bald Eagles.
Better luck with the Hubble on a clear day.

In other news, yesterday's Audubon walk starting at Westchester turned 
some interesting sightings.  A WESTERN WOOD PEWEE was in the wet wooded 
area near the playground and in the same area we looked up just in time 
to see an OSPREY fly over.  Other than the typical selection of 
shorebirds, SPOTTED SANDPIPERS were in probably some of the largest 
numbers I have ever seen at the Chester Creek outflow. I estimated 20+.  
Unseen, but likely Pectoral Sandpipers called in the vicinity as well.

Aaron Bowman
Anchorage




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Subject: Seward Caspian Tern and Sanderling
From: "c_griz AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 14 Aug 2014 16:50:41 -0700
I spotted a CASPIAN TERN this afternoon in the rain; watch for this large 
gull-like bird with a red bill and black on the wings anywhere along the 
waterfront. 

 
 On Tuesday, the big storm delivered a SANDERLING and a dozen RED-NECKED 
PHALAROPES to the little beach between the harbor uplands and Scheffler Creek. 
Also spotted in the pouring rain along the beach was a WANDERING TATTLER, 2 
SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS, 1 LEAST SANDPIPER, and several MARBLED MURRELETS just 
offshore. 

 
 The STELLER'S EIDER is still at Fourth of July Beach with the Harlequins as of 
today. 

 
 Happy Birding!
 Carol Griswold
 Seward Sporadic Bird Report Reporter
 Seward, Alaska
Subject: Re: the putative eagle
From: "Aaron Bowman ampbowman AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2014 23:28:10 -0800
I am going to head out tomorrow (Thursday) AM to look around the 
Girdwood/Turnagain arm area for the eagle.  I will post on location 
should I see anything.
If anyone wants to come and help entertain my 14month old son let me know!

Aaron Bowman




On 08/13/2014 09:10 PM, cathyfoerster AT yahoo.com [AKBirding] wrote:
>
> I was in Girdwood yesterday and heard a call that I wanted to be “the 
> eagle” (but I didn’t see the bird). I have since convinced myself it 
> was a Red-tailed.  BUT that doesn’t mean the eagle wasn’t also there.
> And, as Dave knows, I couldn’t have counted it anyway since my 
> personal rule is that, for lifers, I have to see them not just hear 
> them (since my bird ear is so bad).
> I’ll keep my fingers crossed for the eagle to be there.
>
> *From:* davidsonne AT aol.com [AKBirding] 
> 
> *Sent:* ‎Wednesday‎, ‎August‎ ‎13‎, ‎2014 ‎7‎:‎48‎ 
‎PM 

> *To:* AKBirding AT yahoogroups.com 
>
> Thede looked at the pictures and wondered if it was one of the 
> Harlan's Hawks that have been there all summer and  are presumably 
> breeding. Hasn't anyone bothered to go down there to look?
> DS
>
> 
Subject: Re: the putative eagle
From: "cathyfoerster AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 05:10:43 +0000
I was in Girdwood yesterday and heard a call that I wanted to be “the 
eagle” (but I didn’t see the bird). I have since convinced myself it was a 
Red-tailed. BUT that doesn’t mean the eagle wasn’t also there. 


And, as Dave knows, I couldn’t have counted it anyway since my personal rule 
is that, for lifers, I have to see them not just hear them (since my bird ear 
is so bad). 


I’ll keep my fingers crossed for the eagle to be there.






From: davidsonne AT aol.com [AKBirding]
Sent: ‎Wednesday‎, ‎August‎ ‎13‎, ‎2014 ‎7‎:‎48‎ ‎PM
To: AKBirding AT yahoogroups.com




  





Thede looked at the pictures and wondered if it was one of the Harlan's Hawks 
that have been there all summer and are presumably breeding. Hasn't anyone 
bothered to go down there to look? 


DS


Subject: the putative eagle
From: "davidsonne AT aol.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2014 23:48:34 -0400 (EDT)
Thede looked at the pictures and wondered if it was one of the Harlan's  
Hawks that have been there all summer and  are presumably breeding.  Hasn't 
anyone bothered to go down there to look?
DS
Subject: MIXED FLOCKS
From: "wkeys AT gci.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 13 Aug 2014 10:29:48 -0700
The Mixed Flocks are Back! This morning, the yard flock in the lilacs included 
Wilson's Warblers, Orange-crowned Warblers, Blackpoll Warblers, Ruby-crowned 
Kinglet, White-crowned Sparrows, and the usual Juncos, Nuthatches, & 
Chickadees. So watch for the Mixed Flocks--Anything could happen. 

 
 The Merlin family has also been extremely vocal for the last few 
days--teaching the kids the ropes is loud work. 

 
 w keys
 Spenard
Subject: interesting eagle
From: "davidsonne AT aol.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2014 23:45:56 -0400 (EDT)
A friend from California, Steve Hampton, sent me a picture of an  
interesting eagle that he took in Girdwood today. It is probably nothing but 
may be 

an adult White-tailed. I wouldn't make a special trip yet, but if your  're 
down there anyway you might keep an eye out.
Dave  S
Subject: St. Paul Island bird report: August 4-10, 2014
From: "Scott Schuette SSchuette01 AT hotmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2014 21:39:20 -0800
Hello
Birders, this is the St. Paul Island bird report for the week of August 
4th-10th, 

2014, sponsored by St. Paul Island Tour. The following sequence of sightings is
in taxonomic order; an asterisk denotes a species of less than annual 
occurrence 

or one of particular note.

 

2014
Species count: 123

Weekly
Species Count: 52

 

Birds
Mentioned:

 

TUNDRA
SWAN (ssp. bewickii and columbianus)

Mallard

Greater
Scaup

King
Eider

Bufflehead

Pacific
Loon

Yellow-billed
Loon

*MOTTLED
PETREL

Short-tailed
Shearwater

Fork-tailed
Storm-Petrel

BALD
EAGLE

Pacific
Golden-Plover

GRAY-TAILED
TATTLER

Wandering
Tattler

Ruddy
Turnstone

SHARP-TAILED
SANDPIPER

RED-NECKED
STINT

Pectoral
Sandpiper

*SEMIPALMATED
SANDPIPER

Western
Sandpiper

Wilsons
Snipe

Red
Phalarope

Parasitic
Jaeger

Long-tailed
Jaeger

Herring
Gull

SLATY-BACKED
GULL

Glaucous
Gull

PEREGRINE
FALCON

 

WEATHER

 

The
first major low pressure system of the year passed the island this week passing
by on the 6th-8th. 
Along with the system were strong southern and southwesterly winds on
the 6th and 7th while the rest of the week saw more
light-moderate northerly winds.  While
the weeks temperatures remained above average this week the fog and rain
returned with approx. an inch and half of rain and at least patchy fog each day
of the week.

 

WATERFOWL

 

The
continuing TUNDRA SWANS were still seen through the 10th while last
weeks Mallard was last noted on the 7th. The long-staying Bufflehead and 
Greater Scaup 

were last seen on the 7th and 8th respectively, while
King Eiders were seen through the week.

 

SEABIRDS
& GULLS

 

The
years first incursion of MOTTLED PETRELS occurred this week with individuals
seen on the 6th-9th and in the largest numbers on the 6th
(20+) and 7th (50+).  Also
seen this week were Fork-tailed Storm-Petrels on the 6th and 9th
and numbers of Short-tailed Shearwaters all week with a peak count of 1180 on
the 9th.  A Yellow-billed Loon
was noted on the 4th while three were seen on the 10th
along with a Pacific Loon that day. 
Small numbers of jaegers were also seen with single Parasitics on the 5th,
6th, 8th, and 9th, and single Long-taileds on
the 6th and 7th. 
SLATY-BACKED GULLS were seen daily with two or three present this week
while a couple Herring Gulls were noted mid-week and Glaucous Gulls were seen
on the 4th.

 

SHOREBIRDS

 

Migrant
shorebirds continued to trickle in this week with a SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER seen
from the 5th-7th being the rarest arrival of the
week.  Also seen were a juvenile
RED-NECKED STINT on the 10th, daily GRAY-TAILED TATTLERS (up to
four) through the 8th, and an adult SHARP-TAILED SANDPIPER on the 5th,
6th, and 7th.  A
Wilsons Snipe was seen on the 8th while an adult Western Sandpiper
was seen on the 8th and three juveniles were noted on the 10th. A few Pectoral 
Sandpipers were seen daily 

with counts of one to eight Pacific Golden-Plovers each day this week. 
Wandering Tattlers were seen in average 

numbers this week (five to ten daily) with low hundreds of Ruddy Turnstones
seen daily as well.  Most days saw small
numbers of Red Phalaropes though upwards of 10,000 were seen rafting on the 5th
and hundreds were passing by during the storm on the 6th.

 

LANDBIRDS
& PASSERINES

 

The
only landbird migrant seen this week was a PEREGRINE FALCON noted on the 10th
while the BALD EAGLE was seen again this week.

 

Breeding
or resident species currently present on the island:

 

Northern
Pintail

Green-winged
(and Common) Teal

Harlequin
Duck

Long-tailed
Duck

Northern
Fulmar

Red-faced
Cormorant

Pelagic Cormorant

Semipalmated
Plover

Least
Sandpiper

Rock Sandpiper (ssp. ptilocnemis)

Red-necked
Phalarope

Black-legged Kittiwake

Red-legged Kittiwake

Glaucous-winged Gull

Common
Murre

Thick-billed Murre

Pigeon Guillemot

Ancient
Murrelet

Parakeet
Auklet

Least
Auklet

Crested
Auklet

Horned
Puffin

Tufted
Puffin

Pacific
Wren (ssp. alascensis)

Lapland Longspur

Snow Bunting

Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch (ssp. umbrina)





This is Scott Schuette, Cory Gregory, and Glen
Davis, the 2014 St. Paul Island Tour guides, wishing you good birding. For tour
information or to make travel arrangements visit our website 
http://www.alaskabirding.com 

or call 1-877-424-5637. 		 	   		  
Subject: Northern Wheatear - Arctic Valley
From: "Buzz Scher bscher AT rmconsult.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2014 16:11:03 -0800
Today along the ridge between the radar facility and Mt Gordon Lynn: 3 n 
wheatear (all juvs), 6+ horned larks, am pipits, 5 rock ptarmigan (family), 1 
n. harrier, sav sparrows. 


If you dont have wheatear on your anchorage or year list this is the time of 
year you can find them easily along the ridge top - plus snacks are plentiful 
on the hike up and down from the ridge (blue berries) 


rls

Sent from my iPhone

------------------------------------
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Subject: Re: Steller Eider update
From: "Jen Nafzgar jenlinkhart AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2014 21:51:36 -0800
I also spied the STELLER'S EIDER this evening (August 9) at 4th of July
Beach, Seward. It was with 17 HARLEQUIN DUCKS, acting very Harlequin
Duck-like. I watched, from the dunes, for about 30 minutes (7:30-8:00 pm)
as the flock incessantly dove, each time re-surfacing with great buoyancy.
What fun!

Jen Nafzgar
Seward, AK
Subject: Steller Eider update
From: "collman AT gci.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 09 Aug 2014 19:38:37 -0700
STELLER'S EIDER still in Seward AK at 4th of July beach.
 Robin C Seward AK.
 8/9/14
Subject: Seward Steller's Eider update
From: "c_griz AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 09 Aug 2014 11:56:27 -0700
Update: pouring rain, surfers, beach walkers and their dogs, and now the Silver 
Salmon Derby have conspired to disturb the birds at Fourth of July beach. No 
sign of the Eider since Thursday. 

 

 Thursday, August 7, 2014 Steller's Eider
 Seward, Alaska
 

 Thanks to Tasha DiMarzio of the Alaska Sealife Center for spotting, 
recognizing, and reporting the amazing discovery of a second year male 
STELLER'S EIDER right here in Resurrection Bay. She and other ASLC researchers 
initially discovered the bird yesterday about a half mile south of the beach 
while doing a routine bay survey by boat. Today, she refound the bird feeding 
with about dozen HARLEQUIN DUCKS just off Fourth of July beach on the east side 
of Resurrection Bay at the end of Nash Road. 

 

 Even though the light was dim even at midday due to the heavy cloud cover, the 
Eider really stood out from his companions. He was slightly larger, with a flat 
head compared to the round Harlequins', a longer, thicker bill, and was much 
lighter in color. Through the spotting scope, the varying shades of tans and 
browns was quite stunning. 


Tasha noted that he is still molting, so he might be here until the primary 
flight feathers are in. 

 

 The raft of Harlequins and the Eider dove in synchrony, allowing a brief time 
to sneak closer before they popped up. They were wary, and paddled farther off 
shore when they noticed movement, but soon returned to chase small fish. The 
Eider swam compatibly with the Harlequins; there was no apparent problem with 
this visitor mingling and feeding with them. 

 

 Tasha reported November 28, 2007 was the last time a Steller's Eider, a 
female, was reported in Resurrection Bay. It is quite unusual; perhaps his 
arrival was influenced by the big storm that was moving in. Watch for this 
special visitor and any other wayward storm birds. 

   
 Note: If you want to stay dry, visit the Alaska Sealife Center to see and hear 
King Eiders up close in the bird habitat. Bring your binocs to view the Common, 
Spectacled, and Steller's Eiders in the outdoor enclosures. The scientists at 
the ASLC are doing outstanding pioneering research on Eiders. 


 

 Happy Birding!
 Carol Griswold
 
 Seward Sporadic Bird Report Reporter
 
 for a few "unstellar" photos please visit my blog at 
http://sporadicbird.blogspot.com/ http://sporadicbird.blogspot.com/ 


 

Subject: Barren Island trip
From: "Ginger Moore ginger AT kbaywhales.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2014 19:48:05 -0800
So on August 17 Rainbow Tours is attempting a Barren Island trip aboard the M/V 
Rainbow Connection. Cost is $155person. Leave at 7am and try to be back by 
5:30. 

Need a minimum of 25 to go. Please email me if interested and please spread the 
word!!!! 

Need to know by August 14 for all wanting to go.
Focus is whales, auklets, murrelets, red-faced cormorants, puffins, northern 
fulmars, sooty/short-tailed shearwaters and of course more whales. 

This is a great trip. Bring your own food but there is a snack bar on-board.
Maximum number is 50 people. 

Ginger Moore
Rainbow Tours
ginger AT kbaywhales.com






On Aug 7, 2014, at 6:47 PM, Otto Lake erik.hendrickson755 AT gmail.com [AKBirding] 
wrote: 


> 
> My apologies - I was cleaning up my AK Birding album - adding and deleting 
some photos, and adding captions (I was using the photos while reviewing an 
earlier post on AK Birding). 

> 
> Apparently, when I add photos, or change a caption, Yahoo recognizes the 
photo as "new". The Bristle-thighed Curlew photos all have a caption that says: 
Anchor Point, May 27, 2012. 

> 
> Erik Hendrickson
> Healy, AK
> 
> 
Subject: Re: BT Curlew
From: "Otto Lake erik.hendrickson755 AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2014 18:47:16 -0800
My apologies - I was cleaning up my AK Birding album - adding and deleting
some photos, and adding captions (I was using the photos while reviewing an
earlier post on AK Birding).

Apparently, when I add photos, or change a caption, Yahoo recognizes the
photo as "new".  The Bristle-thighed Curlew photos all have a caption that
says: Anchor Point, May 27, 2012.

Erik Hendrickson
Healy, AK
Subject: Steller's Eider Seward AK
From: "tjbluebird AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 07 Aug 2014 16:56:10 -0700
 7/8/2014 12:30pm-1:30pm  4th July Beach (past the dry dock out Nash RD)
 

 A group of 6 birders watched a Steller's Eider (2nd year male) forage and then 
come to shore and preen with 18 Harlequin Ducks. It seems as though it only has 
2 primaries left to molt so, it might stick around a while as it completes its 
primary flight feather re-growth. 

 Since the birds are flightless they spook easily, its best to view with a 
spotting scope from the rye grass sand dunes. Otherwise they will move further 
off shore and make them very hard to view. 

 

 Tasha
 Seward,AK
 

 2 poor iPhone digi-scoped photos can be viewed in Tasha's album
 



 

Subject: Steller's Eider Currently in Seward
From: "tjbluebird AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 07 Aug 2014 15:25:34 -0700
7/8/2014 12:30pm-1:30pm
 

 A group of 6 birders watched a Steller's Eider (2nd year male) forage and then 
come to shore and preen with 18 Harlequin Ducks. It seems as though it only has 
2 primaries left to molt so, it might stick around a while as it completes its 
primary flight feather re-growth. 

 Tasha
 Seward,AK
 

 2 poor iPhone digi-scoped photos can be viewed in Tasha's album
Subject: snipes
From: "Louann Feldmann louannf AT alaska.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 07 Aug 2014 14:00:11 -0800
Went to Potter Marsh this AM, still looking for my Anchorage flicker, 
and counted about 15 Wilson's Snipes scattered around the flock of 50 
Herring X GW Gulls feasting on the dead fish on the mud at low tide.  I 
also counted about 10 Alder Flycatchers and watched a Merlin chasing and 
being chased by a Raven and then a couple Magpies for quite a while.  It 
was amusing, but probably not to them.  Other sightings: a Spotted 
Sandpiper in non breeding plumage, several Yellowlegs, and a weasel like 
animal with light brown above, white underparts, and black tail tip 
scurrying after the mallards and shorebirds that beat a hasty retreat 
whenever it came near, altogether a very busy place.  Wish I could 
figure out the mammal. Doesn't exactly fit any common descriptions.   
Louann Feldmann


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Subject: Feral Rock Doves in Anchorage
From: "gary_rasmussen2002 AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 07 Aug 2014 10:28:50 -0700
About 5 PM on 8/6/2014 I observed a pair of Pigeons (Rock Doves) at Windy 
Point, on the Seward Hwy. I believe it is time to admit there are feral Rock 
Doves in the Municipality of Anchorage. In reality there are hundreds, of feral 
Rock Doves, living under bridges and railroad overpass throughout the 
Municipality, and now they are moving down Turnagain Arm. These birds are not 
in any way dependent on humans for their existence! I maintain these birds are 
in fact feral, and can no longer be considered escapees. I hope this post will 
start a discussion leading to officially recognize reality: 

 There are feral Rock Doves in the Municipality.
  
 Gary Rasmussen
 
 Anchorage       
 

Subject: BT Curlew
From: "David Sonneborn davidsonne AT aol.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2014 05:06:57 -0800
Where and when were the photos of BT Curlew taken

Sent from my iPhone


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Subject: Anchor River
From: "David Sonneborn davidsonne AT aol.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 6 Aug 2014 20:47:57 -0800
Lots of birds on the beach
Only thing of note that I found today was a single Caspian Tern
Dave S

Sent from my iPhone


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Subject: STELLER'S EIDER hen- Seward
From: "sadie.ulman AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 06 Aug 2014 18:23:12 -0700
I observed a STELLER'S EIDER hen with a flock of 28 HARLEQUIN DUCKS, about 1/2 
mile south of the Fourth of July Beach area. The bird was observed from a boat, 
and would not have been visible from the Fourth of July Beach at that time. 
Maybe the birds will make their way a bit more north, and able to observed from 
the shore. 

 

 The last reported STELLER'S EIDER in the Seward area was first seen on Nov 28, 
2007. That hen was seen in the same general area, off Spring Creek Beach, for 
several days. 

 

 -Sadie Ulman, John Maniscalco, Sarah Tanedo
 Seward, Alaska
Subject: St. Paul Island bird report: July 28-August 3, 2014
From: "Scott Schuette SSchuette01 AT hotmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 5 Aug 2014 11:01:02 -0800
Hello
Birders, this is the St. Paul Island bird report for the week of July 
28th-August 

3rd, 2014, sponsored by St. Paul Island Tour. The following sequence
of sightings is in taxonomic order; an asterisk denotes a species of less than
annual occurrence or one of particular note.

 

2014
Species count: 123

Weekly
Species Count: 46

 

Birds
Mentioned:

 

TUNDRA
SWAN (ssp. bewickii and columbianus)

Mallard

Greater
Scaup

King
Eider

Bufflehead

Pacific
Loon

Short-tailed
Shearwater

BALD
EAGLE

Pacific
Golden-Plover

GRAY-TAILED
TATTLER

Wandering
Tattler

Ruddy
Turnstone

Rock
Sandpiper (ssp. tschuktschorum)

Pectoral
Sandpiper

Red
Phalarope

Parasitic
Jaeger

Long-tailed
Jaeger

Herring
Gull

SLATY-BACKED
GULL

Glaucous
Gull

American
Pipit

Common
Redpoll

 

WEATHER

 

The
warm temperatures and high pressure continued to dominate this week with the
continuation of a light weather period for the Pribilofs. Daily temperatures 
were consistently five to 

ten degrees above average with highs of 60 or above on the 31st and
1st, a very rare event for the islands. The rest of the week continued in 
normal 

fashion for these types of weather patterns with light winds (south early in
the week and north later on), no rain, and generous amounts of fog at times.

 

WATERFOWL

 

The
only new arrival this week was a Mallard found on the 3rd with
continued sightings of seven TUNDRA SWANS, Greater Scaup, King Eiders, and the
lone female Bufflehead rounding out the migrant waterfowl list for the week.

 

SEABIRDS
& GULLS

 

A
slight increase in jaegers was noted on the 1st and 2nd
with a couple Parasitics and five or six Long-taileds seen over those two
days.  Large gull numbers have continued
to increase with sightings of Herring Gull on the 29th, 1st,
and 2nd, SLATY-BACKED GULL on the 30th and 2nd,
and Glaucous Gull on 29th, 1st, and 2nd. The first movement of Short-tailed 
Shearwaters 

occurred on the 2nd, though light, with a few hundred seen that day.

 

SHOREBIRDS

 

Migrant
shorebird numbers dwindled this week with two-plus GRAY-TAILED TATTLERS seen on
the 2nd and 3rd being the highlight. Other migrants included the continuing 
large 

numbers of early Pacific Golden-Plovers with up to 10 seen on the 31st,
numbers of Wandering Tattlers with up to 10 on the 2nd, a handful of
Pectoral Sandpipers which continued from previous weeks, a non-Pribilof Rock
Sandpiper on the 28th, and building numbers of Ruddy Turnstones with
a daily high count of 300 on the 2nd.  The first large concentrations of Red
Phalaropes were also noted this week with 5,000-15,000 birds noted between
Marunich and Northeast Point from the 29th-31st. 

 

LANDBIRDS
& PASSERINES

 

The
first fall migrant passerines were noted on the 2nd when a pair of American
Pipits were found, these add to continuing sightings of Common Redpoll and Bald
Eagle as the only landbirds found on St. Paul for the week.

 

Breeding
or resident species currently present on the island:

 

Northern
Pintail

Green-winged
(and Common) Teal

Harlequin
Duck

Long-tailed
Duck

Northern
Fulmar

Red-faced
Cormorant

Pelagic Cormorant

Semipalmated
Plover

Least
Sandpiper

Rock Sandpiper (ssp. ptilocnemis)

Red-necked
Phalarope

Black-legged Kittiwake

Red-legged Kittiwake

Glaucous-winged Gull

Common
Murre

Thick-billed Murre

Pigeon Guillemot

Ancient
Murrelet

Parakeet
Auklet

Least
Auklet

Crested
Auklet

Horned
Puffin

Tufted
Puffin

Pacific
Wren (ssp. alascensis)

Lapland Longspur

Snow Bunting

Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch (ssp. umbrina)





This
is Scott Schuette, Cory Gregory, and Glen Davis, the 2014 St. Paul Island Tour
guides, wishing you good birding. For tour information or to make travel
arrangements visit our website http://www.alaskabirding.com
or call 1-877-424-5637. 		 	   		  
Subject: Cordova Report
From: "wkeys AT gci.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 04 Aug 2014 11:38:09 -0700
A quick trip to Cordova this weekend was fabulous even with limited birding 
time. The Fast Ferry trip over produced Pigeon Guillemot, Marbled Murrelet, two 
pairs of Kittlitz's Murrelets, one Parasitic Jaeger harassing a Kittiwake, Red 
Necked Phalaropes, one Humpback Whale, two pods of Harbor Porpoise, a couple of 
sea lions, Harbor Seals, and bazillions of Otters. 

 In Cordova, the 50-70 Caspian Terns previously reported were scattered 
throughout the loafing million-gull flock that stretched the entire length of 
Hartney Bay. One here, two there, five over yonder, and on and on. 
Surprisingly, the only shorebirds in sight were Yellowlegs and a couple of peep 
fly-bys. 

 Out the airport road, Trumpeter Swan families were doing quite well in 
numerous ponds. The Rufous Hummingbirds are regularly attending the feeders at 
the airport, but another surprise was the lack of ducks. Hardly any in the 
millions of ponds out the airport road. 

 And then.....as we walked a ways on the road shoulder near the Gazebo Pond, 
two birds flushed from the alders, landed in front of us in a touch and go, and 
were off in seconds. It was a perfect display of a Bohemian Waxwing and a CEDAR 
Waxwing side by side. Big and Small, Tannish and Gray--it was the ultimate 
comparison. 

 Another short hike up the Eisner Lake trail was like walking through the fruit 
buffet line: Blueberries, raspberries, and Salmon Berries in an all-you-can-eat 
serving line. Birds were in very short supply until the baby Swainson's Thrush 
landed 6 feet away. Even at that distance, it took examination of the photos to 
see the fleecy down still sticking out of his feathers. This guy was not long 
out of the nest. 

 And then it was back on the ferry for a couple of Parakeet Auklets, one Tufted 
Puffin, a Common Murre, and TWO pairs of Parasitic Jaegers (three dark morph 
and one light) harassing gulls and forcing them down into the water. They're 
definitely the Bad Boys of the Sound. 

 

 w keys
 spenard
      
Subject: Raven Kiss
From: "c_griz AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 04 Aug 2014 11:00:37 -0700
Seward, Alaska

 

 It's usually quite difficult to spy on COMMON RAVENS, much less get photos. 
They are wary and private, and do not tolerate paparazzi spying on their 
personal lives. By happy circumstance, while studying the raucous gulls at the 
NE Beach fish cleaning station, I found a family of oblivious RAVENS parading 
along the beach. The three youngsters looked disheveled, their feathers stained 
with fish oil from the delectable feast thrown into the fish bin by the 
fishermen. But raven teenagers always look unkempt, losing and gaining feathers 
like a human teenager outgrows baggy jeans and shoes, so this was normal. 

 

 The mom was also a mess, her feathers in disarray and likewise streaked with 
fish oil. I could almost see her pink foam hair curlers sliding off, her 
wrinkled and worn house dress, and her shabby slippers, exhausted from a busy 
day minding the kids and rustling up dinner. The dad, in contrast, was 
magnificent, glossy and iridescent, impeccably attired with impressive shaggy 
throat feathers. He looked like a VIP, possibly the CEO of the boat harbor. 

 

 The pair ignored their children while they shared a few tender moments 
together. The dad, a perfect, gallant gentleman, saw only the beautiful bride 
and mother of his handsome family. After a little bowing and horn display (the 
female's are smaller and shorter), they tenderly exchanged a raven kiss where 
the female gently grasped the male's beak in hers. These are powerful tools 
that can rip branches off a tree, so it was quite an act of trust. Their sky 
blue nictitating membranes flashed across their black eyes from back to front. 
Afterwards, they both burst into a cascade of croaking and celebration followed 
by more respectful bowing to each other. 

 

 Unfortunately, my DSLR camera makes quite a racket as the mirror slaps up and 
down. The amorous pair paused and glanced in my direction several times. 
Finally, with great dignity, the stars walked off stage, side by side, little 
hearts zipping between them. 

 

 Happy Birding!
 Carol Griswold
 Seward Sporadic Bird Report Reporter

 for photos of the lovely couple, please visit my blog at 
http://sporadicbird.blogspot.com/ http://sporadicbird.blogspot.com/ and scroll 
down to July 23, 2014 

 
 
 http://sporadicbird.blogspot.com/ 
 
 Sporadic Bird http://sporadicbird.blogspot.com/ Seward, Alaska It rained hard 
Monday night with temperatures in the low 50s. Typically this weather pattern 
subsides to cool overcast weather with occasional... 

 
 
 
 View on sporadicbird.blogspot... http://sporadicbird.blogspot.com/ 
 Preview by Yahoo 
 
 
 

Subject: Rufous Hummingbird in Anchorage
From: "wkeys AT gci.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 04 Aug 2014 10:58:06 -0700
This Morning at 9:30am, a female or sub-adult male Rufous Hummingbird checked 
out the Keys' front porch, and settled into a hanging red/purple Fuchsia 
basket. A minute or two of feeding and she (he?) was on her way. Wahoo! Ten 
years of wintering over at Bell's was finally worth it. 

 

 w keys
 spenard
Subject: ID help please
From: "echecs AT alaska.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 3 Aug 2014 13:35:31 -0800 (AKDT)
Okay, now that I know that this list doesn't accept attachments, you can see 
the 

photos in the album labeled "Nikiski - Thrush?".

I couldn't get a photo of the bird front on, so I need to tell you that the 
breast 

was not all orange like a robin. Which is why I think it might be a Varied 
Thrush 

instead of a robin. But per my bird book, a Varied Thrush doesn't have the 
white 

around the eye like the bird in the picture.

Also, it was raining when I took the pictures. That is why it had ruffled 
feathers 

in one of the photos.

BTW, I'm using Robert Armstrong's book, 5th edition.

Thanks,
Dorey Harman
Nikiski



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Subject: ID help please
From: "echecs AT alaska.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 3 Aug 2014 12:40:54 -0800 (AKDT)
This fella visited me just moments ago. At first I thought it might be a Varied 

Thrush, but since I've only ever seen one of those, I'm not sure. Luckily he 
hung 

around long enough for me to get some nice photos, and I had the large lens 
already 

on my camera.

It is raining here, so in the one of the photos he had his feathers kind of 
ruffled. 


Thanks,
Dorey Harman
Nikiski

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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Subject: compiling spring/summer data from Gambell and St. Lawrence Island
From: "Paul Lehman lehman.paul1 AT verizon.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 01 Aug 2014 16:23:30 -0700
For many years I have kept tabs on the autumn-season bird data from 
GAMBELL and all of ST. LAWRENCE ISLAND.  Earlier this year I started 
amassing the spring and summer Gambell data as well, and have gotten 
quite far. (Also the winter data, but there aren't too much of those!!)  
But there are undoubtedly many missing spring records of interest from 
over the years since birders began visiting Gambell in late spring 
starting in the 1970s and which have never been published or otherwise 
even submitted to the current and past Alaska regional editors for 
"North American Birds" (NAB), Thede Tobish and Dan Gibson. A number of 
birders have recently entered their past sightings in to eBird, and I 
have already accessed that information. BUT, that still leaves all the 
birders who have visited Gambell in late spring or early summer and made 
some important sightings but who have not submitted that information to 
either NAB or eBird. Such "important" data includes not only Asian 
strays, but also:

Alaska mainland strays, some of which are common at Nome but are very 
rare offshore (such as various sparrows, warblers, thrushes, waterfowl, 
etc.)
potential early arrival and late departure dates
high counts
unusual local nesting records
major population changes

It would NOT include expected sightings of regular-occurring species.

So....  here's everyone's chance to help this project (which will get 
turned in to a major publication on the birds of Gambell/St. Lawrence 
Island as well as the entire Bering Sea islands region). If you have 
records of "potential interest" from Gambell since the 1970s and have 
not otherwise sent them previously to NAB or eBird, please pass them on 
to me.  All submissions will be acknowledged. IF IN DOUBT ABOUT THEIR 
VALUE, PLEASE SEND OR INQUIRE.  I hope to wrap up most, though not all, 
of the data collection by late this year.

Many, many thanks!!!

--PAUL LEHMAN
lehman.paul AT verizon.net
11192 Portobelo Drive,  San Diego, CA  92124



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Subject: Homer/Kachemak Bay Bird Alert Information: 7-31-14
From: "'Lani Raymond' lani67 AT alaska.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 1 Aug 2014 09:28:47 -0800
KACHEMAK BAY BIRD ALERT INFORMATION: July 31, 2014
The mystery surrounding the dark 8 bird photographed by David Hanson on the 
Spit near Spit Sisters on June 6th has apparently been solved, and the best 
conjecture is that it was a RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD. The photos were seen by many 
people, sent to Cornell, and posted on the WhatBird site--where it got 450 
views and several replies. We're saying it's a Red-winged but we'll always 
wonder why it had the yellow band, why someone would have had it in a cage, and 
whatever happened to it? (We'll have to save our promised unlimited fame for 
some other time, some other bird.) 


A large number of dark Shearwaters (600+) were seen between the end of the Spit 
and the Green Can buoy channel marker in a feeding frenzy. This was on the 
16th. 


A RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD was reported in town on the 12th and on the 13th one was 
seen very close through a window out near Miller's Landing. The observer was 
only about two feet away! Very exciting but also breathtaking, with coherent 
thoughts of her camera occurring unfortunately. 


George Harbeson observed, documented and photographed the nesting of a pair of 
SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS. Many of us see the plovers doing the broken-wing act 
and know there might be a nest nearby. He was patient enough to be able to find 
this one! The eggs were photographed on June 18th, and the chicks hatched just 
before the 30th. (Photos on our website.) 


His summary of Semipalmated Plover Nesting observations:
1. About 2 weeks on the nest.
2. Eggs hatch one day.
3. Parents and little ones running around next day.
4. Just the parents running around the next day.
5. No plovers at all the next day. 

The little ones mature rapidly but that was awfully fast. Or were they hiding? 
(one could hope) 


There was a report from Seldovia of a MOURNING DOVE seen on the 29th at the 
south entrance of the Tribal Center and Museum. However this was subsequently 
determined to be an escapee! 



Please report crane family presence and/or groups to Cranewatch, 235-6262 or 
reports AT cranewatch.org. The following information is what they need from you: 
location, time and date, what they were doing (landing, flying high, circling, 
etc.), how many, and your email and/or phone number. 




                                    ITS A GREAT DAY TO BIRD! 
Subject: Cordova
From: "David Sonneborn davidsonne AT aol.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 14:07:50 -0800
1 Second cycle Glaucous Gull -harbor
42 Caspian Terns-Hartmey Bay
Dave S 

Sent from my iPhone


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Posted by: David Sonneborn 
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Subject: Tuesday, July 29, 2014 Primrose Trail Shorebird Surprises
From: "c_griz AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 30 Jul 2014 15:28:15 -0700
Seward, Alaska

  
 It rained hard Monday night with temperatures in the low 50s. Typically this 
weather pattern subsides to cool overcast weather with occasional showers that 
persists for the week. To everyone's amazement, the weather forecast for sun 
and temps in the mid 70s was correct! 

  
 Tuesday dawned clear and freshly washed. It was a lovely day for a hike so we 
headed to the Primrose Trailhead at Mile 18 Seward Highway. The first 5 miles 
or so climbs through a Mt Hemlock forest with scattered spruce. The cones are 
abundant this year, attracting hoards of WHITE-WINGED CROSSBILLS, a species 
that was entirely absent last winter. Their long, complex trills filled the 
tops of the trees. 

  
 I followed a soft tapping to find a male AMERICAN THREE-TOED WOODPECKER 
methodically working his way around a dead spruce tree. This is my first 
sighting for the year, and quite a treat! 

  
 A PINE GROSBEAK stopped to sing from a dead snag. Numerous overflights of 
REDPOLLS called back and forth. HERMIT THRUSHES cautioned with their soft 
"chway." I finally saw one watching me before it quietly flew off. The VARIED 
THRUSHES were silent, but I did spot one, almost perfectly camouflaged in the 
hemlock forest on a branch. 

  
 The blueberries along the trail were bountiful and delicious. After the 
disastrous 3-year attack by the geometrid moth larvae, the sweet berries are 
back and so appreciated by more than just snacking hikers. 

  
 We took a short spur trail at mile 2 to view thundering Porcupine Falls across 
the canyon. Such a huge volume of water! 

  
 Once out of the forest, spectacular views of snowy mountains cradling cirque 
and valley glaciers opened up to the east with Mt Ascension at 5710' dominating 
the west side. Small subalpine ponds dotted the rolling emerald green 
landscape. Fluffy white cloud reflections sailed across the calm shallow 
waters. 

  
 I did not expect to see a shorebird up here, but there, walking along the edge 
of one pond, was a SOLITARY SANDPIPER! I watched it poke and prod the muddy 
bank, obviously finding something to eat. I wonder if it nested close by, or if 
it was migrating through. 

  
 A short time later, around mile 7, a WILSON'S SNIPE flushed out of a shallow 
wetlands, another big surprise. 

  
 Glimpses of Lost Lake began to appear, then the beautiful turquoise-blue 
waters were below us. A wake of an unseen swimmer, a rainbow? v-ed across a 
little bay embellished with cloud reflections. Fat marmots whistled sharply 
from their rocky outposts. A daring vole dashed across the path in just front 
of me, diving back into the safety of the beautiful wildflowers and grasses. 

  
 At the half-way point, mile 7.5, and end of the Primrose Trail, we crossed the 
bridge over Lost Creek as it began its journey from Lost Lake to the sea. Stone 
steps led up the other side to the north end of the Lost Lake Trail. Shortly 
afterwards, I admired a frost-heaved rock pocket, filled with water. Looking 
more closely, I discovered a LEAST SANDPIPER busily hunting for insects. 
Another shorebird surprise! 

  
 We still had about 8 miles to hike, so regretfully we turned around to head 
back down the Primrose Trail. The white-winged crossbills were still singing in 
the hemlock forest as we plucked just a few more blueberries on the long 
descent. The final bird was a Chickadee, either a Boreal or Chestnut-backed, 
hidden in the hemlock branches, as we trundled through the Primrose campground 
back to the parking lot. 

  
 What a gorgeous place, the high country of Lost Lake!
  
 Happy Birding!
 Carol Griswold
 Seward Sporadic Bird Report Reporter 
 for photos and other reports, please visit my blog at 
http://sporadicbird.blogspot.com/ 

 

Subject: new sighting - Nikiski
From: "echecs AT alaska.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 12:28:01 -0800 (AKDT)
Last week while sitting on my front porch a little yellow bird flew into my 
lattice 

work, then, just as quickly, flew away. From what I can remember, I believe it 
was 

a Yellow Warbler. This is a first for my house. I saw one years ago when I was 
in 

Fairbanks, but never at my house on the peninsula.

Hopefully they will come again and I will be able to get a picture of it.

Dorey Harman
Nikiski



------------------------------------
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Subject: Anchorage Coastal Trail Bike and Bird Day
From: "Aaron Bowman ampbowman AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 29 Jul 2014 11:22:38 -0800
Hi all,
Just wanted to pass this info along to those of you who are interested in
getting out on the Anchorage Coastal trail for a bit of birding and or
biking this coming Sunday (you really can walk too). There will be stations
set up with scopes and binoculars with your fellow birders standing by. It
should be a generally fun event for both the experts and non birding public.
See some of you out there!

Aaron Bowman
Anchorage



Anchorage Coastal Trail

Bike and Bird Day

Sunday, August 3, 1:00 pm—5:00 pm



Come ride your bike along the Tony Knowles Coastal Trail and learn about
the birds of this *Important Bird Area* right here in Anchorage. Whether
you want to learn how to tell a godwit from a grebe and other bird basics
or are ready to exercise your birding skills, grab your bike and join us!



Bird TLC will show a live bird of prey at the start (1:00-1:30pm) and
finish (4:30-5:00pm) locations!


*Where*: Start at Westchester Lagoon boat ramp and bike a portion of the
Coastal Trail with bird experts at stations along the way.

*What to bring*: Your bike and yourself.  Binoculars would be handy if you
have them, but not necessary.
*For More Information:  *Contact Aaron Bowman of Audubon Alaska at 276-7034
or abowman AT audubon.org.
Subject: St. Paul Island bird report: July 21-27, 2014
From: "Scott Schuette SSchuette01 AT hotmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 19:34:24 -0800
Hello
Birders, this is the St. Paul Island bird report for the week of July 
21st-27th, 

2014, sponsored by St. Paul Island Tour. The following sequence of sightings is
in taxonomic order; an asterisk denotes a species of less than annual 
occurrence 

or one of particular note.

 

2014
Species count: 124

Weekly
Species Count: 55

 

Birds
Mentioned:

 

TUNDRA
SWAN (ssp. bewickii and columbianus)

Greater
Scaup

King
Eider

White-winged
Scoter

Bufflehead

Pacific
Loon

COMMON
LOON

*MOTTLED
PETREL

Short-tailed
Shearwater

BALD
EAGLE

Pacific
Golden-Plover

LESSER
SAND-PLOVER

GRAY-TAILED
TATTLER

Wandering
Tattler

Bar-tailed
Godwit

Ruddy
Turnstone

RED-NECKED
STINT

Rock
Sandpiper (ssp. tschuktschorum)

Pectoral
Sandpiper

Western
Sandpiper

Long-billed
Dowitcher

Wilsons
Snipe

Red
Phalarope

Pomarine
Jaeger

Parasitic
Jaeger

Long-tailed
Jaeger

Herring
Gull (ssp. vegae and smithsonianus)

SLATY-BACKED
GULL

Glaucous
Gull

Common
Redpoll

 

WEATHER

 

High
pressure continues to cover the Bering Sea and control the weather within the
Pribilofs leading to generally light winds all week and very little weather
to speak of.  Temperatures continue to be
above average every day with the only noticeable rain of the week coming on the
22nd when a third of an inch or so fell. Early in the week there was regular 
mist, 

fog, and low-lying clouds while the final two days saw improved weather with a
strong showing by the sun.  Winds were
generally out of the west all week (though very light) with the only moderate
to strong winds being on the 23rd when the gusts hit 30 MPH or so.

 

WATERFOWL

 

The
only newly arrived waterfowl this week was a single White-winged Scoter on the
21st while the other migratory species noted included continuing
TUNDRA SWANS, Greater Scaup, King Eiders, and the single female Bufflehead.

 

SEABIRDS
& GULLS

 

The
lack of true storms has kept most of the passage tubenoses away from the island
though a more regular scattering of Short-tailed Shearwaters were noted during
the week while on the 26th in moderate northwest winds two MOTTLED
PETRELS were sighted providing the first sighting for that species this
year.  A few jaegers were noted this week
with a Pomarine on the 27th, Parasitic on the 21st, and
Long-taileds on the 24th and 26th.  Increasing numbers of large gulls have been
arriving of late as well and with them were two to four SLATY-BACKED GULLS, two
HERRING GULLS, and at least one GLAUCOUS GULL this week. The only loons sighted 
this week were two 

Pacifics on the 22nd and three COMMONS on the 21st.

 

SHOREBIRDS

 

Last
weeks LESSER SAND-PLOVER continued through at least the 24th while
the last GRAY-TAILED TATTLER sighting this week was on the 24th as
well.  A new RED-NECKED STINT was seen on
the 26th and 27th while the long-staying Wilsons Snipe
was also noted on the 26th. 
Scattered Pacific Golden-Plovers continue to be seen with singles on the
22nd and 27th and three on the 26th this week
while the Bar-tailed Godwit was last seen on the 24th, the Western
Sandpiper was last sighted on the 23rd, and the final Long-billed
Dowitcher sighting was on the 24th as well. Numbers of Pectoral Sandpipers 
continued into 

this week with up to 30 on the 22nd and still 13 present on the 27th
while other more common migrants included small numbers of Wandering Tattlers
daily, up to 200 Ruddy Turnstones on the 23rd, a Mainland Rock
Sandpiper on the 23rd, and small numbers of Red Phalaropes on most
days of the week.

 

LANDBIRDS
& PASSERINES

 

Same
as last week, the only landbirds noted were the continuing BALD EAGLE and a
Common Redpoll on the 26th.

 

Breeding
or resident species currently present on the island:

 

Northern
Pintail

Green-winged
(and Common) Teal

Harlequin
Duck

Long-tailed
Duck

Northern
Fulmar

Red-faced
Cormorant

Pelagic Cormorant

Semipalmated
Plover

Least
Sandpiper

Rock Sandpiper (ssp. ptilocnemis)

Red-necked
Phalarope

Black-legged Kittiwake

Red-legged Kittiwake

Glaucous-winged Gull

Common
Murre

Thick-billed Murre

Pigeon Guillemot

Ancient
Murrelet

Parakeet
Auklet

Least
Auklet

Crested
Auklet

Horned
Puffin

Tufted
Puffin

Pacific
Wren (ssp. alascensis)

Lapland Longspur

Snow Bunting

Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch (ssp. umbrina)





This is Scott Schuette, Cory Gregory, and Glen
Davis, the 2014 St. Paul Island Tour guides, wishing you good birding. For tour
information or to make travel arrangements visit our website 
http://www.alaskabirding.com 

or call 1-877-424-5637. 		 	   		  
Subject: Anchorage--Black Turnstone and Osprey
From: "Aaron Bowman ampbowman AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 17:32:23 -0800
Yesterday on the Wednesday evening Westchester bird walk we saw an
increasing number of young shorebirds including one young PECTORAL
SANDPIPER...early I thought!  The other highlight was a beautiful adult
BLACK TURNSTONE on the bank of the Fish Creek.
Late this afternoon while absentmindedly swinging in my hammock I tracked
an OSPREY circling and drifting with the wind to the south over my house
here in Spenard.

Let the late summer (humm, Autumn?) birding begin!

Aaron Bowman
Subject: Gulf of AK Result
From: "joe staab staabjoe AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 15:57:53 -0700
Greetings all,

4birders from Anc., Juneau and Seward took the ferry Kennicot from Juneau to 
Whittier July 22 thru 24. Here is an abbreviated list of birds seen. 
Black-footed Albatross(78), Pink-Footed Shearwater(7), Buller's Shearwater(2), 
Cassin's & Rino Auklets, Aleutian Terns, Ancient Murrelets, Leach's & 
Fork-Tailed Storm-Petrels, all 3 Jaegers,along with the regular common birds 
of the area. 


In Yakutat there were Eurasian-Collared Doves flying overhead, along with Barn 
Swallows at the dock. 


In Juneau the Red-eyed Vireo and nest were located.

Joe Staab, Seward AK
. .
Subject: Caspian Terns
From: "Louann Feldmann louannf AT alaska.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 22:36:06 -0800
I saw 3 this afternoon about 5 pm at the tide line with the gulls on the 
north side of the outlet for Chester Creek.  In spite of the sun the 
best view was outside of the Westchester Park north tunnel. They 
occasionally flew to reposition as the tide was coming in, but flew away 
about 6:15 and I didn't see them again.  Nice views while they lasted, 
though.  Louann


------------------------------------
Posted by: Louann Feldmann 
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Subject: Re: Possible Western Gull in Seward
From: "Floyd Hayes floyd_hayes AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 2014 21:12:31 -0700
After scrutinizing my photos a bit more this morning, there appears to be a 
slight purplish tinge in a small section of where the orbital ring would be. If 
it fairly accurately depicts the orbital ring coloration, it's not a Western 
Gull. I'll try to post it when I get my computer on wifi again. 


Floyd Hayes
Angwin, CA

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Posted by: Floyd Hayes 
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Subject: Solitary Sandpiper
From: "avocet AT gci.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 23 Jul 2014 00:14:13 -0700
A single solitary sandpiper was seen about 05:30 at the mouth of Fish Creek on 
the Cook Inlet side of the Bridge. It was on the mudflats close to the bridge. 
Another wonderful day. 

 

 Tom Evans
 Anchorage
 

 P.S. I now have a cell phone so I can call others and be contacted in the 
field. 
Subject: Gulls at the Mouth Kenai River Monday
From: "swinak AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 23 Jul 2014 00:04:38 -0700
Saw a Slaty-backed gull and a Glaucous Gull at the mouth of the Kenai River 
Monday morning. 


 

 Steve W.

  
Subject: Possible Western Gulls in Seward
From: "Floyd Hayes floyd_hayes AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 22:16:42 -0700
This morning I spotted a couple of possible WESTERN GULLS in the harbor at 
Seward and got a few fair photos of one as my ship cruised past them. I just 
uploaded a photo in an album titled "Possible Western Gull in Seward." I've 
tried turning it into a Slaty-backed Gull or Thayer's Gull, but to me it looks 
more like a Western Gull. Being from California and visiting Alaska for the 
first time, I was far more interested in many of the other birds I saw today, 
but I thought I'd better report this. 



Floyd Hayes
Angwin, CA, USA
Subject: St. Paul Island bird report: July 14-20, 2014
From: "Scott Schuette SSchuette01 AT hotmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 22:43:38 -0800
Hello
Birders, this is the St. Paul Island bird report for the week of July 
14th-20th, 

2014, sponsored by St. Paul Island Tour. The following sequence of sightings is
in taxonomic order; an asterisk denotes a species of less than annual 
occurrence 

or one of particular note. 2014
Species count: 123Weekly
Species Count: 55 Birds
Mentioned: TUNDRA
SWAN (ssp. bewickii and columbianus)MallardGreater
ScaupKing
EiderBuffleheadRed-breasted
MerganserPacific
LoonCOMMON
LOONShort-tailed
ShearwaterBALD
EAGLEPacific
Golden-PloverLESSER
SAND-PLOVERGRAY-TAILED
TATTLERWandering
TattlerBar-tailed
GodwitRuddy
TurnstoneSHARP-TAILED
SANDPIPERRED-NECKED
STINTRock
Sandpiper (ssp. tschuktschorum)Bairds
SandpiperPectoral
SandpiperWestern
SandpiperLong-billed
DowitcherWilsons
SnipeRed
PhalaropeParasitic
JaegerLong-tailed
JaegerSLATY-BACKED
GULLGlaucous
GullCommon
Redpoll WEATHER A
lack of low pressure systems continued this week with a high pressure system
present early in the week and a lack of any weather system the second half of
the week.  Winds were predominantly light
(below 15 MPH) and most regularly out of the west though north, east, and south
winds made an appearance as well. 
Temperatures remained at, or above average, with little rain and a touch
of fog in the early mornings or late evenings some days. WATERFOWL The
seven TUNDRA SWANS continued through the 20th along with continuing
Mallard, Bufflehead, Greater Scaup, King Eider, and Red-breasted Merganser. 
SEABIRDS 

& GULLS A
SLATY-BACKED GULL was found on the 20th while a Glaucous Gull was
noted on the 18th along with a Long-tailed Jaeger and two Parasitic
Jaegers.  A high count of four COMMON
LOONS was made on the 15th with a single Pacific Loon on the 20th
the only other sighting of the week.  A
few Short-tailed Shearwaters were noted on the 18th this week. SHOREBIRDS The
LESSER SAND-PLOVER continued through the 20th while the SHARP-TAILED
SANDPIPER was found until the 18th, the seasons first GRAY-TAILED
TATTLER was located on the 19th, and a RED-NECKED STINT appeared on
the 15th.  The most unusual
American shorebird this week was a Bairds Sandpiper present on the 18th
and 19th while other migrants included one or two Pacific
Golden-Plovers on the 14th and 15th, a Bar-tailed Godwit
from the 19th-20th, a Western Sandpiper from the 18th-20th,
and the first Long-billed Dowitchers of the fall with two or three seen from
the 18th-20th.  A
few Pectoral Sandpipers were present from the 14th-16th
with a large influx 30-50 birds daily from the 18th-20th
which is well above average for the month of July. Other migrant shorebirds 
noted this week 

included the lingering Wilsons Snipe through the 18th, the first
moderate push of Red Phalaropes with a few hundred on the 18th, ever
increasing numbers of Ruddy Turnstones (350+ on the 20th) and
Wandering Tattlers (3-5 on the 20th), and a single non-Pribilof Rock
Sandpiper on the 15th. LANDBIRDS
& PASSERINES Similar
to last week the only landbirds noted were the continuing BALD EAGLE and a few
Common Redpolls with no more than two seen on a single day. Breeding
or resident species currently present on the island: Northern
PintailGreen-winged
(and Common) TealHarlequin
DuckLong-tailed
DuckNorthern
FulmarRed-faced
Cormorant

Pelagic CormorantSemipalmated
PloverLeast
Sandpiper

Rock Sandpiper (ssp. ptilocnemis)Red-necked
Phalarope

Black-legged Kittiwake

Red-legged Kittiwake

Glaucous-winged GullCommon
Murre

Thick-billed Murre

Pigeon GuillemotAncient
MurreletParakeet
AukletLeast
AukletCrested
AukletHorned
PuffinTufted
PuffinPacific
Wren (ssp. alascensis)

Lapland Longspur

Snow Bunting

Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch (ssp. umbrina)





























































































































































This
is Scott Schuette, Cory Gregory, and Glen Davis, the 2014 St. Paul Island Tour
guides, wishing you good birding. For tour information or to make travel
arrangements visit our website http://www.alaskabirding.com
or call 1-877-424-5637. 		 	   		  
Subject: Varied Thrush
From: "rose123ak AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 21 Jul 2014 18:10:23 -0700
Has anyone spotted a Varied Thrush area? If so please let me know. 

 Robin
Subject: Palmer Creek near Hope report for 7-20-2014
From: "tarbox AT ptialaska.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 21 Jul 2014 12:14:46 -0700
Ten Keen Peninsula Bird Club members went to Palmer Creek near Hope yesterday 
and the following is what we saw along the road and hiking trail at the end of 
the road. Bird numbers were down but diversity was good. The weather was a 
little cold in the morning but the sun came out in the afternoon. We also 
stopped at Tern Lake and there was a Common Loon with chick, Arctic terns, 
Red-necked grebe, Mew gulls, Robins, Juncos, and a female duck too far away to 
figure out what it was. 

 
 AK - KEN - Palmer Creek Road, Kenai Peninsula, US-AK
Jul 20, 2014 10:45 AM - 2:45 PM
Protocol: Traveling
12.0 mile(s)
23 species

Spotted Sandpiper  1
Wilson's Snipe  1
Mew Gull  4
Alder Flycatcher  1
Gray Jay  2
Black-billed Magpie  2
Common Raven  1
Tree Swallow  2
Black-capped Chickadee  1
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  1
Hermit Thrush  1
American Robin  12
Yellow Warbler  2
Wilson's Warbler  20
Savannah Sparrow  6
Fox Sparrow  1
White-crowned Sparrow  8
Golden-crowned Sparrow  12
Dark-eyed Junco  2
Pine Grosbeak  4
White-winged Crossbill  4
Common Redpoll  40
Pine Siskin  1

View this checklist online at
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19175990 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19175990 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org 
http://ebird.org/) 


Subject: Re: Young Merlins in Anchorage
From: "jtam AT gci.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 21 Jul 2014 11:42:56 -0700
The homeowner says that the young merlins are about to fledge.  

Jean Tam
Anchorage
Subject: Kenai Caspian Tern
From: "kenaibirder AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 20 Jul 2014 15:55:55 -0700
On Saturday at 9:45 PM we snuck into the Port of Kenai to do some quick 
hit-and-run birding after most dip-netters had departed the area for the 
evening. We were rewarded with the raucous calling and overflight of a single 
CASPIAN TERN. Though the birding is usually very good at this time of year on 
the Kenai Flats, considering the post-breeding dispersal of many birds, 20,000 
dip-netters can make a reasonable person want to steer clear of the area too. 

 

 Toby and Laura Burke
 Kenai, AK
 



 

Subject: Young Merlins in Anchorage
From: "jtam AT gci.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 19 Jul 2014 14:35:57 -0700
A friend who lives at 1521 W 15th Ave. says that merlins have a nest in a 
nearby spruce tree. Three chicks have hatched. 


Jean Tam
Anchorage
 

Subject: Friday, July 18, 2014 One thing after another!
From: "c_griz AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 18 Jul 2014 23:02:33 -0700
Seward, Alaska

 
  
 Sunrise 5:06 am, sunset 10:59 pm, for a total length of day of 17 hours and 53 
minutes. Tomorrow will be 4 minutes and 4 seconds shorter. 

  
 After several overcast days that promised rain without delivering and temps in 
the mid 50s, the clouds took a break and let that blue sky and sunshine reign 
instead. A soft south breeze with a high of 64º was a lovely and welcome 
combination. Late in the afternoon, I sallied forth to see what I could see. 

  
 It turned out to be a Larid afternoon, short for gulls and terns. A dainty 
little gull with a black bill and matching black earrings flew overhead and 
landed just offshore in the brown, silty waves (lots of glacier melt going on.) 
A BONAPARTE'S GULL, perhaps the same one I spotted last month. I've only seen 
one at a time this summer; they are not common here like they are in Anchorage. 
When the little gull flew off, the black band on the tail and distinctive black 
markings on the wings flashed. 

  
 As I followed the gull's flight, I caught sight of a life and death drama 
being played out high over the bay. An adult BALD EAGLE and GLAUCOUS-WINGED 
GULL rapidly exchanged positions of pursuit. The eagle gained the upper hand 
and the gull gave flight as they raced across the sky, ever lower. At times, 
they were in perfect synchrony, as if choreographed. Finally, with both birds' 
beaks open and panting, the gull pulled away. The eagle broke off and flew to 
the beach where it landed in the water to cool off. ARCTIC TERNS immediately 
bombarded it, trying to drive it off, to no avail. Too tired. 

  
 A random glance at other Arctic Terns in the distance made me jump! The 
ratcheting Arctic Terns were escorting a jumbo tern with a huge red bill and 
black-tipped wings. I've been looking for a CASPIAN TERN all summer, and here 
it was! It didn't linger over the feisty smaller terns' territory, but took 
leisurely loops and soon disappeared. No one messes with Arctic Terns! 

  
 As I headed back, small groups of invisible LEAST SANDPIPERS flushed out of 
the seaweed wrack. They blend in so well, it's hard to spot them until they 
move. Migration is well underway as the season races along. 

  
 Happy Birding!
 Carol Griswold
 Seward Sporadic Bird Report Reporter
 for photos, please visit my blog at http://sporadicbird.blogspot.com
 
 Sporadic Bird http://sporadicbird.blogspot.com
 
 
 http://sporadicbird.blogspot.com 
 
 Sporadic Bird http://sporadicbird.blogspot.com Seward, Alaska Sunrise 4:32 am, 
sunset 11:27 pm for a total day length of 18 hours and 55 minutes. Tomorrow 
will be 21 seconds shorter! 

 
 
 
 View on sporadicbird.blogspot... http://sporadicbird.blogspot.com 
 Preview by Yahoo 
 
 
 

Subject: warblers
From: "Louann Feldmann louannf AT alaska.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 13:07:18 -0800
This was a good morning to view warblers behind Potter Marsh. Besides 
the usual Yellow-rumped, Wilson's and Orange- crowned, I was treated to 
good views of a cooperative Northern Waterthrush across the road from 
that large pond that is nearly hidden while driving by because of all 
the roadside overgrowth.  Of course the Alder Flycatchers showed up 
also.  Louann Feldmann


------------------------------------
Posted by: Louann Feldmann 
------------------------------------

Remember -- Be nice!
------------------------------------

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Subject: Re: Homer mystery "Black" bird
From: "bob payne bobbobpayne AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 15:41:33 -0400
The photos look to me like Red-winged Blackbird. The bill shape, head shape
(not as round as
rusty), size, wing length (about same as under-tail coverts), the faint tan
streaks above the eye,
tan on face and at base of bill, and in the more ventral view the edges of
the breast and belly feathers
all are like some female red-wings (not Alaska birds, more like the dark
central California birds, which this photo
is not as the bill is too long and narrow) and dark first-year male
Red-winged Blackbirds (new Sibley,
"Dark 1st summer", his body proportions are so on target!). The pale areas
of the underparts feathers
 at first glance suggest wet gloss, but the feather barbs are clear and
don't seem to be matted in wetness,
especially the belly feathers. Scruffy looking bird, maybe a worn July
bird, maybe wet.

Rusty Blackbirds would a pale eye and a more slender bill and a more
rounded crown.
Head shape (not flat crown and forehead) and bill shape (straight not
curved through the length) are unlike grackles.
Song Sparrows would have a shorter bill, bigger rounder head, and shorter
wings (well short of undertail coverts).

Bob Payne
Subject: Homer/Kachemak Bay Bird Alert Information: 7-12-14
From: "'Lani Raymond' lani67 AT alaska.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 06:56:01 -0800
KACHEMAK BAY BIRD ALERT INFORMATION: July 12, 2014
(Sorry this is a little late getting posted.)

The mystery surrounding a dark 8-9 bird photographed by David Hanson on the 
Spit near Spit Sisters on June 6th continues. Some folks are very intent on 
finding a conclusive ID of this bird! Indications that this had been a caged 
bird would be that it looked very disheveled and had worn, ragged tail 
feathers, that it had just a single yellow band, and that the lower mandible is 
shorter than the top one. If anyone has seen this bird (or by miracle might 
have photographed it!), please let us know. Any input as to species would be 
very welcome. Proposed species have been: juv. Common Grackle, Melodious 
Blackbird, Shiny Cowbird, juv. Rusty Blackbird, Starling, Song Sparrow. Gary 
Lyon's post on AKBirding with photos was posted July 6th. We have promised 
unlimited fame for an absolute identification, by the way! 


A juv. RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD was reported at Mt. View and Kachemak Way on the 
12th. The report said it briefly chased a Black-capped Chickadee. 


At the Barge Basin on the 10th there were SURFBIRDS, BLACK TURNSTONES (30), and 
Dowitchers (12). SURFBIRDS also on the Harbor Jetty. At mid-spit CASPIAN TERNS 
(1) and BRANT (4) were seen on the 7th / 8th. CASPIAN TERNS were also been seen 
on Glacier Spit on the 4th. 


A BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER was seen in Beluga Slough on the 7th.

Reported at Mud Bay on the 4th: WHIMBREL (10), DOWTICHER (1), YELLOWLEGS (14), 
peeps mostly WESAs (80). 


Please report cranes or crane families or groups to Cranewatch, 235-6262 or 
reports AT cranewatch.org. The following information is what they need from you: 
location, time and date, what they were doing, how many, and your email and/or 
phone number. 


ITS A GREAT DAY TO BIRD! 


Subject: Hummingbirds - new place to look
From: "steve_scordino AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 15 Jul 2014 08:15:37 -0700
I was at the Wildlife Conservation Center near Portage this last weekend and 
noticed that they have hummingbird feeders up at the entrance. I asked the 
people working the booth if they see hummingbirds very often and was told they 
are there quite often. I didn't have control of my schedule to wait to see one, 
but it looks like it is another site within the Anchorage municipality to see 
hummingbirds. 


To recap an earlier conversation on here, hummingbirds have also been visiting 
the flowers at the entrance to the Alyeska resort. 


Personally, I haven't seen hummingbirds at either site, but hopefully someone 
will find this information useful. Plus, the Wildlife Conservation Center is a 
good place to see Northwestern Crows and is a cool place overall. 

 

Subject: St. Paul Island bird report: July 7-13, 2014
From: "Scott Schuette SSchuette01 AT hotmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 18:23:20 -0800
Hello
Birders, this is the St. Paul Island bird report for the week of July 7th-13th,
2014, sponsored by St. Paul Island Tour. The following sequence of sightings is
in taxonomic order; an asterisk denotes a species of less than annual 
occurrence 

or one of particular note.

 

2014
Species count: 120

Weekly
Species Count: 57

 

Birds
Mentioned:

 

TUNDRA
SWAN (ssp. bewickii and columbianus)

Mallard

Greater
Scaup

King
Eider

Black
Scoter

Bufflehead

Red-breasted
Merganser

RED-THROATED
LOON

COMMON
LOON

Yellow-billed
Loon

Red-necked
Grebe

Short-tailed
Shearwater

Fork-tailed
Storm-Petrel

BALD
EAGLE

LESSER
SAND-PLOVER

Wandering
Tattler

Ruddy
Turnstone

SHARP-TAILED
SANDPIPER

RED-NECKED
STINT

Dunlin

Rock
Sandpiper (ssp. tschuktschorum)

Pectoral
Sandpiper

Western
Sandpiper

Short-billed
Dowitcher

Wilsons
Snipe

Red
Phalarope

Parasitic
Jaeger

RHINOCEROS
AUKLET

SLATY-BACKED
GULL

Glaucous
Gull

Arctic
Tern

Common
Redpoll

 

WEATHER

 

On
the 10th it was rainy, on the 11th and 12th it
was windy, and on every other day of the week it was sunny, calm and extremely
pleasant to be outside.  The continued period
of high pressure in the mid-Bering Sea has kept most of the real weather at bay
and allowed us to really enjoy our summer of late with temps in the 60s some
days.  The only wind to speak of was on
the 11th and 12th out of the west-northwest while the
rest of the week saw light southerly or easterly winds.

 

WATERFOWL

 

The
only newly arrived waterfowl this week were a Mallard on the 12th
and two Black Scoters on the 11th while small numbers of Greater
Scaup, King Eider, Bufflehead, and Red-breasted Merganser continued from
earlier in the season.  The long-staying
TUNDRA SWANS were still present this week with both subspecies seen on the 8th
and a single Whistling Swan noted on the 9th and 11th.

 

SEABIRDS
& GULLS

 

A
SLATY-BACKED GULL appeared on the 13th while a Glaucous Gull and
Arctic Tern were noted on the 11th and single Parasitic Jaegers were
seen on the 7th and 12th. 
The seasons first Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel was seen on the 9th
along with the weeks only Short-tailed Shearwaters and a RHINOCEROS AUKLET was
found on the 11th.  Loons were
seen regularly this week with a RED-THROATED seen on the 8th, 9th,
and 12th, three COMMONS on the 10th, and single
Yellow-billeds on the 9th and 11th.  A Red-necked Grebe was found on the 7th.

 

SHOREBIRDS

 

The
real beginning of the fall shorebird season began this week with the highlights
being a LESSER SAND-PLOVER on the 12th, a SHARP-TAILED SANDPIPER
from the 8th-13th, and a RED-NECKED STINT from the 8th-11th. Other new migrants 
noted this week included a 

Dunlin on the 8th, a Western Sandpiper on the 8th,
Pectoral Sandpipers (one on the 8th and seven on the 13th),
and a Mainland Rock Sandpiper on the 12th. Wilsons Snipe and Short-billed 
Dowitcher 

continued through the end of the week along with a few Red Phalaropes. 
Increasing numbers of Wandering Tattlers and 

Ruddy Turnstones were also noted throughout the week.

 

LANDBIRDS
& PASSERINES

 

The
continuing BALD EAGLE was seen this week with the only other migrant landbird
noted being Common Redpoll which was normally seen in small numbers daily
though a very large flock of 45 was found on the 11th.

 

Breeding
or resident species currently present on the island:

 

Northern
Pintail

Green-winged
(and Common) Teal

Harlequin
Duck

Long-tailed
Duck

Northern
Fulmar

Red-faced
Cormorant

Pelagic Cormorant

Semipalmated
Plover

Least
Sandpiper

Rock Sandpiper (ssp. ptilocnemis)

Red-necked
Phalarope

Black-legged Kittiwake

Red-legged Kittiwake

Glaucous-winged Gull

Common
Murre

Thick-billed Murre

Pigeon Guillemot

Ancient
Murrelet

Parakeet
Auklet

Least
Auklet

Crested
Auklet

Horned
Puffin

Tufted
Puffin

Pacific
Wren (ssp. alascensis)

Lapland Longspur

Snow Bunting

Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch (ssp. umbrina)





This
is Scott Schuette, Cory Gregory, and Glen Davis, the 2014 St. Paul Island Tour
guides, wishing you good birding. For tour information or to make travel
arrangements visit our website http://www.alaskabirding.com
or call 1-877-424-5637. 		 	   		  
Subject: Visting Alaska July 20-30
From: "Floyd Hayes floyd_hayes AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2014 17:12:14 -0700
I'm taking a small group of students from California to Alaska during July 
20-30. We'll be staying in RV parks in Seward during July 21-24 and Denali 
during July 24-29. Any tips (as private messages) for finding some of the rarer 
species would be appreciated. 


Floyd E. Hayes
Professor of Biology 
Department of Biology, Pacific Union College 
1 Angwin Ave., Angwin, CA 94508, USA 
Tel: 707-965-6401; Fax: 707-965-7577 
Website: web2.puc.edu/Faculty/Floyd_Hayes
Subject: Great Shorebird Diversity
From: "wkeys AT gci.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 13 Jul 2014 14:27:53 -0700
 This morning's High Tide was fabulous! In the past 2 days, shorebird diversity 
was low--around 1500 Short-billed Dowitchers and around a dozen Hudsonian 
Godwits with some Legs thrown in. This morning was way different. 

 The 32 foot tide brought birds right up to the fence line at the North 
Westchester Tunnel for the closest looks of the summer. Craig and I spent a lot 
of time on a totally weird bird that was so black and white mottled that it 
looked leucistic. When Aaron looked at it, at least he was kind enough to say, 
"That's really strange. What's that?" before he said "It's a surfbird." 

 We thought it might be a very young bird, but a perusal of the Shorebird tomes 
later says it was more likely a molting adult in a stage of molt that's not 
even approached by any photos in the Big Shorebird guides. 

 Along side of him was a Solitary Sandpiper, and a Godwit in a plumage state 
that's also not even close to anything in the Big Guides. We're assuming a 
young Hudsonian, but the smooth brown plumage is also a little bit of a 
mystery. 

 

      So keep you're eyes peeled.  They're starting to come barreling in.
 

 w keys
 spenard
       
Subject: Re: Flocking shorbirds in Port Heiden
From: "Kate McLaughlin mclenvironmental AT yahoo.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2014 08:32:41 -0700
Looking at what is happening with my hummingbird banding numbers, I'd say the 
birds are definitely moving out a few weeks early!  I should be still banding 
babies, but the peak was 2 weeks ago.  

 
Interesting to note, a 2-3 earlier spring migration, followed by a 2-3 week 
early out-migration.  Wonder if that means the snows will be earlier too this 
year? 

 
Another interesting sighting yesterday, the salmonberries are ripe and while 
picking berries at the airstrip yesterday, I kept hearing a soft purring 
trill.  Finally spotted several BOHEMIAN WAXWINGS.  I guess they were also 
gorging on the berries.  I've never seen these birds out here, only on the 
mainland, and only in the winter. 

 
Kate

 
McLaughlin Environmental Services
PO Box 8043
Chenega Bay, Alaska 99574
907/573-2006
http://www.akenvironmentalservices.com/



On Saturday, July 12, 2014 6:23 PM, "ejnorris AT sbcglobal.net [AKBirding]" 
 wrote: 

  


  
Hi Birders, 

I have a general question regarding shorebird flocking that I've been observing 
the past couple weeks. I've been in Port Heiden on the Alaska Peninsula since 
June 18th and have watched flocks of Whimbrel and flocks of western and 
semipalmated sandpiper growing progressively larger and larger. There are 
hundreds of whimbrel flocking up out here (I first observed them flocking June 
29 which was a Sunday which are the only days I have off). And there is a flock 
of hundreds of western and semi-palmated sandpipers. They stay flocked up all 
day and don't appear to be breading right now. However, I've seen other 
westers/semipalmated/rock sandpipers and whimbrel which do appear to be paired 
off and acting like they have nests/young around. It seems SO early to have 
these shore birds flocking up this time of year. Are these juveniles which have 
migrated but are not breeding? I was out here in 2012 from June-October and 
don't at all recall the numbers of whimbrel 

 or the flocking behavior of the sandpipers this early in the season. Any 
thoughts or speculations are appreciated! 


In general I also see:
Marbled Godwit
Greater Yellowlegs
Snipe
Short-billed Dowitcher
Rock sandpiper
Western sandpiper
Semipalmated Sandpiper
Semipalmated Plover
Long-tailed Jaeger
Parasitic Jaeger
Black-legged kittiwake
Bonaparte's gull
Glaucous gull
Pacific golden-plover
Black-bellied plover
All three scoter species
Greater scaup
Yellow warbler
Orange-crowned warbler
Wilson's warbler
Tree swallow
Bank swallow
American pipit
American Robin
Common Redpoll
White crowned sparrow
Golden crowned sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Lap-land longspur
Merlin
Bald eagle



Thanks!

-Beth Norris
ejnorris AT sbcglobal.net
Anchorage AK
Working in Port Heiden AK  
 
Subject: Osprey at Otto Lake
From: "erik.hendrickson755 AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 12 Jul 2014 23:54:33 -0700
Probably reflecting signs of avian movement as reported in other postings, 
there was an OSPREY at Otto Lake Saturday evening. The osprey made at least two 
dives while I watched, but missed its prey each time (Otto Lake freezes solid 
each winter, there is no inlet or outlet, so all fish are stocked.) 

 

 Otto Lake is about 5 hours north of Anchorage, and 2 hours south of Fairbanks 
on the Parks Highway (one mile west of milepost 247). A nice place to stop and 
look for birds. 

 

 Erik Hendrickson
 Healy, AK

Subject: Flocking shorbirds in Port Heiden
From: "ejnorris AT sbcglobal.net [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 12 Jul 2014 19:20:32 -0700
Hi Birders, 
 

 I have a general question regarding shorebird flocking that I've been 
observing the past couple weeks. I've been in Port Heiden on the Alaska 
Peninsula since June 18th and have watched flocks of Whimbrel and flocks of 
western and semipalmated sandpiper growing progressively larger and larger. 
There are hundreds of whimbrel flocking up out here (I first observed them 
flocking June 29 which was a Sunday which are the only days I have off). And 
there is a flock of hundreds of western and semi-palmated sandpipers. They stay 
flocked up all day and don't appear to be breading right now. However, I've 
seen other westers/semipalmated/rock sandpipers and whimbrel which do appear to 
be paired off and acting like they have nests/young around. It seems SO early 
to have these shore birds flocking up this time of year. Are these juveniles 
which have migrated but are not breeding? I was out here in 2012 from 
June-October and don't at all recall the numbers of whimbrel or the flocking 
behavior of the sandpipers this early in the season. Any thoughts or 
speculations are appreciated! 

 

 In general I also see:
 Marbled Godwit
 Greater Yellowlegs
 Snipe
 Short-billed Dowitcher
 Rock sandpiper
 Western sandpiper
 Semipalmated Sandpiper
 Semipalmated Plover
 Long-tailed Jaeger
 Parasitic Jaeger
 Black-legged kittiwake
 Bonaparte's gull
 Glaucous gull
 Pacific golden-plover
 Black-bellied plover
 All three scoter species
 Greater scaup
 Yellow warbler
 Orange-crowned warbler
 Wilson's warbler
 Tree swallow
 Bank swallow
 American pipit
 American Robin
 Common Redpoll
 White crowned sparrow
 Golden crowned sparrow
 Savannah Sparrow
 Lap-land longspur
 Merlin
 Bald eagle
 

 

 

 Thanks!
 

 -Beth Norris
 ejnorris AT sbcglobal.net
 Anchorage AK
 Working in Port Heiden AK
Subject: Birding Juneau - Guide
From: "gpelphrey AT gmail.com [AKBirding]" <AKBirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 12 Jul 2014 08:05:56 -0700
I will be in Juneau Sunday July 27th - while our cruise ship is docked there. 
I'll be there from 9AM to 9PM and would like to do some birding there. I'm 
wondering what advice y'all might have for me -good spots, good target birds, 
recommendations for a guide for the day? It may be somewhat dependent on the 
weather - of course - but it sounds like we might need a car to get from our 
ship to the better Juneau birding spots. 

 

 Your insight much appreciated!
 

 Gary - from Austin, Texas