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Updated on Thursday, March 5 at 12:28 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Cnemophilus macgregorii

5 Mar AW: true bug ID ["'Konrad Zobel' konrad.zobel AT chello.at [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
5 Mar true bug ID ["Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
5 Mar True Bugs of Virginia & N.C. [8 Attachments] ["'Konrad Zobel' konrad.zobel AT chello.at [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
1 Mar The 22nd Approximation for Butterflies of North Carolina ["Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
26 Feb The Story of a Butterfly Big Year ["Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
23 Feb Beginners Beekeeping Course ["'The Kuder Family' treetops5 AT comcast.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
22 Feb Free Family Program, 3/15 in Rehoboth Beach, "It's a Bug's World", Entomological Society of America ["'Kuehn, Faith (DDA)' Faith.Kuehn AT state.de.us [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
10 Feb Re: [washbutterflies] Monarchs at tmw's PGAS Mtg ["Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
9 Feb Monarchs at tmw's PGAS Mtg ["Lynette Fullerton l_fullerton_1999 AT yahoo.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
2 Feb Announcement of New Butterfly Records Reported in 2014 Covering Maryland, Delaware, and District of Columbia ["'Smith, Richard H.' Richard.Smith AT jhuapl.edu [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
2 Feb 2015 Announcement and Update on the Butterfly Unknown Species Status Project in Maryland, Delaware, and DC [2 Attachments] ["'Smith, Richard H.' Richard.Smith AT jhuapl.edu [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
2 Feb Insect and Spider themed art show ["sally o'byrne salobyrne AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
31 Jan Re: RE: Spread the News! New findings published 2015: Predators of Wavyleaf basketgrass! ["Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
31 Jan RE: Spread the News! New findings published 2015: Predators of Wavyleaf basketgrass! ["Richard.Smith AT jhuapl.edu [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
31 Jan Re: RE: Spread the News! New findings published 2015: Predators of Wavyleaf basketgrass! ["Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
31 Jan RE: Spread the News! New findings published 2015: Predators of Wavyleaf basketgrass! ["'Marc Imlay' ialm AT erols.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
25 Jan A hearty welcome to the newest butterfly org in Maryland .... ! ["Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
19 Jan FW: [Leps-l] books and liteerature [1 Attachment] ["'Smith, Richard H.' Richard.Smith AT jhuapl.edu [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
15 Jan New Year, New MD Field Checklist! ["Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
15 Jan Fall Canker Worm Spraying Needs to Stop ["Mona Miller runmede AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
13 Jan Re: Question on success of Monarch Watch milkweed seed packets ["Linda Hunt raven10322 AT hotmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
12 Jan Re: Question on success of Monarch Watch milkweed seed packets ["Denise Gibbs monarch301 AT verizon.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
12 Jan FW: [ButterflyConservation] North American Monarch habits and decline ["'Smith, Richard H.' Richard.Smith AT jhuapl.edu [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
12 Jan Question on success of Monarch Watch milkweed seed packets ["'Smith, Richard H.' Richard.Smith AT jhuapl.edu [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
30 Dec RE: Upcoming Talk: "The Effects of Climate Change on Native Plants" . ["'Smith, Richard H.' Richard.Smith AT jhuapl.edu [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
30 Dec RE: Upcoming Talk: "The Effects of Climate Change on Native Plants" . ["Harry Pavulaan harrypav AT hotmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
28 Dec Upcoming Talk: "The Effects of Climate Change on Native Plants" . . . and Insects ["treetops5 AT comcast.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
26 Dec Re: Butterfly ID help ["June Tveekrem damselfly AT southernspreadwing.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
26 Dec Re: Butterfly ID help ["Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
26 Dec Re: Butterfly ID help ["sopol AT yahoo.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
26 Dec Butterfly ID help [1 Attachment] ["June Tveekrem damselfly AT southernspreadwing.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
25 Dec 2014 Butterfly Year in Review ["Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
25 Dec How butterflies get their shine ["sopol AT yahoo.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
24 Dec New US swallowtail species described this month ["Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
19 Dec Re: Looking for Miner Bee Nests ["Alonso alonsolucy AT aol.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
18 Dec Re: Looking for Miner Bee Nests ["Hal White halwhite AT udel.edu [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
17 Dec Looking for Miner Bee Nests [1 Attachment] ["treetops5 AT comcast.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
10 Dec FW: [ButterflyConservation] John Shaw's new book ["'Smith, Richard H.' Richard.Smith AT jhuapl.edu [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
08 Dec Insect themed art show in February ["salobyrne AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
6 Dec National competition announced for digital capture of museum insect collections ["Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
01 Dec Re: The Book of Beetles book signing at the National Museum of Natural History [1 Attachment] ["'Arthur V. Evans' arthurevans AT verizon.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
01 Dec The Book of Beetles book signing at the National Museum of Natural History [2 Attachments] ["'Arthur V. Evans' arthurevans AT verizon.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
23 Nov Re: [NEleps] Cabbage White!!?? ["Mona Miller runmede AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
24 Nov Cabbage White!!?? ["Harry Pavulaan harrypav AT hotmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
22 Nov Stocking stuffer field guides ["Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
19 Nov Continent-wide Monarch Conservation Activities ["'Smith, Richard H.' Richard.Smith AT jhuapl.edu [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
12 Nov Re: butterfly sightings ["Denise Gibbs monarch301 AT verizon.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
11 Nov Re: butterfly sightings ["Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
11 Nov butterfly sightings ["Denise Gibbs monarch301 AT verizon.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
10 Nov Grand Challenges for MD Lepidopterists ["Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
7 Nov RE: Fw: [MDBirding] Frederick municipal forest threat ["'Smith, Richard H.' Richard.Smith AT jhuapl.edu [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
07 Nov Re: Fw: [MDBirding] Frederick municipal forest threat ["David Smith lacsmith12 AT comcast.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
7 Nov Fw: [MDBirding] Frederick municipal forest threat ["altomomatic AT verizon.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
28 Oct butterfly sightings Oct 27 ["Denise Gibbs monarch301 AT verizon.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
27 Oct Late Season Butterflies in Southern Carroll County ["David Smith lacsmith12 AT comcast.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
25 Oct Spiders ["'Alex Netherton' blueridgediscovery AT charter.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
23 Oct Monarchs over the Bay ["Craig Crotts crottscraig AT yahoo.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
22 Oct FW: [valeps] Chincoteague NWR, 9-10 Oct ["'Smith, Richard H.' Richard.Smith AT jhuapl.edu [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
10 Oct Re: Caterpiller? ["Alonso alonsolucy AT aol.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
10 Oct Caterpiller? [1 Attachment] ["Guineabird AT aol.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
2 Oct Re: Single gene responsible for monarch migration ["Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
2 Oct Re: Fwd: Single gene responsible for monarch migration ["Sheryl Pollock sopol AT yahoo.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
2 Oct Fwd: Single gene responsible for monarch migration ["foresmiths AT comcast.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
1 Oct ocola skipper ["foresmiths AT comcast.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
1 Oct Single gene responsible for monarch migration ["Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
01 Oct Monarchs ["'Alex Netherton' blueridgediscovery AT charter.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
29 Sep butterflies still flying ["foresmiths AT comcast.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
19 Sep American Snout - Huntley Meadows, Alexandria ["dcharlesl AT msn.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
18 Sep Final Mid-Atlantic Lep Forecast of the 2014 Season -- Autumn Equinox Weekend ["Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
12 Sep Re: First butterfly ["hylajwhite AT aol.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
11 Sep Mid-Atlantic Field Lep Forecast for the Weekend of 2014 Sept. 13-14 ["Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
10 Sep Re: First butterfly ["June Tveekrem damselfly AT southernspreadwing.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
10 Sep Re: First butterfly ["Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
10 Sep First butterfly ["lance biechele ltb0076 AT yahoo.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
9 Sep Re: RFI - Williamsburg, VA ["foresmiths AT comcast.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]
9 Sep RFI - Williamsburg, VA ["altomomatic AT verizon.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" ]

Subject: AW: true bug ID
From: "'Konrad Zobel' konrad.zobel AT chello.at [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 17:57:40 +0100
Hi, Rick,

thank you so much for your prompt reply and the helpful links. That will keep 
me busy for a while, but I look forward to further communications. I also love 
photographing dragonflies, but have recently been given a field guide by Dennis 
Paulsen „Dragonflies and Damselflies of the East“ (Princeton Field Guides) 
that proved incredibly helpful in identifying the various species. 


I take it that all e-mails get distributed to all members, so I’m also 
looking forward to hearing about discoveries from my new peers. 


Thank you again for your help,

Konrad

 

Von: VA-MD-DE-Bugs AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:VA-MD-DE-Bugs AT yahoogroups.com] 
Gesendet: Donnerstag, 05. März 2015 17:19
An: konrad.zobel AT chello.at; VA-MD-DE-Bugs
Betreff: [VA-MD-DE-Bugs] true bug ID

 

  

Konrad, I'm sure you'll get lots of good help from the listserv, but a better 
resource -- designed specifically for your kind of request, really -- is the 
website BugGuide. Here's the link directly to the ID help section, but you'll 
find out a lot just browsing around. 


http://bugguide.net/node/view/6/bgimage

There's also a super resource locally called the Maryland Biodiversity Project, 
and here's the link to their photo gallery of true bugs; I think you'll find 
some of your targets there: 


http://www.marylandbiodiversity.com/viewThumbnails.php?order=Hemiptera 
 & 






-- 

Rick Borchelt
College Park, MD
preferred personal email:  rborchelt |AT| gmail |DOT| com

http://leplog.wordpress.com


Subject: true bug ID
From: "Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 11:19:16 -0500
Konrad, I'm sure you'll get lots of good help from the listserv, but a
better resource -- designed specifically for your kind of request, really
-- is the website BugGuide.  Here's the link directly to the ID help
section, but you'll find out a lot just browsing around.

http://bugguide.net/node/view/6/bgimage

There's also a super resource locally called the Maryland Biodiversity
Project, and here's the link to their photo gallery of true bugs; I think
you'll find some of your targets there:

http://www.marylandbiodiversity.com/viewThumbnails.php?order=Hemiptera&



-- 
Rick Borchelt
College Park, MD
preferred personal email:  rborchelt |AT| gmail |DOT| com

http://leplog.wordpress.com
Subject: True Bugs of Virginia & N.C. [8 Attachments]
From: "'Konrad Zobel' konrad.zobel AT chello.at [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 17:01:53 +0100
Hi,

I've just been admitted to your group and I don't really know my way around
yet. Among my insect interests are the so-called true bugs. Many from the
Virginia area I have been able to identify, but there are plenty left where
I failed. I'm sending you a sample in the attachment wondering if any of you
can either help me identify them or tell me a website that has a gallery of
true bugs of the East Coast or a forum where one can post them for help.
Actually I sort of thought that your group works a little like that - i.e.
where there is a website one can access to see the various pictures other
members of the group are posting. From what I gather now, one can only send
an e-mail to this group. That's fine with me, but I also hope I get a
response.

Many thanks,

Konrad Zobel

(living in Vienna, Austria, but often visiting Virginia)
Subject: The 22nd Approximation for Butterflies of North Carolina
From: "Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 11:04:07 -0500
It’s a sign of spring at least as reliable as the first Mourning Cloak — a
new “Approximation” from Harry LeGrand (with illustrations by Tom Howard)
for NC butterflies.  It’s hard to describe exactly what an Approximation
is, but it’s part atlas, part field guide, and part armchair handbook for
the butterflies of North Carolina.  Some descriptors do come readily to
mind:  comprehensive, monumental, easily accessible, eagerly anticipated.

Review both the website and the PDF on LepLog at

https://leplog.wordpress.com/2015/03/01/the-22nd-approximation-for-north-carolina-butterflies/ 



-- 
Rick Borchelt
College Park, MD
preferred personal email:  rborchelt |AT| gmail |DOT| com

http://leplog.wordpress.com
Subject: The Story of a Butterfly Big Year
From: "Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 11:08:49 -0500
What better way to spend yet another of our seemingly endless snow days than 
reliving exciting adventures in the field? Tom Stock has made it easy and 
enjoyable with this post to LepLog, which recounts our 2013 Big Year in 
Maryland -- and has me, at least, planning for 2015! 


https://leplog.wordpress.com/2015/02/25/the-story-of-a-butterfly-big-year/



------------------------------------
Posted by: Rick Borchelt 
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

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Subject: Beginners Beekeeping Course
From: "'The Kuder Family' treetops5 AT comcast.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 08:37:14 -0500
 
https://app.certain.com/accounts/register123/umd/events/bee15/bee-bullet.gif
Are you interested in learning how to keep bees?


 
https://app.certain.com/accounts/register123/umd/events/bee15/bee-bullet.gif
Do you like the idea of having bee hives in your backyard?


 
https://app.certain.com/accounts/register123/umd/events/bee15/bee-bullet.gif
Do you want to learn the skills to succeed in beekeeping?


 

 


...Then, the University of Maryland Beginners Beekeeping course is a perfect
fit! 

 

Sign up NOW for the Inaugural University of Maryland Beginners Beekeeping
Course!

You will learn beginning beekeeping skills from the best in the field, right
on campus. 

We are offering 17 presentations, as well as opportunities to engage with
local beekeeping experts, and Q&A sessions. 

The course is two full days, March 28-29, and includes lunch and coffee
breaks.

For more information or to register visit our website:

 
https://app.certain.com/profile/form/index.cfm?PKformID=0x1988997b8e8

Or please contact:

Grace Kunkel

Bee Informed Partnership

  gkunkelUMD AT gmail.com

  301 405 3799




Subject: Free Family Program, 3/15 in Rehoboth Beach, "It's a Bug's World", Entomological Society of America
From: "'Kuehn, Faith (DDA)' Faith.Kuehn AT state.de.us [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 21:54:47 +0000
?Experience the fascinating world of insects at "It's a Bug's World", a free 
family program presented by the Entomological Society of America, Eastern 
Branch. It will be held on Sunday, March 15 from 10:00am-3:00pm at the Atlantic 
Sands, 1 Baltimore Ave (on the Boardwalk), Rehoboth Beach, DE 19971. There will 
be interactive and educational exhibits, crafts, activities and much more. 
Questions contact Faith Kuehn, Faith.Kuehn AT state.de.us 


?



Exhibitors:

 The Pollinator Hot Spot, University of Delaware Dept. of Entomology and 
Wildlife Ecology, the Waggle ?dance, dress up like a beekeeper, 
pollinator-themed activities and demonstrations 


 The Nectar Collector, Delaware Beekeeper with honey for sale, plus Basic 
Beekeeping Q & A 


 12:00 noon - "Let's All Eat Bugs" step right up to Lou Sorkin's table and 
give insects a taste. With a variety of cricket protein bars, some chapulin 
salsa, and dry roasted and spiced grasshoppers, you can decide if you're ready 
to see the bugs you're eating or prefer to have them disguised. Lou will talk 
about edible insects as well as health benefits, and he'll talk about how to 
source food-grade bugs and products. 


        Insects that live in Delaware's Forests, Delaware Forest Service

 Photos of insects as they flutter and creep through their hidden world, by 
Heather JM Siple. Website www.sipleart.com 


 Mosquitos!, Delaware Mosquito Control, highlighting surveillance work, 
mosquito life cycle and live mosquito fish 


 Museum Marauders, Thomas A. Parker, Pest Control Services, preserving 
museums, historic properties, libraries and archives 


 The Beginner Entomologist: coloring and activity table, Cartoonist and 
student entomologist Esabelle Ryngin presents her all-ages coloring book. 
Parents, kids and adults are welcome to stop by to play with crayons and create 
their own insect. At the end of the day, an insect will be chosen and drawn by 
Ryngin, and sent to the person who created it. 


 U.S. Customs and Border Protection, agricultural specialists, and K9 
"Trooper", protecting American agriculture and the food supply by preventing 
the introduction of harmful pests at air and seaports 


 U.S. Air Force Operational Entomology, how pests and insects impact the US 
Air Force and military operations at Dover Air Force Base and foreign deployed 
locations. 


        Clowning Around, face painting and balloon sculptures

        Build-a-Bug, make and take, for kids to create their own insect

 Don't Move Firewood, with AL B, the larger than life-sized Asian Longhorned 
Beetle, coming to Delaware with a special USDA permit 


 USDA Plant Protection and Quarantine, Port of Wilmington, include imported 
cargo, pests intercepted and quarantine treatments. 


        Fancy Flights, butterflies and moths of all shapes and colors

 Insect/Inspect, a closer look at insects that become pests in your home, 
Brightside Pest Services. 


Subject: Re: [washbutterflies] Monarchs at tmw's PGAS Mtg
From: "Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 10 Feb 2015 13:20:34 -0500
I have to echo Harry's concerns, and regret that I'll miss tonight's
program because I'm on an early flight to the Bay Area (and hopefully some
spring leps flying there already!) tomorrow morning.

First, the widely touted "90% decline" in monarch populations is truly
suspect, containing all sorts of assumptions about the size of the *known*
Mexican overwintering sites, the relationship between breeding population
size and overwintering population size, and what the "optimum" number of
monarchs would be to sustain the Midwest migratory pathway (and remember,
not all populations are migratory, and not all migratory populations winter
in Mexico).  And remember too, as noted in the announcement, this is an
unusual petition in that it never claims that monarchs as a species are
endangered, but that the migratory phenomenon is endangered.  No one is
arguing that the species is in trouble (at least, not on credible
scientific grounds). In fact, migration funnels along the Great Lakes and
Cape May have shown a very consistent number of migrants year to year in
recent counts even as wintering numbers in the Oyamel fir forests have been
all over the map.

It also appears we're trying to build back to the huge numbers of the late
1800's as a benchmark for where monarchs should be now.  That time period
was probably an artificial population boom contingent on busting up the
prairies for agriculture.  There is not very good evidence for the size of
the monarch population(s) pre-European colonization.

I'm frankly suspicious that this petition is a back-door attempt to
regulate GMOs by interest groups who failed to win such regulation outrigh
on its own merits, and that the monarch has become a political football in
that contest by parties who couldn't care less about the butterfly (the
Center for Food Safety was one of the co-petitioners, for example -- no
monarch research going on there, far as I can tell).

And my last concern is that the petition to list monarchs as threatened or
endangered makes a mockery of one of our best tools for species protection,
the Endangered Species Act.  What does "endangered" mean to the public and
to already skeptical lawmakers when practically any North American can walk
into a meadow in the summer and see an "endangered" species, often in great
numbers?

There are some very good initiatives to provide pollinator habitat in the
Great Plains -- highway corridors, for example, prairie restoration and
preservation for another. But listing monarchs under the ESA is not one of
them, nor is regulation of GMOs to "protect" monarchs (although there may
be many other good reasons to do the latter that have nothing to do with
monarchs).








On Tue, Feb 10, 2015 at 11:46 AM, pavulaan AT aol.com [washbutterflies] <
washbutterflies AT yahoogroups.com> wrote:

>
>
>
> All:
>
> Hopefully, before people jump on the bandwagon and submit their support
> for this petition, be careful of what you ask for.  Once the Monarch is
> declared threatened, or even endangered, citizen efforts will be severely
> restricted or worse yet - terminated.  The end effect of this will be that
> the Monarch will suffer a worse fate, without citizens helping to raise and
> release Monarch.  It could become illegal.
>
> A worse yet scenario may unfold.  Once landowners become aware that
> Monarchs are breeding on their land, say goodbye to Common Milkweed.  I
> have heard rumors that some farmers in the Midwest intend to eradicate
> Milkweed on their lands to the maximum extent possible before such
> legislation takes effect.  The effect of the regulation portends to have an
> immediate opposite effect.  There are a few landowners who will pitch in to
> plant milkweed on their lands, to do their part - but such lands may be off
> limits to any other use, once the Milkweeds take hold.
>
> There really is no "habitat" to restore for Monarchs.  The host Milkweeds
> are, as the name inplies: "weeds".  They grow anywhere.  Monarchs breed on
> the abundance of Milkweeds wherever they occur and I imagine the bulk of
> milkweed on this continent grows along roadsides and in patches in
> agricultural regions.  So do we protect "monarch habitat" be protecting
> every patch of Milkweeds wherever they pop up?  This is unenforceable.  I
> imagine we'd be OK with abandonment of agriculture in this country because
> a few Milkweeds pop up here and there on farms - thus the eradication of
> Milkweed.  Public open spaces only contain a minimal part of the mass bulk
> of Milkweed.  Would that be enough to support millions of Monarchs?
>
> Volunteerism might help, but where has that volunteerism been to date?
> Why do we need to enact federal regulation to spark volunteerism?
>
> My feeling is that our efforts would be best directed at highway edge
> management.  Stop mowing 100' out from the highway edge and plant
> Milkweeds.
>
> Harry
>
>
>
>
> 1. Monarchs at tmw's PGAS Mtg
>     From: Lynette Fullerton
>
>
>
> Messages
> ________________________________________________________________________
> 1. Monarchs at tmw's PGAS Mtg
> Posted by: "Lynette Fullerton" l_fullerton_1999 AT yahoo.com l_fullerton_1999 

>     Date: Mon Feb 9, 2015 7:16 am ((PST))
>
> I would like to extend an invitation to all interested in the monarch 
situation 

> to attend a talk that will be given at tomorrow night's meeting of the Prince
> George's Audubon Society and the Patuxent Bird Club. The program is free and
> open to the public, and takes place at the College Park Aviation Museum, off
> Cpl. Scott Drive. See our website Prince George's Audubon Society for
> directions. The program description follows.
> |   |
> |   |  |   |   |   |   |   |
> | Prince George's Audubon SocietyNEXT PROGRAM:  Tuesday, February 10,2015 at
> 7:30pm at the College Park AviationMuseum "What You and Your Parks Can Do Now 
to 

> HelpSave the... |
> |  |
> | View on www.pgaudubon.org | Preview by Yahoo |
> |  |
> |   |
>
>    What You and Your Parks Can Do Nowto Help Save the Monarchwith
>
> RichardDolesh
>
> 7:30pm, Tuesday, February 10, 2014
>
> CollegePark Aviation Museum
>
> 1985Cpl. Frank Scott Drive, College Park, MD 20740
>
>
>
> Monarch butterflies are in deeptrouble. Once found in great numbersthroughout 

> North America and much beloved for their multi-generationalmigration from 
Mexico 

> all the way into Canada and the northern United States,monarch populations 
have 

> declined nearly 95% in recent years.  There are many reasons for the
> decline--theloss of migratory habitat, the rapid disappearance of critical 
food 

> plants, thenegative effects of new classes of insecticides, extreme weather
> events,disruptions of winter roosts, and more. No one factor is solely
> responsible, but the fact is that the monarchpopulation has crashed and some
> experts fear that the northward migrations ofthis species may soon simply
> cease. Recently, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Serviceagreed to review a 
petition 

> to list the monarch as a federally endangeredspecies under the Endangered
> Species Act.
>
> But there is hope for this seriouslythreatened species.  Restoring habitatfor
> monarchs, planting milkweed, and ensuring that there are food plants alongthe
> migration routes of monarchs may be able to turn the tide and stop 
thedecline. 

> And citizen volunteers working with their local and state parkand recreation
> agencies and other public landowners can play a critical role indirectly 
helping 

> to save this disappearing species.
>
> This informative program will coveractions that you personally can take right
> now, this year, to attract, feed,and propagate more monarchs on their 
migration. 

> It will also provideinformation on how you and your family, friends, and
> communities can takeaction as citizen volunteers working with your local park
> and recreation andpublic lands agencies.
>
> Richard Dolesh, vice-president forconservation and parks of the National
> Recreation and Parks Association, willdiscuss the most important action steps
> that individuals and parks can take toimprove monarch habitat, create monarch
> Waystations, engage volunteers incitizen science, connect kids to nature, and
> engage both park staff and thepublic in responding to this national 
conservation 

> challenge.
>
> Whether you are already committed tothe cause of monarch conservation, or if 
you 

> are just learning what needs to bedone, there will be much new for you to 
learn 

> and new resources for you todiscover how you can do more to help turn the 
tide 

> for monarchs. Inaddition, you’ll hear some great ideas on how you and your
> friends cancontribute to public education and conservation stewardship for 
this 

> valuablewildlife species.
>
>
> I hope to see many new faces there tomorrow night!
> Lynette Fullerton, Monarchaholic
>
>
>
>
>   
>



-- 
Rick Borchelt
College Park, MD
preferred personal email:  rborchelt |AT| gmail |DOT| com

http://leplog.wordpress.com
Subject: Monarchs at tmw's PGAS Mtg
From: "Lynette Fullerton l_fullerton_1999 AT yahoo.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 9 Feb 2015 15:16:11 +0000 (UTC)
I would like to extend an invitation to all interested in the monarch situation 
to attend a talk that will be given at tomorrow night's meeting of the Prince 
George's Audubon Society and the Patuxent Bird Club. The program is free and 
open to the public, and takes place at the College Park Aviation Museum, off 
Cpl. Scott Drive. See our website Prince George's Audubon Society for 
directions. The program description follows. 

|   |
|   |  |   |   |   |   |   |
| Prince George's Audubon SocietyNEXT PROGRAM:  Tuesday, February 10,2015 at 
7:30pm at the College Park AviationMuseum "What You and Your Parks Can Do Now 
to HelpSave the... | 

|  |
| View on www.pgaudubon.org | Preview by Yahoo |
|  |
|   |

   What You and Your Parks Can Do Nowto Help Save the Monarchwith

RichardDolesh

7:30pm, Tuesday, February 10, 2014

CollegePark Aviation Museum

1985Cpl. Frank Scott Drive, College Park, MD 20740


 
Monarch butterflies are in deeptrouble.  Once found in great numbersthroughout 
North America and much beloved for their multi-generationalmigration from 
Mexico all the way into Canada and the northern United States,monarch 
populations have declined nearly 95% in recent years.  There are many reasons 
for the decline--theloss of migratory habitat, the rapid disappearance of 
critical food plants, thenegative effects of new classes of insecticides, 
extreme weather events,disruptions of winter roosts, and more. No one factor 
is solely responsible, but the fact is that the monarchpopulation has crashed 
and some experts fear that the northward migrations ofthis species may soon 
simply cease.  Recently, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Serviceagreed to review a 
petition to list the monarch as a federally endangeredspecies under the 
Endangered Species Act. 


But there is hope for this seriouslythreatened species.  Restoring habitatfor 
monarchs, planting milkweed, and ensuring that there are food plants alongthe 
migration routes of monarchs may be able to turn the tide and stop 
thedecline.  And citizen volunteers working with their local and state parkand 
recreation agencies and other public landowners can play a critical role 
indirectly helping to save this disappearing species. 


This informative program will coveractions that you personally can take right 
now, this year, to attract, feed,and propagate more monarchs on their 
migration. It will also provideinformation on how you and your family, friends, 
and communities can takeaction as citizen volunteers working with your local 
park and recreation andpublic lands agencies.   


Richard Dolesh, vice-president forconservation and parks of the National 
Recreation and Parks Association, willdiscuss the most important action steps 
that individuals and parks can take toimprove monarch habitat, create monarch 
Waystations, engage volunteers incitizen science, connect kids to nature, and 
engage both park staff and thepublic in responding to this national 
conservation challenge.  


Whether you are already committed tothe cause of monarch conservation, or if 
you are just learning what needs to bedone, there will be much new for you to 
learn and new resources for you todiscover how you can do more to help turn the 
tide for monarchs. Inaddition, you’ll hear some great ideas on how you and 
your friends cancontribute to public education and conservation stewardship for 
this valuablewildlife species.   



I hope to see many new faces there tomorrow night!
Lynette Fullerton, Monarchaholic
Subject: Announcement of New Butterfly Records Reported in 2014 Covering Maryland, Delaware, and District of Columbia
From: "'Smith, Richard H.' Richard.Smith AT jhuapl.edu [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Feb 2015 19:06:56 +0000
All,

Observation of uncommon butterflies was a challenge for butterfly enthusiasts 
in the Maryland-DC-Delaware area in 2014. This is evidenced in Rick Borchelt's 
very thorough summary, "2014: The Mid-Atlantic Butterfly Year in Review" 
available at https://leplog.wordpress.com/2014 . There were only a few 
exceptions, such as a seeming record number of Northern Metalmarks in Green 
Ridge State Forest and showings of the Harvester Butterfly at some unexpected 
locations, particularly in Howard County, MD. Nevertheless, a few dedicated 
butterfly enthusiasts were able to tie down some Maryland county records in 
2014, and a new butterfly for District of Columbia was reported during the 2014 
DC NABA Count! Some records from previous years surfaced too, even a state 
record in Delaware (for a species you may not realized had never been reported 
in that state). These are presented in the outline format below. Entries for 
the sightings (and photograph(s), if they accompanied record submission) have 
been entered into and may be viewed at the Butterflies and Moths of North 
America (BAMONA) permanent record-keeping website at 
http://www.butterfliesandmoths.org/ . These may be reviewed in detail by going 
to this website and selecting "Regional Checklists" and then 
butterfly,United States, Maryland, and Apply and then by selecting the 
species of interest. You will need to scroll to the U.S. map displayed at the 
bottom of the species discussions, zoom in the Maryland area, and click on any 
of the sighting dots having orange rings. These are BAMONAs Verified 
Sightings. Clicking on the More Detail option will take you to the record 
information (and photo(s) too, if these were submitted). 

I have also recently updated my public on-line historical Maryland and Delaware 
butterfly county lists to include your new records. These appear at the Leplog 
website under its local listings section at 


http://leplog.wordpress.com/washington-area-butterfly-club/local-and-regional-lists-and-info/butterfly-records-for-maryland-delaware-and-the-district-of-columbia/ 
. The prolog at this link gives some historical background on the listing and 
informs the user as to how to access all state, county, and city butterfly 
lists and state cross-sectional county-by-county occurrence charts. 


The outline below gives in the following order: the state and new county of 
record, the species common name, the species scientific name, the date of 
record, the location of record, the name(s) of the record contributor(s), and 
finally any record-related notes. All contributors are to be commended for 
their diligence in keeping a watchful eye while out in the field. 

Lastly, if you are aware of any new butterfly records from a county or 
statewide standpoint, from 2014 or earlier, that were not yet announced or I 
apparently overlooked, please let me know by e-mail at 
richard.smith AT jhuapl.edu . Also, if you are 
aware of any butterfly county records that actually precede those listed below, 
please send me that information so I can correct and amend the bookkeeping. 
Thanks much. 


MARYLAND

1.     Allegany

a.     Carolina Satyr

b.     Hermeuptychia sosybius

                                                    i.     06/06/2014

 ii. along Fifteen Mile Creek 1.5 mi. s. of I-68 


                                                 iii.     Philip Kean

2.     Allegany
a.      Swarthy Skipper
b.      Nastra lherminier

                                                    i.     08/10/2002

 ii. Green Ridge State Forest near Little Orleans 


 iii. Dick Smith, Fran Pope, and Mary LaMarca 


 iv. Thanks go to Fran Pope for remembering this sighting when we noticed no 
record for this species yet for the county 

     3.    Anne Arundel

a.      Edwards' Hairstreak

b.      Satyrium edwardsii

                                               i.          07/02/2014

                                              ii.          Bristol

                                             iii.          Rick Borchelt

 iv. Photo voucher obtained 


  1.  Frederick

a.      Gulf Fritillary

b.      Agraulis vanilla

                                               i.          09/28/2011

                                              ii.          Frederick (town)

 iii. Jo Beth Roberson and Darrell Davis 


 iv. Visiting passionvine at residence; photo voucher obtained 


  1.  Harford

a.      Giant Swallowtail

b.      Papilio cresphontes

                                               i.          08/18/2014

                                              ii.          Forest Hill

                                             iii.          Matt Hafner

 iv. Visiting garden Delphiniums; photo voucher obtained 


  1.  Talbot

a.      Banded Hairstreak

b.      Satyrium calanus

                                               i.          06/14/2014

 ii. Seth Demonstration Forest, Easton 


                                             iii.          Jim Brighton

 iv. Four specimens seen; photo voucher obtained 


  1.  Wicomico

a.      Southern Cloudywing

b.      Thorybes bathyllus

                                               i.          06/15/2013

 ii. Colbourne Mill Rd., se. of Salisbury 


                                             iii.          Jim Brighton

 iv. Photo voucher obtained 


DELAWARE STATE RECORD

  1.   New Castle

a.     Silvery Checkerspot

b.     Chlosyne nycteis

                                               i.          09/16/2012

 ii. University of Delaware garden 


                                             iii.          Allan Loudell

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA RECORD

a.       White Admiral

b.       Limenitis arthemis arthemis

                                              i.          08/17/2014

                                             ii.          National Arboretum

 iii. Tom Stock and NABA Count party 


 iv. Observed on tree branch high above ground 


Dick Smith
Columbia, MD
Subject: 2015 Announcement and Update on the Butterfly Unknown Species Status Project in Maryland, Delaware, and DC [2 Attachments]
From: "'Smith, Richard H.' Richard.Smith AT jhuapl.edu [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Feb 2015 18:15:27 +0000
Butterfly Surveyors,
Butterfly populations are known to be dwindling worldwide, and that trend has 
been observed in some of our species locally. In an effort to promote 
conservation, it is important to keep abreast of which local species are 
showing such signs of decline, and then concerned naturalist will hopefully be 
able to do something about it before it gets worse. In this effort, I am 
circulating the accompanying charts to local naturalists who I know have toured 
through Maryland and Delaware in recent years and have assembled lists of 
butterfly species they have encountered. By filling in data in the attached 
charts for counties and cities where Unknown status is indicated, we will be 
better able to concentrate our attention onto those remaining species for which 
status remains Unknown and for which declines may be occurring. 

On the attached charts, the check mark (✔) indicates that a record exists for 
a species. For certain recorded species occurrences, A, S, and X symbols are 
used instead of the check marks. The A and S symbols indicate, respectively, 
that the species record is due either to an Accidental occurrence (i.e., 
accidental release or introduction) or to a Stray (i.e., species incidentally 
wandering far from normal range). The X indicates that based on observations of 
local lepidopterists and my own over a period of many years, the species 
apparently no longer occurs in the jurisdiction shown and is therefore 
considered to be eXtirpated there. The symbol U (for unknown) is entered on 
species that are uncommon in some of the counties and cities and for which I 
have received few or no records of occurrence of the species in these 
jurisdictions in the past 15 years. For the species marked U in a particular 
jurisdiction, you are asked to provide the date and location (nearest town is 
sufficient) of your latest observation of that species in that jurisdiction, if 
you have seen it there. I publish the latest version of these Unknown Status 
charts once each year (usually in January or February) on the Leplog website at 
http://leplog.wordpress.com/local-and-regional-lists-and-info/. By citing the 
latest date, we will be able to assess how recently each of these species is 
known to have occurred in the area of interest. If certain species are 
eventually found to have disappeared from major parts of our region, 
conservation measures, such as protection of known habitat, will need to be 
implemented in surviving areas. Of course, if anyone observes a species 
currently identified with an X in an indicated area, this information will be 
vitally important; and conservation measures should be considered promptly at 
the sighting locality. 

Since initiating this project early in 2011, I have received a large number of 
records from many of you for the Unknown Status Charts. Thank you all much for 
this. I have also obtained a lot of recent records by poring through butterfly 
entries on the Maryland Biodiversity Project website at 
http://www.marylandbiodiversity.com/ (these are indicated in my chart entries 
by "MBP"). I am grateful for their work in assembling such recent records. 

 Some tentative conclusions can already be drawn based on receipt of no records 
yet from entire regions of Maryland in which certain species were historically 
known. Here are my notes on this: 


·        Hoary Edge – no new records, except in Western Maryland

·        Sleepy Duskywing – no new records, except in Western Maryland

·        European Skipper – no new records, except in Western Maryland

·        Delaware Skipper – no new records in Central Maryland

·        Black Dash – no new records, except in Garrett County

· Dusted Skipper – no new records, except in Howard and Wicomico Counties 


· Common Roadside-Skipper – no new records, except in Western Maryland and 
Soldiers Delight (Baltimore County) 

In addition, I have noticed an absence of recent sightings of Dreamy Duskywing 
in Central and Southern Maryland (it does not occur on the Eastern Shore), so I 
have added this species, with a lot of U’s indicated in respective counties, 
where recent records are requested. Finally, the Bronze Copper has experienced 
a marked decline, even on the Eastern Shore where it used to be frequent, in 
recent years. Thus, I have replaced the checkmarks I had for it in past Unknown 
Status charts with U’s for many of the Eastern Shore counties where it was 
thought to have been secure. Any recent records in those counties would also be 
appreciated. 

Fortunately, we are on the road to being reassured that several of our other 
native butterfly species are still occurring in the cities and counties 
previously known from the historical record. However, there is still an 
abundance of “U” entries on these charts for many species. Please send in 
any new data if you have it or when it becomes available. Also, if anyone has 
later years than the existing occurrence dates in the present charts, please 
forward that information to me too. Finally, please inform me if you notice 
that I have apparently missed entering some of your contributed data. My e-mail 
address is richard.smith AT jhuapl.edu . Here’s 
hoping you all have great seasons this coming year in observing butterflies and 
that you will be able to help replace many more U’s in my charts with recent 
data entries. 

Richard H. (Dick) Smith
Columbia, MD
(Footnote: for those of you who are more knowledgeable about statewide 
conservation activity involving butterflies, note that some (but not all) of 
the species omitted from my Unknown Status charts are those already considered 
to be rare, threatened, endangered, or extirpated in Maryland or Delaware and 
for which conservation considerations and measures have already been placed 
into action. For more on these species, please see the information and 
publications available at the Maryland and Delaware Natural Heritage Program 
websites at http://www.dnr.state.md.us/wildlife/Plants_Wildlife/espaa.asp and 
http://www.dnrec.delaware.gov/fw/NHESP/information/Pages/Information.aspx .) 


Subject: Insect and Spider themed art show
From: "sally o'byrne salobyrne AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Feb 2015 10:35:49 -0500
If you are anywhere in the Wilmington De area, please plan to attend the Insect 
and Spider themed art show at the Wilmington Library on Friday, Feb 6.. A group 
show, there will be a variety of artists and art, from photography to quilts. 
The reception will be 5 - 8 at the Library, which is in downtown Wilmington. 
The show itself will be up for the month of February. Artists invited are also 
naturalists, and thematically we wanted a show that celebrated the natural 
beauty of insects rather than showing fantasy insects. 


Library website  http://wilmington.lib.de.us



 "Insects and spiders may be disparaged, but they are the true beauties of 
nature. Their elegant structures and colors are celebrated in this mixed media 
group exhibit" 









------------------------------------
Posted by: sally o'byrne 
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

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Subject: Re: RE: Spread the News! New findings published 2015: Predators of Wavyleaf basketgrass!
From: "Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2015 17:44:42 -0500
There are a few reports (I had a personal observation myself) of one of our
native satyrids, Northern Pearly-eye, ovipositing on stiltgrass.  But I
wouldn't hazard a guess as to whether the caterpillar could eat and thrive
on it; that's the issue with West Virginia White and garlic mustard.  And
these butterflies never reach population numbers great enough to make a
dent in a forest understory of stiltgrass.

On Sat, Jan 31, 2015 at 4:28 PM, Richard.Smith AT jhuapl.edu [VA-MD-DE-Bugs] <
VA-MD-DE-Bugs AT yahoogroups.com> wrote:

>
>
> Marc,
>
> In addition to these species not even being native to our hemisphere, I
> question the notion that they could even have any impact on basketgrass. A
> few butterfly species can become crop pests, such as the Cabbage White on
> cabbage and the Orange Sulphur on alfalfa, but most butterflies are not
> known to produce enough larvae to have any significant impact on their host
> plants. Some moth species are different (e.g., the gypsy moth).  The mere
> fact that a lepidopteran utilizes a particular species as a larval host is
> a long way from expecting that it can serve as a biocontrol agent.  If that
> were possible, then it is definitely a serious concern as to what else here
> it might want to gobble up.
>
> Dick Smith
>
>  
>



-- 
Rick Borchelt
College Park, MD
preferred personal email:  rborchelt |AT| gmail |DOT| com

http://leplog.wordpress.com
Subject: RE: Spread the News! New findings published 2015: Predators of Wavyleaf basketgrass!
From: "Richard.Smith AT jhuapl.edu [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 31 Jan 2015 13:28:15 -0800
Marc, 

 In addition to these species not even being native to our hemisphere, I 
question the notion that they could even have any impact on basketgrass. A few 
butterfly species can become crop pests, such as the Cabbage White on cabbage 
and the Orange Sulphur on alfalfa, but most butterflies are not known to 
produce enough larvae to have any significant impact on their host plants. Some 
moth species are different (e.g., the gypsy moth). The mere fact that a 
lepidopteran utilizes a particular species as a larval host is a long way from 
expecting that it can serve as a biocontrol agent. If that were possible, then 
it is definitely a serious concern as to what else here it might want to gobble 
up. 

 

 Dick Smith
Subject: Re: RE: Spread the News! New findings published 2015: Predators of Wavyleaf basketgrass!
From: "Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2015 08:28:02 -0500
Not only are they not native to the eastern US, they aren't even native to
this hemisphere. All Asian species.



On Sat, Jan 31, 2015 at 5:17 AM, 'Marc Imlay' ialm AT erols.com
[VA-MD-DE-Bugs]  wrote:

>
>
> *Are any of these butterflies native to Eastern USA?*
>
>
>
> *Marc Imlay, PhD, **Chair, Biological control working Group *
>
> *Conservation biologist, Park Ranger Office, Non-native Invasive Plant
> Control coordinator.*
> *(301) 442-5657 <%28301%29%20442-5657> cell  *ialm AT erols.com
>
> *Natural and Historical Resources Division*
> *The  Maryland-National   Capital   Park  and Planning
> Commissionwww.pgparks.com  *
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* Ellis, Michael [mailto:Michael.Ellis AT pgparks.com]
> *Sent:* Friday, January 30, 2015 11:25 PM
> *To:* Marc Imlay; Lowe, Kyle; Garrett, Chris; joel_floyd AT yahoo.com;
> kerrie.kyde AT maryland.gov; Robert B. Trumbule -MDA-; Bergmann, Carole;
> MCP-WeedWarriors
> *Subject:* Spread the News! New findings published 2015: Predators of
> Wavyleaf basketgrass!
>
>
>
> Dear Wavyleaf Warriors and Researchers,
>
>
>
> As you may know, wavyleaf basketgrass  (Oplismenus hirtellus ssp.
> undulatifolius) is quickly dominating local ecosystems and is spreading
> at a seemingly unstoppable pace. The exciting news is that some predators
> have just been uncovered that prey upon this highly invasive species, in
> it's native range in Asia.
>
> On the website EOL, Encyclopedia of Life, which cross references species
> interactions in each article, I just now discovered January 2015 lists
> of host/species iterations containing matches for Oplismenus
> hirtellus / undulatifolius​
>
>
>
>  http://eol.org/pages/1115850/data?data_point_uri_id=6036658
>
>
>
> Take a look at these species who all prey upon Oplismenus​ in their
> larval stage :
> *Isoteinon lamprospilus:*
>
> Host plants
>
> *Imperata cylindrica*
> (cogon grass)
>
>
> 
http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/research/projects/hostplants/search/list.dsml?searchPageURL=index.dsml&Genusqtype=starts+with&Genus=Isoteinon&Speciesqtype=starts+with&Species=lamprospilus 

>
> Miscanthus floridulus (aka Miscanthus japonicus)
> (giant miscanthus)
>
>
> 
http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/research/projects/hostplants/search/list.dsml?searchPageURL=index.dsml&Genusqtype=starts+with&Genus=Isoteinon&Speciesqtype=starts+with&Species=lamprospilus 

>
> Miscanthus sinensis
>
>
> 
http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/research/projects/hostplants/search/list.dsml?searchPageURL=index.dsml&Genusqtype=starts+with&Genus=Isoteinon&Speciesqtype=starts+with&Species=lamprospilus 

>
> Oplismenus hirtellus
>
>
> 
http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/research/projects/hostplants/search/list.dsml?searchPageURL=index.dsml&Genusqtype=starts+with&Genus=Isoteinon&Speciesqtype=starts+with&Species=lamprospilus 

>
> *All non-native invasives! Could this caterpillar be a silver bullet for
> biocontrols?*
>
>
>
>
>
> *Common Fivering (Ypthima baldus):*
>
> Attacks Oplismenus​, a species of Microstegium, and ​many other
> stiltgrass-like grasses
>
> http://www.inaturalist.org/observations/681359​
>
>
>
> *Ypthima esakii*:
>
> Attacks several species of Oplismenus and invasive Isachne globosa​
>
>
>
> *Dingy Bushbrown** (**Mycalesis francisca**):*
>
> Attacks invasive ​palmgrass, miscanthus, and two species of Oplismenus
>
>
>
>
>
> *Chinese Bushbrown (Mycalesis gotama)*
>
> ​ attacks invasive crab-grasses, invasive Isachne globosa​, Oplismenus
> species, but does eat native Leersia hexandra
>
>
>
> Palaeonympha opalina:
>
> Attacks miscanthus, Oplismenus hirtellus, Oplismenus undulatifolius,
> and 2 other non-native grasses.
>
>
>
> Mycalesis sangaica
>
> Attacks Oplismenus undulatifolius, invasive Palm grass, Pennisetum
> purpureum, Pennisetum alopecuroides, invasive Isachne globosa​, and
> invasive miscanthus
>
>
>
> For the compiled list of butterflies and host species see
> 
http://files.figshare.com/1674327/20140912_CompiledButterflyHostPlantRecords_JRFP.csv 

>
> *It is important that this data is spread to the right people, and
> that funding may be established to look at species like these much more
> extensively.  Wavyleaf basketgrass is quickly becoming one of the worst
> invasive plants to ever hit the Mid-Atlantic, and all possible data on the
> control of this species will be is highly valuable.  It is our hope that
> this species will one day be controlled, and species such as these
> butterflies might hold some potential to become safe and effective
> biocontrols for a species such as Wavyleaf Basketgrass.*
>
>
> Michael Ellis
>
> Non-Native Invasive Plant Control
>
> Natural and Historical Resources Division, Park Ranger Office
>
> The Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission
>
> www.pgparks.com
>
>
>
>
>
> B.S. Wildlife Ecology & Management
> University of Maryland, College Park
>
> 240-429-5042
>
>
> ------------------------------
>    
>
> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> www.avast.com
>
>  
>



-- 
Rick Borchelt
College Park, MD
preferred personal email:  rborchelt |AT| gmail |DOT| com

http://leplog.wordpress.com
Subject: RE: Spread the News! New findings published 2015: Predators of Wavyleaf basketgrass!
From: "'Marc Imlay' ialm AT erols.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2015 05:17:31 -0500
Are any of these butterflies native to Eastern USA?

 

Marc Imlay, PhD, Chair, Biological control working Group  

Conservation biologist, Park Ranger Office, Non-native Invasive Plant Control 
coordinator. 

(301) 442-5657 cell    ialm AT erols.com
Natural and Historical Resources Division
The  Maryland-National   Capital   Park  and Planning Commission
  www.pgparks.com  

 

 

 

From: Ellis, Michael [mailto:Michael.Ellis AT pgparks.com] 
Sent: Friday, January 30, 2015 11:25 PM
To: Marc Imlay; Lowe, Kyle; Garrett, Chris; joel_floyd AT yahoo.com; 
kerrie.kyde AT maryland.gov; Robert B. Trumbule -MDA-; Bergmann, Carole; 
MCP-WeedWarriors 

Subject: Spread the News! New findings published 2015: Predators of Wavyleaf 
basketgrass! 


 

Dear Wavyleaf Warriors and Researchers,

 

As you may know, wavyleaf basketgrass (Oplismenus hirtellus ssp. 
undulatifolius) is quickly dominating local ecosystems and is spreading at a 
seemingly unstoppable pace. The exciting news is that some predators have just 
been uncovered that prey upon this highly invasive species, in it's native 
range in Asia. 


On the website EOL, Encyclopedia of Life, which cross references species 
interactions in each article, I just now discovered January 2015 lists of 
host/species iterations containing matches for Oplismenus hirtellus / 
undulatifolius​ 


 

 http://eol.org/pages/1115850/data?data_point_uri_id=6036658

 

Take a look at these species who all prey upon Oplismenus​ in their larval 
stage : 

Isoteinon lamprospilus:



Host plants


Imperata cylindrica
(cogon grass)


http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/research/projects/hostplants/search/list.dsml?searchPageURL=index.dsml 
 
&Genusqtype=starts+with&Genus=Isoteinon&Speciesqtype=starts+with&Species=lamprospilus 



Miscanthus floridulus (aka Miscanthus japonicus)
(giant miscanthus)


http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/research/projects/hostplants/search/list.dsml?searchPageURL=index.dsml 
 
&Genusqtype=starts+with&Genus=Isoteinon&Speciesqtype=starts+with&Species=lamprospilus 



Miscanthus sinensis


http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/research/projects/hostplants/search/list.dsml?searchPageURL=index.dsml 
 
&Genusqtype=starts+with&Genus=Isoteinon&Speciesqtype=starts+with&Species=lamprospilus 



Oplismenus hirtellus


http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/research/projects/hostplants/search/list.dsml?searchPageURL=index.dsml 
 
&Genusqtype=starts+with&Genus=Isoteinon&Speciesqtype=starts+with&Species=lamprospilus 


All non-native invasives! Could this caterpillar be a silver bullet for 
biocontrols? 


 

 

Common Fivering (Ypthima baldus):




Attacks Oplismenus​, a species of Microstegium, and ​many other 
stiltgrass-like grasses 


http://www.inaturalist.org/observations/681359​

 

Ypthima esakii:



Attacks several species of Oplismenus and invasive Isachne globosa​

 

Dingy Bushbrown (Mycalesis francisca):



Attacks invasive ​palmgrass, miscanthus, and two species of Oplismenus 

 

 

Chinese Bushbrown (Mycalesis gotama)



​ attacks invasive crab-grasses, invasive Isachne globosa​, Oplismenus 
species, but does eat native Leersia hexandra 


 

Palaeonympha opalina:



Attacks miscanthus, Oplismenus hirtellus, Oplismenus undulatifolius, and 2 
other non-native grasses. 


 

Mycalesis sangaica



Attacks Oplismenus undulatifolius, invasive Palm grass, Pennisetum purpureum, 
Pennisetum alopecuroides, invasive Isachne globosa​, and invasive miscanthus 


 

For the compiled list of butterflies and host species see 
http://files.figshare.com/1674327/20140912_CompiledButterflyHostPlantRecords_JRFP.csv 


It is important that this data is spread to the right people, and that funding 
may be established to look at species like these much more extensively. 
Wavyleaf basketgrass is quickly becoming one of the worst invasive plants to 
ever hit the Mid-Atlantic, and all possible data on the control of this species 
will be is highly valuable. It is our hope that this species will one day be 
controlled, and species such as these butterflies might hold some potential to 
become safe and effective biocontrols for a species such as Wavyleaf 
Basketgrass. 



Michael Ellis

Non-Native Invasive Plant Control

Natural and Historical Resources Division, Park Ranger Office

The Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission

  www.pgparks.com 

 

 

B.S. Wildlife Ecology & Management
University of Maryland, College Park 

240-429-5042



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
http://www.avast.com
Subject: A hearty welcome to the newest butterfly org in Maryland .... !
From: "Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 00:18:36 -0500
Replacing WABC as the only local active butterfly club, it appears.

A Carroll Co-based chapter of the North American Butterfly Assn:

*NABA-Central Maryland Checkerspot*
Debbie Maeder  - President
E-mail: thecatsmeowdaylilygarden AT mail.com

-- 
Rick Borchelt
College Park, MD
preferred personal email:  rborchelt |AT| gmail |DOT| com

http://leplog.wordpress.com
Subject: FW: [Leps-l] books and liteerature [1 Attachment]
From: "'Smith, Richard H.' Richard.Smith AT jhuapl.edu [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2015 16:09:16 +0000
From: leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu [mailto:leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu] 
On Behalf Of monarchrst AT aol.com 

Sent: Monday, January 19, 2015 10:28 AM
To: metzlere AT msu.edu; leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
Subject: Re: [Leps-l] books and liteerature

Saw the first spring Monarch yesterday, migrating back into Arizona from the 
roosting sites NW of here. It was feeding on shoe-string acacia flowers along 
with two or three Queens. Little earlier than in most years. 


Ian Watkinson, Yuma, Arizona

_______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
Subject: New Year, New MD Field Checklist!
From: "Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2015 22:10:12 -0500
I've updated the MDLepsOdes' Butterfly Field Checklist for Maryland to
create the 2015 revision.  You can either print it double-sided and fold it
to make a trifold for field use, or simply print it and carry it as two
pages.  *IF* there's enough interest I may be cajoled into printing some on
heavy card stock for field use.

https://leplog.wordpress.com/2015/01/15/new-year-revised-md-checklist-for-2015/

-- 
Rick Borchelt
College Park, MD
preferred personal email:  rborchelt |AT| gmail |DOT| com

http://leplog.wordpress.com
Subject: Fall Canker Worm Spraying Needs to Stop
From: "Mona Miller runmede AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 15 Jan 2015 21:04:20 -0500
As you may know, Fairfax County and Prince William County, Virginia conduct
broadcast insecticide spraying programs targeting a native moth caterpillar
called the fall cankerworm.  The insecticide is deadly not only to the
native moth caterpillar, but also to all exposed butterfly and moth
caterpillars.  Please sign this petition asking these programs to be ended:

https://works.audubon.org/node/2651

More information can be found here:

http://www.audubonva.org/index.php/advocacy-efforts/asnv-urges-stop-killing-caterpillars 



http://www.connectionnewspapers.com/news/2015/jan/14/letter-county-shouldnt-spray-against-fall-cankerwo/ 

Letter: County Shouldn’t Spray Against Fall Cankerworm
David G. Furth, Ph.D.
Department of Entomology
Smithsonian Institution

-- 
Mona Miller
Herndon, VA (USA) }i{ }i{ }i{
"For the butterflies I must speak because they do not."
Subject: Re: Question on success of Monarch Watch milkweed seed packets
From: "Linda Hunt raven10322 AT hotmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 13 Jan 2015 00:02:19 -0500
Hi,

Ha to you. Like I'm going to ever get up early. The bar is across the street 
and seems to have a big breakfast crowd though we are only there in the evening 
for dinner. I doubt I can even beat their opening time. 


I think the info we give him needs to be simple and minimal and let him chase 
his tail without outside attention which only seems to rev him up. 


I'm going to pretend I'm not getting email on vacation and give no responses.

More showers tomorrow and the sun for a while.

Linda


> On Jan 12, 2015, at 2:24 PM, Denise Gibbs monarch301 AT verizon.net 
[VA-MD-DE-Bugs]  wrote: 

> 
> Dick,
> 
> Please ask your Howard County resident to contact me directly. I'm happy to 
discuss her questions about milkweed seeds in detail. 

> 
> First, let me just state that the Monarch Watch website is or may soon be 
offline, as they work on revamping it and moving it to another location. So 
please be patient while trying to access it. 

> 
> FYI-- Here's what's on the Monarch Waystations link of the website:
> 
> The Standard Monarch Waystation Seed Kit, for gardens east of the Rocky 
Mountains, contains the following milkweed species: 

> Butterfly Weed (Asclepias tuberosa) 
> Common Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) 
> Swamp Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata) 
> 
> Years ago, when these seeds were first offered for sale, and I still had my 
native plant nursery, I ordered and grew them. Germination rates were high. 
However, the seeds (at that time) were not Maryland genotypes. I'm not sure if 
seeds sold currently are specific to ecoregions, but I will ask. 

> 
> Those who want plants of local milkweed genotypes should responsibly collect 
their own seed, or may choose to order plugs from Monarch Watch's Milkweed 
Market at http://monarchwatch.org/milkweed/market/. Once at the website, check 
out the Ecoregions map to request plants from your ecoregion. Maryland is 
divided into 3 ecoregions: Western MD is #M221, the Piedmont is 221, and the 
Coastal Plain is #232. 

> 
> Each year, I collect seeds of the above 3 species from both MD's Piedmont and 
Coastal Plain and I send these to Monarch Watch. People in other states are 
doing the same for their regions. Then MW's participating nurseries grow the 
seeds in plug flats of 32 plugs, which are then sold back to customers at a 
reasonable price in the states where the seeds originated. Also, anyone can 
collect milkweed seeds and send them to Monarch Watch. The more seeds they 
receive, the more plugs they can grow and sell. This effort is just one of many 
being implemented by Monarch Watch and Monarch Joint Venture, 
http://monarchjointventure.org/our-work/ to plant milkweed on a massive scale 
across the country. 

> 
> If people want to buy their milkweeds from a local source, they may want to 
attend one of the native milkweed plant sales below: 

> 
> 1. Loudon Wildlife Conservancy in Leesburg, VA-- contact Nicole Hamilton at 
nhamilton AT loudounwildlife.org or 
http://www.loudounwildlife.org/Monarch_Campaign.html. Nicole orders plugs from 
Monarch Watch's Milkweed Market (grown from seeds gathered in VA). 

> 
> 2. Friends of Black Hill Nature Programs in Boyds, MD-- April native plant 
sale with Montgomery County, MD genotype milkweeds. Contact Park Naturalist 
Lynette Lenz at lynette.lenz AT montgomeryparks.org for the 2015 date and species 
availability. 

> 
> Any questions?  Feel free to contact me.
> 
> Denise 
> 
> Denise Gibbs
> Conservation Specialist
> Monarch Watch
> monarch301 AT verizon.net
> d.gibbs AT monarchwatch.org
> 
> 
> 
> 
>>  
>> All,
>> 
>>  
>> 
>> I have received a question from a Howard County, MD resident about the 
growing success of the milkweed seeds in the Monarch Watch seed packets (see 
http://www.monarchwatch.org/waystations/seed_kit.html ). I assume the common 
native species of milkweed are fairly hardy and their growing success anywhere 
in the U.S. is high regardless of the geographic location where the seeds were 
obtained. However, I have not actually tested this hypothesis, but maybe some 
of you can answer this right away from your firsthand experience. 

>> 
>>  
>> 
>> Dick Smith
>> 
>> Columbia, MD
>> 
> 
> 
Subject: Re: Question on success of Monarch Watch milkweed seed packets
From: "Denise Gibbs monarch301 AT verizon.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2015 14:24:22 -0500
Dick,

Please ask your Howard County resident to contact me directly.  I'm 
happy to discuss her questions about milkweed seeds in detail.

First, let me just state that the Monarch Watch website is or may soon 
be offline, as they work on revamping it and moving it to another 
location.  So please be patient while trying to access it.

FYI-- Here's what's on the /Monarch Waystations/ link of the website:

/The Standard Monarch Waystation Seed Kit, for gardens east of the Rocky 
Mountains, contains the following milkweed species://
//Butterfly Weed (Asclepias tuberosa) //
//Common Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) //
//Swamp Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata) /

Years ago, when these seeds were first offered for sale, and I still had 
my native plant nursery, I ordered and grew them. Germination rates were 
high. However, the seeds (at that time) were not Maryland genotypes. I'm 
not sure if seeds sold currently are specific to ecoregions, but I will 
ask.

Those who want plants of local milkweed genotypes should responsibly 
collect their own seed, or may choose to order plugs from Monarch 
Watch's *Milkweed Market* at http://monarchwatch.org/milkweed/market/.  
Once at the website, check out the Ecoregions map to request plants from 
your ecoregion.  Maryland is divided into 3 ecoregions:  Western MD is 
#M221, the Piedmont is 221, and the Coastal Plain is #232.

Each year, I collect seeds of the above 3 species from both MD's 
Piedmont and Coastal Plain and I send these to Monarch Watch. People in 
other states are doing the same for their regions. Then MW's 
participating nurseries grow the seeds in plug flats of 32 plugs, which 
are then sold back to customers at a reasonable price in the states 
where the seeds originated.  Also, anyone can collect milkweed seeds and 
send them to Monarch Watch. The more seeds they receive, the more plugs 
they can grow and sell. This effort is just one of many being 
implemented by Monarch Watch and Monarch Joint Venture, 
http://monarchjointventure.org/our-work/ to plant milkweed on a massive 
scale across the country.

If people want to buy their milkweeds from a local source, they may want 
to attend one of the native milkweed plant sales below:

1. Loudon Wildlife Conservancy in Leesburg, VA-- contact Nicole Hamilton 
at nhamilton AT loudounwildlife.org or 
http://www.loudounwildlife.org/Monarch_Campaign.html. Nicole orders 
plugs from Monarch Watch's Milkweed Market (grown from seeds gathered in 
VA).

2. Friends of Black Hill Nature Programs in Boyds, MD-- April native 
plant sale with Montgomery County, MD genotype milkweeds. Contact Park 
Naturalist Lynette Lenz at lynette.lenz AT montgomeryparks.org for the 2015 
date and species availability.

Any questions?  Feel free to contact me.

Denise

Denise Gibbs
Conservation Specialist
Monarch Watch
monarch301 AT verizon.net
d.gibbs AT monarchwatch.org



> All,
>
> I have received a question from a Howard County, MD resident about the 
> growing success of the milkweed seeds in the Monarch Watch seed 
> packets (see http://www.monarchwatch.org/waystations/seed_kit.html ).  
> I assume the common native species of milkweed are fairly hardy and 
> their growing success anywhere in the U.S. is high regardless of the 
> geographic location where the seeds were obtained.  However, I have 
> not actually tested this hypothesis, but maybe some of you can answer 
> this right away from your firsthand experience.
>
> Dick Smith
>
> Columbia, MD
>
> 
Subject: FW: [ButterflyConservation] North American Monarch habits and decline
From: "'Smith, Richard H.' Richard.Smith AT jhuapl.edu [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2015 18:54:18 +0000
From: butterflyconservation-admin AT xerces.org 
[mailto:butterflyconservation-admin AT xerces.org] On Behalf Of Scott Black 

Sent: Friday, January 09, 2015 10:47 AM
To: Chris van Swaay; Louis F. Cassar
Cc: butterflyconservation AT xerces.org
Subject: RE: [ButterflyConservation] Number of monarchs in Australia

Hi Chris et al. Although a small number of monarchs may have changed behavior 
and now overwinter in Florida or along the gulf coast this is not the case for 
the vast majority of the NA population. Monitoring monarchs outside of their 
overwintering sites is difficult. Because there are still millions of monarchs 
(likely 35-50 million down from at least half a billion) they can still be 
abundant in some areas that are monitored but missing for large former areas of 
there range. So some monitoring areas have remained relatively stable. That 
said we have many monitoring sites in the US and Canada where the numbers have 
really declined. Some sites near the great lakes have not been able to have 
monarch festivals because there were no monarchs. 


Here are some links to the petition that details decline. 
http://www.xerces.org/2014/12/29/monarch-butterfly-moves-toward-endangered-species-act-protection/ 



Best

_______

Scott Hoffman Black
Executive Director
     The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation
Chair
     IUCN Butterfly Specialist Group

The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation
628 NE Broadway, Suite 200, Portland, OR 97232, USA

sblack AT xerces.org 

Tel: (503) 232-6639 ext. 101
Toll free: 1-855-232-6639 ext. 101
Cell: (503) 449-3792
Connect with Xerces:
xerces.org 
Facebook 
E-newsletter 
Twitter 

The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation is an international nonprofit 
organization that protects wildlife through the conservation of invertebrates 
and their habitat. 

To join the Society, make a contribution, or read about our work, please visit 
www.xerces.org. 


Buy our best-selling book:
Attracting Native Pollinators. Protecting North America’s Bees and 
Butterflies 


From: Chris van Swaay 
[mailto:chris.vanswaay AT vlinderstichting.nl] 

Sent: Thursday, January 08, 2015 11:48 PM
To: Louis F. Cassar
Cc: Scott Black; 
butterflyconservation AT xerces.org 

Subject: Re: [ButterflyConservation] Number of monarchs in Australia

Hi Louis,

Nice to meet again. Indeed I also heard of many more sightings of D chrysippus, 
it must have been a relatively large migration from Africa. Lets see if they 
manage to survive. However this winter is not very helpful in that respect. 
Although D plexippus is also a strong flyer and famous migrant (probably THE 
most famous migrant butterfly), it doesn't seem to show this kind of migration 
behaviour in SW Europa and N Africa (or to a much, much lesser extent). 


Scott, I noticed the messages about the decline of D plexippus in Mexico, 
however I also seem to have understood that on the Butterfly Monitoring sites 
in the US numbers are still fairly stable. Is that correct? If so, and 
regarding the flexibility that the species shows in its migrating behaviour 
(see NZ and Europe), one wonders if part of them has changed its behaviour (as 
a result of climate change?) and is now overwintering somewhere else. They seem 
to be good in hiding, and if everyone only looks for them at THE one spot in 
Mexico, new spots might be easily missed... 

But of course I am no expert in this species (by far). Just wondered.

Best wishes,
Chris




******************
Chris van Swaay
De Vlinderstichting - Dutch Butterfly Conservation
Postbus 506, 6700 AM Wageningen, Netherlands
T: +31 317 467346
chris.vanswaay AT vlinderstichting.nl
Butterfly Conservation Europe
chris.vanswaay AT bc-europe.eu
http://about.me/chrisvanswaay
******************

De Vlinderstichting is een organisatie zonder winstoogmerk. Voor een deel van 
ons werk zijn wij afhankelijk van de steun van donateurs. Wilt u bijdragen aan 
vlinderbescherming? Neem dan een kijkje op onze website en help ons. De 
Vlinderstichting is door ouderenbond ANBO en Omroep MAX uitgeroepen tot het 
Goede Doel van het jaar. Een extra impuls voor de bescherming van vlinders en 
libellen! 


Vindt u ons leuk? Like De Vlinderstichting op 
Facebook of volg ons via 
Twitter. 

******************

2015-01-09 0:13 GMT+01:00 Louis F. Cassar 
>: 

Scott, Chris, greetings! That's quite correct. The only Danaid we get in the 
central Mediterranean is Danaus chrysippus, which migrates in small numbers 
every Autumn from northern Africa. Last year was an exception, when we 
witnessed hundreds (if not many more) migrating across the Islands (Malta), 
mostly congregating around coastal regions. It appears that this species has 
established a small but viable population near Palermo in Sicily. With respect 
to larval foodplant, we have no naturally occuring Asclepias curassavica, but 
other closely related species have been suggested, these being Periploca 
angustifolia (indigenous and relatively widespread), Gomphocarpus physocarpus 
(cultivated) and, possibly, Stephanotis floribunda (common in gardens). 


Best wishes,

louis


On Thursday, 8 January 2015, Chris van Swaay 
> 
wrote: 

Hi Scott,

In Europe they are rare and restricted to the southwest, meaning the southern 
edge of the Iberian peninsula, the Canary Islands and Madeira (and maybe a few 
on the Azores). Here they are sedentary, they stopped migrating. Numbers are 
hard to estimate, but generally low. I only saw more than a few in a park in 
Motril (S Spain mainland) and in the botanical garden of Oratava (Tenerife). 
Also other sources rarely ever give high numbers. It seems safe to assume total 
numbers in Europe rarely exceed thousands, often even only hundreds. 

Good to know most of Europe lacks wild Milkweeds, and even in S Spain and the 
Canary islands most are found in parks etc. where milkweeds are planted. 


Best wishes,
Chris




******************
Chris van Swaay
De Vlinderstichting - Dutch Butterfly Conservation
Postbus 506, 6700 AM Wageningen, Netherlands
T: +31 317 467346
chris.vanswaay AT vlinderstichting.nl
Butterfly Conservation Europe
chris.vanswaay AT bc-europe.eu
http://about.me/chrisvanswaay
******************

De Vlinderstichting is een organisatie zonder winstoogmerk. Voor een deel van 
ons werk zijn wij afhankelijk van de steun van donateurs. Wilt u bijdragen aan 
vlinderbescherming? Neem dan een kijkje op onze website en help ons. De 
Vlinderstichting is door ouderenbond ANBO en Omroep MAX uitgeroepen tot het 
Goede Doel van het jaar. Een extra impuls voor de bescherming van vlinders en 
libellen! 


Vindt u ons leuk? Like De Vlinderstichting op 
Facebook of volg ons via 
Twitter. 

******************

2015-01-08 17:43 GMT+01:00 Scott Black 
>: 

Does anyone on the list serve no of any resources that provide estimate for 
monarchs in Australia, the pacific islands or Europe. 


Thanks for any help.

Best

_______

Scott Hoffman Black
Executive Director
     The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation
Chair
     IUCN Butterfly Specialist Group

The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation
628 NE Broadway, Suite 200, Portland, OR 97232, USA

sblack AT xerces.org 

Tel: (503) 232-6639 ext. 101
Toll free: 1-855-232-6639 ext. 101
Cell: (503) 449-3792
Connect with Xerces:
xerces.org 
Facebook 
E-newsletter 
Twitter 

The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation is an international nonprofit 
organization that protects wildlife through the conservation of invertebrates 
and their habitat. 

To join the Society, make a contribution, or read about our work, please visit 
www.xerces.org. 


Buy our best-selling book:
Attracting Native Pollinators. Protecting North America’s Bees and 
Butterflies 




Subject: Question on success of Monarch Watch milkweed seed packets
From: "'Smith, Richard H.' Richard.Smith AT jhuapl.edu [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2015 16:55:33 +0000
All,

I have received a question from a Howard County, MD resident about the growing 
success of the milkweed seeds in the Monarch Watch seed packets (see 
http://www.monarchwatch.org/waystations/seed_kit.html ). I assume the common 
native species of milkweed are fairly hardy and their growing success anywhere 
in the U.S. is high regardless of the geographic location where the seeds were 
obtained. However, I have not actually tested this hypothesis, but maybe some 
of you can answer this right away from your firsthand experience. 


Dick Smith
Columbia, MD
Subject: RE: Upcoming Talk: "The Effects of Climate Change on Native Plants" .
From: "'Smith, Richard H.' Richard.Smith AT jhuapl.edu [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 30 Dec 2014 22:31:52 +0000
Harry,

Your response below apparently woke me up from a boring day, and so I thought 
of a few additional comments, which may show agreement with you or perhaps add 
more fuel to the fire for discussion. 


I do believe that we are seeing small effects locally of a climate shift - on 
the average, warmer winters, earlier springs, longer hot periods in the summer. 
In the plant community, many ephemerals have been starting to bloom a few weeks 
earlier on the average. However, in the DC area, I don't think that is causing 
actual changes in vegetation (changes due to foreign invasives are much more 
pervasive). Where you might see climate-related changes are in boreal frost 
pockets, such as way out in Garrett County. There has probably been some 
die-off of boreal plants there due to long periods of summer heat. This can 
happen in just few hot years. Without a balance of cool years, they do not 
bounce back, and you could have some loss of plant diversity. On the other 
hand, a shift of southern plants northward to fill in for the loss can take 
centuries, due to limitations in seed dispersal, except those spread by birds. 


For elements of the animal kingdom, which are more mobile for the most part, 
there does seem to be shift northward of the southern range boundaries of 
certain northern species. Butterflies are one example, from studies at least in 
Europe and s. California in just the past half century. I assume the shift is 
due mainly to poor adaptability to long summer hot spells, and not to a shift 
northward of their larval host plants, which I have not read is happening. 
Responses of any information to the contrary are certainly welcome. 


Dick Smith

From: VA-MD-DE-Bugs AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:VA-MD-DE-Bugs AT yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Tuesday, December 30, 2014 4:36 PM
To: VA-MD-DE-Bugs AT yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [VA-MD-DE-Bugs] Upcoming Talk: "The Effects of Climate Change on 
Native Plants" . 



Not to aim a fire hose at the global warming debate, but I find the statement:

<>

difficult to buy into. If global warming is indeed making our region warmer 
(don't tell that to my 15 dead Buddleia bushes that did not make it through 
last winter), we MAY be able to plant slightly more warm-adapted cultivated 
plants. But the local native flora would take many, many decades to change, not 
"significantly in the coming years". Most of our region's flora is adaptable to 
climate zones on either side of ours, so any change to the native ecosystem 
will likely be imperceptible to us. I won't get too eager and start planting 
Cabbage Palms in my garden just yet. If the last two winters (and this one) are 
a sign of winters to come, then global warming, at least in this region, will 
certainly be held in check. 


Harry Pavulaan


> ________________________________________________________________________
> 1. Upcoming Talk: "The Effects of Climate Change on Native Plants" . .
> Posted by: treetops5 AT comcast.net 
lkuder AT rocketmail.com 

> Date: Sun Dec 28, 2014 5:49 pm ((PST))
>
> Thought I'd forward this announcement as it pertains to native pollinators 
too. 

>
>
> The Effects of Climate Change on Native Plants
> 01/27/2015 7:30 PM
> Kensington Library, Kensington, MD
> Title: The Effects of Climate Change on Native Plants
> Speaker: Dr. Sara Via, Departments of Biology and Entomology, University of 
Maryland 

> Description: Climate change is our new reality. Increasing temperature and 
the severe weather it spawns have made widespread flooding and drought 
commonplace, affecting native plants in both wild and cultivated landscapes. 
Native plants face unique challenges under climate change, and ! local floras 
may change significantly in the coming years. . 

> Location: Kensington Library
> Directions: From the Washington Beltway (I-495)
> Take Exit 33, Connecticut Avenue, north to the third signal after the 
Beltway. Turn left onto Knowles and go 2 1/2 blocks to the library on the 
right. 

> The meeting is open to the public.
> Registration is not required.
> More information: The Effects of Climate Change on Native Plants
> For information on this event: http://mdflora.org/event-1815310 
http://mdflora.org/EmailTracker/LinkTracker.ashx?linkAndRecipientCode=Sy%2frQ%2bF3kuVG0TeHmb7yfifQnQWDqx%2fN%2bbWX66LVq3pXIKjcvzdzN5vIZfWHdncABSXCv%2fY%2bC8rmQXLNFw43wimK3oEDsg4UYSWywiAjhp0%3d 

> For a listing of all events: http://mdflora.org/events.html 
http://mdflora.org/EmailTracker/LinkTracker.ashx?linkAndRecipientCode=rbG1JbZY11jXrfx0c0DljVUG4fWTV7I0k4DWKBgmRvus7ES%2bofWlup4h7lOD09340sdNaDB7a7L1LcpGCeYeYV5i7lSsPayiek7ADvRfoEc%3d 

> Best regards,
> Maryland Native Plant Society
> http://mdflora.org/ 
http://mdflora.org/EmailTracker/LinkTracker.ashx?linkAndRecipientCode=BNgOg0ytxYcwd1OGJ2uar8MCd5XRGkkMgTKgWgK9zPBGz9TQdV7lQSakAujhckLNjP0nWwZy3v%2b6AxOynBZvWke6uh71%2b6jmVnA7WOKx2eo%3d 

>
>
> Best,
>
>
> Lisa Kuder
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Messages in this topic (1)
>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Yahoo Groups Links
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
Subject: RE: Upcoming Talk: "The Effects of Climate Change on Native Plants" .
From: "Harry Pavulaan harrypav AT hotmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 30 Dec 2014 21:35:35 +0000
Not to aim a fire hose at the global warming debate, but I find the statement:
 
<>
 
difficult to buy into. If global warming is indeed making our region warmer 
(don't tell that to my 15 dead Buddleia bushes that did not make it through 
last winter), we MAY be able to plant slightly more warm-adapted cultivated 
plants. But the local native flora would take many, many decades to change, not 
"significantly in the coming years". Most of our region's flora is adaptable to 
climate zones on either side of ours, so any change to the native ecosystem 
will likely be imperceptible to us. I won't get too eager and start planting 
Cabbage Palms in my garden just yet. If the last two winters (and this one) are 
a sign of winters to come, then global warming, at least in this region, will 
certainly be held in check. Harry Pavulaan 

> ________________________________________________________________________
> 1. Upcoming Talk: "The Effects of Climate Change on Native Plants" . . 
>     Posted by:  treetops5 AT comcast.net lkuder AT rocketmail.com
>     Date: Sun Dec 28, 2014 5:49 pm ((PST))
> 
> Thought I'd forward this announcement as it pertains to native pollinators 
too. 

>  
> 
>  The Effects of Climate Change on Native Plants
>  01/27/2015 7:30 PM 
>  Kensington Library, Kensington, MD
>  Title: The Effects of Climate Change on Native Plants
> Speaker: Dr. Sara Via, Departments of Biology and Entomology, University of 
Maryland 

> Description: Climate change is our new reality. Increasing temperature and 
the severe weather it spawns have made widespread flooding and drought 
commonplace, affecting native plants in both wild and cultivated landscapes. 
Native plants face unique challenges under climate change, and local floras may 
change significantly in the coming years. . 

>  Location: Kensington Library
>  Directions: From the Washington Beltway (I-495)
> Take Exit 33, Connecticut Avenue, north to the third signal after the 
Beltway. Turn left onto Knowles and go 2 1/2 blocks to the library on the 
right. 

>  The meeting is open to the public.
>  Registration is not required.
>  More information: The Effects of Climate Change on Native Plants 
> For information on this event: http://mdflora.org/event-1815310 
http://mdflora.org/EmailTracker/LinkTracker.ashx?linkAndRecipientCode=Sy%2frQ%2bF3kuVG0TeHmb7yfifQnQWDqx%2fN%2bbWX66LVq3pXIKjcvzdzN5vIZfWHdncABSXCv%2fY%2bC8rmQXLNFw43wimK3oEDsg4UYSWywiAjhp0%3d 

> For a listing of all events: http://mdflora.org/events.html 
http://mdflora.org/EmailTracker/LinkTracker.ashx?linkAndRecipientCode=rbG1JbZY11jXrfx0c0DljVUG4fWTV7I0k4DWKBgmRvus7ES%2bofWlup4h7lOD09340sdNaDB7a7L1LcpGCeYeYV5i7lSsPayiek7ADvRfoEc%3d 

>  Best regards, 
>  Maryland Native Plant Society 
> http://mdflora.org/ 
http://mdflora.org/EmailTracker/LinkTracker.ashx?linkAndRecipientCode=BNgOg0ytxYcwd1OGJ2uar8MCd5XRGkkMgTKgWgK9zPBGz9TQdV7lQSakAujhckLNjP0nWwZy3v%2b6AxOynBZvWke6uh71%2b6jmVnA7WOKx2eo%3d 

>  
>  
> Best,
>  
> 
>  Lisa Kuder
>  
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Messages in this topic (1)
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Yahoo Groups Links
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
 		 	   		  
Subject: Upcoming Talk: "The Effects of Climate Change on Native Plants" . . . and Insects
From: "treetops5 AT comcast.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 28 Dec 2014 17:49:34 -0800
Thought I'd forward this announcement as it pertains to native pollinators too. 

 

 The Effects of Climate Change on Native Plants
 01/27/2015 7:30 PM 
 Kensington Library, Kensington, MD
 Title: The Effects of Climate Change on Native Plants
 Speaker: Dr. Sara Via, Departments of Biology and Entomology, University of 
Maryland 

 Description: Climate change is our new reality. Increasing temperature and the 
severe weather it spawns have made widespread flooding and drought commonplace, 
affecting native plants in both wild and cultivated landscapes. Native plants 
face unique challenges under climate change, and local floras may change 
significantly in the coming years. . 

 Location: Kensington Library
 Directions: From the Washington Beltway (I-495)
 Take Exit 33, Connecticut Avenue, north to the third signal after the Beltway. 
Turn left onto Knowles and go 2 1/2 blocks to the library on the right. 

 The meeting is open to the public.
 Registration is not required.
 More information: The Effects of Climate Change on Native Plants 
 For information on this event: http://mdflora.org/event-1815310 
http://mdflora.org/EmailTracker/LinkTracker.ashx?linkAndRecipientCode=Sy%2frQ%2bF3kuVG0TeHmb7yfifQnQWDqx%2fN%2bbWX66LVq3pXIKjcvzdzN5vIZfWHdncABSXCv%2fY%2bC8rmQXLNFw43wimK3oEDsg4UYSWywiAjhp0%3d 

 For a listing of all events: http://mdflora.org/events.html 
http://mdflora.org/EmailTracker/LinkTracker.ashx?linkAndRecipientCode=rbG1JbZY11jXrfx0c0DljVUG4fWTV7I0k4DWKBgmRvus7ES%2bofWlup4h7lOD09340sdNaDB7a7L1LcpGCeYeYV5i7lSsPayiek7ADvRfoEc%3d 

 Best regards, 
 Maryland Native Plant Society 
 http://mdflora.org/ 
http://mdflora.org/EmailTracker/LinkTracker.ashx?linkAndRecipientCode=BNgOg0ytxYcwd1OGJ2uar8MCd5XRGkkMgTKgWgK9zPBGz9TQdV7lQSakAujhckLNjP0nWwZy3v%2b6AxOynBZvWke6uh71%2b6jmVnA7WOKx2eo%3d 

 
 
Best,
 

 Lisa Kuder
 

Subject: Re: Butterfly ID help
From: "June Tveekrem damselfly AT southernspreadwing.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Dec 2014 19:07:06 -0500
Now you all have me wondering if the image came through as intended. It was 
fairly large in my original attachment. Anyway, I'm glad you were able to 
identify it, Rick. 


June

Sent from my iPad

> On Dec 26, 2014, at 6:11 PM, "Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com 
[VA-MD-DE-Bugs]"  wrote: 

> 
> Yes, Silvery Checkerspot. Many of the black submarginal spots on the DHW 
clearly have white centers, which distinguish it from above from Pearl 
Crescent. But it took a lot of magnification of the image to see! 

> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
>> On Dec 26, 2014, at 4:55 PM, "June Tveekrem damselfly AT southernspreadwing.com 
[VA-MD-DE-Bugs]"  wrote: 

>> 
>>  
>> Is this a silvery checkerspot? Found last summer near the MD-PA line in 
Allegany County. 

>> 
>> June Tveekrem
>> Columbia, MD
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Sent from my iPhone
> 
> 
Subject: Re: Butterfly ID help
From: "Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Dec 2014 18:11:17 -0500
Yes, Silvery Checkerspot. Many of the black submarginal spots on the DHW 
clearly have white centers, which distinguish it from above from Pearl 
Crescent. But it took a lot of magnification of the image to see! 


Sent from my iPad

On Dec 26, 2014, at 4:55 PM, "June Tveekrem damselfly AT southernspreadwing.com 
[VA-MD-DE-Bugs]"  wrote: 


> Is this a silvery checkerspot? Found last summer near the MD-PA line in 
Allegany County. 

> 
> June Tveekrem
> Columbia, MD
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Sent from my iPhone
Subject: Re: Butterfly ID help
From: "sopol AT yahoo.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 26 Dec 2014 14:59:44 -0800
June, It is almost impossible to id with the image this small. However, it is 
either a Pearl Crescent or Silvery Checkerspot. If there are dots in the black 
cells along the bottom of the hind wing, it is likely Silvery Checkerspot. It's 
amazing what comes out on a warm day! Surprised it was alive after the cold 
snaps... 
Subject: Butterfly ID help [1 Attachment]
From: "June Tveekrem damselfly AT southernspreadwing.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Dec 2014 16:55:18 -0500
Is this a silvery checkerspot? Found last summer near the MD-PA line in 
Allegany County. 


June Tveekrem
Columbia, MD



<*> View Attachments on Web 
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/VA-MD-DE-Bugs/attachments/1723870163;_ylc=X3oDMTJxNjJoYTJhBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzE4NjMzNTYEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDY1Nzg2BHNlYwNhdHRhY2htZW50BHNsawN2aWV3T25XZWIEc3RpbWUDMTQxOTYzMDkzNg-- 

------------------------------------
Posted by: June Tveekrem 
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

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Sent from my iPhone
Subject: 2014 Butterfly Year in Review
From: "Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Dec 2014 12:52:07 -0500
The flight season for 2014 will probably be best remembered more for the
paucity of many normally common butterflies than it will be for the
explosion of at least one uncommon species and a very robust finish to the
season.

Review the highlights of the 2014 field season at

http://leplog.wordpress.com/2014/12/25/2014-the-mid-atlantic-butterfly-year-in-review/ 


-- 
Rick Borchelt
College Park, MD
preferred personal email:  rborchelt |AT| gmail |DOT| com

http://leplog.wordpress.com
Subject: How butterflies get their shine
From: "sopol AT yahoo.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 25 Dec 2014 04:36:07 -0800
A friend share this article and video about structural color from UC Berkley.
 http://www.wired.com/2014/12/butterflies-get-shine/?mbid=synd_slate 
http://www.wired.com/2014/12/butterflies-get-shine/?mbid=synd_slate 

 

 Sheryl Pollock
 Herndon, VA
Subject: New US swallowtail species described this month
From: "Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 24 Dec 2014 18:07:35 -0500
Kokiro Shiraiwa, Qian Cong and Nick Grishin describe this month in ZooKeys
a new swallowtail species from the southwest (type locality: USA, Texas,
Duval Co.) that they have named Western Giant Swallowtail.  Read more and
access the paper at

http://leplog.wordpress.com/2014/12/24/new-us-swallowtail-species-described-western-giant-swallowtail/ 



-- 
Rick Borchelt
College Park, MD
preferred personal email:  rborchelt |AT| gmail |DOT| com

http://leplog.wordpress.com
Subject: Re: Looking for Miner Bee Nests
From: "Alonso alonsolucy AT aol.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 19 Dec 2014 17:10:33 -0500
We have Anthrophora plumipes in the rock piles at Long Branch Nature Center in 
Arlington VA. We have them in other nearby parks as well on the upturned 
stumps. By the way, the chimneys are common place for Hibiscus bees Ptilothrix 
bombiformis which we have at Arlington Forest Park also in Arlington. 


Sent from my iPhone

> On Dec 17, 2014, at 7:52 PM, treetops5 AT comcast.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs] 
 wrote: 

> 
> Hello Fellow Bug Enthusiasts,
> 
>  
> 
> I am trying to locate nesting sites for two species of miner bees, Anthophora 
plumipes and Anthophora abrupta for a biology study being conducted by UMD’s 
Entomology Dept. Nesting habitat includes dry clay slopes, upturned tree stumps 
and walls of adobe structures. While each female builds her own nests, both 
species tend to form aggregations. A. abrupta are known for adding 
chimneys/turrets to their homes. If you happen to know of any sites that fit 
this description, I’d be much obliged if you could provide GPS coordinates or 
an address. Attached is a flier that includes more details and pictures. 

> 
>  
> 
> 
> 
>  
> 
> Thank you!
> 
>  
> 
> Lisa
> 
>  
> 
> Lisa Kuder
> 
> Graduate Student
> 
> Department of Entomology
> 
> University of Maryland
> 
> 4112 Plant Science Building
> 
> College Park, MD 20742
> 
> Email: lkuder AT umd.edu
> 
>  
> 
> 
> 
Subject: Re: Looking for Miner Bee Nests
From: "Hal White halwhite AT udel.edu [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 17:35:21 -0500
Lisa,
I have seen such chimneys in close association in a sloping clay bank 
north of the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal in Delaware near the Maryland 
border. The coordinates are 39.543N, -75.766W.
Hal White

On 12/17/2014 7:52 PM, treetops5 AT comcast.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs] wrote:
>
> Hello Fellow Bug Enthusiasts,
>
> I am trying to locate nesting sites for two species of miner bees, 
> /Anthophora plumipes/ and /Anthophora abrupta/ for a biology study 
> being conducted by UMDs Entomology Dept. Nesting habitat includes dry 
> clay slopes, upturned tree stumps and walls of adobe structures. While 
> each female builds her own nests, both species tend to form 
> aggregations. /A. abrupta/ are known for adding chimneys/turrets to 
> their homes. If you happen to know of any sites that fit this 
> description, Id be much obliged if you could provide GPS coordinates 
> or an address. Attached is a flier that includes more details and 
> pictures.
>
> Thank you!
>
> Lisa
>
> /Lisa Kuder/
>
> /Graduate Student/
>
> /Department of Entomology/
>
> /University of Maryland/
>
> /4112 Plant Science Building/
>
> /College Park, MD 20742/
>
> /Email:/ lkuder AT umd.edu 
>
> 
Subject: Looking for Miner Bee Nests [1 Attachment]
From: "treetops5 AT comcast.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 19:52:19 -0500
Hello Fellow Bug Enthusiasts,

 

I am trying to locate nesting sites for two species of miner bees,
Anthophora plumipes and Anthophora abrupta for a biology study being
conducted by UMD's Entomology Dept. Nesting habitat includes dry clay
slopes, upturned tree stumps and walls of adobe structures. While each
female builds her own nests, both species tend to form aggregations. A.
abrupta are known for adding chimneys/turrets to their homes. If you happen
to know of any sites that fit this description, I'd be much obliged if you
could provide GPS coordinates or an address. Attached is a flier that
includes more details and pictures. 

 



 

Thank you!

 

Lisa

 

Lisa Kuder

Graduate Student

Department of Entomology

University of Maryland

4112 Plant Science Building

College Park, MD 20742

Email: lkuder AT umd.edu

 
Subject: FW: [ButterflyConservation] John Shaw's new book
From: "'Smith, Richard H.' Richard.Smith AT jhuapl.edu [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 10 Dec 2014 17:20:04 +0000
From: butterflyconservation-admin AT xerces.org 
[mailto:butterflyconservation-admin AT xerces.org] On Behalf Of Bryan Reynolds 

Sent: Monday, December 08, 2014 8:26 PM
To: okleps; leps-talk; Butterflyconservation; DesertLeps AT yahoogroups.com
Subject: [ButterflyConservation] John Shaw's new book

All,

For those of you who enjoy photographing butterflies (and other natural history 
subjects), John Shaw has a new book coming out: 
http://www.amazon.com/Shaws-Guide-Digital-Nature-Photography/dp/0770434983 


Yippee!

Bryan
Bryan E. Reynolds

The Butterflies of the World Foundation
                www.botwf.org

Find me on Facebook:  Bryan Reynolds/Nature Photographer

My Flickr Photostream:  http://www.flickr.com/photos/78441846 AT N03/
Subject: Insect themed art show in February
From: "salobyrne AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 08 Dec 2014 08:40:12 -0800
I am coordinating a group art show for the Wilmington (DE) library for February 
2015 that will be insect and spider themed. I did a similar show last year with 
18 artists with a bird theme that was very successful. This is not about 
fantasy creatures - I would like the show to reflect the beauty of the natural 
world. 

 

 If anyone would like to submit a piece of artwork ( fine arts, sculpture, 
photography ), please contact me. The show will open Feb 6th as part of the 
First Friday Art Loop and will be up for the month of February. You will need 
to be available to install the work and to remove it at the end of the month. 

 

 I will need to see a sample of your work and get an idea of how many pieces 
you would like to submit. For more information, please contact me by email or 
by phone. 

 

 Thanks,
 

 Sally O'Byrne
 salobyrne AT gmail.com
 302-584-4783
  
Subject: National competition announced for digital capture of museum insect collections
From: "Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 6 Dec 2014 21:33:07 -0500
 NSF and the American Institute of Biological Sciences have launched a
national competition to develop a new tool to digitally capture images and
data from museum insect collections.  The initiative will award $1 million
to the individual or team that develops a novel way to accurately and
efficiently capture digital images of insect specimens and their associated
data from a standard museum drawer of insects. Details at
http://leplog.wordpress.com/2014/12/06/beyond-the-bug-box/


-- 
Rick Borchelt
College Park, MD
preferred personal email:  rborchelt |AT| gmail |DOT| com

http://leplog.wordpress.com
Subject: Re: The Book of Beetles book signing at the National Museum of Natural History [1 Attachment]
From: "'Arthur V. Evans' arthurevans AT verizon.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 01 Dec 2014 10:18:50 -0500
Just found this link to the event itself: 
. 


Arthur V. Evans, D.Sc.

Adjunct Assistant Professor
Biology Department, Randolph-Macon College, Ashland, VA
Biology Department, University of Richmond, Richmond, VA
Biology Department, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA

Research Associate:
Department of Recent Invertebrates, Virginia Museum of Natural History, 
Martinsville, VA 


Research Collaborator:
Department of Entomology, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC

What's Bugging You?
http://arthurevans.wordpress.com

What's Bugging You? is on 88.9 FM WCVE Richmond Public Radio
http://www.ideastations.org/radio/archive/people/dr-art-evans

Join me on Facebook  to find out 
about upcoming lectures, books, and other insect events 


My new book, Beetles of Eastern North America, is available worldwide through 
your favorite bookseller. 




On Dec 1, 2014, at 10:12 AM, "'Arthur V. Evans' arthurevans AT verizon.net 
[VA-MD-DE-Bugs]"  wrote: 


> 
> 
> Greetings all!
> 
> Please join Pat Bouchard, Lourdes Chamorro, and myself at the Smithsonian's 
National Museum of Natural History this Saturday, 6 December at 1:30 PM in the 
book store for a signing of The Book of Beetles, published by the University of 
Chicago Press 
. The book 
features razor-sharp images of 600 beetle species from around the world. 

> 
> Please share this post!
> 
> Sincerely, ART EVANS
> <9780226082752.jpg>
> Arthur V. Evans, D.Sc.
> 
> Adjunct Assistant Professor
> Biology Department, Randolph-Macon College, Ashland, VA
> Biology Department, University of Richmond, Richmond, VA
> Biology Department, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA
> 
> Research Associate:
> Department of Recent Invertebrates, Virginia Museum of Natural History, 
Martinsville, VA 

> 
> Research Collaborator:
> Department of Entomology, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC
> 
> What's Bugging You?
> http://arthurevans.wordpress.com
> 
> What's Bugging You? is on 88.9 FM WCVE Richmond Public Radio
> http://www.ideastations.org/radio/archive/people/dr-art-evans
> 
> Join me on Facebook  to find 
out about upcoming lectures, books, and other insect events 

> 
> My new book, Beetles of Eastern North America, is available worldwide through 
your favorite bookseller. 

> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
Subject: The Book of Beetles book signing at the National Museum of Natural History [2 Attachments]
From: "'Arthur V. Evans' arthurevans AT verizon.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 01 Dec 2014 10:12:33 -0500
Greetings all!

Please join Pat Bouchard, Lourdes Chamorro, and myself at the Smithsonian's 
National Museum of Natural History this Saturday, 6 December at 1:30 PM in the 
book store for a signing of The Book of Beetles, published by the University of 
Chicago Press 
. The book 
features razor-sharp images of 600 beetle species from around the world. 


Please share this post!

Sincerely, ART EVANS

Arthur V. Evans, D.Sc.

Adjunct Assistant Professor
Biology Department, Randolph-Macon College, Ashland, VA
Biology Department, University of Richmond, Richmond, VA
Biology Department, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA

Research Associate:
Department of Recent Invertebrates, Virginia Museum of Natural History, 
Martinsville, VA 


Research Collaborator:
Department of Entomology, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC

What's Bugging You?
http://arthurevans.wordpress.com

What's Bugging You? is on 88.9 FM WCVE Richmond Public Radio
http://www.ideastations.org/radio/archive/people/dr-art-evans

Join me on Facebook  to find out 
about upcoming lectures, books, and other insect events 


My new book, Beetles of Eastern North America, is available worldwide through 
your favorite bookseller. 



Subject: Re: [NEleps] Cabbage White!!??
From: "Mona Miller runmede AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 23 Nov 2014 23:34:27 -0500
I wonder what tomorrow will bring when it goes up to 70F in Northern VA,
that is if the sun shines.

On Sun, Nov 23, 2014 at 11:33 PM, Harry Pavulaan harrypav AT hotmail.com
[NEleps]  wrote:

>
>
>
> While at Home Depot in Leesburg, VA. today, Nov. 23, a Cabbage White flew
> right past me in the parking lot.  I had to do a double take on this one
> and tried to follow it a bit to know I wasn't imagining things.  A quick
> check on my phone indicated the air temp was 44 degrees!  Thin overcast
> with filtered sun, but no breeze.  This little bug survived the record cold
> temps of the last few days either in the chrysalis stage, or adult stage
> after emerging earlier during a brief warm-up.
>
> Harry Pavulaan
>
>  
>



-- 
Mona Miller
Herndon, VA (USA) }i{ }i{ }i{
"For the butterflies I must speak because they do not."
Subject: Cabbage White!!??
From: "Harry Pavulaan harrypav AT hotmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 24 Nov 2014 04:33:33 +0000
 While at Home Depot in Leesburg, VA. today, Nov. 23, a Cabbage White flew 
right past me in the parking lot. I had to do a double take on this one and 
tried to follow it a bit to know I wasn't imagining things. A quick check on my 
phone indicated the air temp was 44 degrees! Thin overcast with filtered sun, 
but no breeze. This little bug survived the record cold temps of the last few 
days either in the chrysalis stage, or adult stage after emerging earlier 
during a brief warm-up. Harry Pavulaan 
Subject: Stocking stuffer field guides
From: "Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 22 Nov 2014 20:15:42 -0500
Just in time for holiday gifting -- two new(ish) field guides that will be
useful to mid-Atlantic lepsters are reviewed at LepLog.

See

http://leplog.wordpress.com/2014/11/22/a-tale-of-two-field-guides-illinois-and-indiana/ 



-- 
Rick Borchelt
College Park, MD
preferred personal email:  rborchelt |AT| gmail |DOT| com

http://leplog.wordpress.com
Subject: Continent-wide Monarch Conservation Activities
From: "'Smith, Richard H.' Richard.Smith AT jhuapl.edu [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 19 Nov 2014 20:40:42 +0000
Excerpt from article below:

In the last year, a revived energy has been brought to monarch conservation in 
North America -- in large part due to President Obama issuing a memorandum that 
directs U.S. government agencies to do what they can to protect the butterfly. 
Xerces has been protecting monarchs since the 1980s, placing us in a good 
position to help. Through the Monarch Joint Venture, Xerces is helping the U.S. 
Fish and Wildlife Service and Mexican agencies revise the tri-national North 
American Monarch Conservation Plan. We are also assisting other federal 
agencies to develop monarch conservation strategies (including the U.S. 
Geological Survey and the U.S. Forest Service) and collaborating with 
NatureServe to complete a status review of the monarch in North America. 


But don't worry if you are not able to help count monarchs this fall, there are 
still things you can do to conserve monarchs: 


 * Help map milkweed. Each spring, monarchs leave the California coast and 
disperse across several western states, searching for milkweed plants on which 
to lay their eggs. We are also searching for milkweed plants and creating maps 
of likely monarch breeding areas. You can help with this by contributing to the 
Milkweed 
Survey 
in spring and summer. 

 * Plant native milkweed. This can be in your backyard, at your workplace, or 
at your school. Find sources of local, native milkweed seed in your state using 
our Milkweed Seed 
Finder. 

 * Plant native flowers. Monarchs need nectar to provide energy to migrate, 
breed, and overwinter. For information about which flowers to plant, visit the 
Bring Back the Pollinators web 
page. 

 * Avoid using insecticides and herbicides. These may kill butterflies or 
caterpillars, or kill the plants that monarchs use for nectaring or breeding. 

 * Get involved in another citizen science project. The Western Monarch Count 
web site has a directory of 
projects 
in other parts of the continent. 

Support the Xerces 
Society's 
monarch conservation efforts. 


From: The Xerces Society [mailto:enewsletter AT xerces.org]
Sent: Wednesday, November 19, 2014 2:44 PM
To: Smith, Richard H.
Subject: A new web site is launched to support volunteers counting monarchs in 
California 


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HOW MANY MONARCHS? ONE...TWO...THREE...


A new web site is launched to support volunteers counting monarchs in 
California -- and new energy is brought to monarch conservation in the United 
States thanks to a memo from the president. 


Knowing how many monarch butterflies there are and where they overwinter is 
vital information that shapes protection efforts. Monarchs ranging from British 
Columbia to Arizona migrate primarily to the California coast, where they 
overwinter in wooded groves scattered from San Diego to Mendocino. The Western 
Monarch Count is an annual citizen-science project that collects data on the 
status of these monarchs during the overwintering season. Xerces has launched 
the Western Monarch Count web 
site 
to support this effort and help coordinate the count. 


The height of this volunteer effort occurs during three weeks surrounding the 
Thanksgiving holiday. Those three weeks are starting now -- and you could join 
in! Roughly 100 overwintering sites are monitored each year, but we know of 
approximately 450 sites that monarchs are currently using or have used in the 
past. With your help we can monitor more sites and paint a clearer picture of 
the status of this vital monarch habitat. The new 
website 
allows volunteers to find sites to monitor, read information about those sites, 
and contact regional count coordinators. The project will also use social media 
to enable volunteers to connect with each other and share count information. 


In the last year, a revived energy has been brought to monarch conservation in 
North America -- in large part due to President Obama issuing a memorandum that 
directs U.S. government agencies to do what they can to protect the butterfly. 
Xerces has been protecting monarchs since the 1980s, placing us in a good 
position to help. Through the Monarch Joint Venture, Xerces is helping the U.S. 
Fish and Wildlife Service and Mexican agencies revise the tri-national North 
American Monarch Conservation Plan. We are also assisting other federal 
agencies to develop monarch conservation strategies (including the U.S. 
Geological Survey and the U.S. Forest Service) and collaborating with 
NatureServe to complete a status review of the monarch in North America. 


But don't worry if you are not able to help count monarchs this fall, there are 
still things you can do to conserve monarchs: 


 * Help map milkweed. Each spring, monarchs leave the California coast and 
disperse across several western states, searching for milkweed plants on which 
to lay their eggs. We are also searching for milkweed plants and creating maps 
of likely monarch breeding areas. You can help with this by contributing to the 
Milkweed 
Survey 
in spring and summer. 

 * Plant native milkweed. This can be in your backyard, at your workplace, or 
at your school. Find sources of local, native milkweed seed in your state using 
our Milkweed Seed 
Finder. 

 * Plant native flowers. Monarchs need nectar to provide energy to migrate, 
breed, and overwinter. For information about which flowers to plant, visit the 
Bring Back the Pollinators web 
page. 

 * Avoid using insecticides and herbicides. These may kill butterflies or 
caterpillars, or kill the plants that monarchs use for nectaring or breeding. 

 * Get involved in another citizen science project. The Western Monarch Count 
web site has a directory of 
projects 
in other parts of the continent. 

 * Support the Xerces 
Society's 
monarch conservation efforts. 





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MEMBER 


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Subject: Re: butterfly sightings
From: "Denise Gibbs monarch301 AT verizon.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2014 09:49:53 -0500
It was worn, as was the variegated fritillary.
Denise

On 11/11/2014 7:55 PM, Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs] 
wrote:
> Meadow Frits have been hanging out late this year. What condition was 
> it in?
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> On Nov 11, 2014, at 7:28 PM, "Denise Gibbs monarch301 AT verizon.net 
>  [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" 
> > 
> wrote:
>
>> Little Bennett Reg. Park, Nov 10, 2-3pm
>> 1/2 mile walk through meadow above golf course ponds:
>>
>> cabbage white - 2
>> clouded sulphur - 4
>> orange sulphur - 11
>> pearl crescent - 1
>> variegated fritillary - 1
>> meadow fritillary - 1
>> common buckeye - 2 (both fresh)
>> painted lady - 1
>>
>> hundreds of grasshoppers
>> dozens of honeybees
>>
>> Still in bloom: scattered patches of
>> red clover
>> small white aster
>> chicory
>> knapweed
>> re-bloom of Deptford pink
>>
>> Denise Gibbs
>>
> 
Subject: Re: butterfly sightings
From: "Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2014 19:55:12 -0500
Meadow Frits have been hanging out late this year. What condition was it in?

Sent from my iPad

On Nov 11, 2014, at 7:28 PM, "Denise Gibbs monarch301 AT verizon.net 
[VA-MD-DE-Bugs]"  wrote: 


> Little Bennett Reg. Park, Nov 10, 2-3pm
> 1/2 mile walk through meadow above golf course ponds:
> 
> cabbage white - 2
> clouded sulphur - 4
> orange sulphur - 11
> pearl crescent - 1
> variegated fritillary - 1
> meadow fritillary - 1
> common buckeye - 2 (both fresh)
> painted lady - 1
> 
> hundreds of grasshoppers
> dozens of honeybees
> 
> Still in bloom: scattered patches of
> red clover
> small white aster
> chicory
> knapweed
> re-bloom of Deptford pink
> 
> Denise Gibbs
> 
> 
Subject: butterfly sightings
From: "Denise Gibbs monarch301 AT verizon.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 11 Nov 2014 19:28:00 -0500
Little Bennett Reg. Park, Nov 10, 2-3pm
1/2 mile walk through meadow above golf course ponds:

cabbage white - 2
clouded sulphur - 4
orange sulphur - 11
pearl crescent - 1
variegated fritillary - 1
meadow fritillary - 1
common buckeye - 2 (both fresh)
painted lady - 1

hundreds of grasshoppers
dozens of honeybees

Still in bloom:  scattered patches of
red clover
small white aster
chicory
knapweed
re-bloom of Deptford pink

Denise Gibbs






------------------------------------
Posted by: Denise Gibbs 
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

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Subject: Grand Challenges for MD Lepidopterists
From: "Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 10 Nov 2014 20:19:09 -0500
I’ve been thinking through what some of the top questions are for Maryland
lepidopterists -- amateur or professional -- to pursue, and the list is
LONG! For contemplation over the winter months, though, here’s a short Top
10 list of challenges that will have me in the field next season:

http://leplog.wordpress.com/2014/11/10/marylands-big-butterfly-challenges/


-- 
Rick Borchelt
College Park, MD
preferred personal email:  rborchelt |AT| gmail |DOT| com

http://leplog.wordpress.com
Subject: RE: Fw: [MDBirding] Frederick municipal forest threat
From: "'Smith, Richard H.' Richard.Smith AT jhuapl.edu [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 7 Nov 2014 16:50:33 +0000
Justin, Tom,

The whole Frederick Municipal Watershed?!! You can't be serious!! We definitely 
need to protect the known sites up there for Edwards' Hairstreak. The Watershed 
is one of only 3-4 areas in the whole state where this State Endangered Species 
is known to occur in Maryland now! 


Jen,

Since this is a state endangered butterfly, is there some way that your MD DNR 
Wildlife and Heritage Service can become part of this decision process and 
intervene on the extent of any alterations planned for this watershed area? The 
Frederick people are probably unaware at the present time that they need to 
deal with the preservation of endangered species up there. The place is also a 
hotbed for Timber Rattlesnakes, another Maryland Endangered Species. This is a 
much greater issue here than just a few nature clubs "not liking and voicing 
isolated opposition" to what's going on. We need to let these people know that 
mountain biking and reservoir management are NOT the only things for which this 
watershed area has importance and even legal significance( for protected 
species)!!! 


Dick Smith

From: VA-MD-DE-Bugs AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:VA-MD-DE-Bugs AT yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Friday, November 07, 2014 10:08 AM
To: List Serve washbutterflies; List Serve VA-MD-DE-Bugs
Subject: [VA-MD-DE-Bugs] Fw: [MDBirding] Frederick municipal forest threat



This is bad news for many of us, and for threatened Edwards Hairstreaks that 
breed in the watershed. 


Tom Stock
Silver Spring MD

Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

-----Original Message-----
From: JC >
Sender: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com
Date: Fri, 07 Nov 2014 03:30:26
To: >
Subject: [MDBirding] Frederick municipal forest threat

Just wanted to put this out there, not sure how many of you bird or get out to 
the Municipal forest (aka 'watershed')of Frederick but the city is entertaining 
pressure from a downhill and mountain bikers group to turn the forest into a 
bicycle park. Not good from a wildlife perspective.....There are meetings with 
the city that are open to the public of course and I am one of just a few 
attending that opposes the idea! The 'naturalists' 'side of the debate could 
use help!! If prefferred you can mail me at 
justinian2120 AT hotmail.com I can get you there 
for the next meeting(next Thursday, Nov. 13th). The watershed is on Catoctin 
mountain and is a ~8,000 acre tract of mixed hardwood and Eastern Hemlock 
forest surrounding two of the states' finest trout streams (fishing creek and 
little fishing creek). Increasingly rare habitat for many bird species and 
other flora and fauna alike. Help! 


Justin
910-352-4601

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Subject: Re: Fw: [MDBirding] Frederick municipal forest threat
From: "David Smith lacsmith12 AT comcast.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 07 Nov 2014 10:58:52 -0500
Thanks for posting this Tom.  Justin reached out to the Audubon Society 
of Central Maryland yesterday as well.  We will add our voice to those 
seeking conservation of the watershed for passive recreational use and 
against the cutting of any new trails.  I also brought this up at the 
Frederick Bird Club meeting last night in Frederick and just sent the 
officers and other concerned members a copy of Justin's email.  The Bird 
Club is also opposed to more trails and more impacts to the forest.

David Smith


------------------------------------
Posted by: David Smith 
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

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Subject: Fw: [MDBirding] Frederick municipal forest threat
From: "altomomatic AT verizon.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 7 Nov 2014 15:07:37 +0000
This is bad news for many of us, and for threatened Edwards Hairstreaks that 
breed in the watershed. 


Tom Stock
Silver Spring MD

Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

-----Original Message-----
From: JC 
Sender: mdbirding AT googlegroups.com
Date: Fri, 07 Nov 2014 03:30:26 
To: 
Subject: [MDBirding] Frederick municipal forest threat

Just wanted to put this out there, not sure how many of you bird or get out to 
the Municipal forest (aka 'watershed')of Frederick but the city is entertaining 
pressure from a downhill and mountain bikers group to turn the forest into a 
bicycle park. Not good from a wildlife perspective.....There are meetings with 
the city that are open to the public of course and I am one of just a few 
attending that opposes the idea! The 'naturalists' 'side of the debate could 
use help!! If prefferred you can mail me at justinian2120 AT hotmail.com I can get 
you there for the next meeting(next Thursday, Nov. 13th). The watershed is on 
Catoctin mountain and is a ~8,000 acre tract of mixed hardwood and Eastern 
Hemlock forest surrounding two of the states' finest trout streams (fishing 
creek and little fishing creek). Increasingly rare habitat for many bird 
species and other flora and fauna alike. Help! 


Justin
910-352-4601

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Posted by: altomomatic AT verizon.net
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Subject: butterfly sightings Oct 27
From: "Denise Gibbs monarch301 AT verizon.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Oct 2014 09:02:48 -0400
C&O Canal Towpath, Harper's Ferry WV
3 species of asters still in bloom

cabbage white
clouded sulphur
orange sulphur
eastern tailed blue
pearl crescent
mourning cloak
eastern comma
question mark
common buckeye
variegated fritillary
red admiral
American lady
monarch

Rob & Denise Gibbs


------------------------------------
Posted by: Denise Gibbs 
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Subject: Late Season Butterflies in Southern Carroll County
From: "David Smith lacsmith12 AT comcast.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 27 Oct 2014 16:59:21 -0400
Butterflies observed in my garden/meadow along the South Branch of the 
Patapsco River in southern Carroll County on 10/25/14:

Cabbage White - 1
Orange Sulphur - 3
Clouded Sulphur - 2
Eastern Tailed Blue - 1
Red-banded Hairstreak - 1
Variegated Fritillary - 1
Pearl Crescent - 3
Common Buckeye - 3
Sachem - 5

David Smith


------------------------------------
Posted by: David Smith 
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Subject: Spiders
From: "'Alex Netherton' blueridgediscovery AT charter.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 25 Oct 2014 15:35:34 -0400
Is anyone here interested in spiders? I have been seeing hundreds, possibly 
many more, in my leaf covered lawn here in Western NC. All seen at night with 
the aid of a head mounted lamp. 

If so, I will try to figure out a way to post them; Yahoo would not accept 
them, even re-sized, but I think I can link to picasa or Flickr. 


Though I am in NC, I think we share many species...

Enjoy!

Alex Netherton
Asheville, NC
http://blueridgediscovery.org
Amateur call W5ALX
Subject: Monarchs over the Bay
From: "Craig Crotts crottscraig AT yahoo.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2014 00:43:06 +0000 (UTC)
Saturday night I was returning home to the Eastern Shore via the Bay Bridge 
Tunnel after attending a conference in Suffolk, Va. I made a brief stop at the 
Grill on Seagull Island and found the buildings next to the parking lot covered 
in Monarchs, there were quite a few flying in the still air on the downwind 
side of the buildings and I can say that there were many large groupings of 
many dozens of insects clinging to the brickwork. I couldn't get any real 
count, it was getting very dark as the weather was getting really 
cruddy.  There were many more than I have seen in one place since I was 
young, I was very impressed by the sight and was very glad that they found a 
place of refuge before the storm hit.  
Subject: FW: [valeps] Chincoteague NWR, 9-10 Oct
From: "'Smith, Richard H.' Richard.Smith AT jhuapl.edu [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 14:49:41 +0000
Inspirational note from Mark Adams.

From: valeps AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:valeps AT yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Tuesday, October 21, 2014 9:18 PM
To: valeps AT yahoogroups.com
Subject: [valeps] Chincoteague NWR, 9-10 Oct


On Thursday-Friday, 9-10 October, I witnessed an impressive (to me, at least) 
flight of hundreds of fresh Monarchs heading generally south at the 
Chincoteague NWR, especially along the beach. Some stopped to nectar on the 
plentiful seaside goldenrod; others maintained a steady pace to Mexico. I could 
always see at least 1, and often 5 to 10, Monarchs in flight and/or perched 
along the beach. The weather was sunnier on Thursday, and the Monarch numbers 
were better that day. I saw only a few other late-season butterflies at 
Chincoteague NWR, but saw and/or heard nearly 100 species of birds. Always an 
interesting place to visit. 


9-10 October 2014
Chincoteague NWR, VA

Monarch, 100s
Common Buckeye, 10
Cabbage White, 3
Red Admiral, 1
Sleepy Orange, 1 (winter form)


Subject: Re: Caterpiller?
From: "Alonso alonsolucy AT aol.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 21:18:05 -0400
Banded Tussock Moth?

Sent from my iPad

> On Oct 10, 2014, at 9:14 PM, Guineabird AT aol.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs] 
 wrote: 

> 
> Thought this might be a Laugher cat but now am not so sure.
> What do you think?
>  
> SNPCATp
>  
> 
> Thanks,
>  
> Gail Frantz
> Old Hanover Rd
> Baltimore County
> guineabird AT aol.com
> 
> 
Subject: Caterpiller? [1 Attachment]
From: "Guineabird AT aol.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 21:14:29 -0400
Thought this might be a Laugher cat but now am not so sure.
What do you think?
 
SNPCATp
 

Thanks,  

Gail  Frantz
Old Hanover Rd
Baltimore  County
guineabird AT aol.com
Subject: Re: Single gene responsible for monarch migration
From: "Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 2 Oct 2014 08:56:37 -0400
It's the Washington Post link at the bottom of the first email. 

> On Oct 2, 2014, at 7:38 AM, "Sheryl Pollock sopol AT yahoo.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" 
 wrote: 

> 
> Can you provide the link to the Monarch article? I can't find it. Thanks, 
Sheryl Pollock 

> 
> 
> On Thursday, October 2, 2014 7:12 AM, "foresmiths AT comcast.net 
[VA-MD-DE-Bugs]"  wrote: 

> 
> 
>  
> Hey guys,
> 
> This article below highlights how fragile the monarch migration is.
> 
> Mike Smith
> 
> From: "Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com" 
> To: mdlepsodes AT googlegroups.com, "Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com" 
, "washbutterflies" 
 

> Sent: Wednesday, October 1, 2014 7:10:34 PM
> Subject: [VA-MD-DE-Bugs] Single gene responsible for monarch migration
> 
>  
> Today's genetics news that a SINGLE GENE involving flight musculature 
characterizes migratory vs nonmigratory populations of migrating butterflies 
should put the final nail in the coffin of butterfly releases and even 
commercial traffic for educational purposes. Introducing the nonmigrant version 
of this gene into migratory populations could very well end the migratory 
phenomenon with much more certainty than the hand-wringing over milkweeds, 
GMOs, and deforestation in Mexico. 

> 
> 
http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2014/10/01/the-ability-of-monarch-butterflies-to-migrate-may-hinge-on-a-single-gene/ 

> 
> Sent from my iPad
> 
> 
> 
> 
Subject: Re: Fwd: Single gene responsible for monarch migration
From: "Sheryl Pollock sopol AT yahoo.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 2 Oct 2014 11:38:50 +0000 (UTC)
Can you provide the link to the Monarch article? I can't find it. Thanks, 
Sheryl Pollock 


 On Thursday, October 2, 2014 7:12 AM, "foresmiths AT comcast.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" 
 wrote: 

   

     Hey guys,
This article below highlights how fragile the monarch migration is.
Mike Smith
From: "Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com" 
To: mdlepsodes AT googlegroups.com, "Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com" 
, "washbutterflies" 
 

Sent: Wednesday, October 1, 2014 7:10:34 PM
Subject: [VA-MD-DE-Bugs] Single gene responsible for monarch migration

  Today's genetics news that a SINGLE GENE involving flight musculature 
characterizes migratory vs nonmigratory populations of migrating butterflies 
should put the final nail in the coffin of butterfly releases and even 
commercial traffic for educational purposes. Introducing the nonmigrant version 
of this gene into migratory populations could very well end the migratory 
phenomenon with much more certainty than the hand-wringing over milkweeds, 
GMOs, and deforestation in Mexico.  


http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2014/10/01/the-ability-of-monarch-butterflies-to-migrate-may-hinge-on-a-single-gene/ 


Sent from my iPad   
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Subject: Fwd: Single gene responsible for monarch migration
From: "foresmiths AT comcast.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 2 Oct 2014 11:12:22 +0000 (UTC)
Hey guys, 

This article below highlights how fragile the monarch migration is. 

Mike Smith 

----- Original Message -----

From: "Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com"  
To: mdlepsodes AT googlegroups.com, "Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com" 
, "washbutterflies" 
 

Sent: Wednesday, October 1, 2014 7:10:34 PM 
Subject: [VA-MD-DE-Bugs] Single gene responsible for monarch migration 




Today's genetics news that a SINGLE GENE involving flight musculature 
characterizes migratory vs nonmigratory populations of migrating butterflies 
should put the final nail in the coffin of butterfly releases and even 
commercial traffic for educational purposes. Introducing the nonmigrant version 
of this gene into migratory populations could very well end the migratory 
phenomenon with much more certainty than the hand-wringing over milkweeds, 
GMOs, and deforestation in Mexico. 



http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2014/10/01/the-ability-of-monarch-butterflies-to-migrate-may-hinge-on-a-single-gene/ 


Sent from my iPad 



 
Subject: ocola skipper
From: "foresmiths AT comcast.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 1 Oct 2014 23:31:21 +0000 (UTC)
Greetings, 

In the yard/pasture yesterday (9-30) I saw my first ocola skipper of the year. 
In fact I haven't seen one in the Valley for at least 4 yrs. I suppose they are 
here, but go undetected. The list: 


black swallowtail 1 fresh female 
cabbage white 2 
eastern-tailed blue 1 
pearl crescent 4 
great spangled fritillary 4 
buckeye 1 fresh 
monarch 2 fresh 
ocola skipper 1 on heath aster 
common checkered skipper 2 
sachem common 

Mike Smith 
Subject: Single gene responsible for monarch migration
From: "Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 1 Oct 2014 19:10:34 -0400
Today's genetics news that a SINGLE GENE involving flight musculature 
characterizes migratory vs nonmigratory populations of migrating butterflies 
should put the final nail in the coffin of butterfly releases and even 
commercial traffic for educational purposes. Introducing the nonmigrant version 
of this gene into migratory populations could very well end the migratory 
phenomenon with much more certainty than the hand-wringing over milkweeds, 
GMOs, and deforestation in Mexico. 



http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2014/10/01/the-ability-of-monarch-butterflies-to-migrate-may-hinge-on-a-single-gene/ 


Sent from my iPad
Subject: Monarchs
From: "'Alex Netherton' blueridgediscovery AT charter.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 01 Oct 2014 17:43:30 -0400
Hi folks;
I am in Western NC, and have seen mint fresh Monarchs floating by on a 
southwesterly heading. I see some Milkweed, but have seen no caterpillars on 
any of it this year. Almost joined a wild butterfly group on Facebook, but was 
bounced due to offering people membership in my own group, a non-profit. 

I love watching butterflies, and have not seen as many Monarchs this year - 
usually from my yard in suburban East Asheville, on a ridge at around 2200 
feet, I will see hundreds flying over here in a short time. Last few weeks it 
has been singles. None seem interested in nectar. 



Alex Netherton
Asheville, NC
http://blueridgediscovery.org
Amateur call KC4BO
Subject: butterflies still flying
From: "foresmiths AT comcast.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2014 11:06:22 +0000 (UTC)
Howdy, 

The butterflies are still flying here in our pasture near Elkton, Va. Despite 
the dry conditions and late season, I have recorded 16 species in the last few 
days. Heath aster and thistle are the main nectar sources now. Temperatures 
have peaked close to 80 degrees and sunny. The list: 


9-27 
pipevine swallowtail 1 worn, on thistle 
cabbage white 3 
orange sulfur 8 
eastern-tailed blue 2 
pearl crescent 5 
great spangled fritillary 5 on thistle ; worn 
variegated fritillary 1 fresh; on heath aster 
American lady 1 fresh; on heath aster 
buckeye 1 worn; on heath aster 
monarch 1 fresh; on thistle 
indigo duskywing 1 fresh on heath aster 
common checkered skipper 1 on heath aster 
sachem very common; worn 

9-28 
black swallowtail 1 male; fresh; on thistle 
pipevine swallowtail 1 worn 
cabbage white 3 
orange sulfur 2 
"albino" sulfur 1 
gray hairstreak 1 on heath aster 
eastern-tailed blue 2 
pearl crescent 3 
vareigated fritillary 1 
great spangled fritillary 6 
painted lady 1 on heath aster 
common checkered skipper 1 
sachem very common 

Mike Smith 
Subject: American Snout - Huntley Meadows, Alexandria
From: "dcharlesl AT msn.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 19 Sep 2014 13:45:46 -0700
I saw an American Snout today at Huntley Meadows Park in Alexandria, VA. David 
Ledwith Falls Church, Va. 
Subject: Final Mid-Atlantic Lep Forecast of the 2014 Season -- Autumn Equinox Weekend
From: "Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 10:23:03 -0400
It’s been quite the interesting – and sometimes frustrating -- season, an
exceedingly slow start for many of our larger butterflies especially, low
numbers but reasonable diversity through the summer, some puzzling absences
of several usual suspects and few individuals of often-abundant species,
and a final explosion of grass skippers but few of the southern migrants
that makes autumnal lepping here in the mid-Atlantic so rewarding.



This final Forecast of the season fits the pattern; little new to report
again this week from our region but the dwindling of most of our summer
butterflies.  No new migrants to share with readers; even *Common Buckeye*
numbers are fairly paltry unless there’s a last-ditch emergence in late
September or a surge from a coastal storm coming up from the Carolinas.  But
even to our south, in the Carolinas and Virginia, southern strays have been
hard to come by.



From NJ comes our most interesting sighting, a report of a very fresh *Funereal
Duskywing * in The Great Swamp NWR in Gillette.  Odds are this is a
hitchhiker on nursery stock or legume hay from the south; the mint
condition could only have come from a locally eclosed specimen and the
nearest* Funereals* are in the Deep South and Southwest.



A few *Long-tailed Skippers *have made their way into the region but still
far to the south in VA and NC; true also of *Eufala Skipper* and
*Whirlabout.*  *Ocolas *and *Clouded Skippers* remain rare to unusual
sightings for us locally.  *Gulf Fritillaries* are having a good year – in
southern NC, where *Little Yellow* numbers also seem to have recovered in
this last brood.



Apple and pear windfalls make some of the most interesting observation
posts for butterflies this time of year, with the last of the *Red-spotted
Purples, Viceroys,* and the few *Red Admirals *we’ve seen this year
clustered around rotting fruit.  Lingering satyrids will also be found
there, as will the anglewings – *Comma, Question Mark, Mourning Cloak* –
that will soon hibernate for the winter and greet us again in 2015 as
overwintered adults.



A *Giant Swallowtail* caterpillar was photographed for the Maryland
Biodiversity Project website this week on cultivated rue at Cromwell Valley
Park near Baltimore.



And I can close out the season’s Forecast with the good news that
*Monarch *numbers
are far above last year’s throughout the Northeast, and we should be seeing
a quite robust southern flow of these butterflies along the coast and
through the mountains for the next month or so.  Reports from Canada and
the Upper Midwest also note large roosting and staging congregations;
whether these Plains populations do well crossing the many
still-drought-stricken regions between them and the Oyamel fir forests in
Mexico is anyone’s guess.  While we’d all like to credit more Monarch
Waystations and backyard milkweed patches with the boost, the scientist in
us all compels recognition that – at least here in the East -- these are
just natural population fluctuations of a very resilient and hardy critter.




Thanks to all of you who’ve provided excellent fodder for the Forecast this
year, notably Tom Stock, Beth Johnson, Matt Orsie, Barry and Bev Marts,
Fran Pope, Monica Miller, Curtis Lehman, Harry Pavulaan, Kathy Barylski,
Jim Wilkinson, Sheryl Pollock, Walt Gould, Michael Drake, Mike Smith, Rick
Cheicante, Pat Sutton, faithful posters to MDLepsOdes, and the folks
associated with the Maryland Biodiversity Project who, along with many
others, helped me share sightings and field notes with readers of the
Forecasts this year to expand and enhance our enjoyment of butterflying
afield in the mid-Atlantic.



Look for the Forecast to return next spring with the *Mourning Cloaks*.


-- 
Rick Borchelt
College Park, MD
preferred personal email:  rborchelt |AT| gmail |DOT| com

http://leplog.wordpress.com
Subject: Re: First butterfly
From: "hylajwhite AT aol.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2014 17:08:27 -0400
I had a Harvester and a Giant Swallowtail last week up here in Northern 
Delaware.

Jim White

-----Original Message-----
 From: Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs] 

To: VA-MD-DE-Bugs 
Sent: Wed, Sep 10, 2014 5:52 pm
Subject: Re: [VA-MD-DE-Bugs] First butterfly

  
They've been very hard to come by this season so far.  The only 
Cloudless I've seen have been on the Western shore (St. Mary's Co) and 
in DE.  Red Admirals have not been easy to find either.  
On Wed, Sep 10, 2014 at 1:03 PM, lance biechele ltb0076 AT yahoo.com 
[VA-MD-DE-Bugs] <VA-MD-DE-Bugs AT yahoogroups.com> wrote:
  
Hi Folks,
   Hallelujah!  My first [FOS] Cloudless Sulphur here on Cooley Road,
NW Princess Anne in Somerset County.
  Some Buckeyes at Deal Island, but, I'm still waiting for my first Red
Admiral.
Best Regards,
Lance











--
Rick Borchelt
College Park, MD
preferred personal email:  rborchelt |AT| gmail |DOT| com

http://leplog.wordpress.com


             






------------------------------------
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Subject: Mid-Atlantic Field Lep Forecast for the Weekend of 2014 Sept. 13-14
From: "Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2014 22:58:42 -0400
Very little new to report this week; mostly continuations of end-of-summer
populations that are dwindling and a few late fall specialties.


*Leonard’s Skipper* is finally on the wing locally, with up to 9 reported
at a time last week from Soldiers Delight (Baltimore Co MD).  Most of these
were along the upper Choate Mine trail.  *Clouded Skippers* were also
reported there and from various other locations around the region, mostly
associated with garden and other nectar sources.  *Ocola Skippers*, too,
are being seen infrequently in scattered locations.  These latter two
migrants have not yet arrived in large numbers in our area – if they will
at all this season.


*Monarchs,* on the other hand, continue to rise in numbers.  Reports from
Northeast Coast in NY, MA, and CT all suggest the southward migration has
begun in earnest and in good numbers.  Several were working the nectar and
laying eggs on the milkweed in the Smithsonian’s butterfly walk on the east
side of the Natural History Museum this afternoon.


*Red-spotted Purples* are still out in decent numbers, as are *Viceroys*.  But
other nymphalids are in shorter supply.  This week saw a couple of *Painted
Ladies* in the area to round out the more common (but nowhere
numerous) *American
Ladies* that we’ve been seeing all season.  There are fresh *Red Admirals*
about, but again in quite small numbers – the suspicion is that the harsh
winter knocked back the southern populations that normally would be our
source of fresh broods that hatch and develop locally.  *Pearl Crescents*
are in a new brood but generally small numbers; nevertheless they were the
most common butterfly at Soldiers Delight this week.



A very few *Cloudless Sulphurs* have made their way up from the south, but
no *Little Yellows*.  And the cold front moving through tonight means we’ll
have mostly northerly winds the next few days with little chance of blowing
southern specialties northward into our area.  *Clouded Sulphurs *numbers
are making a strong final showing, and both *Small (Cabbage) Whites*
and *Orange
Sulphurs* are maxing out in numbers we haven’t seen all summer.



Grass skipper numbers are falling off quickly; large numbers remain only of
*Zabulon* and *Sachem*, although many of the others – *Dun, Swarthy,
Crossline,* *Peck’s*, and *Southern Broken-dash* among them – will likely
be around in single digit numbers for another week or two.  *Saltmarsh
Skipper* apparently is still pretty common in coastal areas where saltmarsh
fleabane is blooming.  We’re still awaiting our first report of *Long-tailed
Skipper* locally; it’s been reported in VA and Carolinas already this fall.
At their peak at the moment, by contrast, are the final brood of *Wild
Indigo Duskywing.  Silver-spotted Skipper *numbers peaked about two weeks
ago but are still around in some force.



*The last weekly Forecast for 2014 will be next weekend the Autumnal
Equinox.  After that, I’ll occasionally post to MDLepsOdes only if we have
significant sightings.  *



The weather Saturday does not look promising, but Sunday does.  If you make
it out into the field this weekend, don’t forget to post or send your
sightings for the next Weekend Forecast!  In the meantime, visit us at
https://leplog.wordpress.com/ and on Google Groups at MDLepsOdes.


-- 
Rick Borchelt
College Park, MD
preferred personal email:  rborchelt |AT| gmail |DOT| com

http://leplog.wordpress.com
Subject: Re: First butterfly
From: "June Tveekrem damselfly AT southernspreadwing.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2014 19:17:13 -0400
I didn't realize Red Admirals were hard to come by this year. I saw two of them 
several days ago along the Patuxent Branch Trail in Howard County and thought 
that was normal. It never occurred to me to mention them to anyone. Sorry - 
I'll try to be more aware next time. 


June

--
June Tveekrem
Columbia, MD


> On Sep 10, 2014, at 5:52 PM, "Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com 
[VA-MD-DE-Bugs]"  wrote: 

> 
> They've been very hard to come by this season so far. The only Cloudless I've 
seen have been on the Western shore (St. Mary's Co) and in DE. Red Admirals 
have not been easy to find either. 

> 
>> On Wed, Sep 10, 2014 at 1:03 PM, lance biechele ltb0076 AT yahoo.com 
[VA-MD-DE-Bugs]  wrote: 

>>  
>> Hi Folks,
>>    Hallelujah!  My first [FOS] Cloudless Sulphur here on Cooley Road,
>> NW Princess Anne in Somerset County.
>>   Some Buckeyes at Deal Island, but, I'm still waiting for my first Red
>> Admiral.
>> Best Regards,
>> Lance
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Rick Borchelt
> College Park, MD
> preferred personal email:  rborchelt |AT| gmail |DOT| com
> 
> http://leplog.wordpress.com
> 
Subject: Re: First butterfly
From: "Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2014 17:52:34 -0400
They've been very hard to come by this season so far.  The only Cloudless
I've seen have been on the Western shore (St. Mary's Co) and in DE.  Red
Admirals have not been easy to find either.

On Wed, Sep 10, 2014 at 1:03 PM, lance biechele ltb0076 AT yahoo.com
[VA-MD-DE-Bugs]  wrote:

>
>
> Hi Folks,
>    Hallelujah!  My first [FOS] Cloudless Sulphur here on Cooley Road,
> NW Princess Anne in Somerset County.
>   Some Buckeyes at Deal Island, but, I'm still waiting for my first Red
> Admiral.
> Best Regards,
> Lance
>
>  
>



-- 
Rick Borchelt
College Park, MD
preferred personal email:  rborchelt |AT| gmail |DOT| com

http://leplog.wordpress.com
Subject: First butterfly
From: "lance biechele ltb0076 AT yahoo.com [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2014 10:03:36 -0700
Hi Folks,
   Hallelujah!  My first [FOS] Cloudless Sulphur here on Cooley Road,
NW Princess Anne in Somerset County.
  Some Buckeyes at Deal Island, but, I'm still waiting for my first Red
Admiral.
Best Regards,
Lance
Subject: Re: RFI - Williamsburg, VA
From: "foresmiths AT comcast.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 9 Sep 2014 11:30:38 +0000 (UTC)
Tom & Rick, 

Have you been down to the Jamestown area for rare skippers? It may be late, as 
they fly around the third week of August. Take the Colonial Parkway to 
Jamestown, in James City county. But don't go into Jamestown, but stay left. 
You will pass by water on both sides of the road with blooming swamp milkweed. 
Look on the these flowers. Also here were dion, deleware, broad-winged, 
southern brokendash, palamedes swallowtail, buckeye,sleepy orange, cloudless 
sulfur, & carolina satyr. Don't forge to dress for chiggers too! On Aug. 21, 
2007 I had 63 rare skippers here! I was here last year (8-20-13) and we still 
had 26 rare skippers. 


good luck! 

Mike Smith 

----- Original Message -----

From: "Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com"  
To: "Rick Borchelt rborchelt AT gmail.com" , "List 
Serve washbutterflies"  

Sent: Monday, September 8, 2014 11:53:13 PM 
Subject: [VA-MD-DE-Bugs] RFI - Williamsburg, VA 



I will be in Williamsburg, Virginia on business next week (Mon-Thur) and may 
have time to get out looking for butterflies. Does anyone have any particularly 
good spots for leps this time of year within easy or moderately easy driving 
distance of town? I am particularly interested in southern skippers like 
Palatka, and cane specialists like Creole Pearly Eye and Lace-winged Roadside 
Skipper. Thanks for any information! 


Tom Stock 
Silver Spring MD 

Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry 
 
Subject: RFI - Williamsburg, VA
From: "altomomatic AT verizon.net [VA-MD-DE-Bugs]" <VA-MD-DE-Bugs@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 9 Sep 2014 03:53:13 +0000
I will be in Williamsburg, Virginia on business next week (Mon-Thur) and may 
have time to get out looking for butterflies. Does anyone have any particularly 
good spots for leps this time of year within easy or moderately easy driving 
distance of town? I am particularly interested in southern skippers like 
Palatka, and cane specialists like Creole Pearly Eye and Lace-winged Roadside 
Skipper. Thanks for any information! 


Tom Stock
Silver Spring MD


Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry


------------------------------------
Posted by: altomomatic AT verizon.net
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

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