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Updated on Thursday, January 12 at 06:43 PM EST
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12 Jan Post on ABA.org: Advice on Neck Pain [Tina Vecchio ]
5 Oct Prime indenture!!! [Peter Doherty ]
6 Sep Re: Charlton Island James Bay Nature Canada shorebird expedition 2016. [Norman Deans van Swelm ]
4 Sep Happy World Shorebirds Day [Gyorgy Szimuly ]
1 Sep Faithful Counters of Global Shorebird Counting [Gyorgy Szimuly ]
29 Aug Re: Charlton Island James Bay Nature Canada shorebird expedition 2016. [Ted Cheskey ]
26 Aug Global Shorebird Counting starts in a week [Gyorgy Szimuly ]
20 Aug Fw: [SPAM] [BirdsinRussia] Materials of tbe 10th Jubilee Conference of the Working Group on Waders of Northern Eurasia [Norman Deans van Swelm ]
19 Aug Re: JAMES BAY SHOREBIRD REPORT #3 - PHOTOS & VIDEOS - revised [Norman Deans van Swelm ]
19 Aug Re: JAMES BAY SHOREBIRD REPORT #3 - PHOTOS & VIDEOS - revised [Patrick Leary ]
18 Aug JAMES BAY SHOREBIRD REPORT #3 - PHOTOS & VIDEOS - revised []
18 Aug JAMES BAY SHOREBIRD REPORT #3 - PHOTOS & VIDEOS []
15 Aug JAMES BAY SHOREBIRD REPORT #2 []
7 Aug Re: Ellesmere female Knot nonstop to Ellesmere and back to the Dutch Waddensea! [Patrick Leary ]
8 Aug Ellesmere female Knot nonstop to Ellesmere and back to the Dutch Waddensea! [Norman Deans van Swelm ]
7 Aug JAMES BAY SHOREBIRDS 2016 - Report #1 []
14 Jul World Shorebirds íday 2016 [Gyorgy Szimuly ]
7 Apr Shorebird Photos Wanted [Kevin McLean ]
7 Mar 'Shorebird of the Year' poll [Gyorgy Szimuly ]
21 Dec Unveiling the cover of shorebird handbook [Gyorgy Szimuly ]
7 Dec Chamaco [Ted Cheskey ]
25 Aug Shcr [Ted Cheskey ]
19 Aug JAMES BAY SHOREBIRDS - North Point Report #3 [Jean Iron ]
14 Aug JAMES BAY SHOREBIRDS - North Point Report #2 [Jean Iron ]
9 Aug un-subscribe []
9 Aug World Shorebirds Day is coming [Gyorgy Szimuly ]
5 Aug James Bay Shorebirds - North Point Report #1 [Jean Iron ]
18 Apr Banded Stilt [Gyorgy Szimuly ]
4 Jan Global shorebird project database [Gyorgy Szimuly ]
4 Dec Who's for shorebirds? [Gyorgy Szimuly ]
29 Nov From: Russ Namitz [Russ Namitz ]
25 Sep James Bay Shorebirds - Summary Report (15 July-26 August 2014) ["Friis,Christian [Ontario]" ]
19 Aug The 1st World Shorebirds Day is at the corner [Gyorgy Szimuly ]
19 Aug James Bay Shorebirds - Little Piskwamish Report #3 [Jean Iron ]
12 Aug Re: James Bay Shorebirds - Little Piskwamish Report #2 [norman deans van swelm ]
12 Aug Re: James Bay Shorebirds - Little Piskwamish Report #2 [norman deans van swelm ]
11 Aug James Bay Shorebirds - Little Piskwamish Report #2 [Jean Iron ]
5 Aug Re: James Bay Shorebirds - Little Piskwamish Report #1 [Ted Cheskey ]
4 Aug James Bay Shorebirds - Little Piskwamish Report #1 [Jean Iron ]
25 Mar Greetings SHOREBIRDS [Steve Holzman ]
13 Feb Re: World Shorebirds Day Proposal [Gyorgy Szimuly ]
8 Feb Automatic reply: [SHOREBIRDS] World Shorebirds Day Proposal ["Brunjes, John (FW)" ]
8 Feb World Shorebirds Day Proposal [Gyorgy Szimuly ]
27 Nov Purple Sandpiper ID [norman deans van swelm ]
12 Oct Shorebird news [Gyorgy Szimuly ]
11 Sep Re: James Bay shorebird report #5, 31 July - 12 August 2013 [William Jones ]
10 Sep James Bay shorebird report #5, 31 July - 12 August 2013 ["Friis,Christian [Ontario]" ]
10 Sep James Bay shorebird report #6, 13 August - 27 August 2013 ["Friis,Christian [Ontario]" ]
28 Aug James Bay Report #4, 31 July - 10 August ["Friis,Christian [Ontario]" ]
20 Aug Automatic reply: [SHOREBIRDS] Good news from the Caribbean ["Brunjes, John (FW)" ]
20 Aug Good news from the Caribbean [Gyorgy Szimuly ]
12 Aug Shorebird news [Gyorgy Szimuly ]
4 Aug Automatic reply: [SHOREBIRDS] James Bay Shorebird Report #3 + Photos ["James B. Cole" ]
4 Aug James Bay Shorebird Report #3 + Photos [Jean Iron ]
26 Jul James Bay Shorebirds - Hannah Bay #2 [Jean Iron ]
21 Jul Automatic reply: [SHOREBIRDS] James Bay Shorebirds - Hannah Bay #1 ["Brunjes, John (FW)" ]
21 Jul James Bay Shorebirds - Hannah Bay #1 [Jean Iron ]
29 Jun Automatic reply: [SHOREBIRDS] Spoon-billed Sandpiper Animation Project ["Wolfgang Rohloff (WH)" ]
28 Jun Automatic reply: [SHOREBIRDS] Spoon-billed Sandpiper Animation Project [Brad Winn ]
28 Jun Automatic reply: [SHOREBIRDS] Spoon-billed Sandpiper Animation Project ["Brunjes, John (FW)" ]
29 Jun Spoon-billed Sandpiper Animation Project [Gyorgy Szimuly ]
7 Jun Automatic reply: [SHOREBIRDS] Shorebirds and Climate Change - pdf ["Brunjes, John (FW)" ]
7 Jun Shorebirds and Climate Change - pdf [Jean Iron ]
6 Jun WorldWaders News Update - 6.6.13 [Gyorgy Szimuly ]
25 May Shorebird news [Gyorgy Szimuly ]
15 May Whimbrels completed 3rd leg of unknown loop migration route | WorldWaders News Blog [Gyorgy Szimuly ]
6 May Fwd: William Jones [William Jones ]
4 May WorldWaders Celebrates 3rd birthday with devastating news... [Gyorgy Szimuly ]
26 Mar Shocking news from Australia [Gyorgy Szimuly ]
14 Mar Conservation Issues in Kuwait [Gyorgy Szimuly ]
11 Mar SPAM/SCAM Re: [SHOREBIRDS] Sad Trip..................Dorothy Crowley [Steve Holzman ]
11 Mar Sad Trip..................Dorothy Crowley [Jenifer Hilburn ]
24 Oct The New Shorebirds Handbook blog [Gyorgy Szimuly ]
18 Sep Fred Bodsworth (1918-2012) Last of the Curlews [Jean Iron ]
4 Sep James Bay Shorebirds #4 + photos & videos [Jean Iron ]
27 Aug James Bay shorebirds -- Chickney Channel Point 15 to 31 July ["Friis,Christian [Ontario]" ]

Subject: Post on ABA.org: Advice on Neck Pain
From: Tina Vecchio <tina.vecchio AT OUTLOOK.COM>
Date: Thu, 12 Jan 2017 18:25:14 -0500
Saw this on ABA.org and had to share because the writing is so funny and I feel 
like I've had neck pain since the 70s. Does anyone else have advice on tree 
climbing without tweaking yourself? 


Tina

--

ORIGINAL POST 
(http://birding.aba.org/message.php?mesid=1229606&MLID=&MLNM=Ohio) 

Hi Ohio-Birders!

I usually lurk on this listserv and take your great advice on where to spot 
when I am in town seeing my folks in Somerville, but I thought I would end the 
silence and share a story. 


After meeting my darling (who is also an avid birder), we spent every waking 
minute out in the woods or fields with our Bushnell binoculars. But, it was 
short lived when a year ago I cricked my neck trying to get a glimpse of a 
purple finch in Vermont. 


My friends gave me advice on what to do, but nothing worked. No chiropractor, 
massage therapist, or pillow could help my aching neck. Every morning I would 
wake up and it would be the same pain for me. Finally, I decided I had to buy a 
new bed because if that didn't help, nothing would. 


For all those in the same position, it is so overwhelming to find a new 
mattress these days. I must have been living under a rock since the 80s. I 
searched high and low on the net, not knowing if what I was going to get was 
going to be good. Luckily, I finally found a site called 
http://www.slumbersearch.com that had a bunch of customer reviews and mattress 
rankings that really clarified everything. 


I just got a new mattress last month and I can't believe it, but my neck pain 
is almost all gone. If you also have cricked your neck from too much birding, I 
highly advise you to take care and get a new bed if now is the time. 


Stay safe and best of luck!
Birdwatcher Tobin
Subject: Prime indenture!!!
From: Peter Doherty <leasttern AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 5 Oct 2016 17:30:16 +0000
Hello

Please view the financial quotation I uploaded for you,Look IN 
HERE for the Quotation it is very prime. and let me know 
if you are able to view it accordingly. 


Thanks


Peter Doherty
leasttern AT hotmail.com
214-B 84th Street
Virginia Beach, VA 23451
757-470-0774??(cell)
757-321-0255 (local)
Subject: Re: Charlton Island James Bay Nature Canada shorebird expedition 2016.
From: Norman Deans van Swelm <norman.vanswelm AT WXS.NL>
Date: Tue, 6 Sep 2016 01:04:42 +0200
Hi Ted and friends, Thank you for sharing your great adventures. Great 
stuff. I have one question regarding the Horned Grebe & chick in the photo. 
Although everything points to Horned Grebe it's plumage looks weird to me. 
Have a look at p.27 in Sibley's North American Bird Guide and you will see 
what I mean. I see a rather plain colored bird lacking the typical jet black 
cheeks and bright yellow head patch f.i. I don't know what it means but it 
would be interesting to know if the other grebes you saw looked similar.
All the best, Norman


Charlton Island shorebird expedition, 2016  (click here to see part 1 of 
account on Nature Canada 

blog) 


Ted Cheskey, Nature Canada



A joint project of Nature Canada, Environment Canada, the Cree Nation 
Government, the Waskaganish Cree Trappers' Association, the Cree Nation of 
Waskaganish, and Eeyou Marine Region Wildlife Board



On July 26, the day after delivering a community workshop in Waskaganish 
Quebec on shorebird identification and conservation, seven of us headed out 
into Rupert Bay and James Bay in `local sea-worthy boats for the 80 plus 
kilometre trip to Charlton Island.  Our late departure (about 8 pm), had us 
arriving just as it was getting dark, around 10:30, but our drivers were 
experts, and not only knew the route by heart but also knew how to dodge two 
storms converging on either side of us.



A second crew of five, who were slightly delayed didn't fare as well and 
were forced to seek refuge from the storm in a camp less than half way to 
their destination, Boatswain Bay.  Unfortunately their shorter expedition 
was compromised by rough seas and rain the following two days and they 
returned to Waskaganish on July 29 without seeing Boatswain Bay.



One of the project's goals is to determine through daily counts, populations 
of bird species, with a focus on shorebird species, on Charlton, Carey, 
Danby, and the Strutton Islands, and their surrounding waters.  The outcome 
of this project could support nomination of one or more new Important Bird 
and Biodiversity Areas (IBA) and possibly an extension to a proposed Western 
Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network site for Southern James Bay.



Community Engagement is a priority

A second project goal is engage local community members of the Cree Nation 
of Waskaganish directly in research, monitoring and conservation of bird 
populations, particularly shorebirds and species at risk.  Five of the seven 
expedition participants were local, from the Cree Nation of Waskaganish.






Over the course of the following nine days, we surveyed the perimeter of 
Charlton Island, which stretches about 40 kilometres in length from 
south-west to north-east, about 35 kilometres beyond the mouth of Rupert Bay 
at 52 degrees latitude, and 79 degrees longitude, as well as some of the 
other nearby islands including Danby and Carey, a few kilometres off the 
south-eastern coast, and another cluster about 20 kilometres to the 
north-east, called the Strutton Islands.   The islands have sandy soils 
underlain by fossil-rich sedimentary rock.  Charlton is an impressive dune 
system that rises to about 30 metres above sea level at its highest 
location.  The interior is a vast network of spruce forest, dunes, beaver 
lakes, and other wetland habitats.  Contrary to the information in 
Wikipedia, which describes Charlton as uninhabited, the Cree have seasonally 
lived on the islands since long before European contact, and currently a few 
families from Waskaganish have family camps on Charlton primarily. 
Charlton Island served as a depot for the Hudson Bay Company and the North 
West Company, as it was the only deep water harbour from which large ships 
could unload goods and collect furs from the trading posts at Fort Rupert, 
Moose Factory, and East Main where access by large ships was impossible. 
Barges would make the trip from the trading posts to Charlton Island.



The Crew:

Ted Cheskey of Nature Canada organized the expedition and was joined by 
skilled field ornithologist Marc-Antoine Montpetit from Mont Laurier, our 
kind host, boat pilot and local guide, elder Bill Jolly, boat pilot and 
local guide Clayton Jolly, local project coordinator Garry Salt, and field 
assistants Jeremy Stevens and Jordan Rabbitskin.




Weather

July 27 and 28 were cool, damp with intermittent rain, and temperatures 
between 5 degrees Celsius at night to 15C during the day.   July 30 was 
warmer, breaking 20C during that day, and from July 31 to August 4 the 
temperature was over 30C each day with slight south winds and no 
precipitation.



Large Mammals

We frequently observed Polar Bear tracks in the mud flats and along the 
beaches.   Montpetit, B. Jolly, G. Salt and J. Stevens had a peaceful 
encounter with a Polar Bear.   We also observed frequent signs of Caribou 
and observed Caribou on three different occasions.  Beluga sightings were 
nearly daily in the strait between Charlton and Danby Islands.   We also 
observed Ringed Seals off the coast of Charlton.



Birds

Over the course of nine days, we observed 18,204 individual birds of 101 
species.  Included in this total were five federally recognized species at 
risk including the Endangered Red Knot (Calidris canutus rufa) (551), the 
Threatened Olive-sided Flycatcher (Contopus cooperi) (2), and the Special 
Concern Yellow Rail (Coturnicops noveboracensis) (4), Rusty Blackbird 
(Euphagus carolinus) (76) and Short-eared Owl (Asio flammeus) (1).   In 
addition, impressive numbers of waterfowl were observed, particularly diving 
ducks off the coast of Charlton Island where rich mussel beds provide a 
stable source of food, and the geography of the island provides refuge from 
stormy seas and predators for moulting birds.  Black Scoter topped the list 
of duck species with 4742 individuals observed, followed by Common Goldeneye 
with 1669 and Surf Scoter with 980.



Seventeen species of shorebirds were observed, most in "adult" plumage.  We 
encountered several flocks of Red Knot on Charlton, Danby, Carey and the 
Strutton Islands.  The largest single group was 148 (all adults), and the 
summed total from maximums observed at different location was 551 
individuals with 8 marked birds that included 3 captured in Canada, 4 from 
the USA, and one from Argentina.



Shorebirds

Species                                                 Corrected total **

Black-bellied Plover                        68

Semipalmated Plover                     153

Killdeer                                                 35

Whimbrel                                            140

Hudsonian Godwit                          213

Ruddy Turnstone                             762

Red Knot                                             551

Dunlin                                                   1

Least Sandpiper                                194

White-rumped Sandpiper            460

Pectoral Sandpiper                          1

Semipalmated Sandpiper             2027

Wilson's Snipe                                   17

Spotted Sandpiper                          112

Solitary Sandpiper                           4

Greater Yellowlegs                          491

Lesser Yellowlegs                             456



**We visited some areas on multiple occasions, while other areas were 
visited only once.  The corrected total is the sum total of all of the areas 
visited once, plus the single maximum number of individuals observed from 
the same location visited multiple times.   For example, to test whether Red 
Knot numbers represent different groups of birds or possibly the same group 
of birds displacing itself multiple times, we revisited one area where we 
had observed the largest flock, about three kilometres from base camp, 
twice.   On both occasions separated by 7 days, we counted the largest 
number of individuals recorded of any flock of Knots in our field work (128 
on first visit, and 148 on second visit).  We used the larger number of 148 
in calculating the corrected total (and discarded the 128 number).   We also 
used this observation as a test of our confidence that Knots recorded in 
different areas are different birds (and not the same ones moving between 
sites).   To answer the question of birds moving between different sites, we 
hope to use the MOTUS system



Other species of conservation interest

Marc Antoine Montpetit located two active nests (with young) of Horned 
Grebe, and one active nest of Red-necked Grebe. Both species are hundreds of 
kilometres outside of their published breeding range.  In fact the nearest 
published Quebec breeding location for this species is on les Iles de la 
Madeleine, a few thousand kilometres to the east, and in Ontario on the 
Manitoba-Ontario border, about a thousand kilometres to the west (Ontario 
Breeding Bird Atlas, 2001-2005.



MOTUS

On July 30, we installed a MOTUS wildlife tracking antennae on Charlton 
Island.  Prior to commencing our trip, a team from Bird Studies Canada 
installed MOTUS antennae at the Waskaganish CTA offices, and trained local 
coordinator Garry Salt.    MOTUS antennae are designed to capture 
transmissions from tiny nanotags that are attached to birds in many 
locations across Canada and elsewhere in the Americas.  For more information 
about MOTUS, click here.



Return and acknowledgements

We arrived back at Waskaganish in late afternoon on August 4rth, just in 
time to unpack and transfer equipment to the CTA office and my vehicle.   A 
few hours later, a massive cold front slammed through Waskaganish with 100 
plus kilometre per hour gusts, driving rain and intense lightning.  The 
storm associated with the front lingered on through the night into the next 
day.



Nature Canada is grateful for the interest and support of the Cree Nation of 
Waskaganish for this project.   This expedition was undertaken with the 
financial support of Government of Canada's Habitat Stewardship program 
(HSP), the Aboriginal Fund for Species At Risk (AFSAR), and support from the 
Eeyou Marine Region Board (EMR). 


---
Dit e-mailbericht is gecontroleerd op virussen met Avast antivirussoftware.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
Subject: Happy World Shorebirds Day
From: Gyorgy Szimuly <gyorgy.szimuly AT MAC.COM>
Date: Sun, 4 Sep 2016 23:58:27 +0100
Happy World Shorebirds Day!

6 September marks the celebration of shorebirds and those who cares about them 
all around the world. Since Friday (2 September) the Global Shorebird Counting 
Program has been running with full swing. Birdwatchers are in the field 
counting shorebirds and sharing their records with World Shorebirds Day. If you 
have been in the field anytime since Friday, consider joining the celebrating 
crowd and share your records with us through eBird. 


By the way, have you seen our fantastic set of prizes? One of them you can win 
if you decide to be a returning supporter and counter of the Global Shorebird 
Counting Program from this year. Read more here: 

https://worldshorebirdsday.wordpress.com/2016/09/01/sign-up-for-a-big-win/

You can follow the progress of the counts here:

https://worldshorebirdsday.wordpress.com/2016/09/02/live-update-of-shorebirds-counted-during-global-shorebird-counting/ 


Happy shorebirding!

Best wishes, Szimi
——
Gyorgy Szimuly 
Global Shorebird Counting Program Coordinator
Milton Keynes, UK
https://worldshorebirdsday.wordpress.com
Subject: Faithful Counters of Global Shorebird Counting
From: Gyorgy Szimuly <gyorgy.szimuly AT MAC.COM>
Date: Thu, 1 Sep 2016 22:00:00 +0100
Dear Shorebirders,

Let me share you a last encouragement email for the 2016 Global Shorebird 
Counting Program. 

https://worldshorebirdsday.wordpress.com/2016/09/01/sign-up-for-a-big-win/

Have a Happy World Shorebirds Day. 

Best, Szimi
https://worldshorebirdsday.wordpress.com

Sent from my iPad
Subject: Re: Charlton Island James Bay Nature Canada shorebird expedition 2016.
From: Ted Cheskey <TCheskey AT NATURECANADA.CA>
Date: Mon, 29 Aug 2016 16:58:34 +0000
Charlton Island shorebird expedition, 2016 (click here to see part 1 of account 
on Nature Canada 
blog) 


Ted Cheskey, Nature Canada



A joint project of Nature Canada, Environment Canada, the Cree Nation 
Government, the Waskaganish Cree Trappers' Association, the Cree Nation of 
Waskaganish, and Eeyou Marine Region Wildlife Board 




On July 26, the day after delivering a community workshop in Waskaganish Quebec 
on shorebird identification and conservation, seven of us headed out into 
Rupert Bay and James Bay in `local sea-worthy boats for the 80 plus kilometre 
trip to Charlton Island. Our late departure (about 8 pm), had us arriving just 
as it was getting dark, around 10:30, but our drivers were experts, and not 
only knew the route by heart but also knew how to dodge two storms converging 
on either side of us. 




A second crew of five, who were slightly delayed didn't fare as well and were 
forced to seek refuge from the storm in a camp less than half way to their 
destination, Boatswain Bay. Unfortunately their shorter expedition was 
compromised by rough seas and rain the following two days and they returned to 
Waskaganish on July 29 without seeing Boatswain Bay. 




One of the project's goals is to determine through daily counts, populations of 
bird species, with a focus on shorebird species, on Charlton, Carey, Danby, and 
the Strutton Islands, and their surrounding waters. The outcome of this project 
could support nomination of one or more new Important Bird and Biodiversity 
Areas (IBA) and possibly an extension to a proposed Western Hemisphere 
Shorebird Reserve Network site for Southern James Bay. 




Community Engagement is a priority

A second project goal is engage local community members of the Cree Nation of 
Waskaganish directly in research, monitoring and conservation of bird 
populations, particularly shorebirds and species at risk. Five of the seven 
expedition participants were local, from the Cree Nation of Waskaganish. 







Over the course of the following nine days, we surveyed the perimeter of 
Charlton Island, which stretches about 40 kilometres in length from south-west 
to north-east, about 35 kilometres beyond the mouth of Rupert Bay at 52 degrees 
latitude, and 79 degrees longitude, as well as some of the other nearby islands 
including Danby and Carey, a few kilometres off the south-eastern coast, and 
another cluster about 20 kilometres to the north-east, called the Strutton 
Islands. The islands have sandy soils underlain by fossil-rich sedimentary 
rock. Charlton is an impressive dune system that rises to about 30 metres above 
sea level at its highest location. The interior is a vast network of spruce 
forest, dunes, beaver lakes, and other wetland habitats. Contrary to the 
information in Wikipedia, which describes Charlton as uninhabited, the Cree 
have seasonally lived on the islands since long before European contact, and 
currently a few families from Waskaganish have family camps on Charlton 
primarily. Charlton Island served as a depot for the Hudson Bay Company and the 
North West Company, as it was the only deep water harbour from which large 
ships could unload goods and collect furs from the trading posts at Fort 
Rupert, Moose Factory, and East Main where access by large ships was 
impossible. Barges would make the trip from the trading posts to Charlton 
Island. 




The Crew:

Ted Cheskey of Nature Canada organized the expedition and was joined by skilled 
field ornithologist Marc-Antoine Montpetit from Mont Laurier, our kind host, 
boat pilot and local guide, elder Bill Jolly, boat pilot and local guide 
Clayton Jolly, local project coordinator Garry Salt, and field assistants 
Jeremy Stevens and Jordan Rabbitskin. 





Weather

July 27 and 28 were cool, damp with intermittent rain, and temperatures between 
5 degrees Celsius at night to 15C during the day. July 30 was warmer, breaking 
20C during that day, and from July 31 to August 4 the temperature was over 
30C each day with slight south winds and no precipitation. 




Large Mammals

We frequently observed Polar Bear tracks in the mud flats and along the 
beaches. Montpetit, B. Jolly, G. Salt and J. Stevens had a peaceful encounter 
with a Polar Bear. We also observed frequent signs of Caribou and observed 
Caribou on three different occasions. Beluga sightings were nearly daily in the 
strait between Charlton and Danby Islands. We also observed Ringed Seals off 
the coast of Charlton. 




Birds

Over the course of nine days, we observed 18,204 individual birds of 101 
species. Included in this total were five federally recognized species at risk 
including the Endangered Red Knot (Calidris canutus rufa) (551), the Threatened 
Olive-sided Flycatcher (Contopus cooperi) (2), and the Special Concern Yellow 
Rail (Coturnicops noveboracensis) (4), Rusty Blackbird (Euphagus carolinus) 
(76) and Short-eared Owl (Asio flammeus) (1). In addition, impressive numbers 
of waterfowl were observed, particularly diving ducks off the coast of Charlton 
Island where rich mussel beds provide a stable source of food, and the 
geography of the island provides refuge from stormy seas and predators for 
moulting birds. Black Scoter topped the list of duck species with 4742 
individuals observed, followed by Common Goldeneye with 1669 and Surf Scoter 
with 980. 




Seventeen species of shorebirds were observed, most in "adult" plumage. We 
encountered several flocks of Red Knot on Charlton, Danby, Carey and the 
Strutton Islands. The largest single group was 148 (all adults), and the summed 
total from maximums observed at different location was 551 individuals with 8 
marked birds that included 3 captured in Canada, 4 from the USA, and one from 
Argentina. 




Shorebirds

Species                                                 Corrected total **

Black-bellied Plover                        68

Semipalmated Plover                     153

Killdeer                                                 35

Whimbrel                                            140

Hudsonian Godwit                          213

Ruddy Turnstone                             762

Red Knot                                             551

Dunlin                                                   1

Least Sandpiper                                194

White-rumped Sandpiper            460

Pectoral Sandpiper                          1

Semipalmated Sandpiper             2027

Wilson's Snipe                                   17

Spotted Sandpiper                          112

Solitary Sandpiper                           4

Greater Yellowlegs                          491

Lesser Yellowlegs                             456



**We visited some areas on multiple occasions, while other areas were visited 
only once. The corrected total is the sum total of all of the areas visited 
once, plus the single maximum number of individuals observed from the same 
location visited multiple times. For example, to test whether Red Knot numbers 
represent different groups of birds or possibly the same group of birds 
displacing itself multiple times, we revisited one area where we had observed 
the largest flock, about three kilometres from base camp, twice. On both 
occasions separated by 7 days, we counted the largest number of individuals 
recorded of any flock of Knots in our field work (128 on first visit, and 148 
on second visit). We used the larger number of 148 in calculating the corrected 
total (and discarded the 128 number). We also used this observation as a test 
of our confidence that Knots recorded in different areas are different birds 
(and not the same ones moving between sites). To answer the question of birds 
moving between different sites, we hope to use the MOTUS system 




Other species of conservation interest

Marc Antoine Montpetit located two active nests (with young) of Horned Grebe, 
and one active nest of Red-necked Grebe. Both species are hundreds of 
kilometres outside of their published breeding range. In fact the nearest 
published Quebec breeding location for this species is on les Iles de la 
Madeleine, a few thousand kilometres to the east, and in Ontario on the 
Manitoba-Ontario border, about a thousand kilometres to the west (Ontario 
Breeding Bird Atlas, 2001-2005. 




MOTUS

On July 30, we installed a MOTUS wildlife tracking antennae on Charlton Island. 
Prior to commencing our trip, a team from Bird Studies Canada installed MOTUS 
antennae at the Waskaganish CTA offices, and trained local coordinator Garry 
Salt. MOTUS antennae are designed to capture transmissions from tiny nanotags 
that are attached to birds in many locations across Canada and elsewhere in the 
Americas. For more information about MOTUS, click here. 




Return and acknowledgements

We arrived back at Waskaganish in late afternoon on August 4rth, just in time 
to unpack and transfer equipment to the CTA office and my vehicle. A few hours 
later, a massive cold front slammed through Waskaganish with 100 plus kilometre 
per hour gusts, driving rain and intense lightning. The storm associated with 
the front lingered on through the night into the next day. 




Nature Canada is grateful for the interest and support of the Cree Nation of 
Waskaganish for this project. This expedition was undertaken with the financial 
support of Government of Canada's Habitat Stewardship program (HSP), the 
Aboriginal Fund for Species At Risk (AFSAR), and support from the Eeyou Marine 
Region Board (EMR). 

Subject: Global Shorebird Counting starts in a week
From: Gyorgy Szimuly <gyorgy.szimuly AT MAC.COM>
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2016 14:53:10 +0000
Dear Friends,

The 3rd World Shorebirds Day with it's popular Global Shorebird Counting (GSC) 
is upon us. In just a week birdwatchers around the world go to their preferred 
location and count shorebirds. I ask all of you to support and appreciate this 
special day by joining the GSC. Simply register your location and go counting. 


For more details please visit our page:
https://worldshorebirdsday.wordpress.com/globalshorebirdcounting/

You can also win one of the small gifts we have through our partners. Please 
find more about it in this blog post: 


https://worldshorebirdsday.wordpress.com/2016/08/18/raffle-prizes-for-global-shorebird-counting-participants/ 


I'm looking forward to hearing from you soon.
Best, Szimi
_______________
Gyorgy Szimuly
Milton Keynes, UK
Coordinator of World Shorebirds Day Events
https://worldshorebirdsday.wordpress.com
Subject: Fw: [SPAM] [BirdsinRussia] Materials of tbe 10th Jubilee Conference of the Working Group on Waders of Northern Eurasia
From: Norman Deans van Swelm <norman.vanswelm AT WXS.NL>
Date: Sat, 20 Aug 2016 14:05:59 +0200
FYI

From: mailto:BirdsinRussia AT yahoogroups.com
Sent: Saturday, August 20, 2016 12:16 PM
To: birdsinrussia AT yahoogroups.com
Subject: [SPAM] [BirdsinRussia] Materials of tbe 10th Jubilee Conference of the 
Working Group on Waders of Northern Eurasia 





Proceedings of the 10th Conference of the Working Group on Waders of Northern 
Eurasia may be downloaded at the link bellow 

«Вопросы экологии, миграции и охраны 
куликов Северной Евразии» (pdf, 12 Mb) 



http://rgk10.pp.ua/ru/materialyi-konferenczii.html



The 10th Jubilee Conference of the Working Group on Waders of Northern Eurasia 
was held during 3-6 February 2016 in Ivanovo in Russia. 




-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 


__._,_.___


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

Posted by: Jevgeni Shergalin 

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 




-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 




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Subject: Re: JAMES BAY SHOREBIRD REPORT #3 - PHOTOS & VIDEOS - revised
From: Norman Deans van Swelm <norman.vanswelm AT WXS.NL>
Date: Fri, 19 Aug 2016 21:19:44 +0200
hear,hear!
Norman


From: Patrick Leary
Sent: Friday, August 19, 2016 1:18 PM
To: SHOREBIRDS AT LISTSERV.UGA.EDU
Subject: Re: [SHOREBIRDS] JAMES BAY SHOREBIRD REPORT #3 - PHOTOS & VIDEOS - 
revised

Wonderful report and excellent field work by the crew. Bravo!

-----Original Message-----
From: Shorebird Discussion Group [mailto:SHOREBIRDS AT LISTSERV.UGA.EDU] On
Behalf Of jeaniron AT SYMPATICO.CA
Sent: Thursday, August 18, 2016 6:04 PM
To: SHOREBIRDS AT LISTSERV.UGA.EDU
Subject: [SHOREBIRDS] JAMES BAY SHOREBIRD REPORT #3 - PHOTOS & VIDEOS -
revised




This is the third and final report. Please see link with 7 pages of photos
and videos on my website.
http://jeaniron.ca/2016/JB16/p1.htm


I thank Christian Friis of the Canadian Wildlife Service for the opportunity
to surrey shorebirds on James Bay. Ron Pittaway posted my first two reports
and provided much valuable information on shorebirds.
Happy shorebirding,
Jean Iron
Toronto, Ontario
       = 


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Subject: Re: JAMES BAY SHOREBIRD REPORT #3 - PHOTOS & VIDEOS - revised
From: Patrick Leary <PRLeary AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Fri, 19 Aug 2016 07:18:31 -0400
Wonderful report and excellent field work by the crew. Bravo! 

-----Original Message-----
From: Shorebird Discussion Group [mailto:SHOREBIRDS AT LISTSERV.UGA.EDU] On
Behalf Of jeaniron AT SYMPATICO.CA
Sent: Thursday, August 18, 2016 6:04 PM
To: SHOREBIRDS AT LISTSERV.UGA.EDU
Subject: [SHOREBIRDS] JAMES BAY SHOREBIRD REPORT #3 - PHOTOS & VIDEOS -
revised




This is the third and final report. Please see link with 7 pages of photos
and videos on my website.
http://jeaniron.ca/2016/JB16/p1.htm


I thank Christian Friis of the Canadian Wildlife Service for the opportunity
to surrey shorebirds on James Bay. Ron Pittaway posted my first two reports
and provided much valuable information on shorebirds.
Happy shorebirding,
Jean Iron
Toronto, Ontario
 		 	   		  =
Subject: JAMES BAY SHOREBIRD REPORT #3 - PHOTOS & VIDEOS - revised
From: jeaniron AT SYMPATICO.CA
Date: Thu, 18 Aug 2016 18:03:38 -0400


This is the third and final report. Please see link with 7 pages of photos and 
videos on my website. 

http://jeaniron.ca/2016/JB16/p1.htm


I thank Christian Friis of the Canadian Wildlife Service for the opportunity to 
surrey shorebirds on James Bay. Ron Pittaway posted my first two reports and 
provided much valuable information on shorebirds. 

Happy shorebirding,
Jean Iron
Toronto, Ontario
 		 	   		  
Subject: JAMES BAY SHOREBIRD REPORT #3 - PHOTOS & VIDEOS
From: jeaniron AT SYMPATICO.CA
Date: Thu, 18 Aug 2016 17:54:02 -0400





This is the third and final report. Please see link with 7 pages of photos and 
videos on my website.http://jeaniron.ca/2016/JB16/p1.htmI thank Christian Friis 
of the Canadian Wildlife Service for the opportunity to surrey shorebirds on 
James Bay. Ron Pittaway posted my first two reports and provided much valuable 
information on shorebirds.Happy shorebirding,Jean IronToronto, Ontario 


 		 	   		  
Subject: JAMES BAY SHOREBIRD REPORT #2
From: jeaniron AT SYMPATICO.CA
Date: Mon, 15 Aug 2016 09:08:46 -0400
"The James Bay Coast is one of the seven ecological
wonders of the world. It is a migration highway for shorebirds." Guy Morrison,
Senior Shorebird Research Scientist, Canadian Wildlife Service.

 

This is Jean Iron's second report for the period 7 - 13
August 2016 from Longridge Point (Lat 51.798681N, Lon 80.691619W) on the
southwest coast of James Bay in Ontario. Longridge is about 910 km (565 mi)
north of Toronto. It is one of four shorebird camps this summer. See locations
on map in link #1 below. Surveys are under the direction of Christian Friis of
the Canadian Wildlife Service with partners the Royal Ontario Museum, Ontario
Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, Bird Studies Canada, Trent
University, Nature Canada and Moose Cree First Nation. Shorebird population
declines and the need to protect crucial intertidal habitats are driving
research.

 

LONGRIDGE CREW: The seven crew members are Allie Anderson
(Crew leader, Trent University, Peterborough ON), Barbara Charlton (ON), Dan
Froehlich (Washington State), Kathryn Hoo (ON), Jean Iron (ON), Amie MacDonald
(ON) and Felicia Sanders (South Carolina).

 

SHOREBIRD OBSERVATIONS: 24 species. Reports are from
Longridge unless otherwise stated. High counts and dates for each species
listed below. Large increases in juveniles of many species. Adults of many
species have departed James Bay.

 

Black-bellied Plover: 28 adults on Aug 10. Juveniles
begin arriving in early September.

 

American Golden-Plover: 4 adults on Aug 10. Juveniles
begin arriving in early September.

 

Semipalmated Plover: 368 on Aug 7, many juveniles by
12th.

 

Killdeer: 10 on Aug 12.

 

Spotted Sandpiper: 7 on Aug 9, all juveniles now.

 

Greater Yellowlegs: 171 on Aug 8, 50% juveniles. Many
adults still on 12th. Adults often undergo wing molt on James Bay.

 

Lesser Yellowlegs: 279 on Aug 10, all juveniles.

 

Whimbrel: 25 on Aug 9, all juveniles.

 

Marbled Godwit: 5 on Aug 8, all juveniles.

 

Hudsonian Godwit: 336 molting and fattening adults on Aug
12. Juvenile numbers increasing. Adults will depart James Bay from now to early
September. Juveniles depart in September and October. 

 

Ruddy Turnstone: 577 adults on Aug 8. First juvenile on
10th.

 

RED KNOT: The latest population estimate for the rufa
subspecies is around 42,000 (Mark Peck, Royal Ontario Museum).There were 883
molting adults on Aug 7. First juvenile on 8th. A Red Knot with an orange flag
TY banded in Argentina in March 2006 was re-sighted by Kathryn Hoo on 27 July
2016 at Longridge. In 2010 TY stayed for 18 days at Longridge. 

 

RED KNOT AERIAL SURVEY: Guy Morrison and Ken Ross
conducted a 4-day helicopter survey (August 9-12) of the Ontario coast of James
Bay from the Quebec border to the Ekwan River and the coastline of Akimiski
Island, Nunavut. The total estimate of Red Knots was 10,500 mostly adults. This
represents 25% of the rufa population. Areas of concentration included south of
Little Piskwamish and in a bay several bays north of Longridge Point. The
helicopter was carrying a nanotag receiver that detected a lot of signals.
Well have to wait for information to be downloaded to know the species of
shorebirds.

 

CURLEW SANDPIPER: One molting adult on Aug 11 at Little
Piskwamish South. Found by Ross Wood.

 

Sanderling: 38 molting and faded adults on Aug 11.
Juveniles normally arrive mid-August into September.

 

Dunlin: 55 molting adults on Aug 9. 

 

Least Sandpiper: 101 on Aug 7, almost all juveniles.

 

PEEPS: 10,017 on Aug 7 and 4525 on 11th, mostly
Semipalmated and White-rumped Sandpipers.

 

White-rumped Sandpiper: 2794 on Aug 9, all molting
adults. Most juveniles begin arriving in September. 

 

Buff-breasted Sandpiper: 2 adults on Aug 8 (photos).

 

Pectoral Sandpiper: 156 almost all adults on Aug 7. Most
juveniles arrive after mid-Aug.

 

Semipalmated Sandpiper: 2614 on Aug 7. Large overnight
turnover on Aug 6 and 7 from adults to juveniles.

 

Short-billed Dowitcher: 5 juveniles on Aug 7. Adults have
departed the breeding grounds.

 

Wilson's Snipe: 8 on Aug 9.

 

Wilson's Phalarope: 1 juvenile on Aug 9. A small disjunct
population breeds in the prairie-like coastal marshes.

 

Red-necked Phalarope: 3 juveniles on Aug 9.

 

PRAIRIE FALCON UPDATE: The Prairie Falcon previously
reported as an adult is a juvenile. Jerry Liguori, a leading authority on North
American raptors, examined a photo. Jerry stated that it is a juvenile only a
few months old. The Prairie Falcon was seen again on August 6 at Longridge and
presumably the same individual was at Little Piskwamish South on August 10 and
11. If accepted by the OBRC, this will be the second record for the Ontario
section of James Bay. Ken Abraham (pers. comm.) commented that "We have a
sight record of a Prairie Falcon on Akimiski Island in 1998 by Jeff Gleason,
who is very familiar with the species as he grew up in the US Great Plains.
Because there were no photos, we have not "pushed" the record, but
given the recent sightings it is probably good. I have a paragraph from Jeff
somewhere in my files." Note that Akimiski Island is part of Nunavut, not
Ontario.

 

SOME OTHER BIRDS: Snow Goose: 38 mostly blue morph birds
on Aug 11. American Black Duck, 16 on Aug 3. White-winged Scoter: 2 on Aug 7
and 1 on 11th. Black Scoter, 885 mostly molting males on Aug 11. American
Bittern: 1 on 8 and 10 Aug. American White Pelican: 20 on Aug 8. YELLOW RAIL: 5
on Aug 11, still ticking loudly all night on 12th. Sora: 5 on Aug 7.
Bonaparte's Gull: 2049 on Aug 10, low number of juveniles. Little Gull: 2
adults and 1 juvenile on Aug 7 at Little Piskwamish and 1 adult at Little
Piskwamish South on Aug 10. Franklin's Gull last seen on Aug 7. Black-billed
Cuckoo: carrying food on Aug 12 at Little Piskwamish. Olive-sided Flycatcher: 2
on Aug 12. Gray Jay: 2 adults and 1 juvenile regular at camp. Common Raven: 31
on Aug 8. Boreal Chickadee: 3 on Aug 10. Swainson's Thrush: 1 juvenile on 11,
12 and 13. American Pipit: 1 on Aug 10. Bohemian Waxwing: 15 on Aug 9 at Little
Piskwamish. Rusty Blackbird: 30 on Aug 9. Clay-colored Sparrow: 4 on Aug 7 were
last sightings. Savannah Sparrow, 67 on Aug 4. Nelson's Sparrow (subspecies
alter): 8 on Aug 10, still singing on 13th but much less song. Le Conte's
Sparrow: 6 on Aug 10 still singing. Fox Sparrow: 2 on Aug 7. HARRIS'S SPARROW:
1 on Aug 10 found by Barb Charlton. Red Crossbill: 1 on Aug 11 at Little
Piskwamish, 1 on Aug 13 at Little Piskwamish South. White-winged Crossbill: 30
on Aug 9. 

 

MAMMALS: Gray Wolf: 2 on Aug 10 (video). Black Bear: 4 on
Aug 12  including a female with 2 cubs.
American Pine Marten: 1 on Aug 9. Beluga (White Whale): 5 on Aug 7 at Little
Piskwamish South. Striped Skunk: almost daily around camp. POLAR BEAR: Guy
Morrison and Ken Ross on aerial survey saw over 20 Polar Bears on north coast
of Akimiski Island in Nunavut. All bears looked to be in good condition and
several females had 2 cubs. No Polar Bears sighted on the Ontario Coast south
of Akimiski Island.

 

BUTTERFLIES: Mustard White, Bronze Copper, Northern
Crescent, Northern Spring Azure, Red Admiral, White Admiral, Common Ringlet and
Mourning Cloak. List compiled by Barb Charlton.

 

1. Map showing locations of survey camps

http://jeaniron.ca/2016/JB16/map2016.htm

 

2. Population Estimates of North American Shorebirds 2012

http://bit.ly/1zPebsP  

 

3. Guide to Southbound Shorebirds

http://www.ofo.ca/site/page/view/articles.southboundshorebirds

 

WESTERN HEMISPHERE SHOREBIRD RESERVE: The vast pristine
intertidal mudflats and prairie-like coastal marshes of James Bay comprise one
of the most important shorebird areas in the world. The hope is that James Bay
or portions thereof will be designated a "Western Hemisphere Shorebird
Reserve of Hemispheric Importance". James Bay greatly exceeds the minimum
criteria for this designation.

 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: Survey camps are rented from the Moose
Cree First Nation. Crews stay at Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and
Forestry (MNRF) staff house while in Moosonee. MNRF helicopter transported
crews in and out of camps on August 13. Surveys would not be possible without
the many hours of dedicated volunteer effort. We thank to Jerry Liguori for 
aging 

the Prairie Falcon. Jean thanks an anonymous donor for financial assistance.

 

Jean returns home today. She will file a summary report
#3 with a link to photos on her website in a few days.

 

Ron Pittaway

Toronto, Ontario 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Ellesmere female Knot nonstop to Ellesmere and back to the Dutch Waddensea!
From: Patrick Leary <PRLeary AT BELLSOUTH.NET>
Date: Sun, 7 Aug 2016 20:28:48 -0400
Many thanks Norman for sharing this enlightening paper. 

-----Original Message-----
From: Shorebird Discussion Group [mailto:SHOREBIRDS AT LISTSERV.UGA.EDU] On Behalf 
Of Norman Deans van Swelm 

Sent: Sunday, August 7, 2016 7:53 PM
To: SHOREBIRDS AT LISTSERV.UGA.EDU
Subject: [SHOREBIRDS] Ellesmere female Knot nonstop to Ellesmere and back to 
the Dutch Waddensea! 


while crossing the Greenland icecap! Staying some three weeks on Ellesmere just 
enough time to lay eggs and recover enough to return while leaving the male to 
care for the chicks! The Dutch Institute NIOZ had fitted a microtransmitter on 
her of 2 g. made in California. 

Ellesmere and Knots from NW Greenland belong to the race islandica so named by 
Linnaeus. So do Knots breeding in East Greenland which reach the breeding area 
after preparing for the journey along the West coast of Britain. 

Another staging area during spring is northern Norway. These birds have been 
well photographed by Stein Nilsen, most Knots in his photographs seem to be 
males. Ellesmere males perhaps? 




here is the link to NIOZ press release (in Dutch):


 
https://www.naturetoday.com/intl/nl/nature-reports/message/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=e-mail&utm_campaign=user-mailing&msg=22860 




here are two links to Stein Nilsen’s pictures taken in northern Norway:


 
https://500px.com/photo/155920953/red-knots-in-troms%C3%B8-norway-by-stein-nilsen 



  http://tromsofoto.smugmug.com/keyword/knot/i-cpStmMf7



Here is a link to David N.Nettleship’s article about the breeding biology of 
Ellesmere Knots: 




  http://epic.awi.de/28020/1/Polarforsch1974_1_2.pdf
“


Also have a look please at the two males collected in East Greenland (plate 2), 
one of which had been ringed in Britain). These birds differ in colour from the 
Norwegian males. It makes me wonder if East Greenland Knots deserve a name of 
their own, see here 




 
http://radioactiverobins.com/archive/icons%20navipag/Report%20wader%20ringing%20Rhine-Meuse%20delta%201984-85.pdf 





Cheers, Norman---
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Subject: Ellesmere female Knot nonstop to Ellesmere and back to the Dutch Waddensea!
From: Norman Deans van Swelm <norman.vanswelm AT WXS.NL>
Date: Mon, 8 Aug 2016 01:53:22 +0200
while crossing the Greenland icecap! Staying some three weeks on Ellesmere just 
enough time to lay eggs and recover enough to return while leaving the male to 
care for the chicks! The Dutch Institute NIOZ had fitted a microtransmitter on 
her of 2 g. made in California. 

Ellesmere and Knots from NW Greenland belong to the race islandica so named by 
Linnaeus. So do Knots breeding in East Greenland which reach the breeding area 
after preparing for the journey along the West coast of Britain. 

Another staging area during spring is northern Norway. These birds have been 
well photographed by Stein Nilsen, most Knots in his photographs seem to be 
males. Ellesmere males perhaps? 




here is the link to NIOZ press release (in Dutch):


 
https://www.naturetoday.com/intl/nl/nature-reports/message/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=e-mail&utm_campaign=user-mailing&msg=22860 




here are two links to Stein Nilsen’s pictures taken in northern Norway:


 
https://500px.com/photo/155920953/red-knots-in-troms%C3%B8-norway-by-stein-nilsen 



  http://tromsofoto.smugmug.com/keyword/knot/i-cpStmMf7



Here is a link to David N.Nettleship’s article about the breeding biology of 
Ellesmere Knots: 




  http://epic.awi.de/28020/1/Polarforsch1974_1_2.pdf
“


Also have a look please at the two males collected in East Greenland (plate 2), 
one of which had been ringed in Britain). These birds differ in colour from the 
Norwegian males. It makes me wonder if East Greenland Knots deserve a name of 
their own, see here 



 
http://radioactiverobins.com/archive/icons%20navipag/Report%20wader%20ringing%20Rhine-Meuse%20delta%201984-85.pdf 





Cheers, Norman

---
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Subject: JAMES BAY SHOREBIRDS 2016 - Report #1
From: jeaniron AT SYMPATICO.CA
Date: Sun, 7 Aug 2016 08:48:34 -0400
This is Jean Iron's first report for the period 30 July
to 6 August 2016 from Longridge Point (Lat 51.798681 N, Lon 80.691619 W) on the
southwest coast of James Bay in Ontario. Longridge is about 910 km (565 mi)
north of Toronto. It is one of four shorebird camps this summer. See locations
on map in link #1 below. Surveys are under the direction of Christian Friis of
the Canadian Wildlife Service with partners the Royal Ontario Museum, Ontario
Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, Bird Studies Canada, Trent
University, Nature Canada and Moose Cree First Nation. Shorebird population
declines and the need to protect crucial intertidal habitats are driving
research.

 

LONGRIDGE CREW: The seven crew members are Allie Anderson
(Crew leader, Trent University, Peterborough ON), Barbara Charlton (ON), Dan
Froehlich (Washington State), Kathryn Hoo (ON), Jean Iron (ON), Amie MacDonald
(ON) and Felicia Sanders (South Carolina).

 

SHOREBIRD OBSERVATIONS: 22 species to date. Total
shorebirds 15,617 on Aug 6. Maximum counts and dates for each species at
Longridge listed below. Counts are done from 2.5 hours before high tide to 2.5
hours after when shorebirds are more concentrated. Turnover from adults to 
juveniles 

is occurring rapidly for many (not all) species.

 

Black-bellied Plover: 61 adults on Aug 6.

 

American Golden-Plover: 1 first summer/second winter on
Aug 6.

 

Semipalmated Plover: 682 on July 31. 164 mostly adults on
Aug 4. Many newly arrived juveniles on Aug 6.

 

Killdeer: 10 on Aug 4.

 

Spotted Sandpiper: 7 on Aug 3.

 

Solitary Sandpiper: 1 adult on Aug 3. 1 juvenile on Aug
6.

 

Greater Yellowlegs: 664 on Aug 6, 60% juveniles.

 

Lesser Yellowlegs: 776 on Aug 6, mostly juveniles.

 

Whimbrel: 41 on Aug 3. First juvenile on July 31. 95
mostly juveniles on Aug 6.

 

Marbled Godwit: 5 juveniles on Aug 4. An isolated
population breeds on southern James Bay. This population migrates southwest to
the Gulf of California, not to the Atlantic Coast as once believed.

 

Hudsonian Godwit: 368 molting and fattening adults on
July 31. 241 including first 2 juveniles on Aug 6. Many thousands are gathering
farther north along James Bay. Most will fly non-stop to South America.

 

Ruddy Turnstone: 400 adults on Aug 1.

 

RED KNOT: Endangered rufa subspecies. 6000 adults seen on
Aug 2 at Little Piskwamish Point South (fide Christian Friis). Smaller numbers
at Longridge with 520 molting adults on Aug 4. Flags read from United States
and Argentina. James Bay knots concentrate at a few favored stopover locations.
They fatten and undergo variable amounts of body molt before most make the long
non-stop flight to South America. This spring (2016) nanotagged knots from
Delaware Bay were detected in James Bay for a day or two going north. Nanotags
give information on timing of migration, migration routes, how long staying at
staging areas, breeding and wintering areas.

 

Sanderling: 5 molting adults on Aug 1.

 

Dunlin: Subspecies hudsonia. 10 molting adults on Aug 3.
Dunlins are feeding on amphipod shrimp.

 

Baird's Sandpiper: 1 adult on 31 July, 6 juveniles on Aug
5.

 

Least Sandpiper: 741 mostly juveniles on Aug 6. Most
adults have departed from the north.

 

PEEPS: 10,000 mostly Semipalmated and White-rumped
Sandpipers on Aug 2 at Little Piskwamish Point South (fide Christian Friis).

 

White-rumped Sandpiper: 3400 molting adults on Aug 6.
Juveniles normally don't arrive until September. James Bay is the most
important fall staging area for this sandpiper in North America. 1 adult banded
on Aug 6 was very fat (fat score of 7) and was well molted into winter plumage.
After fattening most adults overfly southern Canada and the United States going
directly to South America. 

 

Pectoral Sandpiper: 147 adults and 1 juvenile (first) on
Aug 2.

 

Semipalmated Sandpiper: 800 on Aug 4 including 50 juveniles.
First juvenile on 31 July. 1070 on Aug 6 including many more newly arrived 
juveniles. 

James Bay and the Bay of Fundy are the two most important stopover sites for
southbound Semipalmated Sandpipers in North America.

 

Wilson's Snipe: 6 on Aug 6, 1 still winnowing on Aug 3.

 

Red-necked Phalarope: 1 juvenile July 31.

 

SHOREBIRD FOODS: Shorebirds on James Bays feed on the
abundant larvae of the bivalve Macoma balthica (clam), and in southern James
Bay, the gastropod Hydrobia minuta (snail), as well as a variety of crustaceans
(shrimps/crabs and relatives), worms and dipteran (fly) larvae (Ontario
Shorebird Conservation Plan 2003). James Bay shorebirds are apparently not
eating biofilm or "slime mud" as in some other areas (fide Allie
Anderson). Biofilm is a thin layer of nutritious slime on mudflats.

 

UPCOMING AERIAL SURVEY: Legendary shorebird experts Guy
Morrison and Ken Ross will be doing an aerial survey on August 9 going from 
Hannah Bay near the Quebec border 

to the mouth of the Ekwan River opposite Akimiski Island. They are focusing on
Red Knots but will be counting all shorebirds. A nanotag detector will be
attached to bottom of helicopter. Survey funded by Ontario's Species at Risk
Research Fund.

 

PRAIRIE FALCON: An adult Prairie Falcon (found and aged
by Dan Froehlich) was seen 26 July 2016 at Longridge. Presumably this same
Prairie Falcon was seen Aug 2 at Little Piskwamish Point South. The adult
Prairie Falcon (photos taken) was seen again yesterday (Aug 6) at Longridge
Point. This 2016 individual is the second record for James Bay. The first
Prairie Falcon (a juvenile) for James Bay was found 2 August 2013 at Little
Piskwamish Point, but not afterwards. It was accepted by the OBRC. One wonders
if the juvenile in 2013 is now the adult observed this summer.

 

SOME OTHER BIRDS: Yellow Rails often heard ticking, high
count of 11 on Aug 1. Sora on July 31. American Black Duck, 16 on Aug 3. Black
Scoter, 1000 mostly molting males on July 31. Common Goldeneye, 120 on Aug 3.
Osprey, 1 on Aug 2. Bald Eagle, 3 on Aug 4. Northern Goshawk, juvenile on Aug
4. Northern Harrier, 1 seen daily. Merlin on Aug 3/4. Great Black-backed Gull,
2 first summer birds on Aug 3. Bonaparte's Gull 128 on July 31, 2 juveniles on 
Aug 

2. Franklin's Gull on Jul 28, 29, 31 and Aug 2 and 6. Arctic Tern, 4 on Aug 3. 
Common Tern, 22 on 

Aug 3. Alder Flycatcher, 8 on Aug 4. Gray Jay (4) and Boreal Chickadee (2)
regular at camp. Rusty Blackbird, 11 on July 31. Clay-colored Sparrow, 2 on Aug
1. Savannah Sparrow, 67 on Aug 4. Nelson's Sparrow (subspecies alter), 13 on
Aug 1. Le Conte's Sparrow, 5 on July 30. Both Nelson's and Le Conte's heard and
seen regularly. Lincoln's Sparrow, 6 on Aug 4. White-winged Crossbills, 141 on
Aug 2 with some flocks seen flying in off James Bay. Common Redpoll, 6 on Jul
30. Pine Siskins also sighted.

 

MAMMALS: Beluga (White Whale) 1 dead on beach found July
17. Bald Eagles feeding on it. A Polar Bear was seen July 18, but not since.
They are rare south of Akimiski Island where the world's most southerly
population spends the summer. A Black Bear seen regularly. Gray Wolf, 2 seen.
Family of Striped Skunks around camp. No voles and mice recorded (fide Dan
Froehlich).

 

REPTILES: Eastern Gartersnake on Aug 2.

 

BUTTERFLIES: Milbert's Tortoiseshell found by Barb
Charlton. 

                

1. Map showing locations of survey camps

http://jeaniron.ca/2016/JB16/map2016.htm

 

2. Population Estimates of North American Shorebirds 2012

http://bit.ly/1zPebsP  

 

3. Guide to Southbound Shorebirds

http://www.ofo.ca/site/page/view/articles.southboundshorebirds

 

WESTERN HEMISPHERE SHOREBIRD RESERVE: The vast pristine intertidal
mudflats and prairie-like coastal marshes of James Bay comprise one of the most
important shorebird areas in the world. The hope is that James Bay or portions
thereof will be designated a "Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve of
Hemispheric Importance". James Bay greatly exceeds the minimum criteria
for this designation. 

 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: Survey camps are rented from the Moose
Cree First Nation. The Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry
(OMNRF) provides accommodations in the staff house while crews are in Moosonee.
These surveys would not be possible without the many hours of dedicated
volunteer effort. Jean thanks an anonymous donor for financial assistance.

 

Jean messages me by DeLorme inReach two-way satellite
communicator with GPS and sometimes by satellite phone from out on the tidal
flats. She's living her dream with the shorebirds.

 

Second report in 6-7 days.

 

Ron Pittaway (for Jean)

Toronto, Ontario







 		 	   		  
Subject: World Shorebirds íday 2016
From: Gyorgy Szimuly <gyorgy.szimuly AT MAC.COM>
Date: Thu, 14 Jul 2016 18:52:43 +0100
Dear Friends,

The 3rd World Shorebirds Day is at the corner and many of us has already saved 
the dates of the popular Global Shorebird Counting Program. 2-6 September 2016 
is an extended weekend for counting shorebirds on multiple locations. Please 
save the date for you as well. We cannot encourage enough people from here, but 
surely we can ask for your assistance to invite more people from your local 
community. 


Please find the registration page here:

https://worldshorebirdsday.wordpress.com/2016/07/12/global-shorebird-counting-2016-registration/ 


Should you have any question, please don't hesitate to contact us at 
shorebirdsday AT gmail.com 


Best wishes, Szimi
——
Gyorgy Szimuly
Milton Keynes, UK
World Shorebirds Day
Subject: Shorebird Photos Wanted
From: Kevin McLean <kevin AT SHOREBIRD.ORG>
Date: Thu, 7 Apr 2016 15:19:29 -0700
Hi Shorebirders!

I have recently launched a new site that collects and maps shorebird
photos, and would love it if you could share any photos you have, or,
share the site with people who would be interested:

https://www.shorebird.org/

We currently have user-submitted photos from 4 continents, and new photos
are being added daily.

In addition, we have a searchable database, which contains public domain
and creative commons images on over 200 shorebird species:

https://www.shorebird.org/species.cgi

If you have any questions, feel free to contact me.

Happy Birding!

Kevin McLean
Seattle, Washington, USA
https://www.shorebird.org/
twitter:  AT ShorebirdOrg
Subject: 'Shorebird of the Year' poll
From: Gyorgy Szimuly <gyorgy.szimuly AT MAC.COM>
Date: Mon, 7 Mar 2016 20:50:49 +0000
Dear Shorebirders,

The 2016 poll to vote for the 'Shorebird of the Year' is now open. Take your 10 
seconds to vote and please share it with your network. 



https://worldshorebirdsday.wordpress.com/2016/03/07/poll-opens-for-the-2016-shorebird-of-the-year/ 


Best wishes, Szimi
—
Gyorgy Szimuly
Milton Keynes, UK
http://thenewshorebirds.wordpress.com
Subject: Unveiling the cover of shorebird handbook
From: Gyorgy Szimuly <gyorgy.szimuly AT MAC.COM>
Date: Mon, 21 Dec 2015 12:45:13 +0000
Dear Friends,

It's my pleasure to unveil the front cover design and artwork of the first 
volume of the forthcoming shorebird handbook. Please read the related post 
about it: 



https://thenewshorebirds.wordpress.com/2015/12/20/unveiling-the-cover-design-and-art-of-volume-1/ 


I also take the opportunity to wish all of you a wonderful Christmas and a 
Happy New Year. 


Best wishes, Szimi
—
Gyorgy Szimuly
Milton Keynes, UK
https://thenewshorebirds.wordpress.com
Subject: Chamaco
From: Ted Cheskey <TCheskey AT NATURECANADA.CA>
Date: Mon, 7 Dec 2015 11:46:53 +0000
Hay un chamaca quien manajaba una carrô


Sent from my Samsung device over Bell's LTE network.
Subject: Shcr
From: Ted Cheskey <TCheskey AT NATURECANADA.CA>
Date: Tue, 25 Aug 2015 23:19:39 +0000
1.5 km n of Venosta


Sent from my Samsung device over Bell's LTE network.
Subject: JAMES BAY SHOREBIRDS - North Point Report #3
From: Jean Iron <jeaniron AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Wed, 19 Aug 2015 11:31:32 -0400
This is the third and summary report. Please see link with 6 pages of
shorebird photos and videos on my website.
http://www.jeaniron.ca/2015/JB15/p1.htm

I thank Christian Friis of the Canadian Wildlife Service for the opportunity
to surrey shorebirds on James Bay. Ron Pittaway posted my first two reports
and provided much valuable information on shorebirds.

Happy shorebirding,

Jean Iron
Toronto, Ontario
Canada
Subject: JAMES BAY SHOREBIRDS - North Point Report #2
From: Jean Iron <jeaniron AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Fri, 14 Aug 2015 16:44:10 -0400
This is Jean Iron's second report for the period 5 - 14 August 2015 from
North Point on the southwest coast of James Bay 25 km north of Moosonee,
Ontario, Canada. See location on map in link #1 below. The seven crew
members are Ross Wood (crew leader), Theo Cull, Jacqueline Goldstein,
Danielle Hosick, Jean Iron, Lizzie Moore and Walter Wehtje. Two other survey
crews are at Little Piskwamish and Longridge Point. All three survey sites
are globally significant Important Bird Areas. See North Point IBA in ink
#2. Surveys are under the direction of Christian Friis of the Canadian
Wildlife Service with its partners the Royal Ontario Museum, Ontario
Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, Bird Studies Canada, Trent
University, Nature Canada and the Moose Cree First Nation. 

SHOREBIRD BREEDING SUCCESS in 2015: Reports indicate a poor breeding season
in parts of the Eastern Arctic, which may be more widespread. It was a cold
late start to summer with snow staying late in many areas. Paul Smith (pers.
comm.) of the Canadian Wildlife Service said that shorebird breeding success
was very low at East Bay on Southampton Island, Nunavut, in northern Hudson
Bay. Paul reported "The lowest densities and perhaps the worst hatch success
we've seen since 1999. At nearby Coats Island, the breeding densities were
moderate and breeding success was poor, but not quite as bad. The poor
weather, low numbers of breeding geese, and absence of lemmings made for
very high predation rates. The foxes were working hard and very few of our
shorebird nests survived to hatch." 

NORTH POINT OBSERVATIONS: To date 23 shorebird species recorded. Maximum
counts and dates listed below for each species.

HIGH COUNT DAY: 26,055 shorebirds counted on Aug 7 at North Point. 

Black-bellied Plover: 650 adults migrating south in big Vs on Aug 11. 

American Golden Plover: 3 adults on Aug 11. First juvenile on Aug 13.

Semipalmated Plover: 285 mostly adults on Aug 8. First juvenile on Aug 7.

Killdeer, 6 on Aug 8.

Spotted Sandpiper: 1 on Aug 10.

Solitary Sandpiper: 1 on Aug 7.

Greater Yellowlegs: 385 (60% juv) on Aug 7.

Lesser Yellowlegs: 350 (95% juv) on Aug 10.

Whimbrel: 56 adults on Aug 6. First juvenile on Aug 12.

Hudsonian Godwit: 700 on Aug 6. First juvenile on Aug 6.

Marbled Godwit: 11 mostly juveniles on Aug 9.

Ruddy Turnstone: 81 adults on Aug 10.

Red Knot: 510 adults flying south on Aug 11.

Sanderling: 22 molting adults on Aug 7.

Semipalmated Sandpiper: 12,050 (20% juv) on Aug 7. On Aug 6 an adult
Parasitic Jaeger chased a Semipalmated Sandpiper which escaped. 

Least Sandpiper: 950 juveniles on Aug 12. 772 juveniles on Aug 8 in grass
with small ponds refreshed by tide and rain. Very tame and curious. Jean has
never seen such high numbers of juveniles as this year.
	
White-rumped Sandpiper: 12,000 adults on Aug 7. Juveniles first arrive
somewhat later in August and with most coming in September.

Pectoral Sandpiper: 798 adults on Aug 6. First juvenile on Aug 13.

Dunlin: 73 adults on Aug 10. 

Buff-breasted Sandpiper: 1 juvenile on Aug 9 found by Ross Wood.

Short-billed Dowitcher: 1 adult on Aug 8, this species doesn't stage on
James Bay with most going directly to the East Coast.

Wilson's Snipe: 10 on Aug 7. Juvenile on 9 Aug.

Red-necked Phalarope: 1 juvenile on Aug 13.

SHOREBIRD FOODS: Mud samples taken along 13 transects for shorebird food
analysis. Also took blood samples to determine carbon/nitrogen ratios, which
also will give information on diet. Previous studies indicated that
shorebirds in Hudson and James Bays feed on the abundant larvae of the
bivalve Macoma balthica (clam), and in southern James Bay, the gastropod
Hydrobia minuta (snail), as well as a variety of crustaceans (shrimps/crabs
and relatives), worms and dipteran (fly) larvae (Ontario Shorebird
Conservation Plan 2003).

NANO-TAGGING: Nano-tags placed on 5 priority species: Semipalmated
Sandpiper, White-rumped Sandpiper, Dunlin, Hudsonian Godwit and Red Knot.
Tags placed on light weight (low fat) birds rather than heavy individuals to
determine how long they stay to fatten before departing James Bay.

OTHER BIRD SIGHTINGS: New information since last report: Canada Goose, 604
on Aug 8, likely molt migrants subspecies maxima. Snow Goose, 4 (2 ad & 2
juv) blue morphs on Aug 8. Northern Shoveler, 1 on Aug 7. Green-winged Teal,
69 on Aug 8. Northern Pintail, 55 on Aug 7. American Black Duck, 21 on Aug
8. Mallard 210 on Aug 8. Common Goldeneye, 30 on Aug 7. Common Loon, 3 on
Aug 6. Double-crested Cormorant, 1 on Aug 9. Sandhill Crane, 52 on Aug 8 &
9. American White Pelican, 55 on Aug 5. American Bittern, 2 on Aug 11 and
13. Ruffed Grouse, 1 on Aug 7. Bald Eagle, 3 on Aug 10. Osprey, 2 on Aug 8.
Northern Harrier, 4 on Aug 12. American Kestrel, 1 on Aug 13 in aerial
battle with a Merlin. Merlin, 1 on Aug 7 and 13. Yellow Rail, 5 singing
(clicking) on Aug 8. Sora, 3 juveniles 12/13 Aug. Great-Black-backed Gull, 1
adult on Aug 8. Ring-billed Gull, 100 mostly adults on Aug 8. Herring Gull,
2 fresh very dark juveniles on Aug 11. Bonaparte's Gull, 450 adults and 4
juv on Aug 11. Little Gull, 5 (2 ad, 1 first summer/second winter, 2 juv) on
Aug 10, most Little Gulls in North America probably breed in Hudson Bay
Lowlands. Caspian Tern, 2 on Aug 7. Common Tern, 121 on Aug 13 with adults
feeding 17 juveniles. Great Horned Owl, 1 at camp hooting 12/13 Aug.
Short-eared Owl, 1 seen on Aug 7 and 12, 1 heard on Aug 9. Common Raven,
Gray Jay, 4 (2 ad/2 juv) daily, storing Starry False Solomon Seal
(Maianthemum stellatum) berries which are common at camp, 5 Gray Jays taking
handouts at camp on Aug 14. Winter Wren, 1 daily at camp. Yellow-bellied
Sapsucker, 1 on Aug 14. Eastern Kingbird, 1 by Ross Wood on Aug 11 and 12.
Olive-sided Flycatcher, 4 on Aug 12. Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, 1 on Aug 7.
Alder Flycatcher, 1 on Aug 12. Tree Swallow, 115 on Aug 7. Red-breasted
Nuthatch, 4 on Aug 8. Cedar Waxwing, 22 on Aug 8. Winter Wren, 2 daily at
camp. Swainson's Thrush, 3 on Aug 13. American Robin, 50 on Aug 2. Gray
Catbird, 1 on Aug 3. Brown Thrasher, 1 on Aug 2. Yellow-rumped Warbler, 15
on Aug 6. Cape May Warbler, 3 on Aug 12. Black-and-White Warbler, 1 on Aug 8
and 14. Tennessee Warbler, 10 on Aug 8 near camp feeding young. Wilson's
Warbler, 4 on Aug 7. American Redstart, 1 on Aug 12. Clay-colored Sparrow, 2
on Aug 7 and 8. Le Conte's Sparrow, 15 on Aug 7. Nelson's Sparrow
(subspecies alter), 11 on Aug 7. Lincoln's Sparrow, 1 on Aug 7. Swamp
Sparrow, 2 on 9 Aug. Savannah Sparrow, 60 on Aug 7. Dark-eyed Junco, 1 on
Aug 10. Bobolink: 1 on Aug 13. Rusty Blackbird, 2 on Aug 13. Purple Finch, 4
on Aug 8. White-winged Crossbill, 3 on Aug 7. Common Redpoll, 8 on Aug 10.

1. Map of southern James Bay showing location of North Point
http://jeaniron.ca/2015/JB15/map2015.htm

2. North Point Important Bird Area
http://ibacanada.org/site.jsp?siteID=ON139

3. Population Estimates of North American Shorebirds 2012
http://bit.ly/1zPebsP

4. Ontario Shorebird Conservation Plan
http://www.jeaniron.ca/Shorebirds/OSCPlan.pdf

5. Southbound Shorebirds in Ontario
http://www.ofo.ca/site/page/view/articles.southboundshorebirds

WESTERN HEMISPHERE SHOREBIRD RESERVE: The James Bay surveys are vital for
the conservation of critical shorebird habitat. The hope is that James Bay
or portions thereof will be designated a Western Hemisphere Shorebird
Reserve of Hemispheric Importance. "These sites act as staging, nesting or
breeding grounds for at least 500,000 shorebirds annually, or at least 30%
of the biogeographic population of any species." James Bay greatly exceeds
the minimum criteria for a "Hemispheric Importance" designation.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: We appreciate the information provided by Paul Smith
(Canadian Wildlife Service), Ken Abraham (retired Ontario Ministry of
Natural Resources and Forestry), Don Sutherland (Natural Heritage
Information Centre, Ontario) and Mike Burrell (Bird Studies Canada). Survey
camps are rented from the Moose Cree First Nation. The Ontario Ministry of
Natural Resources and Forestry (OMNRF) provides accommodations in the staff
house while crews are in Moosonee. Thanks to Rod Brook, Sarah Hagey and Kim
Bennett of OMNRF for logistical support. The research and data collected
from these surveys would not be possible without the many hours of dedicated
volunteer effort. Jean thanks an anonymous donor for financial assistance.

Jean is expected home on Saturday evening. She'll do a summary report #3
with photos of this summer's surveys in 5 - 10 days.

Ron Pittaway
Toronto, Ontario
Subject: un-subscribe
From: 0000043559d1b2c0-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.UGA.EDU
Date: Sun, 9 Aug 2015 19:15:13 -0400
Please un-subscribe me from this list serv.
Subject: World Shorebirds Day is coming
From: Gyorgy Szimuly <gyorgy.szimuly AT MAC.COM>
Date: Sun, 9 Aug 2015 23:46:40 +0100
Hello Everyone,

World Shorebirds Day is pleased to announce the 2015 ‘Shorebird of the 
Year’, the Red Knot. Please find relevant media release on our website: 


https://worldshorebirdsday.wordpress.com/2015/08/09/red-knot-is-the-2015-shorebird-of-the-year/ 
 


I’d also like to encourage you to register your counting location for the 
Global Shorebird Counting to be held on 4–6 September 2015. More information: 


https://worldshorebirdsday.wordpress.com/2015/08/09/red-knot-is-the-2015-shorebird-of-the-year/ 
 


I’m looking forward to seeing you on the map. :)

Best, Szimi
–
Gyorgy Szimuly
https://worldshorebirdsday.wordpress.com 
 

http://thenewshorebirds.wordpress.com 
Subject: James Bay Shorebirds - North Point Report #1
From: Jean Iron <jeaniron AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Wed, 5 Aug 2015 19:41:18 -0400
This is Jean Iron's first report for the period 31 July to 4 August 2015
from North Point (Lat 51.489737N, Lon -080.447598W) on the southwest coast
of James Bay in Ontario, Canada. I get her messages by DeLorme inReach
two-way satellite communicator with GPS. North Point is 25 km north of
Moosonee. See location on map in link #1 below. The vast tidal mudflats and
prairie-like coastal marshes make James Bay one of the most important
shorebird staging areas in North America. The seven crew members are Ross
Wood (crew leader), Theo Cull, Jacqueline Goldstein, Danielle Hosick, Jean
Iron, Lizzie Moore and Walter Wehtje. Two other survey crews are at Little
Piskwamish and Longridge Point. Surveys are under the direction of Christian
Friis of the Canadian Wildlife Service with partners the Royal Ontario
Museum, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, Bird Studies
Canada, Trent University, Nature Canada and the Moose Cree First Nation.

SHOREBIRD OBSERVATIONS: 19 species to date. Maximum counts and dates for
each species reported below. This report pertains only to North Point.

Black-bellied Plover: 33 adults on Aug 4. 

American Golden Plover: 1 adult on Aug 4.

Semipalmated Plover: 90 mostly adults on Aug 3.

Spotted Sandpiper: 1 on Aug 3.

Solitary Sandpiper: 1 on Aug 3.

Greater Yellowlegs: 185 on Aug 4 (20% juv).

Lesser Yellowlegs: 242 (60% juv) on Aug 3. Also flocks of yellowlegs,
probably both species, observed flying high and calling probably departing
James Bay.

Whimbrel: 64 adults on Aug 1.

Marbled Godwit: 34 on Aug 3. Three juveniles on Aug 1. A local pair on
territory was calling at observers. Ross Wood saw an adult and 1 young. A
isolated population breeds on southern James Bay. Surprisingly, the James
Bay population migrates southwest to the Gulf of California. 

Hudsonian Godwit: 390 molting and fattening adults on Aug 4. Most will fly
non-stop to South America.

Ruddy Turnstone: 35 adults on Aug 4.

RED KNOT: Endangered rufa subspecies. 107 molting adults on Aug 3. James Bay
knots traditionally concentrate at a few favoured stopover locations with
smaller numbers seen elsewhere. North Point normally has small numbers
compared to the much larger numbers at traditional sites such as Little
Piskwanish and Longridge Point. Knots fatten and undergo variable amounts of
body molt before most make the long non-stop flight to South America.

Sanderling: 8 molting adults on Aug 1.

Semipalmated Sandpiper: 6,150 on Aug 3 (5% juv). They fatten over 2-3 weeks
before making a non-stop flight of several days to northern South America.
James Bay and the Bay of Fundy are the two most important stopover sites for
southbound Semipalmated Sandpipers in North America. Flocks of peeps,
probably Semipalmated and White-rumped Sandpipers, seen flying high probably
leaving James Bay.
 
Least Sandpiper: 44 on Aug 4. Percentage of juveniles increasing daily.

White-rumped Sandpiper: 10,000 molting adults on Aug 4. James Bay is the
most important fall staging area for this sandpiper in North America. After
fattening most overfly southern Canada and the United States going to South
America.

Pectoral Sandpiper: 165 adults on Aug 4.

Dunlin: Subspecies hudsonia. 85 molting adults on Aug 4.

Wilson's Snipe: 2 on Aug 4.

WHOOSH: Jean described the "great feeling in the rain at high tide" while
surveying with Jacqueline on August 4 as "1000s of shorebirds whooshed past
our heads".
	
NANO-TAGGING SHOREBIRDS: A system of nano-tagging shorebirds begun in 2013
at James Bay and Motus tracking towers follows migrating shorebirds such as
Semipalmated Sandpiper, White-rumped Sandpiper, Dunlin, Hudsonian Godwit and
Red Knot. Nano-tags are tiny and their signals can be received within a
15-20 km radius of a tower. Tags are placed on shorebirds when banded and
each tag has a different frequency. There are several towers along southern
James Bay and more along Lakes Ontario and Erie, St. Lawrence River and East
Coast.

OTHER BIRD SIGHTINGS: Canada Goose, 420 on Aug 2. American Wigeon. American
Black Duck, 12 on Aug 2. Mallard, 143 on Aug 3. Northern Pintail, 1 on Aug
2. Green-winged Tail, 23 on Aug 2. Common Loon, 3 on Aug 3. Double-crested
Cormorant, 1 on Aug 1. Sandhill Crane, 32 on July 31. American Bittern, 2 on
Aug 2. Northern Harrier, 1 female on Aug 2. Peregrine Falcon, 1 on Aug 4
flushed a flock of 7000 roosting shorebirds at high tide. Yellow Rail, 2
ticking in coastal marshes on Aug 3. Little Gull, 1 adult on Aug 2, most
Little Gulls in North America probably breed in Hudson Bay Lowlands. Common
Tern, 3 on Aug 3. Arctic Tern, 1 on Aug 3. Norther Flicker, 1 on 2/3 Aug.
Olive-sided Flycatcher. Alder Flycatcher, 3 on Aug 2. Tree Swallow, 2 on Aug
2. Cedar Waxwing, 15 on Aug 3. Swainson's Thrush. American Robin, 50 on Aug
2. Gray Jay, family group of 2 adults and 2 juveniles taking handouts at
camp - they love oatmeal. Gray Catbird, 1 on Aug 3. Brown Thrasher, 1 on Aug
2. Tennessee Warbler. Le Conte's Sparrow, 4 on Aug 2. Nelson's Sparrow, 13
on Aug 2 (subspecies alter, previously spelled alterus). Clay-colored
Sparrow, 1 on Aug 1. Savannah Sparrow, 105 on Aug 3. White-throated Sparrow,
40 on Aug 2. Fox Sparrow. Red-winged Blackbird, 800 on Aug 2. Red Crossbill,
3 on July 31, White-winged Crossbill, 1 on Aug 3. Common Redpoll, 8 on Aug
1.

MAMMALS: Beluga (White Whale), 2 at high tide on Aug 1. Black Bears near
camp eating buffaloberries (Shepherdia canadensis). Polar Bears rarely occur
south of Akimiski Island where a sizable population spends the summer. Pine
Marten on Aug 1. Jumping Mouse (more likely Meadow than Woodland). Snowshoe
Hare, adults and young. Meadow Voles and shrews also observed.

1. Map of southern James Bay showing location of North Point
http://jeaniron.ca/2015/JB15/map2015.htm

2. Population Estimates of North American Shorebirds 2012 
http://bit.ly/1zPebsP

3. Ontario Shorebird Conservation Plan
http://www.jeaniron.ca/Shorebirds/OSCPlan.pdf

WESTERN HEMISPHERE SHOREBIRD RESERVE: The hope is that James Bay or portions
of will be designated a Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve of Hemispheric
Importance. "These sites act as staging, nesting or breeding grounds for at
least 500,000 shorebirds annually, or at least 30% of the biogeographic
population of any species." James Bay greatly exceeds the minimum criteria
for a "Hemispheric Importance" designation.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: Survey camps are rented from the Moose Cree First Nation.
The Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (OMNRF) provides
accommodations in the staff house while crews are in Moosonee. Thanks to Rod
Brook, Sarah Hagey and Kim Bennett of OMNRF for logistical support. The data
collected on these surveys would not be possible without the many hours of
dedicated volunteer effort. Jean thanks an anonymous donor for financial
assistance.

Next report in 6-7 days.

Ron Pittaway
Toronto, Ontario
Subject: Banded Stilt
From: Gyorgy Szimuly <gyorgy.szimuly AT MAC.COM>
Date: Sat, 18 Apr 2015 02:22:53 +0100
Dear Shorebirders,

Comments on this post are much welcome.


https://thenewshorebirds.wordpress.com/2015/04/17/is-banded-stilt-actually-a-banded-avocet/ 


Best, Szimi
—
Gyorgy Szimuly
Milton Keynes, UK
http://thenewshorebirds.wordpress.com
http://szimistylebirding.wordpress.com
Subject: Global shorebird project database
From: Gyorgy Szimuly <gyorgy.szimuly AT MAC.COM>
Date: Sun, 4 Jan 2015 03:10:03 +0000
HELP NEEDED for creating a global list of active shorebird project database | 
World Shorebirds Day — Please add yours with the help of a Google form. Find 
it in the relevant blog post. 



http://worldshorebirdsday.wordpress.com/2015/01/04/global-list-of-active-shorebird-project-database/ 


Thanks, Szimi
—
Gyorgy Szimuly
Milton Keynes, UK
http://worldshorebirdsday.wordpress.com
http://szimistylebirding.wordpress.com
Subject: Who's for shorebirds?
From: Gyorgy Szimuly <gyorgy.szimuly AT MAC.COM>
Date: Thu, 4 Dec 2014 00:15:58 +0000
Dear All,

For a new project of the World Shorebirds Day, I need Everyone's help. Please 
have a look at this short blog post and help in completing this list. You can 
add anyone, but you can also add yourself. 


http://worldshorebirdsday.wordpress.com/2014/12/03/who-is-for-shorebirds/

Thanks for your kind help!

Best wishes, Szimi
—
Gyorgy Szimuly
Milton Keynes, UK
http://worldshorebirdsday.wordpress.com
http://szimistylebirding.wordpress.com
Subject: From: Russ Namitz
From: Russ Namitz <namitzr AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 29 Nov 2014 20:22:04 +0100
Sup Shorebirds


http://kangooo.net/yourself.php?guess=dr6qtgh0y87rby


Russ Namitz


Sent from my iPhone
Subject: James Bay Shorebirds - Summary Report (15 July-26 August 2014)
From: "Friis,Christian [Ontario]" <Christian.Friis AT EC.GC.CA>
Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2014 17:31:14 -0400
Hi!

This report summarizes the observations from three camps staffed from 15 July 
to 26 August 2014 on the southwestern coast of James Bay. Surveys are conducted 
under the direction of Christian Friis of the Canadian Wildlife Service (CWS) 
and Mark Peck of the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) and their partners the Ontario 
Ministry of Natural Resources (OMNR), Bird Studies Canada, Nature Canada and 
Moose Cree First Nation. Maximum daily counts and dates for each species are 
reported below for Longridge (51.798942 N, -80.69204 W), Little Piskwamish 
(51.683427 N, -80.565783 W) and North Point (51.7027 N, -80.567 W). Surveys 
were conducted from July 15 - Aug 13 at Longridge, July 15 - August 26 at 
Piskwamish and July 30 - August 26 at North Point. 


Longridge crew: Ryan Burrell, Tove Christensen, Lizzie Grayshon, Dayna Leclair, 
Tim Lucas, Amie MacDonald, Chad Peterson, Ron Ridout, Michael Runtz, Don 
Sutherland, Bill Thompson, Adam Timpf, Ross Wood (crew leader) 


Little Piskwamish crew: Allie Anderson, Susie Cameron, Janice Chard, Tove 
Christensen, Jeff Costa, Tobin Day, Hellen Fu, Mark Gagnon, Marilyn Hughie, 
Jean Iron, Darrell Isaac, Jeffrey Isaac, Brendan Kelly, Peter Kennerley, James 
Kennerley, Doug McRae, Stphane Menu, Mark Peck (crew leader), Lisa Pollock 
(crew leader), Emily Rondel, Greg Stuart, Kat Sutherland, Eleanor Zurbrigg 


North Point crew: Zoe Barrett-Wood, Barbara Charlton, Mark Dodds, Christian 
Friis (crew leader), Kyle Marsh, Janine McManus, Doug McRae (crew leader), 
Dylan White 


HIGHEST DAILY COUNTS: Total numbers of shorebird peaked on August 11 at all 
sites with 13,625 birds observed at Longridge, 45,255 at Piskwamish and 15,000 
at North Point. 


Black-bellied Plover 
Longridge: 358 adults on Aug. 11.
Piskwamish: 150 adults on Aug. 11.
North Point: 144 adults on Aug. 9.

American Golden-Plover 
Longridge: 9 adults on Aug. 11.
Piskwamish: 4 adults on Aug. 11.
North Point: 1 adult observed on a few dates.
 
Semipalmated Plover 
Longridge: 226 on Aug. 11. First juvenile observed on Aug. 6.
Piskwamish: 140 on Aug. 11 (1/3 migrating). First juvenile observed Aug. 1.
North Point: 125 on Aug. 2. First juvenile observed Aug. 10.

Killdeer 
Longridge: 24 on July 31 and 3 young on July 15 and July 20.
Piskwamish: 12 on Aug. 11 and 3 juveniles on Aug. 6.
North Point: 1 adult observed on several dates.
 
Spotted Sandpiper
Longridge: 6 on July 25 (3 observed on several dates).
Piskwamish: 2 juveniles observed on several dates.
North Point: 1 juvenile on Aug. 11.

Solitary Sandpiper 
Longridge: 4 on Aug. 8.
Piskwamish: 4 on Aug. 4.
North Point: 1 juvenile on Aug. 10.

Greater Yellowlegs 
Longridge: 226 adults and juveniles on July 31.
Piskwamish: 380 on Aug. 11. First juvenile observed July 31.
North Point: 480 on Aug. 4. First juvenile observed July 31. 

Lesser Yellowlegs
Longridge: 328 on Aug. 6. By the end of the period they were 90%+ juveniles.
Piskwamish: 325 on Aug. 11 (mostly juveniles). By end of period all juveniles.
North Point: 312 on Aug. 6. First juvenile July 31.

Whimbrel 
Longridge: 60 adults on Aug. 3.
Piskwamish: 46 adults on Aug. 21.
North Point: 55 adults on Aug. 11 migrating flocks.

Hudsonian Godwit 
Longridge: 458 molting adults on Aug 8. No juveniles sighted during the 
period. 

Piskwamish: 388 adults on July 17 and 300 on Aug. 11. First juvenile Aug. 11.
North Point: 709 adults on Aug. 11 (groups migrating). First juvenile Aug. 17.

Marbled Godwit
Longridge: 1 on July 27 and July 31.
Piskwamish: 2 juveniles on Aug. 8 and 3 juveniles on Aug. 10.
North Point: 4 on Aug. 10.

Ruddy Turnstone 
Longridge: 562 on Aug. 10. First juvenile was observed on Aug. 9.
Piskwamish: 185 adults on Aug. 9. First juvenile was observed on Aug. 15.
North Point: 90 on Aug. 24 (75 on Aug. 6 and 71 on Aug. 16). First juvenile on 
Aug. 11. 


Red Knot
Longridge: 1,850 on Aug. 11, including the first juvenile of the year. Most of 
these birds continued south as the high tide moved in, including a flock of 
1000 birds. 

Piskwamish: 2,100 adults on July 26 and 2,000 on Aug. 11/12. First 3 juveniles 
on Aug. 8. By the end of the survey period flocks contained approximately 20% 
juveniles. Approximately 560 knots still present at end of survey period. 

North Point: 999 on Aug. 11 (many migrating). First juvenile on Aug. 5. By the 
end of the survey period only had total observations of 3-9 juveniles. 


Sanderling 
Longridge: 135 molting adults on July 23.
Piskwamish: 74 adults on July 23.
North Point: 414 on Aug. 8. First noted juvenile Aug. 21.

Semipalmated Sandpiper
Longridge: 2,626 on Aug. 11. By Aug. 12 the number of juveniles had increased 
to about 50%. 

Piskwamish: 10,000 on Aug. 11 (many juveniles). First juvenile noted July 24. 
Approximately 700 birds still present at end of survey period. 

North Point: 6,465 on Aug. 12 (75% juveniles). First juvenile Aug. 5. 
Approximately 500 birds still present at end of survey period. 


Western Sandpiper 
Longridge: 1 adult observed on July 23. 

Least Sandpiper
Longridge: 363 juveniles on Aug. 8. First juvenile July 19 (100% juveniles by 
Aug. 8). 

Piskwamish: 250 juveniles on Aug. 11. First 2 juveniles on July 24 (100% 
juveniles by Aug. 5). 

North Point: 544 juveniles on Aug. 11 (100% juveniles by July 31).

White-rumped Sandpiper
Longridge: 6,635 adults on Aug. 11.
Piskwamish: approximately 30,000 adults on Aug. 11. No juveniles observed.
North Point: 6,229 adults on Aug. 15. First 2 juveniles on Aug. 11.

Baird's Sandpiper 
Longridge: 2 adults on Aug. 4 and 2 juveniles on Aug. 11.
North Point: 1 juvenile on Aug. 18 and 2 juveniles on Aug. 24. 

Pectoral Sandpiper
Longridge: 258 adults on July 31. 
Piskwamish: 300 adults on Aug. 11 and 5 juveniles on Aug. 12
North Point: 279 adults on Aug. 2 and 1 juvenile on Aug. 24

Dunlin 
Longridge: 155 molting adults on Aug. 13 
Piskwamish: 1,200 molting adults on Aug. 11. Some adults almost completely 
molted by the end of the survey period. 

North Point: 1,397 molting adults on Aug. 11. First juvenile noted Aug. 25.

Stilt Sandpiper
Longridge: 2 adults on July 19 and 1 adult on July 21.
North Point: 3 on July 31 and 2 on Aug 1/2.

Short-billed Dowitcher
Longridge: 7 on Aug. 4. 
Piskwamish: 8 on Aug. 15 and 3 juveniles on July 31.
North Point: 6 (2 juveniles) on Aug. 4.

Wilson's Snipe 
Longridge: 64 on Aug. 7. 
Piskwamish: 80 on Aug. 11.
North Point: 26 on Aug. 11.

Wilson's Phalarope
Longridge: 4 on July 31. 
Piskwamish: 1 juvenile observed on several dates.
North Point: 5 on Aug. 11 and 4 juveniles on Aug. 21.

Red-necked Phalarope: 
Piskwamish: 4 juveniles on Aug. 7.
North Point: 1 juvenile on Aug. 11 and Aug 14.

A total of 172 bird species were recorded at all three sites (137 species at 
Longridge, 136 species at Piskwamish and 135 species at North Point). 


Other Birds: Non-shorebird highlights include 3 Black Guillemots, 2 Mute Swans, 
Yellow Rail, Arctic Tern, Parasitic Jaeger, Pied-billed Grebe, Great Horned 
Owl, Northern Saw-whet Owl, Common Nighthawk, Clay-colored Sparrow, juvenile 
Northern Shrike, and a female yellow-headed blackbird. 


Mammals: Porcupine, Red Squirrel, Red-backed Vole, Meadow Vole, Beluga, Gray 
Wolf, Red Fox, Black Bear, Ermine, Striped Skunk, River Otter, White-tailed 
Deer, Moose, Caribou and an unidentified seal. 


Reptiles/Amphibians: American Toad, Boreal chorus frog, wood frog, spring 
peeper, and Garter snake. 


Butterflies/moths: Azure, C. Ringlet, Northern Crescent, White Admiral, 
Viceroy, Monarch, Cabbage White, Atlantis Fritillary, Orange Sulphur and 
Bronzed Copper and Catocala spp. (orange underwings). 


Dragonflies: Lake Darner, Lake Emerald, Zigzag Darner, Four-spotted Skimmer, 
Cherry-faced Meadowhawk, Black Meadowhawk, Sedge Darner, Forcepate Emerald, 
Northern Spreadwing, Emerald Spreadwing, Canada Darner, Variable Darner and 
Sedge Sprite. 


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: The Western James Bay Shorebird Survey is a cooperative 
effort of the Canadian Wildlife Service, Royal Ontario Museum , Ontario 
Ministry of Natural Resources (OMNR), Bird Studies Canada, Nature Canada and 
Moose Cree First Nation. Survey camps are rented from the Moose Cree First 
Nation. The OMNR provides accommodations in the staff house while crews are in 
Moosonee. Thanks to Rod Brook, Sarah Hagey and Kim Bennett of OMNR for 
logistical support. 


This project would not be possible without the many long days of dedicated 
volunteer effort. 


This project was funded by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Neotropical 
Migratory Bird Conservation Act program, which supports work to conserve 
Neotropical migratory birds in the United States, Canada, Latin America and the 
Caribbean. Thanks to Ron Pittaway and Jean Iron for their reports on the 
project this year and years past. 


From Jean and Ron:
Map of survey locations. 
#1. http://www.jeaniron.ca/2014/JB14/map.htm

Population Estimates of North American Shorebirds 2012. 
#2. http://www.jeaniron.ca/2013/ShorebirdPop2012.pdf

Southbound Shorebirds: Some basic facts. 
#3. http://www.ofo.ca/site/page/view/articles.southboundshorebirds

Regards,
            Christian

Christian A. Friis 
Canadian Wildlife Service 
Environment Canada 
4905 Dufferin St. 
Toronto ON M3H 5T4 
christian.friis AT ec.gc.ca 
Telephone 416.739.4908 
Mobile 647.882.6097 
Facsimile 416.739.5845 
Government of Canada 
Website www.ec.gc.ca/mbc-com

Christian A. Friis 
Service canadien de la faune 
Environnement Canada 
4905, rue Dufferin 
Toronto ON M3H 5T4 
christian.friis AT ec.gc.ca 
Tlphone 416.739.4908 
Cellulaire 647.882.6097 
Tlcopieur 416.739.5845 
Gouvernement du Canada 
Site Web www.ec.gc.ca/mbc-com
Subject: The 1st World Shorebirds Day is at the corner
From: Gyorgy Szimuly <gyorgy.szimuly AT MAC.COM>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 22:51:14 +0100
Dear All,

My last update about the very first World Shorebirds Day was posted months ago. 
Let me share a few details with you. Id like to encourage you to support this 
initiative by taking a part of it. 


The 6th of September is selected for celebrating shorebirds and raising public 
awareness for the need of conservation, research and fundraising. 


Birdwatchers and researchers have joined the Global Shorebird Counting Program, 
and nearly 300 sites have already been registered covering many of the 
shorebird sites of international importance. Please find the map of the 
registered sites: 
https://mapsengine.google.com/map/edit?mid=z3yRwAVo2mAw.k42bDqIRe7a4 


If you have not joined yet, please think about it and register your site where 
you go counting shorebirds on 6-7 September. 
(http://worldshorebirdsday.wordpress.com/global-shorebird-counting/) 


Last but not least, the shorebird community voted for the Shorebirds of the 
Year for this year. The enigmatic Spoon-billed Sandpiper was selected and will 
hold this title until 15/08/2015. All of our fundraising activity will focus 
this species. However, I have already opened the new poll to decide which 
shorebird will be chosen for the 2015/2016 shorebird year. 
http://worldshorebirdsday.wordpress.com/2014/08/19/shorebirds-of-the-year-2015-poll-opens/ 


Please join us and celebrate shorebirds on 6th of September.

Best regards, Szimi
_
Gyorgy Szimuly
Coordinator of the Global Events of the World Shorebirds Day
Milton Keynes, UK
http://worldshorebirdsday.wordpress.com
Subject: James Bay Shorebirds - Little Piskwamish Report #3
From: Jean Iron <jeaniron AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Tue, 19 Aug 2014 14:31:07 -0400
This is the third report for the two day period 11 -12 August 2014 from
Little Piskwamish Point on the southwestern coast of James Bay in Ontario,
Canada. Be sure to see photos and videos in link below. Surveys are
conducted under the direction of Christian Friis of the Canadian Wildlife
Service (CWS) and Mark Peck of the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) and their
partners: the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (OMNR), Bird Studies
Canada, Nature Canada and Moose Cree First Nation. The Little Piskwamish
crew comprised Mark Peck (crew leader), James Kennerley, Brendan Kelly, Jean
Iron, Eleanor Zurbrigg, Doug McRae, Lisa Pollock, Hellen Fu, and Darrell
Isaac and Jeffrey Isaac from Moose Cree First Nation. Two other crews were
based at North Point and Longridge Point. They may file reports. 

LINK TO PHOTOS AND VIDEOS - 5 PAGES
http://www.jeaniron.ca/2014/JB14/p1.htm

HIGH COUNTS: An estimated 46,256 shorebirds were observed on Aug 11 and
30,875 shorebirds on Aug 12. These high counts resulted from strong north
winds combined with high tides after the full moon on Sunday August 10. We
were in awe as many thousands of shorebirds wheeled around at high tide.
Given these numbers at one location, there must be several million
southbound shorebirds using James Bay. 

SHOREBIRD OBSERVATIONS: Highest maximum counts and dates for each species
are reported below. Reports pertain to Little Piskwamish. 

Black-bellied Plover: 150 adults on Aug 11.

American Golden-Plover: 4 adults on Aug 11.

Semipalmated Plover: 140 on Aug. One third were flying high and migrating
south. Some juveniles noted.

Killdeer: 12 adults and 4 juveniles on Aug 11.

Solitary Sandpiper: 1 juvenile on Aug 12.

Greater Yellowlegs: 380 adults and juveniles on Aug 11.

Lesser Yellowlegs: 325 on Aug 11. All juveniles.

Whimbrel: 3 on Aug 11.

Hudsonian Godwit: 299 molting adults plus first juvenile on Aug 11. 

Marbled Godwit: 2 juveniles on Aug 11. Adults have departed.

Ruddy Turnstone: 101 on Aug 11.

RED KNOT: 2000 on Aug 11 and 2000 again on Aug 12 including 12 juveniles on
both days. Juvenile numbers should increase over the next few weeks and
adults will depart soon. Total flag re-sightings were about 1600 for the
period July 15 to Aug 12. Because many individual flagged knots were seen
more than once, the total number of flags represents over 350 individuals.
Mark Peck (ROM) estimates that at least 5000 adult knots are/were using
Little Piskwamish this summer making it one of the most important southbound
sites for the endangered rufa subspecies in North America.

Sanderling: 1 molting adult on Aug 12.

Semipalmated Sandpiper: 11,000 on Aug 11 and 7800 on Aug 12. Juvenile
numbers increasing to about 10%. 

Least Sandpiper: 250 on Aug 11. All juveniles.

White-rumped Sandpiper: Conservative estimates of 30,000 adults on Aug 11
and 19,000 on Aug 12.

Pectoral Sandpiper: 300 on Aug 11. First juvenile on Aug 11.

Dunlin: 1200 molting adults on Aug 11 and 1000 on Aug 12. Numbers are
building.

Short-billed Sandpiper: 5 juveniles on Aug 11.

Wilson's Snipe: 80 gathering in a coastal marsh on Aug 11. 

Red-necked Phalarope: 1 juvenile on Aug 12.

VIDEO LINKS TO SHOREBIRDS
1. Red Knot Surveys http://youtu.be/x6TP3tAgiKM 

2. Red Knots Feeding http://youtu.be/WbY737Rytwg 

3. Juvenile Red Knot http://youtu.be/A2YpLGoZq_s 

4. Hudsonian Godwit http://youtu.be/YhqqRm4orHU 

5. Juvenile Wilson's Phalarope
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=htCKQoxXpBg 

6. Comparison of juvenile Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs
http://youtu.be/hDM_5Sr0Hd8 

7. Peeps: http://youtu.be/kEAZz3fS9tg

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: The Western James Bay Shorebird Survey is a cooperative
effort of the Canadian Wildlife Service, Royal Ontario Museum , Ontario
Ministry of Natural Resources (OMNR), Bird Studies Canada, Nature Canada in
cooperation with the Moose Cree First Nation. Survey camps are rented from
the Moose Cree First Nation. The OMNR provides accommodations in the
staffhouse while crews are in Moosonee. Thanks to Rod Brook, Sarah Hagey and
Kim Bennett of OMNR for logistical support. This project would not be
possible without the many long days of dedicated volunteer effort. Jean
thanks an anonymous donor for financial assistance to the program.

SHOREBIRD CONSERVATION: It is our hope that these surveys and public support
will contribute to James Bay (or parts thereof) being designated a Western
Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve of Hemispheric Importance. James Bay greatly
exceeds the minimum criteria for this designation.  

Jean Iron and Ron Pittaway
Toronto, Ontario
Canada
Subject: Re: James Bay Shorebirds - Little Piskwamish Report #2
From: norman deans van swelm <norman.vanswelm AT WXS.NL>
Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2014 14:10:14 +0200
Hi Ron & all,
Thank you for sending Jean's fine reports. May I point at Vincent Legrands
website which contains many photographs taken in the Azores which is a
heaven for Europeans to see American birds as you know. Vincent shows a 
picture of an
dult Knot taken in July.Can you or anyone else confirm that this bird 
belongs to
the race rufa please? Here is the link:



     http://www.vincentlegrand.com/#!album-32-20



 All the best, Norman



Ron Pittaway  relays:> This is Jean Iron's second report for the period 4 -
> 10 August 2014 from
>> Little Piskwamish Point on the southwestern coast of James Bay in 
>> Ontario,
>> Canada. See map link #2 below. Surveys are conducted under the direction 
>> of
>> Christian Friis of the Canadian Wildlife Service (CWS) and Mark Peck of 
>> the
>> Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) and their partners the Ontario Ministry of
>> Natural Resources (OMNR), Bird Studies Canada, Nature Canada and Moose 
>> Cree
>> First Nation. The Little Piskwamish crew comprises Mark Peck (crew 
>> leader),
>> James Kennerley from UK, Brendan Kelly from NL, Jean Iron, Eleanor 
>> Zurbrigg,
>> Doug McRae, Lisa Pollock and Hellen Fu. Darrell Isaac and Jeffrey Isaac 
>> from
>> Moose Factory First Nation arrived on August 4 to assist with the survey.
>> Two other crews are based at North Point and Longridge Point.
>>
>> JAMES BAY: Ontario's coastline of James Bay measures about 560 kilometres 
>> or
>> 350 miles. The west coast is extremely flat and intersected by several 
>> large
>> rivers and many streams. The southern coast is characterized by long 
>> narrow
>> promontories, wide tidal flats, shoals, sandy bays, extensive brackish
>> marshes and pools. It's a shorebird paradise of great conservation 
>> concern.
>>
>> SHOREBIRD MIGRATION CHRONOLOGY: Most (not all) southbound shorebirds 
>> migrate
>> in three waves: adult females first, adult males second, juveniles last.
>>
>> SHOREBIRD OBSERVATIONS: The maximum counts and dates for each species are
>> reported below. Reports pertain to Little Piskwamish at Lat 51.655515 N, 
>> Lon
>> -80.57167 W.
>>
>> THREE HIGHEST TOTAL DAILY COUNTS: 18635 shorebirds on July 31, 15530 on 
>> Aug
>> 3 and 13812 on Aug 4.
>>
>> Black-bellied Plover: 57 molting adults on Aug 6.
>>
>> Semipalmated Plover: 60 adults on Aug 6, 1 juvenile on 9th.
>>
>> Killdeer: 4 adults and 3 juveniles on Aug 6.
>>
>> Spotted Sandpiper: first juvenile on Aug 5 and 2 juveniles on 8th.
>>
>> Solitary Sandpiper: 4 adults on Aug 4 and 2 juveniles on 5th.
>>
>> Greater Yellowlegs: 270 on Aug 6, 75% juveniles on 9th. Unlike most
>> shorebirds, some Greaters undergo both body and wing molt at James Bay
>> before continuing migration.
>>
>> Lesser Yellowlegs: 137 on Aug 6. Almost all now are juveniles.
>>
>> Whimbrel: 9 on Aug 3.
>>
>> Hudsonian Godwit: 167 molting adults on Aug 4. One red flag OEM from 
>> Chile
>> on Aug 5. Another with red flag JK from Chile on Aug 9. Most adult 
>> Hudsonian
>> Godwits molt body feathers while at James Bay before departing in late 
>> Aug
>> and early Sept with most going nonstop to South America.
>>
>> Marbled Godwit: 1 juvenile on Aug 7 and 2 juveniles on 8th. The estimated
>> disjunct James Bay population is 2000 birds. Most adults depart in late
>> July. The wintering grounds of James Bay birds were unknown until 
>> recently.
>> Birds fitted with satellite transmitters on Akimiski Island in 2007 and 
>> 2008
>> went southwest to winter along the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez) in
>> Mexico. Previously it was thought that James Bay godwits wintered on the
>> south Atlantic Coast of the United States, which is much closer to James
>> Bay.
>>
>> Ruddy Turnstone: 23 on Aug 6.
>>
>> RED KNOT: Highest daily count was 1670 adults on Aug 6. First 3 juvenile
>> knots on Aug 8. Flag re-sightings are currently about 1400 so Mark Peck 
>> is
>> very happy. Knot numbers this year are similar to most previous summers.
>> Mark estimates that about 5000 adult knots are using Little Piskwamish 
>> this
>> summer making it one of the most important southbound sites for the
>> endangered rufa subspecies in North America. One knot with a white flag 
>> ALH
>> was banded on the Mingan Archipelago on the north shore of the Gulf of 
>> St.
>> Lawrence in Quebec. Mingan is the other major southbound staging area for
>> knots in Eastern Canada, but there is virtually no mixing of birds 
>> between
>> there and James Bay. The knots are fat and in excellent condition. They 
>> will
>> soon fly nonstop to South America. Knots that fail to gain adequate 
>> weight
>> suffer reduced survival.
>>
>> Sanderling: 4 molting adults on Aug 4.
>>
>> Semipalmated Sandpiper: 7000 on Aug 4. Very few juveniles to date but
>> increasing. Both adults and juveniles are being fitted with nano-tags. 
>> This
>> peep has declined very significantly in recent years. See SHOREBIRD
>> CONSERVATION NOTE below.
>>
>> Least Sandpiper: 170 on 7th. Almost all were juveniles. The switchover 
>> from
>> adults to juveniles was rapid.
>>
>> White-rumped Sandpiper: 5900 molting and fattening adults on Aug 6.
>>
>> Pectoral Sandpiper: 100 on Aug 8.
>>
>> Dunlin: Dunlin 800 adults on Aug 8. Thousands of Dunlins (subspecies
>> hudsonia) stage in James Bay. Adults undergo a complete (wings/tail/body)
>> prebasic molt and juveniles undergo a partial (body) preformative molt
>> before both age classes resume migration about mid-September and later. 
>> This
>> is the reason that North American Dunlins are very rare south of the
>> subarctic until much later than most other shorebirds.
>>
>> Stilt Sandpiper: 1 juvenile on 9 Aug.
>>
>> Short-billed Sandpiper: 1 juvenile 9 Aug.
>>
>> Wilson's Phalarope: 1 juvenile on Aug 6 and 9th. Small numbers breed in 
>> the
>> vast prairie-like marshes of James Bay.
>>
>> Red-necked Phalarope: 4 juveniles on Aug 7.
>>
>> OTHER BIRDS: Canada Goose, 460 flying over on Aug 5. American Wigeon, 5 
>> on
>> Aug 4. American Black Duck, 98 on Aug 6. Mallard, 82 on Aug 8. Northern
>> Pintail, 105 on Aug 7. Green-winged Teal, 56 on Aug 6. Ring-necked Duck, 
>> 1
>> on Aug 6. Scaup species, 6 on Aug 1. Common Goldeneye, 18 on Aug 6. 
>> Hooded
>> Merganser, 5 on Aug 9. Common Merganser, 2 on Aug 4. Red-breasted 
>> Merganser,
>> 1 on Aug 7. Black Scoter, large raft of 4000 mostly molting males on Aug 
>> 5.
>> Common Loon, 6 on Aug 6. Pied-billed Grebe, 1 juvenile on Aug 6. American
>> White Pelican, 16 on Aug 4. American Bittern, 2 on Aug 6. Great Blue 
>> Heron,
>> 1 juvenile. Osprey, 4 on Aug 6. Bald Eagle, a few adults and immatures in
>> area. Northern Goshawk, 2 adults on Aug 5. Merlin, 3 on Aug 6. Yellow 
>> Rail,
>> 3 on Aug 8. Sora, 2 on Aug 5. Sandhill Crane, 28 on Aug 7. Bonaparte's 
>> Gull,
>> 631 mostly molting adults, juveniles increasing. Little Gull, 2 molting
>> adults on Aug 10, 1 molting to second winter plumage on Aug 7 and 8. 
>> Great
>> Horned Owl, 1 heard on Aug 7 and 8th. Long-eared Owl, 1 heard on Aug 5 
>> and
>> 6th. Common Raven, 22 on Aug 5. American Crow, 5 on Aug 6. Black-capped
>> Chickadee, 4 on Aug 3. Boreal Chickadee, 3 on Aug 8. Horned Lark, 1 on 
>> Aug 7
>> and 8th. Tree Swallow, 66 on Aug 4. Alder Flycatcher, 8 on Aug 4. 
>> Nashville
>> Warbler, 1 on Aug 4. Tennessee Warbler, 3 on Aug 4. Yellow-rumped 
>> Warbler,
>> 80 on Aug 6. Palm Warbler, 1 on Aug 4. American Redstart, 1 on Aug 9. 
>> Common
>> Yellowthroat, 4 on Aug 3. Wilson's Warbler, 4 on Aug 6. Northern
>> Waterthrush, 7 on Aug 4. Yellow Warbler, 12 on Aug 4. Savannah Sparrow, 
>> 65
>> on Aug 7. Le Conte's, 3 on Aug 4 - 7th. Nelson's Sparrow (daily) with 4 
>> on
>> Aug 8. Fox Sparrow, 1 on Aug 4. Song Sparrow, 40 on Aug 6. Lincoln's
>> Sparrow, 10 on Aug 4. Swamp Sparrow, 13 on Aug 6. Dark-eyed Junco, 2 on 
>> Aug
>> 9. Red-winged Blackbird, 200 on Aug 8. Rusty Blackbird, 1 on Aug 6.
>> White-winged Crossbill, 145 on Aug 1, 105 on Aug 4, 80 on 8th. Common
>> Redpoll, 3 juveniles on Aug 6. Pine Siskin, 2 on Aug 5.
>>
>> SHOREBIRD CONSERVATION NOTE: I've copied the following email from Ken
>> Abraham (emeritus OMNR Research Scientist) with his permission. "See the
>> article linked below on tracking Semipalmated Sandpipers with 
>> geolocators.
>> Note that the bird highlighted in the article spent a month (21 July to 
>> 22
>> August 2013) in James Bay on its southern migration and a week (2 June to 
>> 10
>> June 2014) in James Bay on its spring migration. The other significant 
>> (and
>> remarkable, almost unbelievable) finding is that it flew non-stop for 6 
>> days
>> from James Bay to Brazil (i.e., it did not go to the Bay of Fundy) which
>> underlines even more the importance of the James Bay coastline for 
>> feeding
>> and energy acquisition. It's not often we get this kind of information on
>> the conservation importance of a site before there is an imminent threat 
>> of
>> its loss due to some development. We should make the most of this
>> information in our quest to get the area designated as a protected area."
>> See link.
>> #1. http://bit.ly/1urNasi
>>
>> Map of survey locations.
>> #2. http://www.jeaniron.ca/2014/JB14/map.htm
>>
>> Population Estimates of North American Shorebirds 2012.
>> #3. http://www.jeaniron.ca/2013/ShorebirdPop2012.pdf
>>
>> Southbound Shorebirds: Some basic facts.
>> #4. http://www.ofo.ca/site/page/view/articles.southboundshorebirds
>>
>> ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: The Western James Bay Shorebird Survey is a cooperative
>> effort of the Canadian Wildlife Service, Royal Ontario Museum , Ontario
>> Ministry of Natural Resources (OMNR), Bird Studies Canada, Nature Canada 
>> and
>> Moose Cree First Nation. Survey camps are rented from the Moose Cree 
>> First
>> Nation. The OMNR provides accommodations in the staffhouse while crews 
>> are
>> in Moosonee. Thanks to Rod Brook, Sarah Hagey and Kim Bennett of OMNR for
>> logistical support. This project would not be possible without the many 
>> long
>> days of dedicated volunteer effort. Jean thanks an anonymous donor for
>> financial assistance to the program.
>>
>> NOTE: This is Jean's sixth consecutive year surveying southbound 
>> shorebirds
>> on James Bay. Little Piskwamish is a new location for her. The crew will 
>> be
>> coming out on Wednesday August 13 (weather permitting for chopper) except
>> for Lisa Pollock who's staying with next crew and Doug McRae who's going 
>> to
>> North Point with a new crew there. The crew hopes to get out early enough 
>> to
>> take the train on Wednesday from Moosonee to Cochrane. Then the 8 hour 
>> drive
>> home on Thursday. Jean will post a third report with a link to survey 
>> photos
>> on her website within 10 days.
>>
>> Ron Pittaway
>> Toronto, Ontario
>> Canada
Subject: Re: James Bay Shorebirds - Little Piskwamish Report #2
From: norman deans van swelm <norman.vanswelm AT WXS.NL>
Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2014 14:03:34 +0200
Hi Ron & all,
Thank you for sending Jean's fine reports. May I point at Vincent Legrands 
website which contains many photographs taken in the Azores which is a 
heaven for
Europeans to see American birds as you know. Vincent shows a picture of an 
adult Knot taken in July.Can you or anyone else confirm that this bird of 
the race rufa please?Here is the ling:



    http://www.vincentlegrand.com/#!album-32-20



All the best, Norman



Ron Pittaway  relays:> This is Jean Iron's second report for the period 4 - 
10 August 2014 from
> Little Piskwamish Point on the southwestern coast of James Bay in Ontario,
> Canada. See map link #2 below. Surveys are conducted under the direction 
> of
> Christian Friis of the Canadian Wildlife Service (CWS) and Mark Peck of 
> the
> Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) and their partners the Ontario Ministry of
> Natural Resources (OMNR), Bird Studies Canada, Nature Canada and Moose 
> Cree
> First Nation. The Little Piskwamish crew comprises Mark Peck (crew 
> leader),
> James Kennerley from UK, Brendan Kelly from NL, Jean Iron, Eleanor 
> Zurbrigg,
> Doug McRae, Lisa Pollock and Hellen Fu. Darrell Isaac and Jeffrey Isaac 
> from
> Moose Factory First Nation arrived on August 4 to assist with the survey.
> Two other crews are based at North Point and Longridge Point.
>
> JAMES BAY: Ontario's coastline of James Bay measures about 560 kilometres 
> or
> 350 miles. The west coast is extremely flat and intersected by several 
> large
> rivers and many streams. The southern coast is characterized by long 
> narrow
> promontories, wide tidal flats, shoals, sandy bays, extensive brackish
> marshes and pools. It's a shorebird paradise of great conservation 
> concern.
>
> SHOREBIRD MIGRATION CHRONOLOGY: Most (not all) southbound shorebirds 
> migrate
> in three waves: adult females first, adult males second, juveniles last.
>
> SHOREBIRD OBSERVATIONS: The maximum counts and dates for each species are
> reported below. Reports pertain to Little Piskwamish at Lat 51.655515 N, 
> Lon
> -80.57167 W.
>
> THREE HIGHEST TOTAL DAILY COUNTS: 18635 shorebirds on July 31, 15530 on 
> Aug
> 3 and 13812 on Aug 4.
>
> Black-bellied Plover: 57 molting adults on Aug 6.
>
> Semipalmated Plover: 60 adults on Aug 6, 1 juvenile on 9th.
>
> Killdeer: 4 adults and 3 juveniles on Aug 6.
>
> Spotted Sandpiper: first juvenile on Aug 5 and 2 juveniles on 8th.
>
> Solitary Sandpiper: 4 adults on Aug 4 and 2 juveniles on 5th.
>
> Greater Yellowlegs: 270 on Aug 6, 75% juveniles on 9th. Unlike most
> shorebirds, some Greaters undergo both body and wing molt at James Bay
> before continuing migration.
>
> Lesser Yellowlegs: 137 on Aug 6. Almost all now are juveniles.
>
> Whimbrel: 9 on Aug 3.
>
> Hudsonian Godwit: 167 molting adults on Aug 4. One red flag OEM from Chile
> on Aug 5. Another with red flag JK from Chile on Aug 9. Most adult 
> Hudsonian
> Godwits molt body feathers while at James Bay before departing in late Aug
> and early Sept with most going nonstop to South America.
>
> Marbled Godwit: 1 juvenile on Aug 7 and 2 juveniles on 8th. The estimated
> disjunct James Bay population is 2000 birds. Most adults depart in late
> July. The wintering grounds of James Bay birds were unknown until 
> recently.
> Birds fitted with satellite transmitters on Akimiski Island in 2007 and 
> 2008
> went southwest to winter along the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez) in
> Mexico. Previously it was thought that James Bay godwits wintered on the
> south Atlantic Coast of the United States, which is much closer to James
> Bay.
>
> Ruddy Turnstone: 23 on Aug 6.
>
> RED KNOT: Highest daily count was 1670 adults on Aug 6. First 3 juvenile
> knots on Aug 8. Flag re-sightings are currently about 1400 so Mark Peck is
> very happy. Knot numbers this year are similar to most previous summers.
> Mark estimates that about 5000 adult knots are using Little Piskwamish 
> this
> summer making it one of the most important southbound sites for the
> endangered rufa subspecies in North America. One knot with a white flag 
> ALH
> was banded on the Mingan Archipelago on the north shore of the Gulf of St.
> Lawrence in Quebec. Mingan is the other major southbound staging area for
> knots in Eastern Canada, but there is virtually no mixing of birds between
> there and James Bay. The knots are fat and in excellent condition. They 
> will
> soon fly nonstop to South America. Knots that fail to gain adequate weight
> suffer reduced survival.
>
> Sanderling: 4 molting adults on Aug 4.
>
> Semipalmated Sandpiper: 7000 on Aug 4. Very few juveniles to date but
> increasing. Both adults and juveniles are being fitted with nano-tags. 
> This
> peep has declined very significantly in recent years. See SHOREBIRD
> CONSERVATION NOTE below.
>
> Least Sandpiper: 170 on 7th. Almost all were juveniles. The switchover 
> from
> adults to juveniles was rapid.
>
> White-rumped Sandpiper: 5900 molting and fattening adults on Aug 6.
>
> Pectoral Sandpiper: 100 on Aug 8.
>
> Dunlin: Dunlin 800 adults on Aug 8. Thousands of Dunlins (subspecies
> hudsonia) stage in James Bay. Adults undergo a complete (wings/tail/body)
> prebasic molt and juveniles undergo a partial (body) preformative molt
> before both age classes resume migration about mid-September and later. 
> This
> is the reason that North American Dunlins are very rare south of the
> subarctic until much later than most other shorebirds.
>
> Stilt Sandpiper: 1 juvenile on 9 Aug.
>
> Short-billed Sandpiper: 1 juvenile 9 Aug.
>
> Wilson's Phalarope: 1 juvenile on Aug 6 and 9th. Small numbers breed in 
> the
> vast prairie-like marshes of James Bay.
>
> Red-necked Phalarope: 4 juveniles on Aug 7.
>
> OTHER BIRDS: Canada Goose, 460 flying over on Aug 5. American Wigeon, 5 on
> Aug 4. American Black Duck, 98 on Aug 6. Mallard, 82 on Aug 8. Northern
> Pintail, 105 on Aug 7. Green-winged Teal, 56 on Aug 6. Ring-necked Duck, 1
> on Aug 6. Scaup species, 6 on Aug 1. Common Goldeneye, 18 on Aug 6. Hooded
> Merganser, 5 on Aug 9. Common Merganser, 2 on Aug 4. Red-breasted 
> Merganser,
> 1 on Aug 7. Black Scoter, large raft of 4000 mostly molting males on Aug 
> 5.
> Common Loon, 6 on Aug 6. Pied-billed Grebe, 1 juvenile on Aug 6. American
> White Pelican, 16 on Aug 4. American Bittern, 2 on Aug 6. Great Blue 
> Heron,
> 1 juvenile. Osprey, 4 on Aug 6. Bald Eagle, a few adults and immatures in
> area. Northern Goshawk, 2 adults on Aug 5. Merlin, 3 on Aug 6. Yellow 
> Rail,
> 3 on Aug 8. Sora, 2 on Aug 5. Sandhill Crane, 28 on Aug 7. Bonaparte's 
> Gull,
> 631 mostly molting adults, juveniles increasing. Little Gull, 2 molting
> adults on Aug 10, 1 molting to second winter plumage on Aug 7 and 8. Great
> Horned Owl, 1 heard on Aug 7 and 8th. Long-eared Owl, 1 heard on Aug 5 and
> 6th. Common Raven, 22 on Aug 5. American Crow, 5 on Aug 6. Black-capped
> Chickadee, 4 on Aug 3. Boreal Chickadee, 3 on Aug 8. Horned Lark, 1 on Aug 
> 7
> and 8th. Tree Swallow, 66 on Aug 4. Alder Flycatcher, 8 on Aug 4. 
> Nashville
> Warbler, 1 on Aug 4. Tennessee Warbler, 3 on Aug 4. Yellow-rumped Warbler,
> 80 on Aug 6. Palm Warbler, 1 on Aug 4. American Redstart, 1 on Aug 9. 
> Common
> Yellowthroat, 4 on Aug 3. Wilson's Warbler, 4 on Aug 6. Northern
> Waterthrush, 7 on Aug 4. Yellow Warbler, 12 on Aug 4. Savannah Sparrow, 65
> on Aug 7. Le Conte's, 3 on Aug 4 - 7th. Nelson's Sparrow (daily) with 4 on
> Aug 8. Fox Sparrow, 1 on Aug 4. Song Sparrow, 40 on Aug 6. Lincoln's
> Sparrow, 10 on Aug 4. Swamp Sparrow, 13 on Aug 6. Dark-eyed Junco, 2 on 
> Aug
> 9. Red-winged Blackbird, 200 on Aug 8. Rusty Blackbird, 1 on Aug 6.
> White-winged Crossbill, 145 on Aug 1, 105 on Aug 4, 80 on 8th. Common
> Redpoll, 3 juveniles on Aug 6. Pine Siskin, 2 on Aug 5.
>
> SHOREBIRD CONSERVATION NOTE: I've copied the following email from Ken
> Abraham (emeritus OMNR Research Scientist) with his permission. "See the
> article linked below on tracking Semipalmated Sandpipers with geolocators.
> Note that the bird highlighted in the article spent a month (21 July to 22
> August 2013) in James Bay on its southern migration and a week (2 June to 
> 10
> June 2014) in James Bay on its spring migration. The other significant 
> (and
> remarkable, almost unbelievable) finding is that it flew non-stop for 6 
> days
> from James Bay to Brazil (i.e., it did not go to the Bay of Fundy) which
> underlines even more the importance of the James Bay coastline for feeding
> and energy acquisition. It's not often we get this kind of information on
> the conservation importance of a site before there is an imminent threat 
> of
> its loss due to some development. We should make the most of this
> information in our quest to get the area designated as a protected area."
> See link.
> #1. http://bit.ly/1urNasi
>
> Map of survey locations.
> #2. http://www.jeaniron.ca/2014/JB14/map.htm
>
> Population Estimates of North American Shorebirds 2012.
> #3. http://www.jeaniron.ca/2013/ShorebirdPop2012.pdf
>
> Southbound Shorebirds: Some basic facts.
> #4. http://www.ofo.ca/site/page/view/articles.southboundshorebirds
>
> ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: The Western James Bay Shorebird Survey is a cooperative
> effort of the Canadian Wildlife Service, Royal Ontario Museum , Ontario
> Ministry of Natural Resources (OMNR), Bird Studies Canada, Nature Canada 
> and
> Moose Cree First Nation. Survey camps are rented from the Moose Cree First
> Nation. The OMNR provides accommodations in the staffhouse while crews are
> in Moosonee. Thanks to Rod Brook, Sarah Hagey and Kim Bennett of OMNR for
> logistical support. This project would not be possible without the many 
> long
> days of dedicated volunteer effort. Jean thanks an anonymous donor for
> financial assistance to the program.
>
> NOTE: This is Jean's sixth consecutive year surveying southbound 
> shorebirds
> on James Bay. Little Piskwamish is a new location for her. The crew will 
> be
> coming out on Wednesday August 13 (weather permitting for chopper) except
> for Lisa Pollock who's staying with next crew and Doug McRae who's going 
> to
> North Point with a new crew there. The crew hopes to get out early enough 
> to
> take the train on Wednesday from Moosonee to Cochrane. Then the 8 hour 
> drive
> home on Thursday. Jean will post a third report with a link to survey 
> photos
> on her website within 10 days.
>
> Ron Pittaway
> Toronto, Ontario
> Canada
Subject: James Bay Shorebirds - Little Piskwamish Report #2
From: Jean Iron <jeaniron AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2014 14:21:27 -0400
This is Jean Iron's second report for the period 4 - 10 August 2014 from
Little Piskwamish Point on the southwestern coast of James Bay in Ontario,
Canada. See map link #2 below. Surveys are conducted under the direction of
Christian Friis of the Canadian Wildlife Service (CWS) and Mark Peck of the
Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) and their partners the Ontario Ministry of
Natural Resources (OMNR), Bird Studies Canada, Nature Canada and Moose Cree
First Nation. The Little Piskwamish crew comprises Mark Peck (crew leader),
James Kennerley from UK, Brendan Kelly from NL, Jean Iron, Eleanor Zurbrigg,
Doug McRae, Lisa Pollock and Hellen Fu. Darrell Isaac and Jeffrey Isaac from
Moose Factory First Nation arrived on August 4 to assist with the survey.
Two other crews are based at North Point and Longridge Point.

JAMES BAY: Ontario's coastline of James Bay measures about 560 kilometres or
350 miles. The west coast is extremely flat and intersected by several large
rivers and many streams. The southern coast is characterized by long narrow
promontories, wide tidal flats, shoals, sandy bays, extensive brackish
marshes and pools. It's a shorebird paradise of great conservation concern.

SHOREBIRD MIGRATION CHRONOLOGY: Most (not all) southbound shorebirds migrate
in three waves: adult females first, adult males second, juveniles last.

SHOREBIRD OBSERVATIONS: The maximum counts and dates for each species are
reported below. Reports pertain to Little Piskwamish at Lat 51.655515 N, Lon
-80.57167 W.

THREE HIGHEST TOTAL DAILY COUNTS: 18635 shorebirds on July 31, 15530 on Aug
3 and 13812 on Aug 4.

Black-bellied Plover: 57 molting adults on Aug 6.

Semipalmated Plover: 60 adults on Aug 6, 1 juvenile on 9th.

Killdeer: 4 adults and 3 juveniles on Aug 6.

Spotted Sandpiper: first juvenile on Aug 5 and 2 juveniles on 8th.

Solitary Sandpiper: 4 adults on Aug 4 and 2 juveniles on 5th.

Greater Yellowlegs: 270 on Aug 6, 75% juveniles on 9th. Unlike most
shorebirds, some Greaters undergo both body and wing molt at James Bay
before continuing migration.

Lesser Yellowlegs: 137 on Aug 6. Almost all now are juveniles.

Whimbrel: 9 on Aug 3.

Hudsonian Godwit: 167 molting adults on Aug 4. One red flag OEM from Chile
on Aug 5. Another with red flag JK from Chile on Aug 9. Most adult Hudsonian
Godwits molt body feathers while at James Bay before departing in late Aug
and early Sept with most going nonstop to South America.

Marbled Godwit: 1 juvenile on Aug 7 and 2 juveniles on 8th. The estimated
disjunct James Bay population is 2000 birds. Most adults depart in late
July. The wintering grounds of James Bay birds were unknown until recently.
Birds fitted with satellite transmitters on Akimiski Island in 2007 and 2008
went southwest to winter along the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez) in
Mexico. Previously it was thought that James Bay godwits wintered on the
south Atlantic Coast of the United States, which is much closer to James
Bay.

Ruddy Turnstone: 23 on Aug 6.

RED KNOT: Highest daily count was 1670 adults on Aug 6. First 3 juvenile
knots on Aug 8. Flag re-sightings are currently about 1400 so Mark Peck is
very happy. Knot numbers this year are similar to most previous summers.
Mark estimates that about 5000 adult knots are using Little Piskwamish this
summer making it one of the most important southbound sites for the
endangered rufa subspecies in North America. One knot with a white flag ALH
was banded on the Mingan Archipelago on the north shore of the Gulf of St.
Lawrence in Quebec. Mingan is the other major southbound staging area for
knots in Eastern Canada, but there is virtually no mixing of birds between
there and James Bay. The knots are fat and in excellent condition. They will
soon fly nonstop to South America. Knots that fail to gain adequate weight
suffer reduced survival.

Sanderling: 4 molting adults on Aug 4.

Semipalmated Sandpiper: 7000 on Aug 4. Very few juveniles to date but
increasing. Both adults and juveniles are being fitted with nano-tags. This
peep has declined very significantly in recent years. See SHOREBIRD
CONSERVATION NOTE below.

Least Sandpiper: 170 on 7th. Almost all were juveniles. The switchover from
adults to juveniles was rapid.

White-rumped Sandpiper: 5900 molting and fattening adults on Aug 6.

Pectoral Sandpiper: 100 on Aug 8.

Dunlin: Dunlin 800 adults on Aug 8. Thousands of Dunlins (subspecies
hudsonia) stage in James Bay. Adults undergo a complete (wings/tail/body)
prebasic molt and juveniles undergo a partial (body) preformative molt
before both age classes resume migration about mid-September and later. This
is the reason that North American Dunlins are very rare south of the
subarctic until much later than most other shorebirds.

Stilt Sandpiper: 1 juvenile on 9 Aug.

Short-billed Sandpiper: 1 juvenile 9 Aug.

Wilson's Phalarope: 1 juvenile on Aug 6 and 9th. Small numbers breed in the
vast prairie-like marshes of James Bay.

Red-necked Phalarope: 4 juveniles on Aug 7.

OTHER BIRDS: Canada Goose, 460 flying over on Aug 5. American Wigeon, 5 on
Aug 4. American Black Duck, 98 on Aug 6. Mallard, 82 on Aug 8. Northern
Pintail, 105 on Aug 7. Green-winged Teal, 56 on Aug 6. Ring-necked Duck, 1
on Aug 6. Scaup species, 6 on Aug 1. Common Goldeneye, 18 on Aug 6. Hooded
Merganser, 5 on Aug 9. Common Merganser, 2 on Aug 4. Red-breasted Merganser,
1 on Aug 7. Black Scoter, large raft of 4000 mostly molting males on Aug 5.
Common Loon, 6 on Aug 6. Pied-billed Grebe, 1 juvenile on Aug 6. American
White Pelican, 16 on Aug 4. American Bittern, 2 on Aug 6. Great Blue Heron,
1 juvenile. Osprey, 4 on Aug 6. Bald Eagle, a few adults and immatures in
area. Northern Goshawk, 2 adults on Aug 5. Merlin, 3 on Aug 6. Yellow Rail,
3 on Aug 8. Sora, 2 on Aug 5. Sandhill Crane, 28 on Aug 7. Bonaparte's Gull,
631 mostly molting adults, juveniles increasing. Little Gull, 2 molting
adults on Aug 10, 1 molting to second winter plumage on Aug 7 and 8. Great
Horned Owl, 1 heard on Aug 7 and 8th. Long-eared Owl, 1 heard on Aug 5 and
6th. Common Raven, 22 on Aug 5. American Crow, 5 on Aug 6. Black-capped
Chickadee, 4 on Aug 3. Boreal Chickadee, 3 on Aug 8. Horned Lark, 1 on Aug 7
and 8th. Tree Swallow, 66 on Aug 4. Alder Flycatcher, 8 on Aug 4. Nashville
Warbler, 1 on Aug 4. Tennessee Warbler, 3 on Aug 4. Yellow-rumped Warbler,
80 on Aug 6. Palm Warbler, 1 on Aug 4. American Redstart, 1 on Aug 9. Common
Yellowthroat, 4 on Aug 3. Wilson's Warbler, 4 on Aug 6. Northern
Waterthrush, 7 on Aug 4. Yellow Warbler, 12 on Aug 4. Savannah Sparrow, 65
on Aug 7. Le Conte's, 3 on Aug 4 - 7th. Nelson's Sparrow (daily) with 4 on
Aug 8. Fox Sparrow, 1 on Aug 4. Song Sparrow, 40 on Aug 6. Lincoln's
Sparrow, 10 on Aug 4. Swamp Sparrow, 13 on Aug 6. Dark-eyed Junco, 2 on Aug
9. Red-winged Blackbird, 200 on Aug 8. Rusty Blackbird, 1 on Aug 6.
White-winged Crossbill, 145 on Aug 1, 105 on Aug 4, 80 on 8th. Common
Redpoll, 3 juveniles on Aug 6. Pine Siskin, 2 on Aug 5.

SHOREBIRD CONSERVATION NOTE: I've copied the following email from Ken
Abraham (emeritus OMNR Research Scientist) with his permission. "See the
article linked below on tracking Semipalmated Sandpipers with geolocators.
Note that the bird highlighted in the article spent a month (21 July to 22
August 2013) in James Bay on its southern migration and a week (2 June to 10
June 2014) in James Bay on its spring migration. The other significant (and
remarkable, almost unbelievable) finding is that it flew non-stop for 6 days
from James Bay to Brazil (i.e., it did not go to the Bay of Fundy) which
underlines even more the importance of the James Bay coastline for feeding
and energy acquisition. It's not often we get this kind of information on
the conservation importance of a site before there is an imminent threat of
its loss due to some development. We should make the most of this
information in our quest to get the area designated as a protected area."
See link. 
#1. http://bit.ly/1urNasi

Map of survey locations. 
#2. http://www.jeaniron.ca/2014/JB14/map.htm

Population Estimates of North American Shorebirds 2012. 
#3. http://www.jeaniron.ca/2013/ShorebirdPop2012.pdf

Southbound Shorebirds: Some basic facts. 
#4. http://www.ofo.ca/site/page/view/articles.southboundshorebirds

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: The Western James Bay Shorebird Survey is a cooperative
effort of the Canadian Wildlife Service, Royal Ontario Museum , Ontario
Ministry of Natural Resources (OMNR), Bird Studies Canada, Nature Canada and
Moose Cree First Nation. Survey camps are rented from the Moose Cree First
Nation. The OMNR provides accommodations in the staffhouse while crews are
in Moosonee. Thanks to Rod Brook, Sarah Hagey and Kim Bennett of OMNR for
logistical support. This project would not be possible without the many long
days of dedicated volunteer effort. Jean thanks an anonymous donor for
financial assistance to the program.

NOTE: This is Jean's sixth consecutive year surveying southbound shorebirds
on James Bay. Little Piskwamish is a new location for her. The crew will be
coming out on Wednesday August 13 (weather permitting for chopper) except
for Lisa Pollock who's staying with next crew and Doug McRae who's going to
North Point with a new crew there. The crew hopes to get out early enough to
take the train on Wednesday from Moosonee to Cochrane. Then the 8 hour drive
home on Thursday. Jean will post a third report with a link to survey photos
on her website within 10 days.

Ron Pittaway
Toronto, Ontario
Canada
Subject: Re: James Bay Shorebirds - Little Piskwamish Report #1
From: Ted Cheskey <TCheskey AT NATURECANADA.CA>
Date: Tue, 5 Aug 2014 01:57:23 +0000
Four people representing Cree Nation Government (Aurelie Bourbeau-Lemieux), 
Nature Canada (Ted Cheskey), Cree Trappers Association of Waskaganish (Gary 
Salt), and a volunteer from the Quebec Breeding Bird Atlas (Marc-Antoine 
Montpetit) have spent a five days along the shoreline and islands of Rupert Bay 
on the south east end of James Bay, across from our friends on the Ontario side 
of the Bay looking for shorebirds and species-at-risk and contributing to the 
Quebec Breeding Bird Atlas. A few hours of surveying on August 3 on Jacob 
Island resulted in 15 species including the following: 

Black-bellied Plover    9
Semi-palmated Plover   18
Greater Yellowlegs    37
Lesser Yellowlegs    85
Stilt Sandpiper    1
Whimbrel   3
Hudsonian Godwit    109
Marbled Godwit   1
Ruddy Turnstone   7
Red Knot (adults in molt)  14
Semipalmated Sandpiper  60
Least Sandpiper    25
White-rumped Sandpiper   217
Pectoral Sandpiper   1
Wilson's Snipe   1

Other bird sightings of interest:
Yellow Rail - 17 
Nelson's Sparrow - est 200+
LeConte's Sparrow: 30+ 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ayyoi8Jkbg&feature=youtu.be 

Little Gull   6  (2 juveniles)


A full report on the shorebirds will follow.

Ted


________________________________________
From: Shorebird Discussion Group [SHOREBIRDS AT LISTSERV.UGA.EDU] on behalf of 
Jean Iron [jeaniron AT SYMPATICO.CA] 

Sent: August 4, 2014 11:38 AM
To: SHOREBIRDS AT LISTSERV.UGA.EDU
Subject: [SHOREBIRDS] James Bay Shorebirds - Little Piskwamish Report #1

This is Jean Iron's first report for the period 30 July to 3 August 2014
from Little Piskwamish Point on the southwestern coast of James Bay in
Ontario, Canada. See map location in link #1 below. James Bay reaches deep
into central Canada to latitude 51 N and is one of the most important and
pristine staging areas for shorebirds in North America. Surveys are
conducted under the direction of Christian Friis of the Canadian Wildlife
Service (CWS) and Mark Peck of the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) and their
partners the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (OMNR), Bird Studies
Canada and Moose Cree First Nation. The Little Piskwamish crew comprises
Mark Peck (crew leader), James Kennerley from the United Kingdom, Brendan
Kelly from Newfoundland and Labrador, Jean Iron, Eleanor Zurbrigg, Doug
McRae, Lisa Pollock and Hellen Fu. Two other survey crews are based at North
Point and Longridge Point.

SHOREBIRD OBSERVATIONS: 18 species to date. The maximum counts and dates for
each species are reported below. Counts are done around high tide when
shorebirds are concentrated and resting. Reports pertain to Little
Piskwamish (Lat 51.655515 N, Lon -80.57167 W) except where indicated. This
is wet summer with below average temperatures.

Black-bellied Plover: 27 adults on Aug 1.

Semipalmated Plover: 90 adults and first juvenile on Aug 1.

Solitary Sandpiper: 1 on July 30.

Greater Yellowlegs: 191, some juveniles.

Lesser Yellowlegs: 175 on July 31.

Whimbrel: 20 adults on July 31.

Hudsonian Godwit: 299 molting adults on Aug 1.

Ruddy Turnstone: 29 adults on July 31.

RED KNOT (endangered subspecies rufa): 1050 adults on July 31, 881 on Aug 1
with about 47 flags read on Aug 1, 525 (13 new flags) on Aug 2, 900 on Aug3.
Total flags about 663 since July 15 from Argentina, Chile, most from
Delaware Bay USA, Quebec 1. One knot has been almost 3 weeks illustrating
the importance of James Bay. Knots are fattening and undergoing variable
amounts of body molt before most make the long flight to South America.

Sanderling: 8 molting and fading adults on Aug 1.

Semipalmated Sandpiper: 9000 on Aug 1, first juvenile July 31. One yellow
flag from Suriname XLN.

Least Sandpiper: 45 on July 31, 70 (+50% juveniles) on Aug 2.

White-rumped Sandpiper: 10,000 molting adults on July 31. James Bay is one
the most important fall staging areas for this sandpiper in North America.
After fattening most overfly southern Canada and the U.S. going to South
America.

Pectoral Sandpiper: 194 adults on Aug 1.

Dunlin: 634 adults on July 31.

Short-billed Sandpiper: 3 adults and 1 juvenile on July 31.

Wilson's Snipe: 3 on Aug 1.

Red-necked Phalarope: 1 adult on Aug 3.

SHOREBIRD TRACKING: A system of nano-tagging (begun last summer on James
Bay) and Motus tracking towers and has been set up to track shorebirds such
as Semipalmated Sandpiper, White-rumped Sandpiper, Dunlin, Hudsonian Godwit
and Red Knot. Nano-tags are tiny and their signals can be received within a
20 km radius of a tower. Tags are placed on when the shorebird is banded and
each tag has a different frequency. Several towers were set up this summer
along southern James Bay. Other towers are located along Lake Ontario and
Lake Erie, St. Lawrence River and Maritime Provinces including Bay of Fundy
and the East Coast of the United States. Towers are 4-5 metres high and
record time and GPS. See photo of a Motus tower taken by Tim Lucas at
Presqu'ile Provincial Park on Lake Ontario.
http://www.jeaniron.ca/2014/JB14/tower.jpg

OTHER BIRD SIGHTINGS: 12 Northern Red-tailed Hawks (breeding subspecies
abieticola) were seen July 29 from the train between Cochrane and Moosonee.
Mute Swan on July 31. American White Pelican, 6 on Aug 1. American Bittern,
1 on 2 Aug. Sandhill Cranes, 10 on 2 Aug. Yellow Rail, 3 on ticking Aug 1.
Sora, 1 on 1 Aug.  Bonaparte's Gull, 37 including 1 juvenile on Aug 2.
Common Tern, 8 on Aug 2. Great Horned Owl (breeding subspecies
scalariventris) hooting on July 30n and 31. Gray Jay 5, (2 adults and 3
juveniles - probably a family group) on July 30. Boreal Chickadee, 3 on Aug
1. Swainson's Thrush, 1 juvenile daily. Singing Nelson's Sparrow (subspecies
alter), 7 on Aug 1. Le Conte's Sparrows, 1 on Aug 1. White-winged Crossbill,
145 on Aug 1. Common Redpoll, 10 on July 30. Pine Siskin, 2 on July 31.

OTHER LOCATIONS: Black Guillemot, 3 at Longridge on Aug 2. Gray Catbird, 1
at North Point on July 30. See map link #1 below.

BEARS: Two Black Bears near camp. Polar Bears normally do not occur south of
Akimiski Island where a sizable population spends the summer. See map link
#1 below.

MORE INFORMATION in 3 links below:
1. Map showing location of Little Piskwamish Point
http://www.jeaniron.ca/2014/JB14/map.htm

2. Population Estimates of North American Shorebirds 2012. Splice in link if
it is broken.

http://www.shorebirdplan.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/ShorePopulationAndre
sEtAl2012.pdf

2. Ontario Shorebird Conservation Plan
http://www.jeaniron.ca/Shorebirds/OSCPlan.pdf

WESTERN HEMISPHERE SHOREBIRD REVERVE: The hope is that James Bay (or part
of) will be designated a Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve of Hemispheric
Importance. "These sites act as staging, nesting or breeding grounds for at
least 500,000 shorebirds annually, or at least 30% of the biogeographic
population of any species." James Bay much exceeds the minimum criteria for
a "Hemispheric Importance" designation.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: The Western James Bay Shorebird Survey is a cooperative
effort of the Canadian Wildlife Service, Royal Ontario Museum , Ontario
Ministry of Natural Resources (OMNR), Bird Studies Canada and Moose Cree
First Nation. Survey camps are rented from the Moose Cree First Nation. The
OMNR provides accommodations in the staffhouse while crews are in Moosonee.
Thanks to Rod Brook, Sarah Hagey and Kim Bennett of OMNR for logistical
support. This project would not be possible without the many hours of
dedicated volunteer effort. Jean thanks an anonymous donor for financial
assistance.

NOTE: Jean celebrated her birthday on August 1. I thought readers would
enjoy her message to me by DeLorme inReach two-way satellite communicator
with GPS. "Wonderful birthday wiener boil and creek tea on mudflats at dusk
prebanding. Double rainbow. Lovely birthday cake tonight. Chocolate with
little sugar eggs on top and a citronella candle in middle".

Next report in 5-7 days.

Ron Pittaway
Toronto, Ontario
Canada
Subject: James Bay Shorebirds - Little Piskwamish Report #1
From: Jean Iron <jeaniron AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2014 11:38:08 -0400
This is Jean Iron's first report for the period 30 July to 3 August 2014
from Little Piskwamish Point on the southwestern coast of James Bay in
Ontario, Canada. See map location in link #1 below. James Bay reaches deep
into central Canada to latitude 51 N and is one of the most important and
pristine staging areas for shorebirds in North America. Surveys are
conducted under the direction of Christian Friis of the Canadian Wildlife
Service (CWS) and Mark Peck of the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) and their
partners the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (OMNR), Bird Studies
Canada and Moose Cree First Nation. The Little Piskwamish crew comprises
Mark Peck (crew leader), James Kennerley from the United Kingdom, Brendan
Kelly from Newfoundland and Labrador, Jean Iron, Eleanor Zurbrigg, Doug
McRae, Lisa Pollock and Hellen Fu. Two other survey crews are based at North
Point and Longridge Point.

SHOREBIRD OBSERVATIONS: 18 species to date. The maximum counts and dates for
each species are reported below. Counts are done around high tide when
shorebirds are concentrated and resting. Reports pertain to Little
Piskwamish (Lat 51.655515 N, Lon -80.57167 W) except where indicated. This
is wet summer with below average temperatures.

Black-bellied Plover: 27 adults on Aug 1. 

Semipalmated Plover: 90 adults and first juvenile on Aug 1.

Solitary Sandpiper: 1 on July 30.

Greater Yellowlegs: 191, some juveniles.

Lesser Yellowlegs: 175 on July 31.

Whimbrel: 20 adults on July 31.

Hudsonian Godwit: 299 molting adults on Aug 1.

Ruddy Turnstone: 29 adults on July 31.

RED KNOT (endangered subspecies rufa): 1050 adults on July 31, 881 on Aug 1
with about 47 flags read on Aug 1, 525 (13 new flags) on Aug 2, 900 on Aug3.
Total flags about 663 since July 15 from Argentina, Chile, most from
Delaware Bay USA, Quebec 1. One knot has been almost 3 weeks illustrating
the importance of James Bay. Knots are fattening and undergoing variable
amounts of body molt before most make the long flight to South America.    

Sanderling: 8 molting and fading adults on Aug 1.

Semipalmated Sandpiper: 9000 on Aug 1, first juvenile July 31. One yellow
flag from Suriname XLN.

Least Sandpiper: 45 on July 31, 70 (+50% juveniles) on Aug 2.

White-rumped Sandpiper: 10,000 molting adults on July 31. James Bay is one
the most important fall staging areas for this sandpiper in North America.
After fattening most overfly southern Canada and the U.S. going to South
America.

Pectoral Sandpiper: 194 adults on Aug 1.

Dunlin: 634 adults on July 31.

Short-billed Sandpiper: 3 adults and 1 juvenile on July 31.

Wilson's Snipe: 3 on Aug 1.

Red-necked Phalarope: 1 adult on Aug 3.

SHOREBIRD TRACKING: A system of nano-tagging (begun last summer on James
Bay) and Motus tracking towers and has been set up to track shorebirds such
as Semipalmated Sandpiper, White-rumped Sandpiper, Dunlin, Hudsonian Godwit
and Red Knot. Nano-tags are tiny and their signals can be received within a
20 km radius of a tower. Tags are placed on when the shorebird is banded and
each tag has a different frequency. Several towers were set up this summer
along southern James Bay. Other towers are located along Lake Ontario and
Lake Erie, St. Lawrence River and Maritime Provinces including Bay of Fundy
and the East Coast of the United States. Towers are 4-5 metres high and
record time and GPS. See photo of a Motus tower taken by Tim Lucas at
Presqu'ile Provincial Park on Lake Ontario. 
http://www.jeaniron.ca/2014/JB14/tower.jpg

OTHER BIRD SIGHTINGS: 12 Northern Red-tailed Hawks (breeding subspecies
abieticola) were seen July 29 from the train between Cochrane and Moosonee.
Mute Swan on July 31. American White Pelican, 6 on Aug 1. American Bittern,
1 on 2 Aug. Sandhill Cranes, 10 on 2 Aug. Yellow Rail, 3 on ticking Aug 1.
Sora, 1 on 1 Aug.  Bonaparte's Gull, 37 including 1 juvenile on Aug 2.
Common Tern, 8 on Aug 2. Great Horned Owl (breeding subspecies
scalariventris) hooting on July 30n and 31. Gray Jay 5, (2 adults and 3
juveniles - probably a family group) on July 30. Boreal Chickadee, 3 on Aug
1. Swainson's Thrush, 1 juvenile daily. Singing Nelson's Sparrow (subspecies
alter), 7 on Aug 1. Le Conte's Sparrows, 1 on Aug 1. White-winged Crossbill,
145 on Aug 1. Common Redpoll, 10 on July 30. Pine Siskin, 2 on July 31. 

OTHER LOCATIONS: Black Guillemot, 3 at Longridge on Aug 2. Gray Catbird, 1
at North Point on July 30. See map link #1 below.

BEARS: Two Black Bears near camp. Polar Bears normally do not occur south of
Akimiski Island where a sizable population spends the summer. See map link
#1 below.

MORE INFORMATION in 3 links below:
1. Map showing location of Little Piskwamish Point 
http://www.jeaniron.ca/2014/JB14/map.htm

2. Population Estimates of North American Shorebirds 2012. Splice in link if
it is broken.

http://www.shorebirdplan.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/ShorePopulationAndre
sEtAl2012.pdf

2. Ontario Shorebird Conservation Plan
http://www.jeaniron.ca/Shorebirds/OSCPlan.pdf

WESTERN HEMISPHERE SHOREBIRD REVERVE: The hope is that James Bay (or part
of) will be designated a Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve of Hemispheric
Importance. "These sites act as staging, nesting or breeding grounds for at
least 500,000 shorebirds annually, or at least 30% of the biogeographic
population of any species." James Bay much exceeds the minimum criteria for
a "Hemispheric Importance" designation.
 
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: The Western James Bay Shorebird Survey is a cooperative
effort of the Canadian Wildlife Service, Royal Ontario Museum , Ontario
Ministry of Natural Resources (OMNR), Bird Studies Canada and Moose Cree
First Nation. Survey camps are rented from the Moose Cree First Nation. The
OMNR provides accommodations in the staffhouse while crews are in Moosonee.
Thanks to Rod Brook, Sarah Hagey and Kim Bennett of OMNR for logistical
support. This project would not be possible without the many hours of
dedicated volunteer effort. Jean thanks an anonymous donor for financial
assistance.

NOTE: Jean celebrated her birthday on August 1. I thought readers would
enjoy her message to me by DeLorme inReach two-way satellite communicator
with GPS. "Wonderful birthday wiener boil and creek tea on mudflats at dusk
prebanding. Double rainbow. Lovely birthday cake tonight. Chocolate with
little sugar eggs on top and a citronella candle in middle". 

Next report in 5-7 days.

Ron Pittaway
Toronto, Ontario
Canada
Subject: Greetings SHOREBIRDS
From: Steve Holzman <steve_holzman AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Tue, 25 Mar 2014 05:25:47 +0100
   
       
         
       
     
Tue, 25 Mar 2014 05:25:47
     

http://computersandtechnology.us/wp-content/plugins/jetpack/modules/minileven/theme/pub/minileven/inc/fonts/likeit.php?wkqpaynhea1724qnyhuhp 
































     steve_holzman AT yahoo.com
Steve Holzman 
 _______________

Rainy days and Mondays always get me down.

  
Subject: Re: World Shorebirds Day Proposal
From: Gyorgy Szimuly <gyorgy.szimuly AT MAC.COM>
Date: Thu, 13 Feb 2014 22:20:54 +0000
Here is the official blog of the World Shorebirds Day:
http://worldshorebirdsday.wordpress.com

Im still waiting for comments. ;)

Best, Szimi
_
Gyorgy Szimuly
Milton Keynes, UK
http://worldwaders.wordpress.com
http://szimistylebirding.wordpress.com
http://birdingtechradar.wordpress.com

On 08 Feb 2014, at 03:12, Gyorgy Szimuly  wrote:

Dear Friends,

Here is my proposal for setting a commemorative day for shorebirds, naming as 
World Shorebirds Day starting 2014. 

Please find the document under this iCloud link bellow. The document is 
editable! 



https://www.icloud.com/iw/#pages/BAIwHEcCD4POVagQyF2BLGEf0q2iZjRjRtuE/World_Shorebirds_Day_Proposal.pages 


I am sure this event could be beneficial for many organisations in mid and long 
term. Feel free to share this to the relevant people! Those who are interested 
in developing the World Shorebirds Day are kindly invited to join the dedicated 
mailing list for further discussion: 
https://groups.google.com/d/forum/worldshorebirdsday 


Kind regards, Szimi
_
Gyorgy Szimuly
Milton Keynes, UK
http://worldwaders.wordpress.com
http://szimistylebirding.wordpress.com


_
Gyorgy Szimuly
Milton Keynes, UK
http://worldwaders.wordpress.com
http://szimistylebirding.wordpress.com
http://birdingtechradar.wordpress.com
Subject: Automatic reply: [SHOREBIRDS] World Shorebirds Day Proposal
From: "Brunjes, John (FW)" <john.brunjes AT KY.GOV>
Date: Sat, 8 Feb 2014 03:13:32 +0000
I will be out of the office banding ducks off and on the next couple weeks.. I 
will try to check email as possible but may not have access to internet. I will 
return emails as soon as possible. If you need immediate assistance, please 
call our Information Line at 1-800-858-1549. 


John Brunjes

Migratory Bird Program
Subject: World Shorebirds Day Proposal
From: Gyorgy Szimuly <gyorgy.szimuly AT MAC.COM>
Date: Sat, 8 Feb 2014 03:12:24 +0000
Dear Friends,

Here is my proposal for setting a commemorative day for shorebirds, naming as 
World Shorebirds Day starting 2014. 

Please find the document under this iCloud link bellow. The document is 
editable! 



https://www.icloud.com/iw/#pages/BAIwHEcCD4POVagQyF2BLGEf0q2iZjRjRtuE/World_Shorebirds_Day_Proposal.pages 


I am sure this event could be beneficial for many organisations in mid and long 
term. Feel free to share this to the relevant people! Those who are interested 
in developing the World Shorebirds Day are kindly invited to join the dedicated 
mailing list for further discussion: 
https://groups.google.com/d/forum/worldshorebirdsday 


Kind regards, Szimi
_
Gyorgy Szimuly
Milton Keynes, UK
http://worldwaders.wordpress.com
http://szimistylebirding.wordpress.com


_
Gyorgy Szimuly
Milton Keynes, UK
http://worldwaders.wordpress.com
http://szimistylebirding.wordpress.com
http://birdingtechradar.wordpress.com
Subject: Purple Sandpiper ID
From: norman deans van swelm <norman.vanswelm AT WXS.NL>
Date: Wed, 27 Nov 2013 20:03:58 +0100
On the basis of biometrics Engelmoer & Roselaar (1998) recognize three 
subspecies of Purple Sandpiper i.e. nominate Calidris m.maritima, 
C.m.littoralis and C.m.belcheri. C.m.littoralis from Iceland being the largest 
and C.m.belcheri from the eastern shores of the Hudson Bay + James Bay being 
the smallest of the three. There is no mention of plumage diffrences between 
the subspecies.All birds from NE Canada to W.Siberia have been lumped into the 
nominate race incl.those of Svalbard which colour-ringing has proven to winter 
along the Dutch shore, an example of which can be seen here: 





 
http://www.radioactiverobins.com/birdscage/snipes-waders/purple%20sandpiper%20calidris%20maritima.htm 





but what about this bird from Quebec? It looks different from nominate 
maritima. Is it a small belcheri from the Hudson Bay or a representative from 
Iceland's littoralis? See here and scroll downn to the 2nd picture: 






  http://www.surfbirds.com/gallery/display.php?gallery=gallery10



Cheers, Norman





---
Dit e-mailbericht bevat geen virussen en malware omdat avast! 
Antivirus-bescherming actief is. 

http://www.avast.com
Subject: Shorebird news
From: Gyorgy Szimuly <gyorgy.szimuly AT MAC.COM>
Date: Sat, 12 Oct 2013 01:17:11 +0100
Dear All,

Let me share the latest articles published in the WorldWaders News Blog 
(http://worldwaders.wordpress.com) highlighting an exciting digital publication 
project about shorebirds. 


http://worldwaders.wordpress.com/2013/10/09/shorebirds-emagazine-is-coming/

Let me hear your thoughts. :)

Best, Szimi
_
Gyorgy Szimuly
Milton Keynes, UK
http://worldwaders.wordpress.com
http://szimistylebirding.wordpress.com
http://500px.com/SzimiStyle
Subject: Re: James Bay shorebird report #5, 31 July - 12 August 2013
From: William Jones <trogon AT AOL.COM>
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 2013 08:38:29 -0400
Still to come, guys.



-----Original Message-----
From: Christian.Friis AT EC.GC.CA
To: SHOREBIRDS 
Sent: Tue, Sep 10, 2013 12:09 pm
Subject: [SHOREBIRDS] James Bay shorebird report #5, 31 July - 12 August 2013



Hi All,

Posting on behalf of Mike Burrell:

This is the project's fifth report, for the period 31 July - 12 August 2013 
from 

East Point on Hannah Bay, Ontario, on the south coast of James Bay. This camp 
is 

located in the heart of the East Point Important Bird Area 
(http://ibacanada.ca/site.jsp?siteID=ON147&lang=EN). 


The Hannah Bay crew consists of Ross Wood (volunteer), Mike Burrell (Bird 
Studies Canada), Barb Charlton (volunteer) and Alvan Buckley (volunteer). Final 

reports from Hannah Bay, Little Piskwamish Point and Longridge Point will be 
shared as soon as possible.

The Hannah Bay camp is 68 km east of Moosonee, Cochrane District. High counts 
during the period are given below.

Black-bellied Plover - 101 adults on August 10. No juveniles to date.

American Golden Plover - 2 adults on August 5 and 1 adult on August 8.

Semipalmated Plover  - 46 on August 2; the first juveniles arrived on August 7

Killdeer - 11 on August 9

Spotted Sandpiper - 4 on July 31. Only juveniles observed during the period.

Solitary Sandpiper - singles on 5 days.

Greater Yellowlegs - 554 on July 31. Juveniles were uncommon at the start of 
the 

period but had increased to about 30% by the end.

Lesser Yellowlegs - 395 on August 1. Juveniles represented about 25% of birds 
at 

the start of the period but increased to well over half by the end.

Whimbrel - 6 on August 6. This species was mostly just observed flying over the 

study area.

Hudsonian Godwit - 674 molting adults on August 11. East Point appears to be an 

important stopover site for this species, as the 674 birds represents almost 1% 

of the global population of this species. Flagged birds were seen on 9 
occasions 

and represented at least 3 individuals.  Based on flag colour, one of these 
flagged birds was banded in Canada and the other two were banded in Chile. On 
August 10 as the tide came in Ross Wood and Mike Burrell watched a flock of 27 
individuals circle overhead gaining altitude for close to 30 minutes before 
eventually heading south, presumably leaving James Bay.

Marbled Godwit - 39 on August 3. Small numbers daily.

Ruddy Turnstone - 35 adults on August 2. The first juveniles arrived on August 
6.

Red Knot - 42 birds in a flyover flock on August 9.  This species was very 
uncommon at East Point, with birds on the ground only on 3 days, including 2 
juveniles on August 11.

Sanderling - 6 birds on August 4. Uncommon at East Point with low counts on 7 
days only. No juveniles observed.

Semipalmated Sandpiper - 7311 on August 6. Juveniles represented a very small 
portion of birds (virtually none) when we arrived but had increased to over 50% 

by the end of the period. On August 10 as the tide came in Ross Wood and Mike 
Burrell watched several flocks totalling over 500 birds flying southeast at 
high 

altitude, presumably having fattened up enough to leave James Bay. On August 12 

Ross Wood and Alvan Buckley found an adult Semipalmated Sandpiper with an 
engraved flag - based on the colour of the flag this bird was originally banded 

in Peru.

Least Sandpiper - 425 on July 31. Mostly juveniles at the beginning of the 
period, by the end there were only a handful of adults left.

White-rumped Sandpiper - 2760 on August 6. No juveniles yet.

Pectoral Sandpiper - 259 on August 10.  First juvenile on August 11. On August 
10 as the tide came in Ross Wood and Mike Burrell watched a flock of 40 
individuals circle overhead gaining altitude before heading south, presumably 
leaving James Bay.

Dunlin - 6 adults on August 3.  This species was very uncommon at East Point - 
only adults were observed and only on 6 days.

Stilt Sandpiper - 6 adults on August 1 and 3 adults on August 3. Always 
observed 

roosting at creek mouth at high tide with Short-billed Dowitchers and Hudsonian 

Godwits.

Buff-breasted Sandpiper - 4 on August 2 and 1 on August 3.

Short-billed Dowitcher (hendersoni) - 6 adults on August 3. Low numbers of 
adults on 7 days, always observed roosting at a creek mouth at high tide

with Hudsonian Godwits.

Wilson's Snipe - 14 on August 11.

Wilson's Phalarope - 2 juveniles on August 5. Singles seen on August 3 (adult), 

7 (juvenile) and 9 (unknown).

Red-necked Phalarope - 5 juveniles on August 12. Also seen on August 1 (1 
adult), 2 (1 adult, 2 juveniles), 3 (1 adult), 8 (1 adult), 10 (2 adults) and 
11 

(1 juvenile).

OTHER BIRDS: Blue-winged Teal - female with 9 young near camp; Black Scoter - 
300 on August 7; American White Pelican - 3 birds on August 12; Yellow Rail - 
single bird flushed on August 7; Sora - single bird heard calling on August 5; 
Little Gull - 1 adult on August 2; Black Tern - 1 molting adult on August 3; 
Arctic Tern - adults on 4 days; Bank Swallow - flock of 15 on August 7; Gray 
Catbird - single around camp irregularly through period; LeConte's Sparrow - 
1-3 

still singing around camp; Nelson's Sparrow - up to 29 singing males; Common 
Redpoll - flocks flying over daily 

MAMMALS: Single Grey Wolf seen on August 4 and 6. Black Bears observed almost 
daily. 1 Snowshoe Hare on July 31. Deer Mouse observed almost daily in one of 
the cabins (I won't reveal whose, but you can guess!). Woodland Caribou tracks 
on August 1. Moose tracks most days. Striped Skunk around camp on a few days; 
possibly depredated on the night of August 9. Red Squirrel! around camp on 
several days. 

HERPTILES: Wood Frog, American Toad, Northern Leopard Frog, Spring Peeper, 
Eastern Gartersnake.

Butterflies: Least Skipper, Common Branded Skipper, Roadside Skipper (record 
late for Ontario), Bronze Copper, Bog Copper, Spring Azure, Atlantis 
Fritillary, 

Silver-bordered Fritillary, Arctic Fritillary, Northern Crescent, White 
Admiral, 

Viceroy, Common Ringlet 

DONATES: Northern Spreadwing, Emerald Spreadwing, Marsh Bluet, Eastern 
Forktail, 

Variable "Lineate" Darner, Lake Darner, Shadow Darner, Zigzag Darner, 
Four-spotted Skimmer, Crimson-ringed Whiteface, Black Meadowhawk, Cherry-faced 
Meadowhawk.

Check out Alvan's blog (http://alvanbuckley.blogspot.ca 
 

) for photos and a map of the Hannah Bay camp location. Mike Burrell also has 
some photos on his blog (http://mikeburrell.blogspot.ca 
 

) and Jean Iron has photos from the previous crew at this location 
(http://www.jeaniron.ca/2013/JamesBay/p1.htm).

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: The Western James Bay Shorebird Survey is a cooperative 
effort 

spearheaded by the Canadian Wildlife Service, Royal Ontario Museum, Ontario 
Ministry of Natural Resources (OMNR), Bird Studies Canada and Moose Cree First 
Nation. Additional support for the 2013 expedition was provided

by TD Friends of the Environment Foundation. The OMNR also provides helicopter 
transport to and from field camps and accommodations in the staff house while 
crews are in Moosonee. Thanks to Ken Abraham, Rod Brook, Sarah Hagey and Kim 
Bennett of OMNR for logistical support. Lastly, without the many hours of 
dedicated volunteer support, this project would not be possible.

-----------------------------------------------------------

Mike Burrell

mike.burrell... AT gmail.com

http://mikeburrell.blogspot.com/

_______________________________________________

Regards,

            Christian

Christian A. Friis 

Canadian Wildlife Service 

Environment Canada 

4905 Dufferin St. 

Toronto ON M3H 5T4 

christian.friis AT ec.gc.ca   

Telephone 416.739.4908 

Mobile 647.882.6097 

Facsimile 416.739.5845 

Government of Canada 

Website www.ec.gc.ca/mbc-com  

Christian A. Friis 

Service canadien de la faune 

Environnement Canada 

4905, rue Dufferin 

Toronto ON M3H 5T4 

christian.friis AT ec.gc.ca   

T?l?phone 416.739.4908 

Cellulaire 647.882.6097 

T?l?copieur 416.739.5845 

Gouvernement du Canada 

Site Web www.ec.gc.ca/mbc-com  
Subject: James Bay shorebird report #5, 31 July - 12 August 2013
From: "Friis,Christian [Ontario]" <Christian.Friis AT EC.GC.CA>
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 2013 16:09:02 -0400
Hi All,

Posting on behalf of Mike Burrell:

 

This is the project's fifth report, for the period 31 July - 12 August 2013 
from East Point on Hannah Bay, Ontario, on the south coast of James Bay. This 
camp is located in the heart of the East Point Important Bird Area 
(http://ibacanada.ca/site.jsp?siteID=ON147&lang=EN). 


 

The Hannah Bay crew consists of Ross Wood (volunteer), Mike Burrell (Bird 
Studies Canada), Barb Charlton (volunteer) and Alvan Buckley (volunteer). Final 
reports from Hannah Bay, Little Piskwamish Point and Longridge Point will be 
shared as soon as possible. 


 

The Hannah Bay camp is 68 km east of Moosonee, Cochrane District. High counts 
during the period are given below. 


 

Black-bellied Plover - 101 adults on August 10. No juveniles to date.

 

American Golden Plover - 2 adults on August 5 and 1 adult on August 8.

 

Semipalmated Plover  - 46 on August 2; the first juveniles arrived on August 7

 

Killdeer - 11 on August 9

 

Spotted Sandpiper - 4 on July 31. Only juveniles observed during the period.

 

Solitary Sandpiper - singles on 5 days.

 

Greater Yellowlegs - 554 on July 31. Juveniles were uncommon at the start of 
the period but had increased to about 30% by the end. 


 

Lesser Yellowlegs - 395 on August 1. Juveniles represented about 25% of birds 
at the start of the period but increased to well over half by the end. 


 

Whimbrel - 6 on August 6. This species was mostly just observed flying over the 
study area. 


 

Hudsonian Godwit - 674 molting adults on August 11. East Point appears to be an 
important stopover site for this species, as the 674 birds represents almost 1% 
of the global population of this species. Flagged birds were seen on 9 
occasions and represented at least 3 individuals. Based on flag colour, one of 
these flagged birds was banded in Canada and the other two were banded in 
Chile. On August 10 as the tide came in Ross Wood and Mike Burrell watched a 
flock of 27 individuals circle overhead gaining altitude for close to 30 
minutes before eventually heading south, presumably leaving James Bay. 


 

Marbled Godwit - 39 on August 3. Small numbers daily.

 

Ruddy Turnstone - 35 adults on August 2. The first juveniles arrived on August 
6. 


 

Red Knot - 42 birds in a flyover flock on August 9. This species was very 
uncommon at East Point, with birds on the ground only on 3 days, including 2 
juveniles on August 11. 


 

Sanderling - 6 birds on August 4. Uncommon at East Point with low counts on 7 
days only. No juveniles observed. 


 

Semipalmated Sandpiper - 7311 on August 6. Juveniles represented a very small 
portion of birds (virtually none) when we arrived but had increased to over 50% 
by the end of the period. On August 10 as the tide came in Ross Wood and Mike 
Burrell watched several flocks totalling over 500 birds flying southeast at 
high altitude, presumably having fattened up enough to leave James Bay. On 
August 12 Ross Wood and Alvan Buckley found an adult Semipalmated Sandpiper 
with an engraved flag - based on the colour of the flag this bird was 
originally banded in Peru. 


 

Least Sandpiper - 425 on July 31. Mostly juveniles at the beginning of the 
period, by the end there were only a handful of adults left. 


 

White-rumped Sandpiper - 2760 on August 6. No juveniles yet.

 

Pectoral Sandpiper - 259 on August 10. First juvenile on August 11. On August 
10 as the tide came in Ross Wood and Mike Burrell watched a flock of 40 
individuals circle overhead gaining altitude before heading south, presumably 
leaving James Bay. 


 

Dunlin - 6 adults on August 3. This species was very uncommon at East Point - 
only adults were observed and only on 6 days. 


 

Stilt Sandpiper - 6 adults on August 1 and 3 adults on August 3. Always 
observed roosting at creek mouth at high tide with Short-billed Dowitchers and 
Hudsonian Godwits. 


 

Buff-breasted Sandpiper - 4 on August 2 and 1 on August 3.

 

Short-billed Dowitcher (hendersoni) - 6 adults on August 3. Low numbers of 
adults on 7 days, always observed roosting at a creek mouth at high tide 


with Hudsonian Godwits.

 

Wilson's Snipe - 14 on August 11.

 

Wilson's Phalarope - 2 juveniles on August 5. Singles seen on August 3 (adult), 
7 (juvenile) and 9 (unknown). 


 

Red-necked Phalarope - 5 juveniles on August 12. Also seen on August 1 (1 
adult), 2 (1 adult, 2 juveniles), 3 (1 adult), 8 (1 adult), 10 (2 adults) and 
11 (1 juvenile). 


 

OTHER BIRDS: Blue-winged Teal - female with 9 young near camp; Black Scoter - 
300 on August 7; American White Pelican - 3 birds on August 12; Yellow Rail - 
single bird flushed on August 7; Sora - single bird heard calling on August 5; 
Little Gull - 1 adult on August 2; Black Tern - 1 molting adult on August 3; 
Arctic Tern - adults on 4 days; Bank Swallow - flock of 15 on August 7; Gray 
Catbird - single around camp irregularly through period; LeConte's Sparrow - 
1-3 still singing around camp; Nelson's Sparrow - up to 29 singing males; 
Common Redpoll - flocks flying over daily 


 

MAMMALS: Single Grey Wolf seen on August 4 and 6. Black Bears observed almost 
daily. 1 Snowshoe Hare on July 31. Deer Mouse observed almost daily in one of 
the cabins (I won't reveal whose, but you can guess!). Woodland Caribou tracks 
on August 1. Moose tracks most days. Striped Skunk around camp on a few days; 
possibly depredated on the night of August 9. Red Squirrel! around camp on 
several days. 


 

HERPTILES: Wood Frog, American Toad, Northern Leopard Frog, Spring Peeper, 
Eastern Gartersnake. 


 

Butterflies: Least Skipper, Common Branded Skipper, Roadside Skipper (record 
late for Ontario), Bronze Copper, Bog Copper, Spring Azure, Atlantis 
Fritillary, Silver-bordered Fritillary, Arctic Fritillary, Northern Crescent, 
White Admiral, Viceroy, Common Ringlet 


 

DONATES: Northern Spreadwing, Emerald Spreadwing, Marsh Bluet, Eastern 
Forktail, Variable "Lineate" Darner, Lake Darner, Shadow Darner, Zigzag Darner, 
Four-spotted Skimmer, Crimson-ringed Whiteface, Black Meadowhawk, Cherry-faced 
Meadowhawk. 


 

Check out Alvan's blog (http://alvanbuckley.blogspot.ca 
 ) for photos and a map of the Hannah Bay 
camp location. Mike Burrell also has some photos on his blog 
(http://mikeburrell.blogspot.ca  ) and Jean 
Iron has photos from the previous crew at this location 
(http://www.jeaniron.ca/2013/JamesBay/p1.htm). 


 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: The Western James Bay Shorebird Survey is a cooperative 
effort spearheaded by the Canadian Wildlife Service, Royal Ontario Museum, 
Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (OMNR), Bird Studies Canada and Moose 
Cree First Nation. Additional support for the 2013 expedition was provided 


by TD Friends of the Environment Foundation. The OMNR also provides helicopter 
transport to and from field camps and accommodations in the staff house while 
crews are in Moosonee. Thanks to Ken Abraham, Rod Brook, Sarah Hagey and Kim 
Bennett of OMNR for logistical support. Lastly, without the many hours of 
dedicated volunteer support, this project would not be possible. 


-----------------------------------------------------------

Mike Burrell

mike.burrell... AT gmail.com

http://mikeburrell.blogspot.com/

_______________________________________________

 

 

Regards,

            Christian

 

Christian A. Friis 

Canadian Wildlife Service 

Environment Canada 

4905 Dufferin St. 

Toronto ON M3H 5T4 

christian.friis AT ec.gc.ca   

Telephone 416.739.4908 

Mobile 647.882.6097 

Facsimile 416.739.5845 

Government of Canada 

Website www.ec.gc.ca/mbc-com  

 

Christian A. Friis 

Service canadien de la faune 

Environnement Canada 

4905, rue Dufferin 

Toronto ON M3H 5T4 

christian.friis AT ec.gc.ca   

Tlphone 416.739.4908 

Cellulaire 647.882.6097 

Tlcopieur 416.739.5845 

Gouvernement du Canada 

Site Web www.ec.gc.ca/mbc-com  

 
Subject: James Bay shorebird report #6, 13 August - 27 August 2013
From: "Friis,Christian [Ontario]" <Christian.Friis AT EC.GC.CA>
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 2013 16:04:55 -0400
Hi All,

Posting on behalf of Ross Wood:

 

This is the project's sixth report, for the period 13 August - 27 August 2013 
from East Point on Hannah Bay, Ontario, on the south coast of James Bay. 


 

This camp is located in the heart of the East Point Important Bird Area 
(http://ibacanada.ca/site.jsp?siteID=ON147&lang=EN). 


 

The Hannah Bay crew consists of Ross Wood (volunteer), Kevin Seymour (Royal 
Ontario Museum), Greg Stewart (volunteer), Shannon Page (MNR), Mark Isaac 
(volunteer, Moose Cree First Nations) and Thomas Cheena (volunteer, Moose Cree 
First Nations). 


 

The Hannah Bay camp is 68 km east of Moosonee, Cochrane District. High counts 
during the period are given below. 


 

Black-bellied Plover - 70 adults on August 18. All moulting adults.

 

American Golden Plover - 3 adults on August 18 and 20th.

 

Semipalmated Plover  - 53 on August 22; nearly all juveniles by August 27.

 

Killdeer - 8 on August 18.

 

Spotted Sandpiper - 1 on August 16. Only one juvenile observed during the 
period. 


 

Solitary Sandpiper - singles on 4 days.

 

Greater Yellowlegs - 257 on August 22. Juveniles represented about 50% of the 
birds by the end. 


 

Lesser Yellowlegs - 435 on August 22. Juveniles represented about 80% of the 
birds by the end of the period. 


 

Whimbrel - 4 on August 19.

 

Hudsonian Godwit - 2383 molting and migrating adults on August 22. East Point 
appears to be an important stopover site for this species, as the 2383 birds 
represents about 3.5% of the global population of this species. Flagged birds 
were seen on 12 occasions and represented at least 6 individuals. Based on flag 
colour, one of these flagged birds was banded in Canada and the other two were 
banded in Chile. On August 22 as the tide came in Ross Wood and Kevin Seymour 
watched several flocks totalling roughly 800 individuals gaining altitude and 
heading south. First Juvenile observed on August 23. 


 

Marbled Godwit - 17 on August 18. Small numbers daily.

 

Ruddy Turnstone - 23 adults on August 19. By the end of the period on juveniles 
were being seen. 


 

Red Knot - 27 on August 22. This species was very uncommon at East Point, but 
in the last week or so we started to see very small numbers of 


juveniles more regularly.

 

Semipalmated Sandpiper - 853 on August 22. Juveniles represented nearly 100% of 
the birds by the end of the period. 


 

Least Sandpiper - 58 on August 18. 100% juveniles by the end of the period.

 

White-rumped Sandpiper - 2027 on August 22. One juvenile on the August 22.

 

Pectoral Sandpiper - 196 on August 23. Approximately 50% juveniles by the end 
of the period. 


 

Dunlin - 3 adults on several dates. This species was very uncommon at East 
Point - only adults were observed and only on 15 days in the entire 6 week 
period. 


 

Stilt Sandpiper - 2 August 17. Always observed roosting at creek mouth at high 
tide with Short-billed Dowitchers and Hudsonian Godwits. 


 

Buff-breasted Sandpiper - 1 on August 18.

 

Short-billed Dowitcher (hendersoni) - 9 adults on August 22. First juveniles 
seen August 17. 


 

Wilson's Snipe - 10 on August 16 and 21.

 

Wilson's Phalarope - 1 juvenile on August 16.

 

Red-necked Phalarope - 5 juveniles on August 16.

 

OTHER BIRDS: Snow Goose - first arrivals on August 17, high count of 104 August 
22; Canada Goose 2912 on August 23; Horned Grebe; American White Pelican - 10 
birds on August 22; Black Tern at least 2 juveniles August 18; Arctic Tern - 
adult on August 20; Tree, Bank and Cliff Swallows; Winter Wren; Pine Warbler - 
male feeding on mud flats; Le Conte's Sparrow; Nelson's Sparrow - birds had 
stopped singing by this period, but fledged young and adults were seen most 
days; Purple Finch; White-winged Crossbill; Common Redpoll - seen daily in 
small flocks moving south; Pine Siskin 


 

MAMMALS: Gray Wolf (tracks), Woodchuck, Deer Mouse, Meadow Vole, Short-tailed 
Shrew (dead specimen collected) and Red Squirrel. 


 

HERPTILES: Wood Frog, American Toad, Northern Leopard Frog, Spring Peeper, 
Eastern Gartersnake(common around camp). 


 

Butterflies: Cabbage White, Mustard White, Bronze Copper, Silvery Blue, Spring 
Azure, Atlantis Fritillary, Northern Crescent, Green Comma, White Admiral, 
Viceroy. 


 

ODONATES: Northern Spreadwing, Emerald Spreadwing, Marsh Bluet, Variable 
"Lineate" Darner, Variable "Interrupted" Darner, Lake Darner, Zigzag Darner, 
Black Meadowhawk, Cherry-faced Meadowhawk. 


 

Check out Alvan's blog (http://alvanbuckley.blogspot.ca 
 ) for photos and a map of the Hannah Bay 
camp location. Mike Burrell also has some photos on his blog 
(http://mikeburrell.blogspot.ca  ) and Jean 
Iron has photos from the first crew at this location 
(http://www.jeaniron.ca/2013/JamesBay/p1.htm). 


 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: The Western James Bay Shorebird Survey is a cooperative 
effort spearheaded by the Canadian Wildlife Service, Royal Ontario Museum, 
Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (OMNR), Bird Studies Canada and Moose 
Cree First Nation. Additional support for the 2013 expedition was provided by 
TD Friends of the Environment Foundation. The OMNR also provides helicopter 
transport to and from field camps and accommodations in the staff house while 
crews are in Moosonee. Thanks to Ken Abraham, Rod Brook, Sarah Hagey and Kim 
Bennett of OMNR for logistical support. Lastly, without the many hours of 
dedicated volunteer support, this project would not be possible. 


 

Ross Wood

Burlington, ON

_______________________________________________

 

Regards,

            Christian

 

Christian A. Friis 

Canadian Wildlife Service 

Environment Canada 

4905 Dufferin St. 

Toronto ON M3H 5T4 

christian.friis AT ec.gc.ca   

Telephone 416.739.4908 

Mobile 647.882.6097 

Facsimile 416.739.5845 

Government of Canada 

Website www.ec.gc.ca/mbc-com  

 

Christian A. Friis 

Service canadien de la faune 

Environnement Canada 

4905, rue Dufferin 

Toronto ON M3H 5T4 

christian.friis AT ec.gc.ca   

Tlphone 416.739.4908 

Cellulaire 647.882.6097 

Tlcopieur 416.739.5845 

Gouvernement du Canada 

Site Web www.ec.gc.ca/mbc-com  

 
Subject: James Bay Report #4, 31 July - 10 August
From: "Friis,Christian [Ontario]" <Christian.Friis AT EC.GC.CA>
Date: Wed, 28 Aug 2013 18:41:46 -0400
This is the project's fourth report, for the period 31 July - 10 August 2013 
from Little Piskwamish Point on the south coast of James Bay. The Little 
Piskwamish Point crew consists of Mark Peck (Royal Ontario Museum), Don 
Sutherland (Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources), Ron Ridout (Bird Studies 
Canada), Burke Korol (Canadian Wildlife Service), Mark Field (volunteer) and 
Jeffrey Costa (volunteer). A three day trip was also made to Longridge Point 
(60 km north of Moosonee). One other crew is at Hannah Bay. See map link below. 
Study sites are part of the Western James Bay Shorebird Survey. Camps closed 
for the season on 26 August and crews are en route home this week. Final 
reports from Hannah Bay, Little Piskwamish Point and Longridge Point will be 
shared as soon as possible. 


 

The Little Piskwamish Point camp is 43 km north of Moosonee, Cochrane Dist. 
High counts during the period are for Little Piskwamish followed by (Longridge 
Point). 


 

Black-bellied Plover - 53, (89)

American Golden Plover - 3

Semipalmated Plover  - 95, 6 juveniles, August 10, (40)

Hudsonian Godwit - 360, (260) all adults

Marbled Godwit - 1

Whimbrel - 1, (2)

Greater Yellowlegs - 317, juveniles still uncommon, (76)

Lesser Yellowlegs - 376, 30% juveniles, August 8, (234)

Ruddy Turnstone - 119, all adults, (139)

Red Knot - 1679, 17 juveniles, August 10, (710). Close to 600 resightings of 
banded REKNs have been made during this period involving over 250 individual 
birds. This information is shared throughout the flyway with other researchers 
banding in Quebec, New Jersey, Delaware, Georgia, Florida, Brazil, Argentina 
and Chile and provides valuable information on populations, migration routes, 
stopover sites and stopover times. 


Dunlin - 918, (72) 

Pectoral Sandpiper - 282, (148

White-rumped Sandpiper  - 11001, (6000)

Semipalmated Sandpiper - 1192, 5% juveniles August 8, (620)

Least Sandpiper - 82, 50% juveniles, (86)

Red-necked Phalarope - 2, adults and juveniles, (1)

Prairie Falcon - juvenile, August 2, not seen since.

Northern Harrier - 2 recently fledged juveniles near camp

American White Pelican

Yellow Rail - 1-3 heard daily near camp

Bonaparte's Gull - 323, (600)

Little Gull - 3 juveniles, no adults

Arctic Tern - seen infrequently, 1 or 2.

Black Tern - 1 adult

1 Eastern Garter Snake, daily sightings of Black Bears, 3 River Otter, 1 
Snowshoe Hare and a family of Striped Skunk in camp. No small mammals have been 
observed. 


 

Map of survey sites on southern James Bay.

http://www.jeaniron.ca/2013/JamesBay/map.htm

 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: The Western James Bay Shorebird Survey is a cooperative 
effort spearheaded by the Canadian Wildlife Service, Royal Ontario Museum , 
Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (OMNR), Bird Studies Canada and Moose 
Cree First Nation. Additional support for the 2013 expedition was provided by 
TD Friends of the Environment Foundation. The OMNR also provides helicopter 
transport to and from field camps and accommodations in the staff house while 
crews are in Moosonee. Thanks to Ken Abraham, Rod Brook, Sarah Hagey and Kim 
Bennett of OMNR for logistical support. Lastly, without the many hours of 
dedicated volunteer support, this project would not be possible. 


 

Good birding,

            Christian

 

Christian A. Friis 

Canadian Wildlife Service 

Environment Canada 

4905 Dufferin St. 

Toronto ON M3H 5T4 

christian.friis AT ec.gc.ca   

Telephone 416.739.4908 

Mobile 647.882.6097 

Facsimile 416.739.5845 

Government of Canada 

Website www.ec.gc.ca/mbc-com  

 

Christian A. Friis 

Service canadien de la faune 

Environnement Canada 

4905, rue Dufferin 

Toronto ON M3H 5T4 

christian.friis AT ec.gc.ca   

Tlphone 416.739.4908 

Cellulaire 647.882.6097 

Tlcopieur 416.739.5845 

Gouvernement du Canada 

Site Web www.ec.gc.ca/mbc-com  

 
Subject: Automatic reply: [SHOREBIRDS] Good news from the Caribbean
From: "Brunjes, John (FW)" <john.brunjes AT KY.GOV>
Date: Tue, 20 Aug 2013 11:39:38 +0000
I will be out of the office until Aug 26th. I may be able to check email so I 
will respond as possible. If you need immediate help with banding, contact Erin 
Harper. Otherwise, if you need immediate assistance please call our info center 
at 1-800-858-1549. 


John Brunjes

Migratory Bird Program
Subject: Good news from the Caribbean
From: Gyorgy Szimuly <gyorgy.szimuly AT MAC.COM>
Date: Tue, 20 Aug 2013 12:39:02 +0100
There are some promising news from the Caribbean. Hopefully the implementation 
will be as good as this achievement itself. 

http://worldwaders.wordpress.com/2013/08/19/she-did-not-die-in-vain/

Thank you for all those who are supporting the WorldWaders News Blog by 
visiting and re-visiting. :) 


Best, Szimi
_
Gyorgy Szimuly
Milton Keynes, UK
http://worldwaders.wordpress.com
http://szimistylebirding.wordpress.com
http://500px.com/SzimiStyle
Subject: Shorebird news
From: Gyorgy Szimuly <gyorgy.szimuly AT MAC.COM>
Date: Mon, 12 Aug 2013 23:45:29 +0100
Dear All,

Please find the latest news about shorebirds 
(http://worldwaders.wordpress.com/). Some more interesting items as well as an 
innovative initiative to be published soon. Should you have any relevant 
material to share with us please don't hesitate to send me. 


Best for the rest of the summer.

Szimi
_
Gyorgy Szimuly
Milton Keynes, UK
http://worldwaders.wordpress.com
http://szimistylebirding.wordpress.com
http://500px.com/SzimiStyle
Subject: Automatic reply: [SHOREBIRDS] James Bay Shorebird Report #3 + Photos
From: "James B. Cole" <jbcole AT TNC.ORG>
Date: Sun, 4 Aug 2013 21:14:30 +0000
I'll be out of the office Wednesday, 31 July, through Friday, 2 August, with 
limited email access. I'll reply to your message as soon as I can. Thanks for 
your patience. - James 

Subject: James Bay Shorebird Report #3 + Photos
From: Jean Iron <jeaniron AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Sun, 4 Aug 2013 17:08:54 -0400
This is the third report for the period 26 - 30 July 2013 from East Point on
Hannah Bay, Ontario, on the south coast of James Bay. The Hannah Bay crew
comprised Christian Friis, Shorebird Biologist with the Canadian Wildlife
Service (CWS) and volunteers Jean Iron and Antonio Coral. This report also
includes highlights from Longridge Point (fide Stuart Mackenzie) marked
below with *stars. The Western James Bay Shorebird Survey is a joint effort
of the Canadian Wildlife Service, Royal Ontario Museum, Ontario Ministry of
Natural Resources (OMNR) and Bird Studies Canada in cooperation with the
Moose Cree First Nation. See photos in link #3 below.

SHOREBIRDS: 22 species to date. The high count and date for each species are
given for the period.

Black-bellied Plover: 35 adults on 28 July.

Semipalmated Plover: 118 adults on 26 July.

Killdeer: 10 on 26 July.

Spotted Sandpiper: 1 on 27 July.

Greater Yellowlegs: 305 molting adults on 26 July.

Lesser Yellowlegs: 450 molting adults on 26 July. First juveniles on 27
July.

Whimbrel: 16 on 26 July.

Hudsonian Godwit: 309 molting adults on 26 July.

MARBLED GODWIT: 47 on 26 July. The high count of 99 on 20 July 2013 and
other observations suggest that Marbled Godwits breed in the vast marshes of
Hannah Bay. Todd (1963) in the Birds of the Labrador Peninsula described
Marbled Godwit habitat at Hannah Bay. He wrote "The level, wet meadows which
the godwits haunted reminded me strikingly of the plains of Saskatchewan,
where I had become familiar with this species in the season of 1932." This
godwit was recently found breeding nearby in Quebec at Baie Cabbage Willows
and Baie de Boatswain. The James Bay population was recently revised upwards
from 1500 to 2000 birds based on observations from last summer. See
Shorebird Population Estimates 2012 in second link below. Climate warming
may be having a positive effect on the breeding success of Marbled Godwits
on James Bay.

Ruddy Turnstone: 35 adults on 26 July.

RED KNOT (rufa subspecies): 3 adults on 28 July. This low number indicates
that Hannah Bay is not a staging area for knots. See higher numbers for the
same period at Longridge reported below. The endangered rufa subspecies
breeds in the central Canadian Arctic.

Sanderling: 3 molting adults on 26 July.

SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER: 10,102 adults on 26 July. This high number indicates
Hannah Bay's importance for this sandpiper. Antonio Coral recorded two
flagged birds: One with yellow flag MV2 on upper right leg on 28 July and
one with lime green flag 3P3 on upper right leg on 29 July.

Least Sandpiper: 134 on 29 July. First juvenile on 26 July. 90% juveniles on
29 July. Rapid turnover from adults to juveniles.

White-rumped Sandpiper: 558 molting adults on 26 July. Most juveniles do not
arrive until September.

Pectoral Sandpiper: 127 non-molting adults on 26 July.

Dunlin: 19 on 29 July. All adults.

Short-billed Dowitcher: 6 on 27 July. Adults of the subspecies hendersoni.

Red-necked Phalarope: 1 juvenile on 29 July.

OTHER HANNAH BAY BIRDS: 18 species of waterfowl. New for the period: Greater
Scaup, Red-breasted Merganser. Blue-winged Teal. Northern Pintail with 5
chicks on 29 July. Bald Eagles daily with high count of 7 on 27 July. Daily
several adults, year old molting juveniles and one appeared to be a fresh
juvenile. Merlin with juvenile just behind camp. Hunting shorebirds daily.
Sandhill Cranes daily with high count of 51 on 26 July. Bonaparte's Gulls 38
on 28 July. First four juveniles on 26 July. Herring Gull: first juvenile on
26 July. Ring-billed Gull: first juvenile on 27 July. Golden-crowned Kinglet
feeding young on 27 July. Nelson's Sparrows daily. High count of 15 on 26
July, still singing on 30 July even in very windy conditions. Le Conte's
Sparrow less common with high count of 3 on 27 July. Pine Siskin, high of 7
on 30 July.

MAMMALS: Two Black Bears on 29 July.

BUTTERFLIES: Northern Spring Azure, Northern Crescent, Atlantis Fritillary,
Aphrodite Fritillary, Common Ringlet, White Admiral, Viceroy. Very few good
days for butterflies with rain and wind.

ODONATES: Black Meadowhawk, Cherry-faced Meadowhawk, Aeshna sp.

WILDFLOWERS: Beach-pea, Yellowrattle, Canada Buffaloberry (Soapberry) with
lots of berries, Yarrow, Cinquefoil sp., Thrift, Long-stalked Stitchwort,
Arctic Daisy, Fireweed, Common Skullcap.

*LONGRIDGE HIGHLIGHTS: Courtesy of Stuart Mackenzie: Longridge Crew: Stuart
Mackenzie (Bird Studies Canada), Ian Sturdee (volunteer), Adam Timpf
(volunteer), Sarah Neima (Mount Allison University) and Beth MacDonald
(Mount Allison University). Black-bellied Plover: 8 on 28 July. Semipalmated
Plover: 31 on 28 July. Killdeer: 8 on 26 July. Spotted Sandpiper: 1 on 29
July. Greater Yellowlegs: 75 on 29 July. Lesser Yellowlegs: 74 on 29 July.
Whimbrel: 19 on 25 July. Hudsonian Godwit: 200 on 28 July. Marbled Godwit: 1
on 26 July. Ruddy Turnstone: 103 on 26 July. RED KNOT: 1100 on 27 and 29
July. 266 flags recorded. Sanderling: 58 on 26 July. Semipalmated Sandpiper:
600 on 26 July. Least Sandpiper: 25 on 28 July. White-rumped Sandpiper: 750
on 26 July. Pectoral Sandpiper: 82 on 28 July. Dunlin: 15 on 28 July.
Short-billed Dowitcher: 1 on 29 July. Wilson's Snipe: 1 on 29 July.

*Stu Mackenzie reports they captured 67 Semipalmated Sandpipers, 1 Least
Sandpiper and 30 White-rumped Sandpipers. 47 long-lasting VHF radio
transmitters were put on Semipalmated Sandpipers (46) and Least Sandpiper
(1). There is an array of over 15 towers and receivers installed across the
Bay of Fundy waiting for their arrival. The array is designed to detect
tagged animals in flight and on the ground for a distance of over 10 km. It
will detect the birds' arrival in the Bay of Fundy, the details of their
stopover and departure. It is a project of Mount Allison University (New
Brunswick), Acadia University (Nova Scotia) and Environment Canada. Also of
note is a Semipalmated Sandpiper recaptured at Longridge on 29 July 2013
that was banded as a hatch-year on 13 September 2011 at Milford Point,
Connecticut.

*Other Longridge sightings: Black Scoter: 2000 and 2500 on 28 and 29 July.
White-winged Scoter: 1 on 29 July. Red-breasted Merganser: 1 on 28 July.
Ruffed Grouse: 1 on 27 July. American White Pelican: 50 on 29 July. American
Bittern: 1 on 28 July. Little Gull: 1 adult on 28 July. Downy Woodpecker: 3
on 28 and 29. Alder Flycatcher: 2 on 29 July. Eastern Kingbird: 1 on 28
July. Barn Swallow: 1 on 26 July. Tennessee Warbler: 1 on 27 July. Wilson's
Warbler: 1 on 29 July. Common Redpoll: daily, high 3 on 25 July.

1. Map of survey sites on southern James Bay.
http://www.jeaniron.ca/2013/JamesBay/map.htm

2. Shorebird Population Estimates and Trends 2012
http://www.jeaniron.ca/2013/ShorebirdPop2012.pdf

3. See Hannah Bay Photos July 2013
http://www.jeaniron.ca/2013/JamesBay/p1.htm

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: Many thanks to Stu Mackenzie of Bird Studies Canada for
data from Longridge. The Western James Bay Shorebird Survey is a cooperative
effort by the Canadian Wildlife Service, Royal Ontario Museum, Ontario
Ministry of Natural Resources (OMNR), Bird Studies Canada and Moose Cree
First Nation. Additional support for the 2013 expedition was provided by TD
Friends of the Environment Foundation. The OMNR also provides helicopter
transport to and from field camps and accommodations in the staff house
while crews are in Moosonee. Thanks to Ken Abraham, Rod Brook, Sarah Hagey
and Kim Bennett of OMNR for logistical support. Jean thanks an anonymous
donor for financial assistance allowing her to make satellite phone calls to
Ron so timely reports were available on the Ontbirds and Shorebirds
listservs. Lastly, without the many hours of dedicated volunteer support,
this project would not be possible.

This is our final report. New crews are now in camps at Hannah Bay and
Little Piskwamish. We look forward to their reports.

Jean Iron and Ron Pittaway
Toronto, Ontario
Canada
Subject: James Bay Shorebirds - Hannah Bay #2
From: Jean Iron <jeaniron AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Fri, 26 Jul 2013 17:44:22 -0400
This is Jean Iron's second report by satellite phone for the period 21 - 25
July 2013 from East Point on Hannah Bay, Ontario, on the south coast of
James Bay. Hannah Bay is a new site to survey the shorebirds using
southwestern James Bay. The Hannah Bay crew comprises Christian Friis,
shorebird biologist with the Canadian Wildlife Service (CWS) and volunteers
Jean Iron and Antonio Coral. Two other crews are at Longridge Point and
Little Piskwamish Point. A separate summary for Longridge marked with a
*star is included below. See map link below for survey locations.

The Hannah Bay camp is on a pristine wilderness coast with no human debris
or flotsam that is frequent on most sea coasts and the Great Lakes. The
surveyors have not seen any people since arriving on 14 July.

SHOREBIRDS: 22 species to date. The high count and date for each species are
given for the count period. All migrant shorebirds so far have been adults.
The absence of juveniles for some species such as Lesser Yellowlegs and
Least Sandpiper, and reports from farther north suggest a late breeding
season in 2013.

Black-bellied Plover: 17 on 25 July.

Semipalmated Plover: 25 on 25 July.

Killdeer: 8 on 24 July.

Spotted Sandpiper: 1 on 24 July.

Greater Yellowlegs: 437 on 22 July.

Lesser Yellowlegs: 999 on 22 July.

Whimbrel: 45 on 22 July.

Hudsonian Godwit: 463 on 22 July.

Marbled Godwit: 55 on 24 July.

Ruddy Turnstone: 34 on 25 July.

RED KNOT: None during this period indicates that Hannah Bay is not a staging
area for knots. See numbers at Longridge below.

Sanderling: 12 on 25 July.

Semipalmated Sandpiper: 12,650 on 21 July.

Least Sandpiper: 181 migrant adults on 20 July.

White-rumped Sandpiper: 125 on 21 July.

Pectoral Sandpiper: 489 on 22 July.

Dunlin: 4 on 21 July.

Stilt Sandpiper: 5 on 21 July.

Short-billed Dowitcher: 11 on 21 July. Most were the subspecies hendersoni.

Wilson's Snipe: 7 on the 21 July.

Wilson's Phalarope: 2 on 22 July.

*LONGRIDGE SUMMARY (high counts only) fide Stuart Mackenzie: Black-bellied
Plover, 7 on 22 July. Semipalmated Plover, 31 on 22 July. Greater
Yellowlegs, 307 on 23 July. Lesser Yellowlegs, 138 on 21 July. Whimbrel, 130
on 17 July. Hudsonian Godwit, 400 on 25 July. Marbled Godwit, 3 on 17 July.
Ruddy Turnstone, 209 on 22 July. Sanderling, 9 on 25 July. RED KNOT, >1000
birds present since 18 July, high of 1500 on 25th, slowly building with >200
tags read. Semipalmated Sandpiper, 1100 on 21 July. Least Sandpiper, 85 on
18 July, <30 since. White-rumped Sandpiper, 450 on 21 and 22 July. Pectoral
Sandpiper, 270 on 21 July. Short-billed Dowitcher, 4 on 17 July. Red-necked
Phalarope, 1. Singles of Arctic Tern, more Common Terns. Bonaparte's Gull,
adult numbers building, juvenile on 19 July. Parasitic Jaegers, 2 adults
hunting shorebirds. Yellow Rails, 6 around camp. 12 Nelson's and 2 Le
Conte's Sparrows around camp. Clay-colored Sparrow, 1 on 22 July.

OTHER HANNAH BAY BIRDS in no particular order: GRAY CATBIRD on 25 July. No
Yellow Rails. A Sora on 24 and 25 July in cattails. 16 species of waterfowl
including 8 Redheads on 21 July, Northern Shoveler and Blue-winged Teal.
American White Pelican, 4 on 24 July. Pair of Northern Harriers on
territory. Peregrine Falcon, adult on 21 July. Merlin chasing shorebirds on
24 July. Common Nighthawk flying southeast on 25 July. Blue-headed Vireo.
Philadelphia Vireo. Red-eyed Vireo. Gray Jay, 2 adults on 25 July. Boreal
Chickadee on 26 July. Brown Creeper on 25 July. Winter Wren. Golden-crowned
Kinglet. Ruby-crowned Kinglet. Nashville Warbler. Magnolia Warbler.
Yellow-rumped Warbler. Le Conte's Sparrow, 1 singing on 24 July. Nelson's
Sparrow, 14 singing on 24 July. Common Grackle on 24 July. White-winged
Crossbill, 13 on 22 July. Pine Siskin, 3 on 24 July.

MAMMALS: Black Bear, 2 on 25 July. Hannah Bay is south of the normal range
of Polar Bears which are rare south of Akimiski Island. See map link. Deer
Mouse and a vole sp. in cabin.

BUTTERFLIES: Old World Swallowtails on host plant, Scotch Lovage. Pink-edged
Sulphur. Bronze Cooper. Northern Spring Azure. Atlantis Fritillary. Northern
Crescent. White Admiral. Viceroy. Common Ringlet (abundant). Long Dash.

WILDFLOWERS (some): Balsam Ragwort. Labrador Indian Paintbrush. Northern
Grass-of-Parnassus. Labrador Tea. Large-flowered Wintergreen. Twinflower.
Bunchberry.

Map of survey sites on southern James Bay.
http://www.jeaniron.ca/2013/JamesBay/map.htm

Snow/Ice Cover Map
http://www.natice.noaa.gov/pub/ims/ims_gif/DATA/cursnow_usa.gif

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: The Western James Bay Shorebird Survey is a cooperative
effort spearheaded by the Canadian Wildlife Service, Royal Ontario Museum ,
Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (OMNR), Bird Studies Canada and Moose
Cree First Nation. Additional support for the 2013 expedition was provided
by TD Friends of the Environment Foundation. The OMNR also provides
helicopter transport to and from field camps and accommodations in the staff
house while crews are in Moosonee. Thanks to Ken Abraham, Rod Brook, Sarah
Hagey and Kim Bennett of OMNR for logistical support. Jean thanks an
anonymous donor for financial assistance allowing her to make satellite
phone calls to me so timely reports are available on the Ontbirds and
Shorebirds listservs. Lastly, without the many hours of dedicated volunteer
support, this project would not be possible.

Jean's third report will be in 7 - 10 days.

Ron Pittaway
Toronto, Ontario
Canada
Subject: Automatic reply: [SHOREBIRDS] James Bay Shorebirds - Hannah Bay #1
From: "Brunjes, John (FW)" <john.brunjes AT KY.GOV>
Date: Sun, 21 Jul 2013 22:35:56 +0000
I will be out of the office until July 29th at the Mississippi Flyway Tech 
section and Council meeting. I will be able to check email so I will respond as 
possible. If you need immediate help with banding, Contact Erin Harper. 
Otherwise, if you need immediate assistance please call our info center at 
1-800-858-1549. 


John Brunjes

Migratory Bird Program
Subject: James Bay Shorebirds - Hannah Bay #1
From: Jean Iron <jeaniron AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Sun, 21 Jul 2013 18:35:12 -0400
This is Jean Iron's first report by satellite phone for the period 15 - 20
July 2013 from East Point on Hannah Bay, Ontario, on the south coast of
James Bay. Hannah Bay is a new site to survey the shorebirds using
southwestern James Bay. The Hannah Bay crew comprises Christian Friis,
shorebird biologist with the Canadian Wildlife Service (CWS) and volunteers
Jean Iron and Antonio Coral. Two other crews are at Longridge Point and
Little Piskwamish Point. See map link below. Study sites are part of the
Western James Bay Shorebird Survey. These studies may lead to legal
protection such as a biosphere reserve. Decisions to protect areas will
involve the James Bay First Nations.

The Hannah Bay camp consists of three fine cabins on a dry ridge backing
onto the boreal forest (spruce/willow) and about 200 m from the high tide
mark. The coast is rocky with a grassy fringe and pools when the tide is
low. There is a large shallow bay and marsh south of camp.

SHOREBIRDS: 16 species to date. The high count and date for each species is
given. All migrant shorebirds so far have been adults. The first juveniles
will arrive soon. Reports pertain to Hannah Bay (Lat 51.38, Lon 79.68)
except where indicated.

Killdeer: Breeds. 5 adults including one with a chick on 20 July.

Spotted Sandpiper: Breeds. 1 adult.

Greater Yellowlegs: Breeds on muskeg inland from coast. 324 staging adults
along coast on 20 July.

Lesser Yellowlegs: Breeds on muskeg inland from coast. 294 staging adults
along coast on 20 July.

Whimbrel: 8 on 19 July. Migrants from farther north.

Hudsonian Godwit: 180 on 19 July. Staging adults from farther north. After
fattening and undergoing some body molt most will fly nonstop to South
America.

Marbled Godwit: Breeds. 99 adults in small flocks on 20 July. The disjunct
James Bay population apparently winters mostly around the Gulf of California
instead of the closer Atlantic Coast.

Ruddy Turnstone: 16 adults from farther north on 20 July.

Red Knot: 27 adults on 20 July. Southbound knots in Eastern Canada stage in
two main areas where they fatten for long flights to South America: (1)
southwestern James Bay in Ontario and (2) the Mingan Archipelago National
Park Reserve on the north shore of the Gulf of St. Lawrence in Quebec. Both
locations are at approximately 50 degrees N latitude. There is very little
overlap in the populations using both sites. Staging and fattening knots on
James Bay specialize on bivalves on intertidal mud flats before migrating to
South America. The CWS and Parks Canada on the Mingan Archipelago report
good numbers of knots arriving there suggesting a better breeding season
than last summer. The number of juveniles in August and September will be a
better indicator as will the counts on James Bay.

Semipalmated Sandpiper: 3665 migrant adults on 20 July. This peep has
declined sharply in numbers and is of major conservation concern. The two
main southbound staging areas are the Bay of Fundy and James Bay. There is a
project underway of Mount Allison University in New Brunswick and CWS to
find out arrival times and length of stay at James Bay. This summer 40 radio
trackers are being placed on Semipalmated Sandpipers at Longridge Point on
James Bay to find out how long they stage there. A receiver can track birds
within a 5 km radius. A total of 178 birds will be banded and flagged after
radio marking the first 40.

Least Sandpiper: Breeds. 181 migrant adults on 20 July.

White-rumped Sandpiper: 104 migrant adults on 20 July.

Pectoral Sandpiper: 176 migrant adults on 20 July.

Wilson's Snipe: Breeds. 7 on the 20 July. Still winnowing.

Wilson's Phalarope: Breeds. 1 adult on 20th. A small population breeds in
the prairie-like marshes of southwestern James Bay.

Red-necked Phalarope: 4 migrant adults from farther north on 20 July.

OTHER BIRDS in no particular order: This is a dry summer and recent
temperatures have been above normal. No Yellow Rails heard to date. This
rail breeds in coastal sedge marshes above the usual tidal zone and may be
affected by drier marshes as in recent years. Canada Goose, 450-500. Ducks:
Gadwall, American Wigeon, American Black Duck (200), Mallard, Northern
Pintail, female and 6 young on 20 July. Green-winged Teal, Ring-necked Duck,
Lesser Scaup, Bufflehead, Common Goldeneye, Hooded Merganser and Common
Merganser. Common Loon. Double-crested Cormorant. Bald Eagle, 1 adult and 2
immatures probably preying on Canada Geese. Northern Harrier, only 1 adult
male suggesting a low vole year. Merlin. Bonaparte's Gull, small numbers of
adults with one beginning head molt. Common Tern (every day). Arctic Tern, 1
on 18 July. Common Raven. Alder Flycatcher. Tree Swallow, 6 on 20 July.
Black-capped Chickadee. Swainson's Thrush. BROWN THRASHER on 17-18 July.
Warblers: Yellow Warbler, Black-and-white Warbler and Common Yellowthroat.
Sparrows: Savannah Sparrow, Le Conte's Sparrow (a few and singing), Nelson's
Sparrow (singing, more common than Le Conte's), Song Sparrow, Swamp Sparrow
and White-throated Sparrow. Red-winged Blackbird. White-winged Crossbill, 5.

MAMMALS: Large bull Moose on 17 July. Gray Wolf, 2 sighted on 19 July.
Wolves observed stalking Canada Geese and chasing them into the water but no
kills noted. Red Squirrel.

HERPTILES: Eastern Gartersnake, "Hudson Bay" American Toad, Wood Frog and
Northern Leopard Frog.

BUTTERFLIES: White Admiral. Fritillary sp. Skipper sp.

Map of survey sites on southern James Bay.
http://www.jeaniron.ca/2013/JamesBay/map.htm

Snow/Ice Cover Map
http://www.natice.noaa.gov/pub/ims/ims_gif/DATA/cursnow_usa.gif

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: The Western James Bay Shorebird Survey is a cooperative
effort spearheaded by the Canadian Wildlife Service, Royal Ontario Museum ,
Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (OMNR), Bird Studies Canada and Moose
Cree First Nation. Additional support for the 2013 expedition was provided
by TD Friends of the Environment Foundation. The OMNR also provides
helicopter transport to and from field camps and accommodations in the staff
house while crews are in Moosonee. Thanks to Ken Abraham, Rod Brook, Sarah
Hagey and Kim Bennett of OMNR for logistical support. Jean thanks an
anonymous donor for financial assistance allowing her to make satellite
phone calls to me so timely reports are available on the Ontbirds and
Shorebirds listservs. Lastly, without the many hours of dedicated volunteer
support, this project would not be possible.

Jean's second report will be in about 5-7 days.

Ron Pittaway
Toronto, Ontario
Canada
Subject: Automatic reply: [SHOREBIRDS] Spoon-billed Sandpiper Animation Project
From: "Wolfgang Rohloff (WH)" <RohlofWH AT TELKOM.CO.ZA>
Date: Sat, 29 Jun 2013 00:02:39 +0000
I am currently on leave from 22 June to 14 July 2013.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
This e-mail is subject to the Telkom SA SOC Ltd electronic communication legal 
notice, 

available at : http://www.telkom.co.za/TelkomEMailLegalNotice.PDF 
 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Subject: Automatic reply: [SHOREBIRDS] Spoon-billed Sandpiper Animation Project
From: Brad Winn <bwinn AT MANOMET.ORG>
Date: Fri, 28 Jun 2013 23:59:51 +0000
I am out of the office and unable to respond to email until July 8. Sorry for 
any inconvenience. Thank you. 

Subject: Automatic reply: [SHOREBIRDS] Spoon-billed Sandpiper Animation Project
From: "Brunjes, John (FW)" <john.brunjes AT KY.GOV>
Date: Fri, 28 Jun 2013 23:59:47 +0000
I will be out of the office until July 3rd. If you need immediate assistance 
please call our info center at 1-800-858-1549. 


John Brunjes

Migratory Bird Program
Subject: Spoon-billed Sandpiper Animation Project
From: Gyorgy Szimuly <gyorgy.szimuly AT MAC.COM>
Date: Sat, 29 Jun 2013 00:58:40 +0100
Hi There,

Please find our latest news about one of the most touching shorebird public 
awareness project ever. 


http://worldwaders.wordpress.com/2013/06/28/spoon-billed-sandpiper-animation-project/ 


I hope you like it. If you have time, please leave a comment in our blog.

Best, Szimi
_
Gyorgy Szimuly
Milton Keynes, UK
http://worldwaders.wordpress.com
http://szimistylebirding.wordpress.com
http://500px.com/SzimiStyle



_
Gyorgy Szimuly
Milton Keynes, UK
http://worldwaders.wordpress.com
http://szimistylebirding.wordpress.com
http://500px.com/SzimiStyle
Subject: Automatic reply: [SHOREBIRDS] Shorebirds and Climate Change - pdf
From: "Brunjes, John (FW)" <john.brunjes AT KY.GOV>
Date: Fri, 7 Jun 2013 20:23:02 +0000
I will be out of the office from June 10 until June 17. If you need immediate 
assistance please call our info center at 1-800-858-1549. 


John Brunjes

Migratory Bird Program
Subject: Shorebirds and Climate Change - pdf
From: Jean Iron <jeaniron AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Fri, 7 Jun 2013 16:22:00 -0400
Please see article about ongoing studies on the coast of Hudson Bay in
Ontario just published in the June 2013 issue of OFO News.
http://www.jeaniron.ca/2013/ShorebirdsJune2013.pdf

Jean Iron
Toronto, Ontario
Canada
Subject: WorldWaders News Update - 6.6.13
From: Gyorgy Szimuly <gyorgy.szimuly AT MAC.COM>
Date: Thu, 6 Jun 2013 01:52:59 +0100
Hi All,

Quite a bad news from Australia!

http://worldwaders.wordpress.com/2013/06/06/the-future-of-beach-nesting-birds-is-under-a-cloud/ 


Best wishes, Szimi
_
Gyorgy Szimuly
Milton Keynes, UK
http://worldwaders.wordpress.com
http://szimistylebirding.wordpress.com
http://500px.com/SzimiStyle
Subject: Shorebird news
From: Gyorgy Szimuly <gyorgy.szimuly AT MAC.COM>
Date: Sat, 25 May 2013 10:35:01 +0100
Dear Members,

Thanks to the contributors of WorldWaders News Blog I have gotten nice and 
positive feedback on the blog. I would not have been able to run this blog on 
my own but thanks to the tremendous support we could post news about shorebird 
conservation, research and other topics. All this is set to raise awareness of 
the vulnerability of shorebird populations of the world. 


In the future I target to reach more people and share unique, never published 
news and stories on shorebird conservation and possibly nice achievements. 
Personally I am happy by the numerous organizations, groups who work for 
shorebirds and I would be delighted to hear about your stories. If you think 
WorldWaders News Blog is worth to support by a few articles or news items a 
year please send me a mail to discuss the best and easiest way to contribute. 
To learn more of the structure of the blog just read some of the latest news. 


http://worldwaders.wordpress.com

I believe that more new organizations/groups will join and I can welcome you as 
the WorldWaders Contributors, just like WHSRN, Manomet, BirdLife Community, WWT 
and many other big NGOs as well as individuals. 


Looking forward to hear about you.

Best wishes, Szimi
_
Gyorgy Szimuly
Milton Keynes, UK
http://worldwaders.wordpress.com
http://szimistylebirding.wordpress.com
http://500px.com/SzimiStyle
Subject: Whimbrels completed 3rd leg of unknown loop migration route | WorldWaders News Blog
From: Gyorgy Szimuly <gyorgy.szimuly AT MAC.COM>
Date: Wed, 15 May 2013 18:53:36 +0100
Dear List Members,

Please find the latest article on migrating Whimbrels.

http://worldwaders.wordpress.com/2013/05/15/whimbrels-completed-3rd-leg-of-unknown-loop-migration-route/ 


Should you have any news worth to share with the shorebird community please 
pass it to me or became the contributor of WorldWaders News Blog. I'd be happy 
to expand the users. 


Best, Szimi
_
Gyorgy Szimuly
Milton Keynes, UK
http://worldwaders.wordpress.com
http://szimistylebirding.wordpress.com
http://500px.com/SzimiStyle
Subject: Fwd: William Jones
From: William Jones <trogon AT AOL.COM>
Date: Mon, 6 May 2013 15:52:37 -0400
http://gim11.jaworzno.edu.pl/maininf.php




    
-----------

5/6/2013 8:52:33 PM

trogon
  
Subject: WorldWaders Celebrates 3rd birthday with devastating news...
From: Gyorgy Szimuly <gyorgy.szimuly AT MAC.COM>
Date: Sat, 4 May 2013 00:18:00 +0100
Dear All,

I would like to share the WorldWaders blog post from today. Images of those 
birds are shocking!!! 

http://worldwaders.wordpress.com/2013/05/03/bitter-taste-celebration/

I am looking forward to hear your reply in blog (as a comment) if possible.

Thank you, Szimi
_
Gyorgy Szimuly
Milton Keynes, UK
http://worldwaders.wordpress.com
http://szimistylebirding.wordpress.com
http://500px.com/SzimiStyle
Subject: Shocking news from Australia
From: Gyorgy Szimuly <gyorgy.szimuly AT MAC.COM>
Date: Tue, 26 Mar 2013 11:05:48 +0000
Dear Shorebird Enthusiasts,

Please learn more about the recent shocking news from Victoria, Australia.
WorldWaders News Blog reports: 
http://worldwaders.wordpress.com/2013/03/26/red-necked-avocets-illegally-shot-in-victoria/ 


In blog tell us what you think and what changes you would like to see 
implemented. 


Best, Szimi
_
Gyorgy Szimuly
Milton Keynes, UK
http://worldwaders.wordpress.com
http://szimistylebirding.wordpress.com
http://500px.com/SzimiStyle
Subject: Conservation Issues in Kuwait
From: Gyorgy Szimuly <gyorgy.szimuly AT MAC.COM>
Date: Thu, 14 Mar 2013 19:54:11 +0000
Hi,

Today news from Kuwait made me very unhappy. Find a few words about the 
shooting 

of Sociable Lapwings and other waders in the WorldWaders News Blog:

http://worldwaders.wordpress.com/2013/03/14/sociable-lapwings-shot-in-the-middle\ 

-east/

Please show your support by following or liking the blog. Simple clicks.

Best, Szimi
_
Gyorgy Szimuly
Milton Keynes, UK
http://worldwaders.wordpress.com
http://szimistylebirding.wordpress.com
http://500px.com/SzimiStyle
Subject: SPAM/SCAM Re: [SHOREBIRDS] Sad Trip..................Dorothy Crowley
From: Steve Holzman <steve_holzman AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Mon, 11 Mar 2013 06:44:55 -0700
Ignore the original message.



Steve Holzman
North High Shoals, GA
Oconee County,
USA


________________________________
 From: Jenifer Hilburn 
To: SHOREBIRDS AT LISTSERV.UGA.EDU 
Sent: Monday, March 11, 2013 8:40 AM
Subject: [SHOREBIRDS] Sad Trip..................Dorothy Crowley
 
I
really hope you get this fast. I could not inform anyone about our
trip, because it was impromptu. we had to be in Philippines for Tour..
The program was successful, but our journey has turned sour. we
misplaced our wallet and cell phone on our way back to the hotel we
lodge in after we went for sight seeing. The wallet contained all the
valuables we had. Now, our passport is in custody of the hotel
management pending when we make payment.

I
am sorry if i am inconveniencing you, but i have only very few people
to run to now. i will be indeed very grateful if i can get a short term
loan from you ($1,950). this will enable me sort our hotel bills and
get my sorry self back home. I will really appreciate whatever you can
afford in assisting me with. I promise to refund it in full as soon as
soon as I return. let me know if you can be of any assistance. Please,
let me know soonest.
Thanks so much.

Jen

________________________________

Jenifer D. Hilburn
Island Ornithologist
St. Catherines Island
Georgia USA
Subject: Sad Trip..................Dorothy Crowley
From: Jenifer Hilburn <ecojen AT YAHOO.COM>
Date: Mon, 11 Mar 2013 05:40:59 -0700
I
really hope you get this fast. I could not inform anyone about our
trip, because it was impromptu. we had to be in Philippines for Tour..
The program was successful, but our journey has turned sour. we
misplaced our wallet and cell phone on our way back to the hotel we
lodge in after we went for sight seeing. The wallet contained all the
valuables we had. Now, our passport is in custody of the hotel
management pending when we make payment.

I
am sorry if i am inconveniencing you, but i have only very few people
to run to now. i will be indeed very grateful if i can get a short term
loan from you ($1,950). this will enable me sort our hotel bills and
get my sorry self back home. I will really appreciate whatever you can
afford in assisting me with. I promise to refund it in full as soon as
soon as I return. let me know if you can be of any assistance. Please,
let me know soonest.
Thanks so much.

Jen

________________________________

Jenifer D. Hilburn
Island Ornithologist
St. Catherines Island
Georgia USA
Subject: The New Shorebirds Handbook blog
From: Gyorgy Szimuly <gyorgy.szimuly AT MAC.COM>
Date: Wed, 24 Oct 2012 03:43:36 +0100
Dear Friends,

I am happy to announce that the new blog and website of ’The New Shorebirds 
Handbook Project' is up and running. Comments are much appreciated. 


http://thenewshorebirds.wordpress.com/

Best, Szimi
Milton Keynes
United Kingdom
Subject: Fred Bodsworth (1918-2012) Last of the Curlews
From: Jean Iron <jeaniron AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Tue, 18 Sep 2012 08:37:26 -0400
We are posting this on behalf of Glenn Coady about the passing of Fred
Bodsworth, author of Last of the Curlews.

Jean Iron and Ron Pittaway

The following death notice appeared in Monday's Toronto Star:

BODSWORTH, Fred,
Celebrated Canadian Author, "Mr. Curlew" died September 15, 2012, one month
short of his 94th birthday. He was predeceased by his loving wife Margaret
Banner. Dear father of Barbara Welch (Ed), Nancy Hannah (Rick), and Neville
Bodsworth (Lois Mombourquette). Cherished grandfather of Wendy, Erin, Lisa,
Lori, Tyler, Tara, Margaret, Aidan and Cameron. Doting great grandfather of
Cristian and Holden. Fred was a self-taught scientist with an insatiable
curiosity for the natural world and a life-long passion for birds. There
will be a private family service. Friends are invited to join us at the
Bracebridge Sewage Lagoons (Kerr Park) on Sunday, October 7, 2012 for a hike
in Fred's memory. We will meet at Kerr Park at 9 a.m. for brunch with a hike
to follow. A Memorial Service in November will be announced later.
Charitable donations can be made to Ontario Nature, Bird Studies Canada or
Canadian Nature Conservancy. Online condolences may be sent via
www.sherrinfuneral.ca

Glenn Coady wrote this tribute:

Charles Frederick "Fred" Bodsworth was born on October 11, 1918 in Port
Burwell, Ontario. Fred graduated from Port Burwell public and high schools
and went on to a career in journalism, working freelance for the Port
Burwell Enterprise, London Free Press and Woodstock Sentinel-Review during
the Depression, as a full-time reporter for the St. Thomas Times-Journal
1940-1943, a reporter and editor for the Toronto Daily Star and Weekly Star
1943-1946, and staff writer and editor at Maclean's Magazine 1947-1955.
Since 1955, Fred had pursued a career as a freelance writer and editor,
publishing four novels: Last of the Curlews (1955, Toronto and New York,
Dodd Mead); The Strange One (1959, Toronto and New York, Dodd Mead); The
Atonement of Ashley Morden (1964, Toronto and New York, Dodd Mead); and The
Sparrow's Fall (1967, Toronto, McClelland and Stewart and New York,
Doubleday). Fred also wrote and edited for several non-fiction titles
including: The People's Health: Canada and WHO (with Brock Chisholm) -
Canadian Association for Adult Education, Toronto, 1949; The Pacific Coast
volume of the Natural Science of Canada series, 1970; and Wilderness Canada,
Clark Irwin, Toronto, 1970. In the spring of 1954, Fred wrote a short
novelette for the May 15th issue of Maclean's magazine entitled "Last of the
Curlews", accompanied by illustrations by well-known editorial cartoonist
Duncan Mcpherson. In that era, Maclean's magazine was a far more literary
publication than it is today, more akin to the New Yorker than to a news
magazine like Time, as in its current incarnation. Many of Canada's most
famous and successful writers often published short pieces of fiction in its
pages. When "Last of the Curlews" was published in Maclean's, the
overwhelming positive reader response far eclipsed that of any other work
the magazine had ever published, and Fred was encouraged to expand the work
into a larger novel. The completed novel version of "Last of the Curlews",
accompanied by over 40 peerless scratchboard illustrations
by artist/naturalist Terry Shortt, provided a fictionalized account of the
last pair of Eskimo Curlews, and was published by Dodd Mead in February
1955, and was immediately received enthusiastically by the public. It has
since been widely cited as one of the finest pieces of natural history-based
fiction ever written. The book's genius is that it transforms the reader's
appreciation for the extraordinary life experiences that migratory birds
encounter and the challenges they must overcome on a daily basis. It uses
the tragic story of the Eskimo Curlew as a parable to impart a sense of both
the gravity of extinction and the sinister role played by the often wanton
hand of mankind on the natural world. The book was chosen for inclusion as a
Readers' Digest novel selection and eventually went on to sell in excess of
three million copies - an improbable result for a love story with no human
characters or dialogue. In all the years since it was first published, it
has never been out of print. The book has been translated into twelve
foreign languages and was adapted into an animated film by Hanna-Barbera
Productions that first aired on the American Broadcasting
Corporation's After School Special on October 4, 1972. It won an Emmy Award
for Outstanding Achievement in Children's Programming in 1973.

Fred made incalculable contributions to natural history in Ontario. His love
of nature started as a very young boy with an interest in butterflies, and
later birds, in his hometown of Port Burwell. In what might almost be
considered heresy for any Canadian boy of that era, Fred traded a pair of
his skates and a bicycle pump for his first butterfly guide - obviously it
was clear pretty early on where his priorities lay. His correspondence on
natural history matters stretches back even to a personal relationship with
W.E. Saunders, the legendary London-area naturalist of the late-19th and
early 20th centuries and one of Fred's early heroes. In the summer of 1949,
Fred discovered the first Hooded Warbler nest for Canada at Springwater
Conservation Area near Aylmer. In the 1960s and 1970s, Fred was a
much-sought leader of worldwide ornithological tours. Fred's own lifetime of
personal ornithological records were heavily drawn upon in the production
of a 2004 monograph "Birds of Elgin County - a Century of Change". Fred was
a long-time Director and former President (1965-1967) of the Federation of
Ontario Naturalists (now Ontario Nature), an Honorary Director (since 1970)
of the Long Point Bird Observatory and Bird Studies Canada, and Chair of the
Board of Trustees of the James L. Baillie Memorial Fund for Ornithology
(1975-1989) - very appropriate, since Jim Baillie had been a friend of his
for several decades. Fred was one of the longest-serving members of the
Brodie Club (since 1953), the Toronto Ornithological Club (since 1949;
becoming an honorary member in 2002) and the Ontario Field Ornithologists
(since 1983) at the time of his death, and he always thoroughly enjoyed
the meetings of each of these clubs, where he was still a regular attendee
into the summer of this year. True to Fred's style and sense of whimsy, his
90th birthday party was held in a park that featured a tour of the
Bracebridge, Ontario sewage lagoons. Among many speeches made after a walk
around the lagoons, Fred delivered the line of the day when he finished his
speech with the line "Oh, to be 80 again ! .....".

There is likely no better way to describe Fred's novels than by using his
own words:

"The major part of my work has been novels linking human and animal
characters in a fiction format with strong natural history content and
wilderness backgrounds. The nature storyteller who uses birds or mammals in
fictional situations treads a narrow path if he wishes to be scientifically
authentic and portray them as they really are. On the one hand, he has to
personalize his animal as well as his human characters or he simply has no
dramatic base for his story. Yet if the personalizing of animal characters
goes too far and begins turning them into furry or feathered people - the
nature writer's sin of anthropomorphism - the result is maudlin nonsense
that is neither credible fable nor fiction. I enjoy the challenge of
presenting wildlife characters as modern animal behaviour studies are
showing them to be - creatures dominated by instinct, but not enslaved by
it, beings with intelligence very much sub-human in some areas yet
fascinatingly super-human in others. Out of the blending of human and animal
stories comes the theme that I hope is inherent in all my books: that man is
an inescapable part of all nature, that its welfare is his welfare, that to
survive he cannot continue acting and regarding himself as a spectator
looking on from somewhere outside."

I cannot envision capturing the essence of Fred's writing more completely or
eloquently. The impact of Fred's writing, particularly that of Last of the
Curlews, was equally as influential as Aldo Leopold's A Sand County Almanac
(1949) and Rachel Carson's Silent Spring (1962) in the stirring up of a
collective ecological conscience among society that gave impetus and urgency
to the popular post-War environmental movement.

One of my favourite pieces of Fred's writing is an article entitled "Why
Wilderness?", a call to arms for enlightened wilderness preservation, which
was published in the December 1967 issue of The Ontario Naturalist. Here is
one of my favourite passages:

"Conservationists are not trying to stop progress, or to halt further
development of soil and forest resources; but if we believe that man's
heritage includes not only the works of man but also the works of creation,
we have an obligation to the future to ensure that good samples of
creation's multiformity of natural patterns are preserved. To argue that
wilderness preservation is ludicrous because we already have too much
Canadian wilderness is like arguing that we don't need to preserve our Tom
Thomsons or Krieghoffs because we have galleries full of other paintings."


Perhaps the most telling fact that I could share about Fred's life is that
among the many hundreds of friends and acquaintances that I have shared with
Fred over our friendship of several decades, I have never heard a single one
of them utter anything but praise and admiration for his knowledge, wisdom,
infectious inquisitiveness, sense of both humour and fairness, and his love
for family, community, birds and the environment. That truly is the
exemplary hallmark of a life well lived.

Fred passed away peacefully on Saturday, September 15th at Toronto's
Scarborough General Hospital.

I learned the intricacies of shorebird identification leaning heavily on
books crafted by men named Fuertes, Forbush, Peterson and Godfrey, but fully
comprehending them as "minute specks of earthbound flesh challenging an
eternity of earth and sky" was a gift bestowed on me by Fred Bodsworth.

A fond adieu to my friend Fred - he will be dearly missed by countless
friends and fans alike.

Glenn Coady
Whitby, Ontario

Please join Fred's family and friends at Kerr Park in Bracebridge for a
brunch and hike in his honour on Sunday, October 7th at 9:00 a.m. To reach
Kerr Park and the Bracebridge sewage lagoons, take Highway 11 north to just
south of Bracebridge and exit at Exit 182 onto Regional Road 118 (Ecclestone
Drive), taking it northwest 4.2 km to Regional Road 16 (Beaumont Drive).
Turn left (west) onto Beaumont Drive and proceed 0.6 km west to the entrance
to Kerr Park on the south side.





Subject: James Bay Shorebirds #4 + photos & videos
From: Jean Iron <jeaniron AT SYMPATICO.CA>
Date: Tue, 4 Sep 2012 20:08:45 -0400
This is my fourth and summary report with photos and videos for Longridge
Point on the southwestern coast of James Bay in Ontario. Surveys are a
cooperative project of the Canadian Wildlife Service (CWS), Royal Ontario
Museum (ROM) and Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (OMNR). Commonest
shorebird since the last report on 24 August was the White-rumped Sandpiper
with 6402 adults on 27 August and the first juvenile White-rumped was on
28th. A total of 26 species of shorebirds was recorded in August. New birds
since the last report #3 are Red-throated Loon; Turkey Vulture, 1 on 28 Aug
found by Barb Charlton and 2 on 29th; and a juvenile Sabine's Gull on 30
August found by Ross Wood. A total of 142 bird species was recorded for the
period 30 July to 31 August 2012.

Link to photos and videos
http://www.jeaniron.ca/2012/jamesbay/camp.htm

Acknowledgements: I thank Christian Friis (CWS) and Mark Peck (ROM) for the
opportunity to do fieldwork at Longridge. Ken Abraham (OMNR), Rod Brook
(OMNR), Kim Bennett (OMNR) and Sarah Hagey (OMNR) provided logistical
support to the camp. I thank Ron Pittaway for posting my reports to the
Ontbirds and Shorebirds listservs. Ron inspired my love of shorebirds and
has encouraged me to volunteer for northern surveys.

Jean Iron
Toronto, Ontario
Canada
http://www.jeaniron.ca/
Subject: James Bay shorebirds -- Chickney Channel Point 15 to 31 July
From: "Friis,Christian [Ontario]" <Christian.Friis AT EC.GC.CA>
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2012 09:22:12 -0400
This report summarizes the sightings from a crew stationed in the Chickney 
Point area on the western coast of James Bay from July 15 to 31 as a part of 
the Western James Bay Shorebird Survey. The Chickney Point camp is the most 
northerly of the project's three field camps in 2012 and is located just north 
of Chickney Channel (Albany River) roughly 45 km directly south of Akimiski 
Island, and about 150 km north-northwest of Moosonee. Extensive mudflats in the 
region, fuelled with nutrients from the Albany River, its tributaries and the 
innumerable smaller creeks, provide excellent conditions for staging shorebirds 
and waterfowl. The extremely shallow gradient shoreline in the area is 
vegetated by dense tall willow (Salix bebbiana, S. planifolia) thickets, giving 
way to vast supratidal graminoid meadow-marshes (Carex paleacea, Calamagrostis 
inexpansa, Juncus balticus) interspersed with low willow thickets, grading 
finally to brackish and saline tidal marshes (Puccinellia spp.,! 

 Hippuris tetraphylla, Plantago maritima, Salicornia sp.)dissected by a myriad 
of small ponds, drainage channels, tidal inlets, and exposed mudflat. The 
spruce forest begins 5-6 km inland from the high tide line. Previous aerial 
surveys of this region have shown large concentrations of shorebirds during the 
fall migration. 


Christian Friis (CWS), Don Sutherland (OMNR - Natural Heritage Information 
Centre), Ron Ridout (Bird Studies Canada), and Stu Mackenzie (BSC - Long Point 
Bird Observatory) arrived at camp on July 15 and began conducting daily 
shorebird surveys coinciding with high tide at two locations along the coast. 
On July 31, Don, Ron, and Stu were replaced by Ken Burrell, Mike Burrell, and 
Jeanette Goulet. 


Shorebirds:
Shorebird numbers were impressive! During the two weeks, the overall number of 
shorebirds exceeded 1 million (duplicates almost certainly exist) of 23 
species. Most of the individuals observed during this time were adults. Numbers 
and diversity varied substantially with the height and timing of the high 
tides. Shorebird counts exceeded 100,000 on three days: 108, 730 on July 21; 
120,076 on July 24, and 123,777 on July 25 making this one of the densest 
concentrations of migratory shorebirds in the province. Semipalmated Sandpipers 
were the most numerous species on most days ranging from 3,000 (low on July 29) 
to 88,130 (high on July 25). White-rumped Sandpipers were next ranging from 
5,615 (low July 27) to 28,750 (high on July 21). Semipalmated Sandpipers were 
most numerous earlier in the month with a gradual shift to White-rumped's by 
the time we left. There were also impressive numbers of Dunlin ranging from 
1,100 (low July 28) to 19,420 (high on July 21). Numbers of godwi! 

 ts were also significant. We were impressed by a flock of 250 Marbled Godwits 
on our first trek to the flats that was dwarfed by subsequent counts and with a 
high of 1,182 on July 26. Considering that the most recent estimate of 
Ontario's Marbled Godwit population is a "few 1000s (see the Ontario Shorebird 
Conservation Plan; Ross et al. 2003), a substantial portion of the Ontario 
population was observed in a couple of kilometers. Hudsonian Godwits were also 
numerous with nearly 1,000 observed on most days with a high of 1,876 on July 
24. Low numbers of Whimbrels were observed as well with a high of 52 on July 
25. High flying flocks of Marbled Godwits were observed heading southwest on 
several days, presumably headed toward their wintering grounds in the Gulf of 
California. 


Other shorebird highlights:
Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs were abundant in the small tidal ponds with high 
counts of 901 (July 19) and 1,732 (July 24), respectively. 

391 Red Knots were counted during our stay with a high count of 125 on July 24.
Least and Pectoral Sandpipers preferred the more inland grassy pools and 
reached numbers of 585 (July 17) and 424 (July 29), respectively. All other 
shorebirds were present in low numbers, but increasing toward the end of the 
month. 

Spotted Sandpiper - 1 juvenile bird on July 28.
Solitary Sandpiper - 1 adult on July 25.
Stilt Sandpiper - single adults on July 29 and 30
Red-necked Phalarope - single adult females and males observed throughout
Wilson's Phalarope - 7 adults and 12 juveniles observed (probably local 
breeders) 


Other sightings of interest:
Snow Goose - family groups began arriving on July 24 building to 804 (85% 
Blue's) on July 29. 

Redhead - three males present July 27. Singles on July 21, 23, and 29.
American White Pelican - present on most days with a high of 65 on July 19.
American Bittern - 2 present near camp every day.
Great Blue Heron - 1 wing-tagged individual (light green) on July 29 - (herons 
with this colour of patagial tag were banded as nestlings in 2011 and 2012 on 
Howland Rocks, south of Spanish, in the North Channel of Georgian Bay and in 
2012 on Mad Reef, near Stoke's Bay, Lake Huron, 700 and 850 km south of Chickey 
Point, respectively; pers. comm. Chip Weseloh) 

Northern Harrier - most abundant raptor in the area with a high of 11 on July 
28 

Yellow Rail - numerous around camp and in surrounding sedge meadows - 
conservative high of 15 on July 21 

Virginia Rail - two singing males around camp heard between July 25 and 29. One 
of the most northerly records in the province. 

Black Tern - 1 adult on July 27
Bonaparte's Gull - first juvenile on July 26.
Short-eared Owl - two individuals observed throughout the period (pellets were 
full of sparrow feathers) 

Barn Swallow - one on July 27
Eastern Kingbird - one on Jul 29
Swainson's Thrush - breeding near camp
LeConte's Sparrow - numerous in the sedge meadows/willow thickets - 
conservative high of 81 on July 17 

Nelson's Sparrow - numerous in sedge meadows - conservative high of 154 on July 
17 

Fox Sparrow - breeding near camp
Common Redpoll - nest at camp
Bobolink - pair near camp. Male heard on July 15, pair discovered on July 17 
and another or likely the same pair approximately 1 km distant on July 18. 
Possibly the most northerly breeding evidence in the province. 


Migrant Passerines: Northern Waterthrush, Black-and-White Warbler, Tennessee 
Warbler, Western Palm Warbler, Myrtle Warbler. 


Mammals: No direct observations, but evidence of Black Bear, Gray Wolf, Red 
Fox, Striped Skunk, and Weasel sp. 


Butterflies and Dragonflies: Neither group was abundantly represented although 
numbers of individuals generally increased toward the end of the month. 
Butterfly and odonate species observed/documented included Old World and Tiger 
swallowtails, Mustard White, Clouded, Orange, Giant and Pelidne sulphurs, 
American Copper, Atlantis and Frigga fritillaries, Northern Crescent, Mourning 
Cloak, White Admiral, Viceroy, Common Ringlet, Jutta Arctic; and Canada, 
Variable (Interrupted and Lineate subspecies), Sedge and Zigzag darners, 
Hudsonian Whiteface, and Cherry-faced Meadowhawk . 


Amphibians: Boreal Chorus Frog, Wood Frog, and American 'Hudson Bay' Toad.

Acknowledgements

The Western James Bay Shorebird Survey is a cooperative effort spearheaded by 
the Canadian Wildlife Service (CWS), the Royal Ontario Museum, and the Ontario 
Ministry of Natural Resources. The Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (OMNR) 
also provides helicopter transport to and from field camps and accommodations 
in the staff house while crews are in Moosonee. Thanks to Ken Abraham, Rod 
Brook, Sarah Hagey and Kim Bennett of OMNR for providing logistical support. 
Additional support for the Chickney Channel expedition was provided by Bird 
Studies Canada. Many thanks to Ron Pittaway for providing some details in his 
previous report from Jean Iron on James Bay shorebirds. 


Good Birding,

Stu, Don, Ron, and Christian


Christian A. Friis
Canadian Wildlife Service
Environment Canada
4905 Dufferin St.
Toronto ON M3H 5T4
christian.friis AT ec.gc.ca
Telephone 416.739.4908
Mobile 647.882.6097
Facsimile 416.739.5845
Government of Canada
Website www.ec.gc.ca/mbc-com

Christian A. Friis
Service canadien de la faune
Environnement Canada
4905, rue Dufferin
Toronto ON M3H 5T4
christian.friis AT ec.gc.ca
Tlphone 416.739.4908
Cellulaire 647.882.6097
Tlcopieur 416.739.5845
Gouvernement du Canada
Site Web www.ec.gc.ca/mbc-com