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Updated on Friday, March 6 at 03:27 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Owl

6 Mar Blog:Nepal Birds of Prey Migration Voluntourism 2014 ["Prathamesh Desai prathamesh4rpaws AT gmail.com [orientalbirding]" ]
05 Mar The "Rufous-throated White-eye" a.k.a. Madanga is a pipit ["Krys Kazmierczak krys AT krys.net [orientalbirding]" ]
3 Mar Re: Sunda Frogmouth ["Clive Mann clivefmann AT gmail.com [orientalbirding]" ]
2 Mar Baikalian Zoological Journal Nr 15 Issue 2 for 2014 ["Jevgeni Shergalin zoolit2 AT hotmail.com [orientalbirding]" ]
2 Mar March 2015 issue of eBON, newsletter of the Wild Bird Club of the Philippines ["Sylvia Ramos sylviatramos AT yahoo.com [orientalbirding]" ]
1 Mar Sunda Frogmouth ["Mikael Bauer rhabdornis AT yahoo.se [orientalbirding]" ]
27 Feb FW: Swamphen evolution - help requested ["'Buckingham, David' david.buckingham AT rspb.org.uk [orientalbirding]" ]
27 Feb Birding in Mount Abu, Bikaner, Tal Chhapar and Bera ["Aseem Kothiala kothiala AT gmail.com [orientalbirding]" ]
26 Feb Request for photographs of Tytonidae owls ["simonroddis AT yahoo.co.uk [orientalbirding]" ]
26 Feb NE India, May 2015 ["Benjamin Schweinhart bschweinhart AT gmail.com [orientalbirding]" ]
26 Feb Re: Sumatran Woodpecker ["jamesaeaton AT hotmail.com [orientalbirding]" ]
26 Feb Re: Sumatran Woodpecker ["jamesaeaton AT hotmail.com [orientalbirding]" ]
25 Feb RE: Sumatran Woodpecker ["christian artuso chartuso AT hotmail.com [orientalbirding]" ]
25 Feb Re: Sumatran Woodpecker ["Philippe Verbelen filip_verbelen AT yahoo.fr [orientalbirding]" ]
25 Feb Re: Sumatran Woodpecker ["gibbs david david.usia AT blueyonder.co.uk [orientalbirding]" ]
25 Feb Re: Sumatran Woodpecker ["Chris Gooddie chrisgooddie AT me.com [orientalbirding]" ]
25 Feb Sumatran Woodpecker ["Peter Collaerts peter.collaerts AT scarlet.be [orientalbirding]" ]
25 Feb The 9 th ARRCN Symposium 2015, Thailand is opening for registration ["kaset sutasha kasetvet57 AT yahoo.com [orientalbirding]" ]
17 Feb Visiting Enggano Island ["Peter Collaerts peter.collaerts AT scarlet.be [orientalbirding]" ]
17 Feb RE: Asian songbird migrants in trouble ["nial moores spoonbill AT hotmail.com [orientalbirding]" ]
17 Feb RE: Asian songbird migrants in trouble ["'David Melville' david.melville AT xtra.co.nz [orientalbirding]" ]
16 Feb Re: Asian songbird migrants in trouble ["Ronald Orenstein ron.orenstein AT rogers.com [orientalbirding]" ]
16 Feb RE: Asian songbird migrants in trouble ["'John' burridge AT cox.net [orientalbirding]" ]
16 Feb Asian songbird migrants in trouble ["Ronald Orenstein ron.orenstein AT rogers.com [orientalbirding]" ]
16 Feb Re: Digest Number 4512 ["Aasheesh Pittie aasheesh.pittie AT gmail.com [orientalbirding]" ]
16 Feb New NE Tibet images on OBI - not to be missed! ["'Jesper Hornskov' goodbirdmail AT gmail.com [orientalbirding]" ]
16 Feb Re: Digest Number 4512 ["andrew pierce andyjpierce AT yahoo.com [orientalbirding]" ]
15 Feb Fraser's Hill International Bird Race 23-24 May 2015 ["'Bee Choo' msnbc AT singnet.com.sg [orientalbirding]" ]
14 Feb Phone contact for Richard Foster ["Dave Sargeant akalat AT gmail.com [orientalbirding]" ]
11 Feb Java coasts, mangroves and waterbirds ["'Mundkur, Taej' Taej.Mundkur AT wetlands.org [orientalbirding]" ]
4 Feb Birding News from the Wild Bird Club of the Philippines ["Sylvia Ramos sylviatramos AT yahoo.com [orientalbirding]" ]
23 Jan Birding in Indonesia - burung-nusantara.org ["'Nick Brickle' nick AT brickle.com [orientalbirding]" ]
20 Jan Trip report: Namsang Road (Joypur RF, Dehing-Patkai WLS, Assam, India) ["Pritam Baruah doublebulb AT yahoo.com [orientalbirding]" ]
16 Jan Re: Trip report: Khonoma (Nagaland, NE India) ["Pritam Baruah doublebulb AT yahoo.com [orientalbirding]" ]
16 Jan Trip report: Khonoma (Nagaland, NE India) ["Pritam Baruah doublebulb AT yahoo.com [orientalbirding]" ]
16 Jan Highflying Geese Save Energy By Swooping Like A Roller Coaster ["'Mundkur, Taej' Taej.Mundkur AT wetlands.org [orientalbirding]" ]
14 Jan Announcement for AWC 2015 & latest Newsletter ["'Mundkur, Taej' Taej.Mundkur AT wetlands.org [orientalbirding]" ]
7 Jan Asian Waterbird Census 2015 and Newsletter December 2014 ["'Mundkur, Taej' Taej.Mundkur AT wetlands.org [orientalbirding]" ]
12 Jan Sarawak trip for 5 days 17th of Oct anyone? ["Phil Hansbro philip.hansbro AT newcastle.edu.au [orientalbirding]" ]
10 Jan Turquoise-throated Barbet ["Hans Matheve Hans.Matheve AT UGent.be [orientalbirding]" ]
9 Jan FW: Darwin Programme 2015 ["'Mundkur, Taej' Taej.Mundkur AT wetlands.org [orientalbirding]" ]
4 Jan Great Indian Bustard (Ardeotis nigriceps) conservation ["sumit kolkatabird AT yahoo.com [orientalbirding]" ]
03 Jan Spiders catching birds ["spidercatchbird AT yahoo.co.uk [orientalbirding]" ]
2 Jan Re: Re: [Bengalbird:] Re: [DELHIBIRD] South Asia Bird Checklist / IndianBIRDS Website ["Praveen J paintedstork AT gmail.com [orientalbirding]" ]
1 Jan Birding News from eBON, the Newsletter of the Wild Bird Club of the Philippines ["Sylvia Ramos sylviatramos AT yahoo.com [orientalbirding]" ]
29 Dec Re: Re: [Bengalbird:] Re: [DELHIBIRD] South Asia Bird Checklist / IndianBIRDS Website ["Clive Mann clivefmann AT gmail.com [orientalbirding]" ]
29 Dec OBC bird of the day on Twitter ["simonroddis AT yahoo.co.uk [orientalbirding]" ]
29 Dec Re: [Bengalbird:] Re: [DELHIBIRD] South Asia Bird Checklist / IndianBIRDS Website ["Bill Harvey billharve AT gmail.com [orientalbirding]" ]
29 Dec Re: [Bengalbird:] Re: [DELHIBIRD] South Asia Bird Checklist / IndianBIRDS Website ["Mohammed Dilawar dilawarmohammed AT gmail.com [orientalbirding]" ]
28 Dec Re: [DELHIBIRD] South Asia Bird Checklist / IndianBIRDS Website ["Sudhir Vyas vyas.sudhir AT gmail.com [orientalbirding]" ]
28 Dec Re: [DELHIBIRD] South Asia Bird Checklist / IndianBIRDS Website ["Praveen J paintedstork AT gmail.com [orientalbirding]" ]
26 Dec Re: video on Chinese Crested Tern restoration ["Ronald Orenstein ron.orenstein AT rogers.com [orientalbirding]" ]
27 Dec South Asia Bird Checklist / IndianBIRDS Website ["Praveen J paintedstork AT gmail.com [orientalbirding]" ]
26 Dec 返: video on Chinese Crested Tern restoration ["Simba Chan simba.chan AT birdlife.org [orientalbirding]" ]
25 Dec RE: video on Chinese Crested Tern restoration ["'John' burridge AT cox.net [orientalbirding]" ]
25 Dec video on Chinese Crested Tern restoration ["Simba Chan simba.chan AT birdlife.org [orientalbirding]" ]
15 Dec Peninsular Malaysia observations & new accomm Fraser's Hill / 29-30 Nov 2014 ["Remco Hofland cutia2005 AT yahoo.co.uk [orientalbirding]" ]
24 Dec Call for records of Borneo Galliformes ["samuel.ei.jones AT gmail.com [orientalbirding]" ]
23 Dec The 9th ARRCN Symposium 2015, Chumphon, Thailand are calling for abctract ["kaset sutasha kasetvet57 AT yahoo.com [orientalbirding]" ]
22 Dec Little Gull reported from Okhla Bird Sanctuary, Noida, New Delhi, India ["kolkatabird AT yahoo.com [orientalbirding]" ]
22 Dec records of Lesser Crested Terns in South China Sea ["Simba Chan simba.chan AT birdlife.org [orientalbirding]" ]
20 Dec Japanese Paradise Flycatcher ["'James Holmes' jfholmes AT ucdavis.edu [orientalbirding]" ]
20 Dec Spoonbilled Sandpiper ["Ole & Jeff Jakobsen olejeff AT hotmail.com [orientalbirding]" ]
20 Dec Re: Sundarbans oil spill ["'Sayam U. Chowdhury' sayam_uc AT yahoo.com [orientalbirding]" ]
20 Dec Sundarbans oil spill ["Andy Adcock andyadcock AT ntlworld.com [orientalbirding]" ]
18 Dec OBC funds for conservation ["Hock ooichinhock AT gmail.com [orientalbirding]" ]
16 Dec Greater Crested Terns in north-western Pacific ["Simba Chan simba.chan AT birdlife.org [orientalbirding]" ]
16 Dec Baer's Pochard and Chinese Merganser in China ["Simba Chan simba.chan AT birdlife.org [orientalbirding]" ]
15 Dec Sumba & Bali observations / Nov 2014 ["Remco Hofland cutia2005 AT yahoo.co.uk [orientalbirding]" ]
15 Dec Sulawesi observations / Aug 2014 ["Remco Hofland cutia2005 AT yahoo.co.uk [orientalbirding]" ]
15 Dec film about "old magazine house" top destination for birders in karnataka, south india ["David Stanton goabirdingsafari AT gmail.com [orientalbirding]" ]
15 Dec film about "old magazine house" top destination for birders in karnataka, south india ["David Stanton goabirdingsafari AT gmail.com [orientalbirding]" ]
14 Dec The birds of Bharatpur and the babus of Delhi ["Subramanian Sankar subbush AT gmail.com [orientalbirding]" ]
14 Dec RE: Re: Bird flu and industrialized farming ["'David Melville' david.melville AT xtra.co.nz [orientalbirding]" ]
14 Dec Re: Re: Bird flu and industrialized farming ["'norman deans van swelm' Norman.vanswelm AT wxs.nl [orientalbirding]" ]
14 Dec RE: Forktail 30? ["'OBC admin' obc.admin AT virgin.net [orientalbirding]" ]

Subject: Blog:Nepal Birds of Prey Migration Voluntourism 2014
From: "Prathamesh Desai prathamesh4rpaws AT gmail.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 12:20:43 +0530
Dear Members,

If Birds of Prey are your favourite bird species, than you would enjoy this
blog as this blog is all about Raptors and its migration to India. And if
you are interested to know more about this expedition and be a part of it
than write to me on prathamthebirdy AT gmail.com

Please feel free to share with your colleagues and feel free to comment if
you like it.

http://nepalraptorsmigrationvoluntourism.blogspot.in/

-- 
Regards
Prathamesh Desai

(https://www.facebook.com/prathamesh.s.desai)

 Birds of Thane & Raigad District.
 (President and Founder)
(https://www.facebook.com/groups/botrd/)
Subject: The "Rufous-throated White-eye" a.k.a. Madanga is a pipit
From: "Krys Kazmierczak krys AT krys.net [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 05 Mar 2015 13:25:20 +0000
FYI - See:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-31714230

But something wrong with the image on the BBC site, so see

http://orientalbirdimages.org/search.php?Bird_ID=1363

Full paper at:

http://rsos.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/2/3/140364

Correspondence not to me, please

Best regards

Krys
--
Krys Kazmierczak
OB Owner/Moderator
orientalbirding-owner AT yahoogroups.com


------------------------------------
Posted by: Krys Kazmierczak 
------------------------------------

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------------------------------------

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Subject: Re: Sunda Frogmouth
From: "Clive Mann clivefmann AT gmail.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2015 10:24:05 +0000
They were not uncommon around Bandar Seri Begawan in the 1980s, even
nesting in gardens with few trees. The coast road *kerangas* forest west
from Mwara used to have them. You need to find them first at night when
they are calling.

Clive Mann

On 1 March 2015 at 22:15, Mikael Bauer rhabdornis AT yahoo.se
[orientalbirding]  wrote:

>
>
> Hi,
>
> I'm looking for a good site for Sunda Frogmouth in Borneo. I have been
> told they previously occurred rather commonly close to Kota Kinabalu, does
> anybody know if they are still around?
>
> Any chance of finding them in Sungai Wein, Klias or close to Miri?
>
> Cheers,
>
> Mikael
>
>  
>



-- 
Dr C F Mann
Subject: Baikalian Zoological Journal Nr 15 Issue 2 for 2014
From: "Jevgeni Shergalin zoolit2 AT hotmail.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 13:00:04 +0000
There are 9 articles on birds in Baikalian Zoological Journal Nr 2 (15) for 
2014 


http://zmmu.msu.ru/menzbir/publ/BZJ_2_15_2014.pdf

Articles are in Russian but with English summaries.

Jevgeni Shergalin

 
 		 	   		  



    




   

 
  
  
  



     




     

  .


   


 








   		 	   		   		 	   		  
Subject: March 2015 issue of eBON, newsletter of the Wild Bird Club of the Philippines
From: "Sylvia Ramos sylviatramos AT yahoo.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Mar 2015 07:28:29 +0000 (UTC)
Hi Club!
Please check out the eBON website to read our new articles now online!
https://ebonph.wordpress.com/

Here's a a link to the email announcement: http://eepurl.com/bfDMJf
In this month's issue --
Photo of the Month - a TIE! Mindanao Bleeding-heart and Mindanao Wattled 
BroadbillThis month's Photo of the Month is a tie between two 
amazing, palpitation-inducing photos of two Mindanao dream birds taken by 
Robert Hutchinson that were taken on the same day! The Mindanao Bleeding-heart 
because it is a remarkable photo of a a Mindanao endemic that is endangered, 
difficult to see, and rarely photographed in the wild. The Mindanao Wattled 
Broadbill because it is beautiful photo of another Mindanao endemic that is is 
vulnerable, difficult to see, and rarely photographed. 


Green-faced Parrotfinch Explosion in Letran BataanWBCP member Fr. Auckhs 
Enjaynes who is Vice-rector of Letran Bataan was visited by many Manila-based 
WBCP members throughout February after he reported an explosion of 
Green-faced Parrotfinches in the Letran campus! The WBCP group that did the AWC 
in Balanga, Bataan saw 1000 parrotfinches in the campus on 23 January, but 
they held back the announcement of the sighting for a week until Fr. Auckhs's 
schedule opened up and he could accommodate visitors to Letran Bataan. It's a 
good thing the birds were still around and many WBCP members got to see the 
birds. Very little is known about them beyond their habit of showing up 
unexpectedly when bamboo is in bloom.  


A  Short History of Philippine Bird Books - Part 6 American Period Christian 
Perez continues his fascinating series on Philippine bird books. Part 6 covers 
the American Period. The Philippine government goes from having no interest in 
natural science under the Spanish rule to having a Division of Ornithology 
under the Americans! Along with listing which species were discovered during 
this period, Christian also gives us peek back into time where we can 
imagine what it was like to go birding then, when Bleeding-hearts were common 
and Spot-billed Pelicans were abundant. 


Paoay KumakawayPaoay is an attractive destination not only for tourists but 
also for waterbirds. In this year’s Asian Waterbird Census (AWC), counters 
from the Wild Bird Club of the Philippines and DENR recorded 3,500 birds, the 
highest count for Paoay Lake since it was included in the AWC in 2009. 

February 2015 Roundup
February was a festive month for WBCP! Planning for the 10th Philippine Bird 
Festival in Balanga, Bataan has started. A group attended Dia de Aves, a bird 
festival by Zamboanga State College of Marine Sciences and Technology that was 
inspired by the 9th Philippine Bird Festival in Zamboanga. Club members also 
took a group of homeschoolers and their parents birdwatching in LPPCHEA. 




Sylvia

 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 

http://mindingthefarm.wordpress.com/
Subject: Sunda Frogmouth
From: "Mikael Bauer rhabdornis AT yahoo.se [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 22:15:13 +0000 (UTC)
Hi,
I'm looking for a good site for Sunda Frogmouth in Borneo. I have been told 
they previously occurred rather commonly close to Kota Kinabalu, does anybody 
know if they are still around?  

Any chance of finding them in Sungai Wein, Klias or close to Miri?
Cheers,
Mikael
Subject: FW: Swamphen evolution - help requested
From: "'Buckingham, David' david.buckingham AT rspb.org.uk [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 18:37:52 -0000
Dear All,

Please see if you can help this research project on swamphen evolution with 
their request: 


Thanks in advance

Dave Buckingham
OBC Conservation Committee

 
Hi All

OSME have been asked to publicise a request for information on purple 
swamphens. We have just added the following news item to our website 



http://www.osme.org/content/purple-swamphen-request-photos-feathers-tissue-samples 


As the species also occurs in the ABC and OBC regions, you may also wish to 
promote this through your contacts. 


Best wishes to all

Rob Sheldon, OSME

Follow me on Twitter  AT _robsheldon

This email and any attachments may contain material that is confidential, 
subject to copyright and intended for the addressee only. If you are not the 
named recipient you must not use, disclose, reproduce, copy or distribute the 
contents of this communication. If you have received this in error, please 
contact the sender and then delete this email from your system. The Royal 
Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) is a registered charity in England 
and Wales no. 207076 and in Scotland no. SC037654. 




Subject: Birding in Mount Abu, Bikaner, Tal Chhapar and Bera
From: "Aseem Kothiala kothiala AT gmail.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 20:17:37 +0530
Hello Friends,

The brief one week birding (including travel time) was planned with my
birding pals from Mumbai to Tal Chhapar (Churu district) by road . To make
it convenient and less hectic had to take one stop over on the the way
towards the Tal Chhapar sanctuary and one on the way back.

The first location we short listed enroute was Mount Abu to see the Green
Munia and on the way back Bera to sight the illusive leopards. Both Mount
Abu and Bera are mid way from Mumbai to Tal
Chhapar.

Brief trip report :-

http://happysclick.blogspot.in/2015/02/birding-in-rajasthan-western-and-central.html 



These regions definitely need a good guide, which we did not have this time
due to last minute schedules. Hope you enjoy the read.

Best Regards,

*Aseem Kumar Kothiala*

 
Subject: Request for photographs of Tytonidae owls
From: "simonroddis AT yahoo.co.uk [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 26 Feb 2015 12:17:23 -0800
This is posted on behalf of Alexandre Roulin, a professor in Biology at the 
University of Lausanne, Switzerland, requesting photos of the Tytonidae owls. 

 

 
 My name is Alexandre Roulin, a professor in Biology at the University of 
Lausanne, Switzerland. I started working with barn owls in 1987 before going to 
university (1993). In 1997 I did my master thesis on the barn owl and in 1999 
my PhD, again on the barn owl. Since then I always worked on the barn owl 
because this species revealed to be much more interesting than I could have 
expected. So far I wrote 118 papers on the barn owl and my research group is 
entirely dedicated on the study of this bird from several perspectives 
(conservation biology, population genetics, genetics, biogeography, genomics, 
population dynamics, ecophysiology, etc). Our main research focus is on the 
evolution, maintenance and adaptive function of alternative melanin-based color 
morphs as well as on sib-sib vocal communication. To this end, we study a Swiss 
population but also consider other populations located worldwide. 

  
 I am currently working on a book about « barn owls and allies », i.e. barn 
owls, grass owls, masked owls, sooty owls. The main aim of this book is to 
write a review of the studies performed on Tytonidae at the worldwide scale. 
The idea is not to favor my studies but rather to summarize the knowledge 
accumulated by many researchers (I collected >3600 papers on Tytonidae). 
Furthermore, my aim is not to favor studies on barn owls located on the 
northern hemisphere (Europe and USA), as it is usually the case, but rather to 
talk about all worldwide-distributed populations. I indeed started a project 
where I measured 10’000 Tytonidae preserved in natural history museums and 
realized how this group is diverse and interesting. This book should therefore 
interest ornithologists located on all continents (Africa, Asia, Europe, North, 
Central and South America, Oceania). 

  
 The book will deal with the following topics: Conservation - Parasites and 
predation - Physiology in an ecological context - Morphology in an ecological 
context - Foraging - Roost - Sexual behavior - Reproduction - Parental care - 
Sibling interaction - Dispersal - Survival and demography - Moult - Plumage 
color polymorphism. It should be published at Cambridge University Press 
ensuring a large distribution. To illustrate this book, I would like to include 
many pictures of barn owls and allies taken worldwide. The idea is to obtain 
pictures from all continents. Obviously, people who took pictures will get 
credits (name will be indicated). It is very important to obtain pictures from 
all continents to emphasize the importance of studying this group of owls at 
the worldwide scale. 

  
 I thank you very much in advance!
  
 With best regards, 
  
 Alexandre Roulin
 


 Please reply to Roulin Alexandre 
  
Subject: NE India, May 2015
From: "Benjamin Schweinhart bschweinhart AT gmail.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 12:54:28 -0500
I'm going on an unguided, inexpensive trip to Eaglenest Wildlife Sanctuary,
and other sites in NE India, this May. The friend I was planning to travel
with just informed me that he won't be able to go, because he's starting a
new job in April. As such, I'm looking for another birder to join me.

 I'll be spending about two weeks in Eaglenest in early May, and a few days
in Kaziranga before that (late April) and a few days in the Dirang area
(Sela Pass, Mandala Road) afterward.

Email me if you're interested in joining me and I'll send you the details
about the itinerary, costs, etc.

Best,
Ben Schweinhart
Subject: Re: Sumatran Woodpecker
From: "jamesaeaton AT hotmail.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 26 Feb 2015 04:10:43 -0800
Hi Peter, 

 I have seen this just the once, despite putting in significant effort to 
search for it, on Mount Kemiri in the Leuser forest complex, in December 2010. 

 

 I doubt it is that rare, just under-recorded while the vocalisations remain 
unknown, judging by the large number of specimens in Leiden, particularly from 
Kerinci-Seblat National Park, >900m. 

 

 There are other recent records from Leuser and Sibayak (though note Sibayak 
has largely been off-limits for the past year due to volcanic activity). 

 

 Worth noting that the Malaysian race of Grey-faced Woodpecker shares the same 
habitat and plumage features (just lacking the red tones), and remained unseen 
for some time (possibly since the 60s?), but was recently seen, and 
photographed, at a well-watched area of the Cameron Highlands. 

 

 Best of luck,
 

 James
Subject: Re: Sumatran Woodpecker
From: "jamesaeaton AT hotmail.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 26 Feb 2015 04:26:11 -0800
Hi Peter, 

 I have seen this just the once, despite putting in significant effort to 
search for it, on Mount Kemiri in the Leuser forest complex, in December 2010. 

 

 I doubt it is that rare, just under-recorded while the vocalisations remain 
unknown, judging by the large number of specimens in Leiden, particularly from 
Kerinci-Seblat National Park, >900m. 

 

 There are other recent records from Leuser and Sibayak (though note Sibayak 
has largely been off-limits for the past year due to volcanic activity). 

 

 Worth noting that the Malaysian race of Grey-faced Woodpecker shares the same 
habitat and plumage features (just lacking the red tones), and remained unseen 
for some time (possibly since the 60s?), but was recently seen, and 
photographed, at a well-watched area of the Cameron Highlands. 

 

 Best of luck,
 

 James
Subject: RE: Sumatran Woodpecker
From: "christian artuso chartuso AT hotmail.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 20:59:33 +0000
Although not exactly recent, I have fond memories of a sighting of Sumatran 
Woodpecker in April 2001 (I believe 24th April) at Gunong Kerinci. 


Christian Artuso (Manitoba, Canada)
 

 
> To: orientalbirding AT yahoogroups.com
> From: orientalbirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
> Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 14:21:00 +0100
> Subject: [OB] Sumatran Woodpecker
> 
> Hello,
> 
> following recent taxonomic chances, Picus canus is split up in 3 
> species.
> 
> Are there any recent observations of the new species, Sumatran 
> Woodpecker on Gunung Leuser or Gunung Kerinci? Or in other places?
> 
> http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/species/factsheet/22726521 and 
> 
http://www.birdlife.org/globally-threatened-bird-forums/2013/09/grey-faced-woodpecker-picus-canus-is-being-split-list-p-dedemi-as-near-threatened/ 

> 
> Greetings,
> 
> Peter
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------------
> Posted by: Peter Collaerts 
> ------------------------------------
> 
> This group is run in association with the Oriental Bird Club. To find out 
more about the Club and its conservation work, and to become a member, please 
visit www.orientalbirdclub.org 

> ------------------------------------
> 
> Yahoo Groups Links
> 
> 
> 
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Sumatran Woodpecker
From: "Philippe Verbelen filip_verbelen AT yahoo.fr [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 21:31:38 +0000 (UTC)
Hi Peter, 

I observed the Sumatran woodpecker in 1995 along the summit trail at Gunung 
Dempo around 2200 meters. I remember well how shocked I was when I first saw 
that bird;that's the kind of split where you can readily agree ....). 

I may have a tape recording of its call (from Kerinci)which I will try to send 
you.  But apparently it is now a very difficult bird at Kerinci. 


The montane forest at Gunung Dempo probably holds most of the goods birdsfound 
on Kerinci (RB Patridge, Cochoa, Woodcock, BR-T peacock, LB wren babbler, 
schneiders pitta,...)but I am not aware of other birders going there recently. 

 
Philippe Verbelen
 De : "gibbs david david.usia AT blueyonder.co.uk [orientalbirding]" 
 

 À : Peter Collaerts  
Cc : OB  
 Envoyé le : Mercredi 25 février 2015 15h48
 Objet : Re: [OB] Sumatran Woodpecker
   
  Not very recent but I saw one near Berastagi on Sibayak volcano 20 March 
1986 approx here 3.242497, 98.493621 


this was before there was any field guide and the bird had me completely 
flummoxed initially, was very disappointed to conclude that such a superb bird 
was not a tick after all! Taken almost 30 years but finally I can tick it:-) 


Dave Gibbs

On 25 February 2015 at 13:21, Peter Collaerts peter.collaerts AT scarlet.be 
[orientalbirding]  wrote: 


     Hello,

following recent taxonomic chances, Picus canus is split up in 3 
species.

Are there any recent observations of the new species, Sumatran 
Woodpecker on Gunung Leuser or Gunung Kerinci? Or in other places?

http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/species/factsheet/22726521 and 

http://www.birdlife.org/globally-threatened-bird-forums/2013/09/grey-faced-woodpecker-picus-canus-is-being-split-list-p-dedemi-as-near-threatened/ 


Greetings,

Peter

   

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Subject: Re: Sumatran Woodpecker
From: "gibbs david david.usia AT blueyonder.co.uk [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 14:48:57 +0000
Not very recent but I saw one near Berastagi on Sibayak volcano 20 March
1986 approx here 3.242497, 98.493621

this was before there was any field guide and the bird had me completely
flummoxed initially, was very disappointed to conclude that such a superb
bird was not a tick after all! Taken almost 30 years but finally I can tick
it:-)

Dave Gibbs

On 25 February 2015 at 13:21, Peter Collaerts peter.collaerts AT scarlet.be
[orientalbirding]  wrote:

>
>
> Hello,
>
> following recent taxonomic chances, Picus canus is split up in 3
> species.
>
> Are there any recent observations of the new species, Sumatran
> Woodpecker on Gunung Leuser or Gunung Kerinci? Or in other places?
>
> http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/species/factsheet/22726521 and
>
> 
http://www.birdlife.org/globally-threatened-bird-forums/2013/09/grey-faced-woodpecker-picus-canus-is-being-split-list-p-dedemi-as-near-threatened/ 

>
> Greetings,
>
> Peter
>
>  
>
Subject: Re: Sumatran Woodpecker
From: "Chris Gooddie chrisgooddie AT me.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 13:49:41 +0000
Hi Peter,

One negative confirmation re: this new split FYI; there are no known records of 
Grey-faced Woodpecker/Sumatran Woodpecker from the Bukit Barisan Selatan NP in 
SW Sumatra (which includes sites such as Danau Ranau (c1,000-1,700m asl) and 
Way Titias (perhaps rather too low at c850- c1100m asl). 


All the best,




Chris Gooddie

On 25 Feb 2015, at 13:21, Peter Collaerts peter.collaerts AT scarlet.be 
[orientalbirding]  wrote: 


Hello,

following recent taxonomic chances, Picus canus is split up in 3 
species.

Are there any recent observations of the new species, Sumatran 
Woodpecker on Gunung Leuser or Gunung Kerinci? Or in other places?

http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/species/factsheet/22726521 and 

http://www.birdlife.org/globally-threatened-bird-forums/2013/09/grey-faced-woodpecker-picus-canus-is-being-split-list-p-dedemi-as-near-threatened/ 


Greetings,

Peter






------------------------------------
Posted by: Chris Gooddie 
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Subject: Sumatran Woodpecker
From: "Peter Collaerts peter.collaerts AT scarlet.be [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 14:21:00 +0100
Hello,

following recent taxonomic chances, Picus canus is split up in 3 
species.

Are there any recent observations of the new species, Sumatran 
Woodpecker on Gunung Leuser or Gunung Kerinci? Or in other places?

http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/species/factsheet/22726521 and 

http://www.birdlife.org/globally-threatened-bird-forums/2013/09/grey-faced-woodpecker-picus-canus-is-being-split-list-p-dedemi-as-near-threatened/ 


Greetings,

Peter



------------------------------------
Posted by: Peter Collaerts 
------------------------------------

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www.orientalbirdclub.org 

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Subject: The 9 th ARRCN Symposium 2015, Thailand is opening for registration
From: "kaset sutasha kasetvet57 AT yahoo.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 03:48:42 +0000 (UTC)
Sawasdee Colleagues, 

On behalf of Organizing Committee, we would like to invite you all to The 9th 
ARRCN Symposiun 2015, Chumphon, Thailand.  

The registration is now open !!!
http://www.theflywayfoundation.or.th/the_arrcn_registration.html

Don't miss out! Register early and receive the best savings. The deadline for 
Early-bird registration is April 30th, 2015. 

If you have questions or need help, please contact Organizing 
Committee (arrcn.thailand2015 AT gmail.com)   


For further information, please visit
http://www.theflywayfoundation.or.th/the_arrcn.html 
Dr.Kaset Sutasha
Secretary of ARRCN Symposium 2015

Subject: Visiting Enggano Island
From: "Peter Collaerts peter.collaerts AT scarlet.be [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 17 Feb 2015 16:17:48 +0100
Hello,

recently I found on the internet that Susi Air was flying twice a week 
to Enggano. But now I do not find anything about this flight anymore on 
their website. Is there still an airline company that is doing this 
flight? Or is there only the ferry?

Greetings,

Peter



------------------------------------
Posted by: Peter Collaerts 
------------------------------------

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Subject: RE: Asian songbird migrants in trouble
From: "nial moores spoonbill AT hotmail.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 17 Feb 2015 00:13:22 +0000
Dear OBers,

For information on some of the threats to and declines of birds in part of East 
Asia, please download Birds Korea's report, "Status of Birds, 2014": 



http://www.birdskorea.org/Habitats/Yellow-Sea/YSBR/Downloads/Birds-Korea-Status-of-Birds-2014.pdf 


Although focused on Korea, we suspect that as most of our species are migrants 
the methods and results should be of interest to others within the region. 


Best wishes,

Nial Moores PhD (Conservation of Avian Biodiversity)
Birds Korea 

E-mail: Nial.Moores AT birdskorea.org
http://www.birdskorea.org 
http://www.birdskorea.or.kr 
http://www.birdskoreablog.org

Birds Korea: Dedicated to the conservation of birds and their habitats in Korea 
and the wider Yellow Sea Eco-region. 




> To: ron.orenstein AT rogers.com; orientalbirding AT yahoogroups.com; 
malaysianbirders AT yahoogroups.com 

> From: orientalbirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
> Date: Tue, 17 Feb 2015 12:26:23 +1300
> Subject: RE: [OB] Asian songbird migrants in trouble
> 
> The paper can be downloaded at:
> 
> 
http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayFulltext?type=1&fid=9553691&jid=BCI&volumeId=25&issueId=01&aid=9553686 

> 
>  
> 
> David
> 
>  
> 
> From: orientalbirding AT yahoogroups.com 
[mailto:orientalbirding AT yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Ronald Orenstein 
ron.orenstein AT rogers.com [orientalbirding] 

> Sent: 17 February 2015 03:16
> To: Oriental_Birding; malaysianbirders AT yahoogroups.com
> Subject: [OB] Asian songbird migrants in trouble
> 
>  
> 
>   
> 
> Asian songbird migrants in trouble | BirdLife 
 

> 
> 
>  
> 
> 
>  
> 
> 
 
Image removed by sender. image 

> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
> 
> 
 
Asian songbird migrants in trouble | BirdLife 

> 
> Migratory songbirds in East Asia are in trouble, according to new research.
> 
> 	
> 
> 
> 
 
View on www.birdlife.org 

> 
> Preview by Yahoo
> 
> 	
> 
> 
>  
> 
> 								
> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
> Ronald Orenstein
> 1825 Shady Creek Court
> Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
> Canada
> ronorenstein.blogspot.com
> ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------------
> Posted by: "David Melville" 
> ------------------------------------
> 
> This group is run in association with the Oriental Bird Club. To find out 
more about the Club and its conservation work, and to become a member, please 
visit www.orientalbirdclub.org 

> ------------------------------------
> 
> Yahoo Groups Links
> 
> 
> 
 		 	   		  
Subject: RE: Asian songbird migrants in trouble
From: "'David Melville' david.melville AT xtra.co.nz [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 17 Feb 2015 12:26:23 +1300
The paper can be downloaded at:


http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayFulltext?type=1&fid=9553691&jid=BCI&volumeId=25&issueId=01&aid=9553686 


 

David

 

From: orientalbirding AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:orientalbirding AT yahoogroups.com] 
On Behalf Of Ronald Orenstein ron.orenstein AT rogers.com [orientalbirding] 

Sent: 17 February 2015 03:16
To: Oriental_Birding; malaysianbirders AT yahoogroups.com
Subject: [OB] Asian songbird migrants in trouble

 

  

Asian songbird migrants in trouble | BirdLife 
 



 


 

 
 
Image removed by sender. image 


 

 

 

 

 


 
 
Asian songbird migrants in trouble | BirdLife 


Migratory songbirds in East Asia are in trouble, according to new research.

	


 
 
View on www.birdlife.org 


Preview by Yahoo

	


 

								

 

 

Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------
Posted by: "David Melville" 
------------------------------------

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Subject: Re: Asian songbird migrants in trouble
From: "Ronald Orenstein ron.orenstein AT rogers.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 16 Feb 2015 16:40:53 +0000 (UTC)
If you are talking about resident birds I would be astonished if the answer 
were not "yes".  Migrants, however, do not necessarily use the same habitats 
as residents, and may have a broader tolerance to some change 9as they live in 
a variety of habits along their migratory route anyway).  For migrant 
flycatchers etc in countries like Malaysia the loss of highland habitat to tea 
plantations (eg in the Cameron Highlands) might also be a fsactor. 

I have not yet read the paper on which the article is based.
 Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
      From: John 
 To: 'Ronald Orenstein' ; 'Oriental_Birding' 
; malaysianbirders AT yahoogroups.com 

 Sent: Monday, February 16, 2015 9:28 AM
 Subject: RE: [OB] Asian songbird migrants in trouble
   
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{margin-bottom:0in;}#yiv8021009994 Thanks for this article, Dr. Orenstein. 
 Although not specifically mentioned, I am wondering if loss of habitat due to 
forest and jungle clearing for palm oil is as much of a factor for birds as it 
has been for mammals, notably the orangutan and Sumatran tiger.  John 
BurridgePO Box 14444East Providence, Rhode Island 
02914-0444USAbirder AT tricolour.queensu.ca   


From: orientalbirding AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:orientalbirding AT yahoogroups.com] 
On Behalf Of Ronald Orenstein ron.orenstein AT rogers.com [orientalbirding] 

Sent: Monday, February 16, 2015 9:16 AM
To: Oriental_Birding; malaysianbirders AT yahoogroups.com
Subject: [OB] Asian songbird migrants in trouble    Asian songbird migrants 
in trouble | BirdLife 

|   |
|   |  |   |   |   |   |   |
| Asian songbird migrants in trouble | BirdLifeMigratory songbirds in East Asia 
are in trouble, according to new research. | 

|  |
| View on www.birdlife.org | Preview by Yahoo |
|  |
|   |
|  |  |  |  |  |  |  |  |

  Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com

  
Subject: RE: Asian songbird migrants in trouble
From: "'John' burridge AT cox.net [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 16 Feb 2015 09:28:24 -0500
Thanks for this article, Dr. Orenstein. 

 

Although not specifically mentioned, I am wondering if loss of habitat due to 
forest and jungle clearing for palm oil is as much of a factor for birds as it 
has been for mammals, notably the orangutan and Sumatran tiger. 


 

John Burridge

PO Box 14444

East Providence, Rhode Island 02914-0444

USA

birder AT tricolour.queensu.ca

 

From: orientalbirding AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:orientalbirding AT yahoogroups.com] 
On Behalf Of Ronald Orenstein ron.orenstein AT rogers.com [orientalbirding] 

Sent: Monday, February 16, 2015 9:16 AM
To: Oriental_Birding; malaysianbirders AT yahoogroups.com
Subject: [OB] Asian songbird migrants in trouble

 

  

Asian songbird migrants in trouble | BirdLife 
 



 


 

 
 
image 


 

 

 

 

 


 
 
Asian songbird migrants in trouble | BirdLife 


Migratory songbirds in East Asia are in trouble, according to new research.

	


 
 
View on www.birdlife.org 


Preview by Yahoo

	


 

								

 

 

Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com


Subject: Asian songbird migrants in trouble
From: "Ronald Orenstein ron.orenstein AT rogers.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 16 Feb 2015 14:15:46 +0000 (UTC)
Asian songbird migrants in trouble | BirdLife
|   |
|   |  |   |   |   |   |   |
| Asian songbird migrants in trouble | BirdLifeMigratory songbirds in East Asia 
are in trouble, according to new research. | 

|  |
| View on www.birdlife.org | Preview by Yahoo |
|  |
|   |

   Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
Subject: Re: Digest Number 4512
From: "Aasheesh Pittie aasheesh.pittie AT gmail.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 16 Feb 2015 14:22:57 +0530
Dear Andrew Pierce,

Thank you for pointing out this anomaly. Actually, they do have a publication 
year. Let me look into this. Will revert once it is rectified. 



Best wishes and regards!

Aasheesh Pittie
Office: 2nd Flr, 'BBR Forum,' Rd 2, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad 500034, India.
Phones: Mobile: 91 9966702121 / Office: 91 40 23606281 / Fax: 91 40 23606283 / 
Res. (TelFax): 91 40 23556068. 

aasheesh.pittie AT gmail.com 
www.aasheeshpittie.in 
http://aasheeshpittie.blogspot.com/ 
www.southasiaornith.in 
"Quot libros, quam breve tempus."
[So many books, so little time.]

Confidentiality Notice: This email is confidential and may also be privileged. 
You should not copy the email or disclose its contents to any other person as 
it is solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom it is addressed. 
If you have received this message in error, please contact the sender on + 91 
40 23556068 and delete this message from your computer. Internet communications 
cannot be guaranteed to be timely, secure, error- or virus-free. General 
Statement: Any statements made, or intentions expressed in this communication 
may not necessarily reflect the view of Aasheesh Pittie. Be advised that no 
content herein may be held binding upon Aasheesh Pittie or any associate or any 
associated companies unless confirmed by the issuance of a formal contractual 
document. 


Help save paper - do you need to print this email?

On 16-Feb-2015, at 1:11 pm, andrew pierce andyjpierce AT yahoo.com 
[orientalbirding]  wrote: 



Dear  Aasheesh Pittie


On doing a search through the bibliography I found that many references are 
undated (14/20 of the search I did). This otherwise usefull source of 
references would be greatly enhanced if such dates were included. 


For instance all of A. O. Hume's references (including year published) can be 
downloaded as a PDF from the OBC site: 


http://orientalbirdclub.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/HumeAppendixD.pdf 

regards
 
Andrew Pierce


From: "orientalbirding AT yahoogroups.com" 
To: orientalbirding AT yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Tuesday, February 10, 2015 7:37 PM
Subject: [OB] Digest Number 4512

 
 
OrientalBirding - A mailing list for all who are interested in wild birds, 
birding and conservation in the Oriental region. Group 
 

1 Message              Digest #4512      
 1Bibliography of South 
Asian ornithology 
by "Aasheesh 
Pittie" ashpittie 

Message
1Bibliography of South Asian ornithology 
 

Tue Feb 10, 2015 2:33 am (PST) . Posted by: "Aasheesh Pittie" ashpittie 
 

Dear Friend,

I am happy to announce that the Bibliography of South Asian ornithology 
[www.southasiaornith.in ] is now searchable 
with an additional field to help you fine tune your searches. Do give it a try, 
and send me your suggestions for improvement. 


I would like to place on record my grateful appreciation to Tarique Sani and 
his organisation, SaniSoft for making this possible, and to Suhel Quader for 
his constant support. 


My sincerely apologies for cross postings.

Best wishes and regards!

Aasheesh Pittie
Office: 2nd Flr, 'BBR Forum,' Rd 2, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad 500034, India.
Phones: Mobile: 91 9966702121 / Office: 91 40 23606281 / Fax: 91 40 23606283 / 
Res. (TelFax): 91 40 23556068. 

aasheesh.pittie AT gmail.com 
www.aasheeshpittie.in 
http://aasheeshpittie.blogspot.com/ 
www.southasiaornith.in 
"Quot libros, quam breve tempus."
[So many books, so little time.]

Confidentiality Notice: This email is confidential and may also be privileged. 
You should not copy the email or disclose its contents to any other person as 
it is solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom it is addressed. 
If you have received this message in error, please contact the sender on + 91 
40 23556068 and delete this message from your computer. Internet communications 
cannot be guaranteed to be timely, secure, error- or virus-free. General 
Statement: Any statements made, or intentions expressed in this communication 
may not necessarily reflect the view of Aasheesh Pittie. Be advised that no 
content herein may be held binding upon Aasheesh Pittie or any associate or any 
associated companies unless confirmed by the issuance of a formal contractual 
document. 


Help save paper - do you need to print this email?

Reply to sender 
. 
Reply to group 
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Reply via Web Post 
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All Messages (1) 
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Top ^  

This group is run in association with the Oriental Bird Club. To find out more 
about the Club and its conservation work, and to become a member, please visit 
www.orientalbirdclub.org 

VISIT YOUR GROUP 
 

 
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Subject: New NE Tibet images on OBI - not to be missed!
From: "'Jesper Hornskov' goodbirdmail AT gmail.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 16 Feb 2015 10:24:18 +0800
Dear [OB]ers,

 

Anyone still unconvinced that Oriental Bird Club's NE Tibet Fundraiser trips
offer, among so many other things, an excellent opportunity to photograph
some very special birds adapted to a unique environment?

 

Even if you DON'T need further convincing, please take a look at Paul Jones'
newly uploaded series from the June/July 2014 trip at

 

http://orientalbirdimages.org/photographers.php?action=birdercontrib
 &Birder_ID=1279

 

Good birding!

 

Jesper Hornskov / 

Beijing.

 
Subject: Re: Digest Number 4512
From: "andrew pierce andyjpierce AT yahoo.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 16 Feb 2015 07:41:40 +0000 (UTC)
Dear  Aasheesh Pittie

On doing a search through the bibliography I found that many references are 
undated (14/20 of the search I did). This otherwise usefull source of 
references would be greatly enhanced if such dates were included. 


For instance all of A. O. Hume's references (including year published) can be 
downloaded as a PDF from the OBC site: 


http://orientalbirdclub.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/HumeAppendixD.pdf 
regards Andrew Pierce


      From: "orientalbirding AT yahoogroups.com" 
 To: orientalbirding AT yahoogroups.com 
 Sent: Tuesday, February 10, 2015 7:37 PM
 Subject: [OB] Digest Number 4512
   
[an error occurred while processing this directive]

Subject: Fraser's Hill International Bird Race 23-24 May 2015
From: "'Bee Choo' msnbc AT singnet.com.sg [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 15 Feb 2015 15:17:36 +0800

Calling all Oriental region birders

This year the Fraser's Hill International Bird Race takes place during the 
weekend 23 to 24 May 2015. Please note that the timing is May (not June as in 
previous years due to a Malay holiday). Anything that might still be out there 
on Tourism Malaysia websites is wrong! 


Fraser's Hill is renowned as a biodiversity hotspot for more than 257 confirmed 
species of birds plus an additional 55 additional unconfirmed. There is also a 
wealth of insects, reptiles and mammals still to be fully catalogued. Even if 
the bird-race format as such does not appeal to you, please support this annual 
event where apart from the race itself, birders and photographers can also 
enjoy wildlife seminars, workshops and exhibitions. It REALLY makes a 
difference to the managers of this time capsule oasis when foreigners turn up! 
Next to Taman Negara it is the best nature site in Peninsular Malaysia and we 
hope it stays that way, but the pressue from 'development' forces is there as 
well, so each year is a struggle! Sign up by contacting the main organizer Moni 
Ismail at moniismail AT yahoo.com . There is more information available at 
http://www.pahang-delights.com/frasers-hill-international-bird-race.html. 


Thank you for your support

Morten & Bee Choo
Singapore


---
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection 
is active. 

http://www.avast.com
Subject: Phone contact for Richard Foster
From: "Dave Sargeant akalat AT gmail.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 14 Feb 2015 20:46:03 +0700
I am looking for the local phone contact for Richard Foster in Taiwan. If
anyone has, please can they contact me by private message.

Many thanks
dave

-- 
Dave Sargeant
Chiang Mai
Thailand
www.NorthThailandBirding.com
Subject: Java coasts, mangroves and waterbirds
From: "'Mundkur, Taej' Taej.Mundkur AT wetlands.org [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 11 Feb 2015 11:43:01 +0000
Dear all,

The north coast of Java suffers from a huge problem of eroding coastlines and 
loss of mangrove after years of conversion of the land for fish/shrimp farming. 
This is negatively affecting the lives of coastal communities in the region who 
are suffering from loss of livelihoods, lack of drinking water, loss of 
agricultural lands, etc. The loss of rich intertidal habitat is also leading to 
loss of important habitat for migratory and resident waterbirds and other 
biodiversity. 


Wanted to share some work in which Wetlands International has been involved 
that aims to deal with the issue through ecofriendly methods. The first results 
are very encouraging and are being upscaled through active leadership and 
support of local government. 


Do check out the film on

http://www.wetlands.org/WatchRead/Currentpublications/tabid/56/mod/1570/articleType/ArticleView/articleId/3686/Default.aspx 

Best wishes,
Taej Mundkur
Subject: Birding News from the Wild Bird Club of the Philippines
From: "Sylvia Ramos sylviatramos AT yahoo.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Feb 2015 03:47:54 +0000 (UTC)


  

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|  
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| eBON - online newsletter of the Wild Bird Club of the Philippines - August 
2014 issue | 


 
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Dear Friends,

The eBON website has a new look! It's now easier to browse through the site and 
find articles . Check it out at https://ebonph.wordpress.com/   


I hope you enjoy the February issue of eBON.

Happy Birding!

Sylvia
eBON Editor
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|  Baer's Pochard in the Last Pond in Candaba, Pampanga 

Robert Hutchinson, Irene Dy, and Martin Kennewell scored big for Philippine 
birding with this MEGA find -- a Baer's Pochard in Candaba! The Baer's Pochard 
is one of the rarest ducks in Asia. This bird is so rare that in February 2012 
a British birder flew from the UK to Japan just to see one. There are only 3 
records of Baer's Pochard in the Philippines a pair at Candaba Marsh on 4 
March 1979, a male in Ninoy Aquino Park Lake, Quezon City on November 1999, and 
a male in Bislig, Mindanao on 19 February 2003.  This is a great opportunity 
to see an extremely rare bird. Yet the thrill of seeing a rare bird  is 
shadowed by the sight of the very pond it is resting in being tilled!  How 
ominous is it that the day one of the Asia's rarest ducks shows up in 
Candaba is also the day that that the last remaining pond at Candaba starts 
getting converted into a rice field? Tonji Ramos reports on the Baer's Pochard 
at Candaba. 

   |

  |


| 
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|  A Short History of Philippine Bird Books - Part 5 1881 to 1899

Christian Perez continues his series on the history of Philippine bird books. 
In Part 5, he sheds light on questions that have puzzled many birders such 
as: Why is the Mountain Leaf Warbler now called Negros Leaf Warbler? Who is 
this Jeffrey that the Philippine Eagle is named after? Why are there no 
Filipino ornithologists? How did the Spanish rule affect birding in the 
Philippines? 

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|  Photo of the Month - Saunders's Gull

The Philippines’s best bird photographer is on a roll! This is Romy Ocon’s 
second country record for 2015! His first one was an Amur Falcon in January 
2015, and his follow up is a Saunders’s Gull! 

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|  Birding Destination: Camp John Hay

Many people go to Baguio for its cool mountain air, pine trees, and familiar 
tourist sites like Camp John Hay. Maia and Jops share another side of Baguio, 
its birdy side! Who would have thought that there are Siberian Rubythroats and 
Mugimaki Flycatchers right inside Camp John Hay? Not to mention the good 
looking regulars like the Turquoise Flycatcher, Blue-headed 
Fantail, Scale-feathered Malkoha, and more! 


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|  January 2015 Roundup

Various WBCP members took part in the WBCP activities for January 2015. They 
went birding with a Finnish visitor, launched the Birds of Anvaya guidebook, 
celebrated with a New Year's party, went all over the country to count birds 
for the Asian Waterbird Census, came out in an ABC CBN News feature on 
migratory birds, and met with the UP Vice Chancellor regarding biodiversity 
protection. And the Records Committee was busy as ever working on the country's 
only database of Philippine birds. | 


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 eBON - Wild Bird Club of the Philippines online newsletter · Muntinlupa · 
Metro Manila 1780 · Philippines 

 
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Subject: Birding in Indonesia - burung-nusantara.org
From: "'Nick Brickle' nick AT brickle.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2015 13:13:06 +0100
Hi all

 

For anyone with an interest in birding in Indonesia, you may have come
across, even used, the website http://burung-nusantara.org  

 

Amongst other things, the site tries to maintain information on visiting
some of the best birding sites in the country. 

 

Regular or first time visitors to the site may notice a couple of things:

 

.         The site is quite prone to being hacked, and as a result, breaking
down! (annoying, but hard to avoid!)

 

.         Times change, places change, and some of the information about the
state of birding locations and access to them becomes out of date.

 

The Burung Nusantara site is run on a non-profit basis, by a very small
number of volunteers, with no affiliation or motive other than to promote
birding and bird conservation in Indonesia. As a result, we are always
looking for help! The easiest ways to do this are.

 

.         If anyone ever spots that the site is broken - can you send a
quick email to info AT burung-nusantara.org (we check this every day, but we
don't check the website itself daily.)

 

.         If anyone visits a birding site, and finds things not as they are
described, please take the time to let everyone know. The easiest way to do
this is to simply post a comment against the relevant site. Even better,
copy out the text you think is out-of-date, edit it to reflect the current
situation, and then post the revision to the email address above. We can
then edit the page itself.

 

For those of you with even more interest, we are always open to adding more
sites and more features to the website, and welcome any volunteers to help
run it! 

 

Thanks

 

Nick Brickle, on behalf of Burung Nusantara!

 

 
Subject: Trip report: Namsang Road (Joypur RF, Dehing-Patkai WLS, Assam, India)
From: "Pritam Baruah doublebulb AT yahoo.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015 14:49:35 +0000 (UTC)
A rather brief report on a good day of winter birding in Joypur RF of 
Dehing-Patkai Wildlife Sanctuary over four years ago. The Upper Assam wet 
tropical forests are considered to be the northernmost lowland rainforests in 
the world. Being at the juncture of two biodiversity hotspots (Eastern 
Himalayas & Indo-Burma), the bird diversity here is very high. Single day 
totals even in the forest interior will easily cross 100 species. The annotated 
trip list was written soon after the day-visit in Dec 2010 and I’ve always 
wanted to publish a small report around it but somehow it never happened until 
now. Anyway I finally wrote it. Just a few highlights & link below: 

Pied Falconet
Grey Peacock Pheasant
Austen's Brown Hornbill
Great Hornbill
Blue-eared Barbet
Pale-headed Woodpecker
Long-tailed Broadbill
Silver-breasted Broadbill
Lesser Shortwing
Rusty-bellied Shortwing
White-tailed Blue Robin
White-hooded Babbler
Spot-throated Babbler
Rufous-throated Fulvetta
Grey-crowned Warbler
Yellow-vented Warbler
Sultan Tit

http://www.cloudbirders.com/tripreport/repository/BARUAH_IndiaNamsang_12_2010.pdf 

Enjoy!
Pritam.
Subject: Re: Trip report: Khonoma (Nagaland, NE India)
From: "Pritam Baruah doublebulb AT yahoo.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 2015 10:55:09 +0000 (UTC)
Apologies! Corrected link below:
http://www.cloudbirders.com/tripreport/repository/BARUAH_India_01_2015.pdf
~Pritam.

 
      From: Pritam Baruah 
 To: "orientalbirding AT yahoogroups.com"  
 Sent: Friday, January 16, 2015 4:22 PM
 Subject: Trip report: Khonoma (Nagaland, NE India)
   
Just got done with a 4 day trip to Khonoma in Nagaland (North East 
India) (including drive from/to Guwahati so effectively 3 days of birding). 
Saw some great regional specialties: Brown-capped, Spot-breasted, Assam, 
Striped Laughingthrushes, Blue-naped Pitta, Naga Wren Babbler, Mountain Bamboo 
Partridge, Grey-headed Parakeet, Spot-breasted Scimitar Babbler, Rusty-capped 
Fulvetta, Grey-sided Thrush, Grey Sibia, Long-billed Thrush, Chestnut-vented 
Nuthatch, Eurasian Woodcock. Total 96 species were recorded. Detailed trip 
report with maps, pictures, daily log & annotated trip list in the link below: 

http://www.cloudbirders.com/…/repo…/BARUAH_India_01_2015.pdf
Enjoy,Pritam.




   
Subject: Trip report: Khonoma (Nagaland, NE India)
From: "Pritam Baruah doublebulb AT yahoo.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 2015 10:52:45 +0000 (UTC)
Just got done with a 4 day trip to Khonoma in Nagaland (North East 
India) (including drive from/to Guwahati so effectively 3 days of birding). 
Saw some great regional specialties: Brown-capped, Spot-breasted, Assam, 
Striped Laughingthrushes, Blue-naped Pitta, Naga Wren Babbler, Mountain Bamboo 
Partridge, Grey-headed Parakeet, Spot-breasted Scimitar Babbler, Rusty-capped 
Fulvetta, Grey-sided Thrush, Grey Sibia, Long-billed Thrush, Chestnut-vented 
Nuthatch, Eurasian Woodcock. Total 96 species were recorded. Detailed trip 
report with maps, pictures, daily log & annotated trip list in the link below: 

http://www.cloudbirders.com/…/repo…/BARUAH_India_01_2015.pdf
Enjoy,Pritam.
Subject: Highflying Geese Save Energy By Swooping Like A Roller Coaster
From: "'Mundkur, Taej' Taej.Mundkur AT wetlands.org [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 2015 09:09:22 +0100
Dear all,

An interesting article Highflying Geese Save Energy By Swooping Like A Roller 
Coaster http://n.pr/1x389BN 


Best regards, Taej Mundkur
Subject: Announcement for AWC 2015 & latest Newsletter
From: "'Mundkur, Taej' Taej.Mundkur AT wetlands.org [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 14 Jan 2015 00:01:57 +0100
Dear all,

It appears that my message of 7 Jan was returned with a spam message and so it 
is possible that you did not get it before (for some reason it even ended in my 
spam folder). So, I have updated it and forward below. 

For your information, we are already receiving feedback of counts across the 
region. Good luck with the counts and we look forward to receiving the 
information. 


Best regards, Taej Mundkur

From: orientalbirding AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:orientalbirding AT yahoogroups.com] 
On Behalf Of 'Mundkur, Taej' Taej.Mundkur AT wetlands.org [orientalbirding] 

Sent: 07 January 2015 19:03 To: 
orientalbirding AT yahoogroups.com 
Subject: ***** [OB] Asian Waterbird Census 2015 and Newsletter December 2014 



Dear all,

In advance of the annual Asian Waterbird Census counts of January 2015, kindly 
find the latest newsletter; download http://goo.gl/m6ryH3 


The recommended dates for the AWC 2015 counts are from this Saturday 10 to 
Sunday 25, January covering 2 weeks and three weekends, when we should 
encourage you to count waterbirds. To read more check out the newsletter below 
and on the AWC website 
www.wetlandsorg/awc>. 


Should you wish to directly subscribe to the Newsletter, clink the link at the 
very top left of the newsletter. 


We wish you all a successful survey for 2015!

With best regards, Taej

Taej Mundkur, Ph.D.
Programme Manager – Flyways
&
AWC Regional Coordinator
Wetlands International
P.O. Box 471, 6700AL Wageningen, The Netherlands
Tel: +31318660910
Mobile: +31614987324
Skype: taejmundkur

www.wetlands.org> 
Subject: Asian Waterbird Census 2015 and Newsletter December 2014
From: "'Mundkur, Taej' Taej.Mundkur AT wetlands.org [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 7 Jan 2015 19:02:55 +0100
Dear all,

In advance of the annual Asian Waterbird Census counts of January 2015, kindly 
find the latest newsletter. 


The recommended dates for the AWC 2015 counts are from this Saturday 10 to 
Sunday 25, January covering 2 weeks and three weekends, when we should 
encourage you to count waterbirds. To read more check out the newsletter below 
and on the AWC website www.wetlandsorg/awc. 


If for any reason, you are unable to access the newsletter below, copy and 
paste the following link in your browser 


http://us3.campaign-archive1.com/?u=a127e9541acd4f9edde804369&id=b5f819696a&e=421f7a95da 


Should you wish to subscribe to the Newsletter, clink the link at the very top 
left of the newsletter. 


We wish you all a successful survey for 2015!

With best regards, Taej

Taej Mundkur, Ph.D.
Programme Manager – Flyways
&
AWC Regional Coordinator
Wetlands International
P.O. Box 471, 6700AL Wageningen, The Netherlands
Tel: +31318660910
Mobile: +31614987324
Skype: taejmundkur
www.wetlands.org

[cid:image001.jpg AT 01D02AAC.8B2F9FC0] 
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"We safeguard and restore wetlands for people and nature"

Asian Waterbird Census website



From: Wetlands International [mailto:awc=wetlands.org AT mail203.atl81.rsgsv.net] 
On Behalf Of Wetlands International Sent: 07 January 2015 16:59 

Subject: Asian Waterbird Census Newsletter December 2014

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Asian Waterbird Census

December 2014 (issue 20)







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Contents



Asian Waterbird Census 2015

Species of interest

Taxonomy update

Goose specialist group meeting


Waterbird conservation in the EAAF

CMP COP 11

Balanga City festival

Avian influenza update






Dear reader,

With many of you busy preparing for the Asian Waterbird Census counts in 
January 2015, now is a timely moment to look back over the past year and ahead 
to the next. With the continued help of national coordinators and participants, 
we have made some progress in filling important data gaps from 2008 to present 
– 23 countries have now sent us counts for this period. We have also been 
busy developing new tools to help support quicker and easier data collection in 
the future. We are developing an online database to accommodate the AWC data 
and have trialled a new excel form in India to help participants and state 
coordinators transfer data from paper forms more easily. We will expand this 
data entry trial to Bhutan, who will join the census for the first time in 
2015. This will provide new and valuable information for the census, though we 
are aware there are still important gaps to fill in the region and we will be 
looking to strengthen monitoring in these areas for the future. 


Next year will also see an update of the Waterbird Population Estimates, a 
major policy document for which the International Waterbird Census remains a 
key source of information. We hope especially to improve the number of 
populations in Asia with reliable trends and estimates - especially since the 
population estimates of a number of species are outdated and some are changing 
(mainly declining rapidly). 


As ever (and as national coordinators are well aware!) securing long-term and 
sustainable funding for the census will be a priority for next year. We are 
especially grateful for the continued support of the Wetlands International 
Members, whose contributions provide a crucial foundation for the coordination 
and data management for the entire IWC. We are also very grateful for the many 
hours put in by national coordinators and their networks of counters to collect 
and collate waterbird counts. 


We wish you all a successful survey for 2015!

Taej Mundkur
Tom Langendoen

Return to top






Asian Waterbird Census - Jan 2015
The recommended dates for the AWC 2015 counts are Saturday 10 to Sunday 25, 
January 2015, covering 2 weeks and three weekends, when we should encourage you 
to count waterbirds. These dates are for guidance only and counts from any date 
in January are very welcome. 


Kindly use the appropriate AWC Site and Count forms to report your observations 
and provide these through your national coordinators. In India, kindly submit 
your count information to your state coordinators. 

For more information…
Check out 
www.wetlands.org/AWC. 
For all AWC communication, kindly use 
awc AT wetlands.org. 


Return to top






Species of interest for 2015

For the 2015 AWC, we would like to encourage special attention on a few 
species: 


Eurasian Oystercatcher Haematopus ostralegus – two subspecies occur in the 
region longipes (largely in South Asia eastwards to the Malay Peninsula) and 
osculans (mainly in China, Korean peninsula and Japan during the northern 
winter – with few observations from Southeast Asia). The eastern subspecies 
osculans (often called the Far Eastern Oystercatcher) has been considered a 
contender for the Near threatened IUCN category due to its rapidly declining 
status. 


The distribution and status of these two subspecies, particularly in the Bay of 
Bengal and Southeast Asia is not clear and more information is being sought. 


Separating the two subspecies in the field is relatively easy. The adult 
non-breeding and immature longipes both have a distinct white fore-collar, a 
duller red bill and bill tip. The eye-ring of the adult is scarlet. The adult 
non-breeding osculans lack the fore-collar as do most immatures. However, some 
immature osculans show a faint fore-collar, and especially in the most 
strongly-marked birds a small white chin spot. The bill of osculans remains 
bright orange throughout the year, with only the distal third washed browner in 
immatures, and in adults a slightly duller tip in the non-breeding season and a 
yellowish tip in the breeding season. Also, osculans has an orange eye-ring. 


We would like to encourage participants to pay particular attention to 
reporting on the species and in your notes on your count forms to clarify the 
subspecies with observed features. 


Bean Goose Anser fabalis middendorffi and serrirostris - in East Asia, two 
distinct subspecies occur and increasingly are being identified based on their 
bill colour differences and reported separately. The middendorfii is a larger 
bird with a long body and bill; while serrirostris has a short body, neck and a 
particularly short and thick bill. We encourage reporting on the two subspecies 
and in your notes on your count forms to clarify the subspecies with observed 
features. 


Pallas's Fish-eagle Haliaeetus leucoryphus a globally vulnerable species with a 
limited distribution in Asia is believed to be declining. The key breeding 
range countries are Nepal, India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, but any data (presence 
or absence) would also be valuable from Myanmar, China, Bhutan, Iran and 
Afghanistan. This raptor is closely associated with wetlands and has been 
covered during the AWC. We encourage continued reporting of this species during 
the census. 


If any observations are made outside the main AWC period, these observation are 
also worth reporting to awc AT wetlands.org 







Species taxonomy update

As many of you will be aware, the Handbook of the Birds of the World and 
BirdLife International Illustrated Checklist of the Birds of the World Volume 
1: 
Non-passerines, 
that was published in July 2014 is fast gaining the interest of people 
worldwide and is now being accepted as the latest taxonomic reference. This 
brings with it the latest information on species and subspecies. In November it 
was adopted as the standard reference for bird taxonomy and nomenclature for 
non-passerine species by the Convention on Migratory Species (CMS) at its 
eleventh meeting of the Conference of the Parties in Quito, Ecuador. Those 
interested in the new taxonomy, may download it from the BirdLife International 
website 
http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/info/taxonomy 


Wetlands International aims to adopt this new taxonomy as a standard and in 
2015 would be bring our International Waterbird Census and Waterbird Population 
Estimate databases in line with this new standard. We foresee this will require 
updating and standardising of the AWC count forms used in the different 
countries. Linked to this, we also plan to review the information being 
collected on wetland condition, uses and threats. We will be communication with 
national coordinators and participants in mid 2015 to enable us to plan the 
process in the best way possible. 







16th Goose Specialist Group meeting held in China

In November the 16th meeting of the Goose Specialist Group was held in Beijing, 
China. Over two and a half days a number of presentations were given, focusing 
on recent advances in goose research and conservation. This included a 
presentation by Lu Yong from Wetlands International China on strengthening the 
monitoring of geese and other waterbirds in the East Asian-Australasian and 
Central Asian Flyways. With apparent declines in many waterbird populations and 
a paucity of data, the Asian Waterbird Census remains a crucial source of 
information for many populations, and strengthening the census will be one of 
our top priorities in the coming years. 





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For more information…

Much more information about the meeting will be available from the Goose 
Specialist Group 
website. 
The presentation made by Wetlands International is available 
here. 


Return to top






Strengthening migratory waterbird conservation in East Asian-Australasian 
Flyway region 


The 8th Meeting of Partners (MOP8) of the East-Asian Australasian Flyway 
Partnership will take place in Kushiro City, kindly hosted by the Ministry of 
Environment, Japan, and Kushiro City, during 16–21 January 2015. The AWC 
serves as an key programme to support the monitoring of waterbirds at network 
and other important sites for the Partnership, and ways to improve this are to 
be discussed here. 


For more information…

See the EAAF partnership 
website 
and see our 
report 
submitted to the meeting 


Return to top






CMP COP11 leads the way for promoting conservation of migratory birds globally
The UNEP Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals at 
its 11th Meeting of Parties in Ecuador, in early November passed several 
resolutions for the conservation of migratory waterbirds and to deal with major 
threats (e.g. poisoning and illegal harvest). 


Importantly, for the first time, a global "Programme of Work on Migratory Birds 
and Flyways - 2014-2023" (POW-MBF) was endorsed as a means of prioritising 
global action along major flyways, including the East Asian-Australasian and 
Central Asian flyways. The POW-MBF identifies the importance of designating and 
improving management of critically and internationally important sites; 
understanding the ecological functionality of flyways through research of 
migratory birds and their habitats; strengthening monitoring programmes; and 
promoting the conservation of migratory birds and ensuring any use of migratory 
birds is sustainable. In addition, it calls for strengthening national and 
local capacity for flyway conservation including, by developing partnerships 
with key stakeholders and organizing training courses. 


For more information…

The Programme of Work is available 
here. 


Return to top






Balanga City welcomes migratory birds!

Balanga City wetland and Nature park in the Philippines is a major stop-over 
and wintering site for migratory birds, with many tens of thousands counted 
regularly. Every December a festival is held to celebrate the arrival of these 
visitors, with numerous events for locals and tourists alike. So if you are in 
the area next December, do check it out! 


For more information…

Click 
here 
for an article about this year's festival. 


Return to top






Waterbirds affected by new strain of Highly Pathogenic Avian influenza virus

Over the last few months there has been an increasing number of wild waterbird 
species found to be affected by Highly Pathogenic Avian influenza (HPAI) virus 
subtype H5N8 in East Asia (Japan and South Korea) and recently detected in 
Europe (Germany, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom). There is concern that 
migratory waterbirds may be responsible for the transmission of the virus from 
Asia to Europe during the last southward migration, although there is little 
evidence to demonstrate this. The UN Scientific Task Force on Avian Influenza 
and Wild Birds have issued a statement on H5N8 in poultry and wild birds, that 
provides useful information on the rapidly changing situation. 


For more information…

Click 
here 


Return to top






Further reading

Conservation status of Oystercatchers around the 
world, 
edited by Bruno J. Ens and Les G. Underhill, (International Wader Studies Group 
#20) 





Announcements

8th Meeting of Partners of the East-Asian Australasian Flyway 
Partnership 


12th meeting of the Ramsar Conference of the Contracting Parties (COP12), 
Uruguay, 1-9 June 
2015. 









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------------------------------------
Posted by: "Mundkur, Taej" 
------------------------------------

This group is run in association with the Oriental Bird Club. To find out more 
about the Club and its conservation work, and to become a member, please visit 
www.orientalbirdclub.org 

------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orientalbirding/

<*> Your email settings:
    Individual Email | Traditional

<*> To change settings online go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orientalbirding/join
    (Yahoo! ID required)

<*> To change settings via email:
    orientalbirding-digest AT yahoogroups.com 
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<*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
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<*> Your use of Yahoo Groups is subject to:
    https://info.yahoo.com/legal/us/yahoo/utos/terms/
Subject: Sarawak trip for 5 days 17th of Oct anyone?
From: "Phil Hansbro philip.hansbro AT newcastle.edu.au [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 12 Jan 2015 09:23:58 +0000
Hi all

I am planning a trip to Sarawak for Frogmouths, Black Oriole etc. Will have 
expert guides etc. 


Please contact me offline if you are interested in joining me on a cost share 
basis. 


Thanks very much
Phil.

------------------------------------
Posted by: Phil Hansbro 
------------------------------------

This group is run in association with the Oriental Bird Club. To find out more 
about the Club and its conservation work, and to become a member, please visit 
www.orientalbirdclub.org 

------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orientalbirding/

<*> Your email settings:
    Individual Email | Traditional

<*> To change settings online go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/orientalbirding/join
    (Yahoo! ID required)

<*> To change settings via email:
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<*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
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<*> Your use of Yahoo Groups is subject to:
    https://info.yahoo.com/legal/us/yahoo/utos/terms/
Subject: Turquoise-throated Barbet
From: "Hans Matheve Hans.Matheve AT UGent.be [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 10 Jan 2015 22:05:07 +0100
Hi all,

Two of my friends are planning to do an independent birding trip to 
Thailand. Does anyone have some useful information on how to see the 
recently split Turquoise-throated Barbet?

Many thanks in advance,
Hans Matheve


------------------------------------
Posted by: Hans Matheve 
------------------------------------

This group is run in association with the Oriental Bird Club. To find out more 
about the Club and its conservation work, and to become a member, please visit 
www.orientalbirdclub.org 

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Subject: FW: Darwin Programme 2015
From: "'Mundkur, Taej' Taej.Mundkur AT wetlands.org [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 9 Jan 2015 18:01:19 +0100
Dear all,

See opportunity at the Field Studies Council's Darwin Scholarship Programme 
below. 

Kindly directly contact Wetlands Link International  for follow 
up. 


Best regards, 
Taej Mundkur

From: Wetlands Link International Sent: 09 January 2015 17:57 To: Mundkur, Taej 
Subject: Darwin Programme 2015 


Darwin Scholarship Programme, 2015
If you are a young conservationist and would like to spend two weeks in the UK 
at the Field Studies Council's Darwin Scholarship Programme, in August this 
year, then please see details at the WLI website.  

http://wli.wwt.org.uk/2015/01/news/darwin-scholarship-programme-uk/

The deadline is the 20th of January. 

Best regards,

Chris Rostron
Head of WLI


Follow WLI on facebook
Mr Chris Rostron
Head of Wetland Link International/El director de la Red Internacional de los 
Humedales (WLI)/Chef du Réseau International des Zones Humides (WLI) 

WWT Slimbridge, UK
Tel: + 44(0)1453 891214  Fax: +44(0)1453 890827
www.wli.org.uk

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Subject: Great Indian Bustard (Ardeotis nigriceps) conservation
From: "sumit kolkatabird AT yahoo.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 4 Jan 2015 05:29:20 +0000 (UTC)
The Great Indian Bustard is an iconic bird which is teetering on the brink of 
extinction.  

There is a need to create and spread awareness of its plight in a last-ditch 
effort to persuade GOI to pull out all stops to save this species.To this end, 
I have created an infographic/poster. A desktop sized copy is available 
at:http://www.kolkatabirds.com/gib_a3_72dpi.jpg for viewing. A large(A3) 
printable copy is also available for download at:http://www.kolkatabirds.com 
for those who want to spread the word in print. 

The posters are free to use without alteration.
Let us make a big effort in 2015 to turn the tide for this bird!
Happy New Year to all.
Regards,SumitSumit K SenKolkata, India
Subject: Spiders catching birds
From: "spidercatchbird AT yahoo.co.uk [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 03 Jan 2015 19:42:08 -0800
Dear fellow birders,
  
 I am also looking for any records of large spiders catching birds in Asia, 
such as documented on page 25 in 

  
 http://www.biosch.hku.hk/ecology/porcupine/por32pdf/por32-p23-25.pdf
  
 If you know of such a record, please let me know if possible
  
 - the species of bird, the species of spider, location and date, what happened 
to the bird (did it survive, was it freed by humans?), and any published 
sources, references or websites of the record 

  
 and send your information to my email
 spidercatchbird AT gmail.com
  
 Your record would be used in a scientific publication and of course be 
acknowledged. 

  
 Please forward this message to other Asian birders.
  
 Thank you, Bruno Walther, 
  
  
 www.crisisoflife.net
  
 Assistant Professor, Taipei Medical University

Subject: Re: Re: [Bengalbird:] Re: [DELHIBIRD] South Asia Bird Checklist / IndianBIRDS Website
From: "Praveen J paintedstork AT gmail.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 2 Jan 2015 21:33:39 +0530
Hi Dilawar,
                Thank you very much for your email. Some of us were
traveling and hence the delay in this reply.

As you noted, this is a 'bare' checklist for South Asia that included all
species including ones marked as 'possible' or treated as 'unconfirmed'.
This list is a 'utility' for creating sub checklists - which at times, may
require unconfirmed species also to be listed. When such a list already
exists for South Asia, we do not see a value in creating a similar
checklist for India.

Having said that, what we need is a *definitive checklist* for India as a
country. This will only have those species which have been proven to have
occurred in the country beyond any reasonable doubt. You might know
that at *Indian
BIRDS*, we are working on such a project with the help of a large network
of ornithologists and birdwatchers who have interest in Indian Ornithology
to come up with such an authentic list. Having published two parts of a
review on Indian Rarities, there are a few more to go and our internal
target is to complete this project by end of 2015 - hence, that is the
timeline for the definitive India checklist.

Hi Clive,
             In South Asia we have included Afghanistan & Chagos which are
not part of Indian subcontinent. We do not intend to create an ‘Indian
Subcontinent’ list, but if one wishes, it is possible to do so from this
South Asia Checklist. We will, however, publish a definitive India
Checklist by the end of this year.

thanks & best rgds
Praveen
[For the team, Praveen J, Rajah Jayapal & Aasheesh Pittie]

On Mon, Dec 29, 2014 at 3:23 PM, Clive Mann  wrote:

> South Asia = Indian Subcontinent
>
> Clive Mann
>
> On 29 December 2014 at 05:37, Mohammed Dilawar dilawarmohammed AT gmail.com
> [orientalbirding]  wrote:
>
>>
>>
>> Dear Team,
>>
>> Congratulations for your effort to update the checklist of birds of South
>> Asia. By when can we expect a checklist of birds for India and the Indian
>> Subcontinent eagerly waiting for the same.
>>
>> Best wishes,
>>
>> Mohammed Dilawar
>>
>> On 28 December 2014 at 15:11, Praveen J  wrote:
>>
>>> Dear Sudhir,
>>>                 Thank you very much for your email.
>>>
>>> Really happy to note that someone of your cadre had a go at this
>>> checklist.
>>>
>>> Here are the details of the species you highlighted.
>>>
>>> In general, except for a handful of birds (nearly 10), you will find all
>>> of them in Birds of South Asia - The Ripley Guide. Volume 2. 2nd Edition
>>> [BSA2] ; however, the taxonomy we followed is of H&M4.
>>>
>>>
>>> 1. Australian Shelduck:
>>> BSA2, Pp: 71 [Most Chagos checklists have this species]
>>>
>>> 2. Tahiti Petrel:
>>> van den Berg, A. B., Smeenk, C., Bosman, C. A. W., Haase, B. J. M., van
>>> der Niet, A. M.,
>>> & Cadée, G. C., 1991. Barau’s Petrel *Pterodroma baraui*, Jouanin’s
>>> Petrel *Bulweria fallax* and other seabirds in the northern Indian
>>> Ocean in June-July 1984 and 1985. *Ardea* 79 (1): 1–14
>>> The same record discussed here
>>> Praveen J., Jayapal, R., Pittie, A., 2013. Notes on Indian rarities—1:
>>> Seabirds. *Indian BIRDS* 8 (5): 113–125
>>>
>>> 3. Cory's Shearwater:
>>> Praveen J., Palot, M. J., Karuthedathu, D., 2013. Recovery of a Cory’s
>>> Shearwater *Calonectris borealis* from Thaikadapuram beach, Kasaragod
>>> district, Kerala. *Indian BIRDS* 8 (6): 152–153
>>>
>>> 4. Blue-footed Booby:
>>> Dave, R., Dodiya, P., & Dhadhal, J., 2003. Bluefooted Booby on Mahuva
>>> coast: A first record for the Indian subcontinent. *Flamingo* 1 (3&4):
>>> 4–5
>>> Dhadhal, J., 2003. Blue-footed Booby in Gujarat. *Newsletter for
>>> Birdwatchers* 43 (5): 75.
>>> Dhadhal, J., Dodiya, P., Dave, R., & Flamingo Nature, C., 2004. Boobies
>>> in India. *Newsletter for Birdwatchers* 44 (1): 9.
>>>
>>> All the above refers to the same record which is discussed here
>>> Praveen J., Jayapal, R., Pittie, A., 2013. Notes on Indian rarities—1:
>>> Seabirds. *Indian BIRDS* 8 (5): 113–125
>>>
>>> 5. White-fronted Falconet:
>>> BSA2, Pp: 605
>>>
>>> We would be much delighted to get the full list of the examples where
>>> you think there is a potential anomaly. Compilations like these will
>>> improve a lot with such competent peer reviews.
>>>
>>> thanks & best rgds
>>> Praveen
>>>
>>>
>>> On Sun, Dec 28, 2014 at 2:49 PM, Sudhir Vyas 
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Wonderful effort. And fascinating, too, as it captures the latest
>>>> taxonomic twists and turns (till the next).
>>>>
>>>> This list, as you have clarified, "includes taxa that are both claimed
>>>> and possible for the region". But surely some anomalies have crept in
>>>> - probably editing errors - and may need to be revisited: Australian
>>>> Shelduck, Tahiti Petrel, Cory's Shearwater, Blue footed Booby,
>>>> White-fronted Falconet are examples that come to mind.
>>>>
>>>> Unless they have been claimed for our region ...
>>>>
>>>> Regards,
>>>> Sudhir Vyas
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> On Sat, Dec 27, 2014 at 11:31 PM, Praveen J paintedstork AT gmail.com
>>>> [DELHIBIRD]  wrote:
>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Dear Friend,
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>               You would be interested to learn that a 'bare' checklist
>>>>> of south Asian birds is made available in IndianBIRDS website at the 
below 

>>>>> link.
>>>>>
>>>>> http://www.indianbirds.in/south-asia/
>>>>>
>>>>> All species that have been claimed or marked as possible in this
>>>>> region are included.
>>>>>
>>>>> Though the primary purpose is to provide a reference checklist for the
>>>>> contributors of IndianBIRDS journal, this would also serve the purpose 
for 

>>>>> creating pruned regional checklists that may be published elsewhere.
>>>>>
>>>>> The taxonomic sequence, species limits, scientific names and a
>>>>> majority of English names follow Howard and Moore world checklist 4th
>>>>> edition (H&M4).
>>>>>
>>>>> These are turbulent times in avian systematics, when rapid advances in
>>>>> avian molecular research unravel hidden relationships, when authors of
>>>>> regional books create new 'splits' without peer reviewed publications, 
when 

>>>>> multiple global consortiums drive discordant global checklists - we have
>>>>> decided to follow a source which is exemplary in its critical evaluation 
of 

>>>>> species limits basing it on peer reviewed literature.
>>>>>
>>>>> Hence, this list is not exactly the same as eBird / Clements list, or
>>>>> the International Ornithological Committee's (IOC) list or the Birdlife
>>>>> International's / Handbook of Birds of the World's lists, as indeed, each
>>>>> differ from the others; though all these lists have drawn many
>>>>> recommendations from H&M4.
>>>>>
>>>>> It is hoped that such a list will be helpful for professionals and
>>>>> amateurs interested in south Asian ornithology.
>>>>>
>>>>> best rgds
>>>>> Praveen J, Rajah Jayapal, Aasheesh Pittie
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>  --
>>> --
>>> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google
>>> Groups "bengalbird" group.
>>>
>>> ---
>>> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google
>>> Groups "bengalbird" group.
>>> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send
>>> an email to bengalbird+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com.
>>> For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Mohammed.E.Dilawar
>> www.natureforever.org |www.worldsparrowday.org | www.cbmi.in
>> Like us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/NatureForeverSociety
>> Cell - 09420001820
>>
>>   
>>
>
>
>
> --
> Dr C F Mann
>
Subject: Birding News from eBON, the Newsletter of the Wild Bird Club of the Philippines
From: "Sylvia Ramos sylviatramos AT yahoo.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 1 Jan 2015 03:34:18 +0000 (UTC)


  

 Birding News from eBON, the Newsletter of the Wild Bird Club of the 
Philippines#yiv3362360049 body, #yiv3362360049 #yiv3362360049bodyTable, 
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!important;}#yiv3362360049 _filtered #yiv3362360049 {}#yiv3362360049 

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| eBON - online newsletter of the Wild Bird Club of the Philippines - August 
2014 issue | 


 
|  View this email in your browser  |

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Dear Friends,

Happy New Year! Here's to another year of birds, birdwatching, and birding! 

Check out the January 2015 issue of eBON for some firsts in this first month of 
the new year: 

   
   - the first bird photo by newly hatched bird photographer Mike Lu!
 - a country first record by the Romy Ocon, the Philippines' #1 bird 
photographer 


Click on the link above to go to the eBON site www.ebonph.wordpress.com or 
click on the photos below to go straight to a particular article. 


I hope you enjoy the January 2015 issue of eBON. Share it with your friends!

Sylvia
eBON Editor
  |

  |

  |


| 
|      |
| A Short History of Philippine Bird Books - Part 4 The 1870s by Christian 
Perez 


Christian Perez continues his series on Philippine bird books. In this part of 
the series, we get a sense of the some of the adventures, dangers and 
thrills that historical figures faced in exploring the Philippines and 
discovering new species. | 


  |


| 
|      |
|  Black-headed Gulls with Spicy Vegetables by Willem van de Ven

WBCP Vice-President Willem van de Ven and WBCP Treasurer Mike Lu 
represented WBCP at theThailand Bird Fair. Willem writes about the his many 
duties at the fair from giving a presentation about Philippine Hornbills in 
the wild to learning to enjoy hot peppers as an after dinner snack. 


   |

  |


| 
|      |
|  Photo of the Month - Amur Falcon

This wonderful photo came about through an amazing series of fortunate events 
that put the right person at the right place and the right time. The best bird 
photographer of the Philippines happened to capture a country record in his 
home province! 

   |

  |


| 
|      |
|  Bird Traps on Mount Polis by Kitty Arce

Hunting is illegal in the Philippines. Yet the practice hunting a few birds 
for the cooking pot is common and prevalent in this poor and largely rural 
country. WBCP Founding Member Kitty Arce takes a long, hard look at the 
illegal practice of hunting birds for food and reexamines her beliefs about 
hunting. 

   |

  |


| 
|      |
|  December 2014 Roundup by Mike Lu and James Biron

WBCP members took time out from their busy December schedules to attend Balanga 
City's Ibong Dayo Festival, give a guided trip for students, make plans for an 
even busier birding year in 2015. | 


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 eBON - Wild Bird Club of the Philippines online newsletter · Muntinlupa · 
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Subject: Re: Re: [Bengalbird:] Re: [DELHIBIRD] South Asia Bird Checklist / IndianBIRDS Website
From: "Clive Mann clivefmann AT gmail.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Dec 2014 09:53:28 +0000
South Asia = Indian Subcontinent

Clive Mann

On 29 December 2014 at 05:37, Mohammed Dilawar dilawarmohammed AT gmail.com
[orientalbirding]  wrote:

>
>
> Dear Team,
>
> Congratulations for your effort to update the checklist of birds of South
> Asia. By when can we expect a checklist of birds for India and the Indian
> Subcontinent eagerly waiting for the same.
>
> Best wishes,
>
> Mohammed Dilawar
>
> On 28 December 2014 at 15:11, Praveen J  wrote:
>
>> Dear Sudhir,
>>                 Thank you very much for your email.
>>
>> Really happy to note that someone of your cadre had a go at this
>> checklist.
>>
>> Here are the details of the species you highlighted.
>>
>> In general, except for a handful of birds (nearly 10), you will find all
>> of them in Birds of South Asia - The Ripley Guide. Volume 2. 2nd Edition
>> [BSA2] ; however, the taxonomy we followed is of H&M4.
>>
>>
>> 1. Australian Shelduck:
>> BSA2, Pp: 71 [Most Chagos checklists have this species]
>>
>> 2. Tahiti Petrel:
>> van den Berg, A. B., Smeenk, C., Bosman, C. A. W., Haase, B. J. M., van
>> der Niet, A. M.,
>> & Cadée, G. C., 1991. Barau’s Petrel *Pterodroma baraui*, Jouanin’s
>> Petrel *Bulweria fallax* and other seabirds in the northern Indian Ocean
>> in June-July 1984 and 1985. *Ardea* 79 (1): 1–14
>> The same record discussed here
>> Praveen J., Jayapal, R., Pittie, A., 2013. Notes on Indian rarities—1:
>> Seabirds. *Indian BIRDS* 8 (5): 113–125
>>
>> 3. Cory's Shearwater:
>> Praveen J., Palot, M. J., Karuthedathu, D., 2013. Recovery of a Cory’s
>> Shearwater *Calonectris borealis* from Thaikadapuram beach, Kasaragod
>> district, Kerala. *Indian BIRDS* 8 (6): 152–153
>>
>> 4. Blue-footed Booby:
>> Dave, R., Dodiya, P., & Dhadhal, J., 2003. Bluefooted Booby on Mahuva
>> coast: A first record for the Indian subcontinent. *Flamingo* 1 (3&4):
>> 4–5
>> Dhadhal, J., 2003. Blue-footed Booby in Gujarat. *Newsletter for
>> Birdwatchers* 43 (5): 75.
>> Dhadhal, J., Dodiya, P., Dave, R., & Flamingo Nature, C., 2004. Boobies
>> in India. *Newsletter for Birdwatchers* 44 (1): 9.
>>
>> All the above refers to the same record which is discussed here
>> Praveen J., Jayapal, R., Pittie, A., 2013. Notes on Indian rarities—1:
>> Seabirds. *Indian BIRDS* 8 (5): 113–125
>>
>> 5. White-fronted Falconet:
>> BSA2, Pp: 605
>>
>> We would be much delighted to get the full list of the examples where you
>> think there is a potential anomaly. Compilations like these will improve a
>> lot with such competent peer reviews.
>>
>> thanks & best rgds
>> Praveen
>>
>>
>> On Sun, Dec 28, 2014 at 2:49 PM, Sudhir Vyas 
>> wrote:
>>
>>> Wonderful effort. And fascinating, too, as it captures the latest
>>> taxonomic twists and turns (till the next).
>>>
>>> This list, as you have clarified, "includes taxa that are both claimed
>>> and possible for the region". But surely some anomalies have crept in -
>>> probably editing errors - and may need to be revisited: Australian
>>> Shelduck, Tahiti Petrel, Cory's Shearwater, Blue footed Booby,
>>> White-fronted Falconet are examples that come to mind.
>>>
>>> Unless they have been claimed for our region ...
>>>
>>> Regards,
>>> Sudhir Vyas
>>>
>>>
>>> On Sat, Dec 27, 2014 at 11:31 PM, Praveen J paintedstork AT gmail.com
>>> [DELHIBIRD]  wrote:
>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Dear Friend,
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>               You would be interested to learn that a 'bare' checklist
>>>> of south Asian birds is made available in IndianBIRDS website at the below
>>>> link.
>>>>
>>>> http://www.indianbirds.in/south-asia/
>>>>
>>>> All species that have been claimed or marked as possible in this region
>>>> are included.
>>>>
>>>> Though the primary purpose is to provide a reference checklist for the
>>>> contributors of IndianBIRDS journal, this would also serve the purpose for
>>>> creating pruned regional checklists that may be published elsewhere.
>>>>
>>>> The taxonomic sequence, species limits, scientific names and a majority
>>>> of English names follow Howard and Moore world checklist 4th edition 
(H&M4). 

>>>>
>>>> These are turbulent times in avian systematics, when rapid advances in
>>>> avian molecular research unravel hidden relationships, when authors of
>>>> regional books create new 'splits' without peer reviewed publications, 
when 

>>>> multiple global consortiums drive discordant global checklists - we have
>>>> decided to follow a source which is exemplary in its critical evaluation 
of 

>>>> species limits basing it on peer reviewed literature.
>>>>
>>>> Hence, this list is not exactly the same as eBird / Clements list, or
>>>> the International Ornithological Committee's (IOC) list or the Birdlife
>>>> International's / Handbook of Birds of the World's lists, as indeed, each
>>>> differ from the others; though all these lists have drawn many
>>>> recommendations from H&M4.
>>>>
>>>> It is hoped that such a list will be helpful for professionals and
>>>> amateurs interested in south Asian ornithology.
>>>>
>>>> best rgds
>>>> Praveen J, Rajah Jayapal, Aasheesh Pittie
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>  --
>> --
>> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
>> "bengalbird" group.
>>
>> ---
>> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
>> "bengalbird" group.
>> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
>> email to bengalbird+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com.
>> For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
>>
>
>
>
> --
> Mohammed.E.Dilawar
> www.natureforever.org |www.worldsparrowday.org | www.cbmi.in
> Like us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/NatureForeverSociety
> Cell - 09420001820
>
>   
>



-- 
Dr C F Mann
Subject: OBC bird of the day on Twitter
From: "simonroddis AT yahoo.co.uk [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 29 Dec 2014 09:13:13 -0800
OBC started an Oriental #birdoftheday feature on Twitter in August this year. 
We are very grateful to the many photographers who have supported the feature, 
the vast majority of images having come from their contributions to the 
Oriental Bird Images database. 

 

 In January the #birdoftheday will feature Endangered and Critically Endangered 
birds of the Orient, the photos again coming from OBI. If you wish to follow 
OBC on Twitter, we go by the name of  AT orientbirdclub - and please retweet us to 
help spread the OBC's name further. 

 

 Simon Roddis
 OBC Publications Committee
Subject: Re: [Bengalbird:] Re: [DELHIBIRD] South Asia Bird Checklist / IndianBIRDS Website
From: "Bill Harvey billharve AT gmail.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Dec 2014 12:30:35 +0000
While the area covered is often referred to as the Indian Subcontinent some
member countires may be uncomfortable with the implication of "Indian "
ownership.

It is also frequently referred to as South Asia (politically,
geographically and ornithologically). This is actually more accurate as it
can then include oceanic islands which are not strictly speaking part of
the subcontinent.

regards Bill
Subject: Re: [Bengalbird:] Re: [DELHIBIRD] South Asia Bird Checklist / IndianBIRDS Website
From: "Mohammed Dilawar dilawarmohammed AT gmail.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Dec 2014 11:07:38 +0530
Dear Team,

Congratulations for your effort to update the checklist of birds of South
Asia. By when can we expect a checklist of birds for India and the Indian
Subcontinent eagerly waiting for the same.

Best wishes,

Mohammed Dilawar

On 28 December 2014 at 15:11, Praveen J  wrote:

> Dear Sudhir,
>                 Thank you very much for your email.
>
> Really happy to note that someone of your cadre had a go at this
> checklist.
>
> Here are the details of the species you highlighted.
>
> In general, except for a handful of birds (nearly 10), you will find all
> of them in Birds of South Asia - The Ripley Guide. Volume 2. 2nd Edition
> [BSA2] ; however, the taxonomy we followed is of H&M4.
>
>
> 1. Australian Shelduck:
> BSA2, Pp: 71 [Most Chagos checklists have this species]
>
> 2. Tahiti Petrel:
> van den Berg, A. B., Smeenk, C., Bosman, C. A. W., Haase, B. J. M., van
> der Niet, A. M.,
> & Cade, G. C., 1991. Barau's Petrel *Pterodroma baraui*, Jouanin's
> Petrel *Bulweria fallax* and other seabirds in the northern Indian Ocean
> in June-July 1984 and 1985. *Ardea* 79 (1): 1-14
> The same record discussed here
> Praveen J., Jayapal, R., Pittie, A., 2013. Notes on Indian rarities--1:
> Seabirds. *Indian BIRDS* 8 (5): 113-125
>
> 3. Cory's Shearwater:
> Praveen J., Palot, M. J., Karuthedathu, D., 2013. Recovery of a Cory's
> Shearwater *Calonectris borealis* from Thaikadapuram beach, Kasaragod
> district, Kerala. *Indian BIRDS* 8 (6): 152-153
>
> 4. Blue-footed Booby:
> Dave, R., Dodiya, P., & Dhadhal, J., 2003. Bluefooted Booby on Mahuva
> coast: A first record for the Indian subcontinent. *Flamingo* 1 (3&4): 4-5
> Dhadhal, J., 2003. Blue-footed Booby in Gujarat. *Newsletter for
> Birdwatchers* 43 (5): 75.
> Dhadhal, J., Dodiya, P., Dave, R., & Flamingo Nature, C., 2004. Boobies in
> India. *Newsletter for Birdwatchers* 44 (1): 9.
>
> All the above refers to the same record which is discussed here
> Praveen J., Jayapal, R., Pittie, A., 2013. Notes on Indian rarities--1:
> Seabirds. *Indian BIRDS* 8 (5): 113-125
>
> 5. White-fronted Falconet:
> BSA2, Pp: 605
>
> We would be much delighted to get the full list of the examples where you
> think there is a potential anomaly. Compilations like these will improve a
> lot with such competent peer reviews.
>
> thanks & best rgds
> Praveen
>
>
> On Sun, Dec 28, 2014 at 2:49 PM, Sudhir Vyas 
> wrote:
>
>> Wonderful effort. And fascinating, too, as it captures the latest
>> taxonomic twists and turns (till the next).
>>
>> This list, as you have clarified, "includes taxa that are both claimed
>> and possible for the region". But surely some anomalies have crept in -
>> probably editing errors - and may need to be revisited: Australian
>> Shelduck, Tahiti Petrel, Cory's Shearwater, Blue footed Booby,
>> White-fronted Falconet are examples that come to mind.
>>
>> Unless they have been claimed for our region ...
>>
>> Regards,
>> Sudhir Vyas
>>
>>
>> On Sat, Dec 27, 2014 at 11:31 PM, Praveen J paintedstork AT gmail.com
>> [DELHIBIRD]  wrote:
>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Dear Friend,
>>>
>>>
>>>               You would be interested to learn that a 'bare' checklist
>>> of south Asian birds is made available in IndianBIRDS website at the below
>>> link.
>>>
>>> http://www.indianbirds.in/south-asia/
>>>
>>> All species that have been claimed or marked as possible in this region
>>> are included.
>>>
>>> Though the primary purpose is to provide a reference checklist for the
>>> contributors of IndianBIRDS journal, this would also serve the purpose for
>>> creating pruned regional checklists that may be published elsewhere.
>>>
>>> The taxonomic sequence, species limits, scientific names and a majority
>>> of English names follow Howard and Moore world checklist 4th edition 
(H&M4). 

>>>
>>> These are turbulent times in avian systematics, when rapid advances in
>>> avian molecular research unravel hidden relationships, when authors of
>>> regional books create new 'splits' without peer reviewed publications, when
>>> multiple global consortiums drive discordant global checklists - we have
>>> decided to follow a source which is exemplary in its critical evaluation of
>>> species limits basing it on peer reviewed literature.
>>>
>>> Hence, this list is not exactly the same as eBird / Clements list, or
>>> the International Ornithological Committee's (IOC) list or the Birdlife
>>> International's / Handbook of Birds of the World's lists, as indeed, each
>>> differ from the others; though all these lists have drawn many
>>> recommendations from H&M4.
>>>
>>> It is hoped that such a list will be helpful for professionals and
>>> amateurs interested in south Asian ornithology.
>>>
>>> best rgds
>>> Praveen J, Rajah Jayapal, Aasheesh Pittie
>>>
>>>  
>>>
>>
>>
>  --
> --
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
> "bengalbird" group.
>
> ---
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
> "bengalbird" group.
> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
> email to bengalbird+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com.
> For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
>



-- 
Mohammed.E.Dilawar
www.natureforever.org |www.worldsparrowday.org | www.cbmi.in
Like us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/NatureForeverSociety
Cell - 09420001820
Subject: Re: [DELHIBIRD] South Asia Bird Checklist / IndianBIRDS Website
From: "Sudhir Vyas vyas.sudhir AT gmail.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Dec 2014 14:49:39 +0530
Wonderful effort. And fascinating, too, as it captures the latest taxonomic
twists and turns (till the next).

This list, as you have clarified, "includes taxa that are both claimed and
possible for the region". But surely some anomalies have crept in -
probably editing errors - and may need to be revisited: Australian
Shelduck, Tahiti Petrel, Cory's Shearwater, Blue footed Booby,
White-fronted Falconet are examples that come to mind.

Unless they have been claimed for our region ...

Regards,
Sudhir Vyas


On Sat, Dec 27, 2014 at 11:31 PM, Praveen J paintedstork AT gmail.com
[DELHIBIRD]  wrote:

>
>
> Dear Friend,
>
>
>               You would be interested to learn that a 'bare' checklist of
> south Asian birds is made available in IndianBIRDS website at the below
> link.
>
> http://www.indianbirds.in/south-asia/
>
> All species that have been claimed or marked as possible in this region
> are included.
>
> Though the primary purpose is to provide a reference checklist for the
> contributors of IndianBIRDS journal, this would also serve the purpose for
> creating pruned regional checklists that may be published elsewhere.
>
> The taxonomic sequence, species limits, scientific names and a majority of
> English names follow Howard and Moore world checklist 4th edition (H&M4).
>
> These are turbulent times in avian systematics, when rapid advances in
> avian molecular research unravel hidden relationships, when authors of
> regional books create new 'splits' without peer reviewed publications, when
> multiple global consortiums drive discordant global checklists - we have
> decided to follow a source which is exemplary in its critical evaluation of
> species limits basing it on peer reviewed literature.
>
> Hence, this list is not exactly the same as eBird / Clements list, or the
> International Ornithological Committee's (IOC) list or the Birdlife
> International's / Handbook of Birds of the World's lists, as indeed, each
> differ from the others; though all these lists have drawn many
> recommendations from H&M4.
>
> It is hoped that such a list will be helpful for professionals and
> amateurs interested in south Asian ornithology.
>
> best rgds
> Praveen J, Rajah Jayapal, Aasheesh Pittie
>
>  
>
Subject: Re: [DELHIBIRD] South Asia Bird Checklist / IndianBIRDS Website
From: "Praveen J paintedstork AT gmail.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Dec 2014 15:11:17 +0530
Dear Sudhir,
                Thank you very much for your email.

Really happy to note that someone of your cadre had a go at this checklist.

Here are the details of the species you highlighted.

In general, except for a handful of birds (nearly 10), you will find all of
them in Birds of South Asia - The Ripley Guide. Volume 2. 2nd Edition
[BSA2] ; however, the taxonomy we followed is of H&M4.


1. Australian Shelduck:
BSA2, Pp: 71 [Most Chagos checklists have this species]

2. Tahiti Petrel:
van den Berg, A. B., Smeenk, C., Bosman, C. A. W., Haase, B. J. M., van der
Niet, A. M.,
& Cadée, G. C., 1991. Barau’s Petrel *Pterodroma baraui*, Jouanin’s
Petrel *Bulweria
fallax* and other seabirds in the northern Indian Ocean in June-July 1984
and 1985. *Ardea* 79 (1): 1–14
The same record discussed here
Praveen J., Jayapal, R., Pittie, A., 2013. Notes on Indian rarities—1:
Seabirds. *Indian BIRDS* 8 (5): 113–125

3. Cory's Shearwater:
Praveen J., Palot, M. J., Karuthedathu, D., 2013. Recovery of a Cory’s
Shearwater *Calonectris borealis* from Thaikadapuram beach, Kasaragod
district, Kerala. *Indian BIRDS* 8 (6): 152–153

4. Blue-footed Booby:
Dave, R., Dodiya, P., & Dhadhal, J., 2003. Bluefooted Booby on Mahuva
coast: A first record for the Indian subcontinent. *Flamingo* 1 (3&4): 4–5
Dhadhal, J., 2003. Blue-footed Booby in Gujarat. *Newsletter for
Birdwatchers* 43 (5): 75.
Dhadhal, J., Dodiya, P., Dave, R., & Flamingo Nature, C., 2004. Boobies in
India. *Newsletter for Birdwatchers* 44 (1): 9.

All the above refers to the same record which is discussed here
Praveen J., Jayapal, R., Pittie, A., 2013. Notes on Indian rarities—1:
Seabirds. *Indian BIRDS* 8 (5): 113–125

5. White-fronted Falconet:
BSA2, Pp: 605

We would be much delighted to get the full list of the examples where you
think there is a potential anomaly. Compilations like these will improve a
lot with such competent peer reviews.

thanks & best rgds
Praveen


On Sun, Dec 28, 2014 at 2:49 PM, Sudhir Vyas  wrote:

> Wonderful effort. And fascinating, too, as it captures the latest
> taxonomic twists and turns (till the next).
>
> This list, as you have clarified, "includes taxa that are both claimed and
>  possible for the region". But surely some anomalies have crept in -
> probably editing errors - and may need to be revisited: Australian
> Shelduck, Tahiti Petrel, Cory's Shearwater, Blue footed Booby,
> White-fronted Falconet are examples that come to mind.
>
> Unless they have been claimed for our region ...
>
> Regards,
> Sudhir Vyas
>
>
> On Sat, Dec 27, 2014 at 11:31 PM, Praveen J paintedstork AT gmail.com
> [DELHIBIRD]  wrote:
>
>>
>>
>> Dear Friend,
>>
>>
>>               You would be interested to learn that a 'bare' checklist of
>> south Asian birds is made available in IndianBIRDS website at the below
>> link.
>>
>> http://www.indianbirds.in/south-asia/
>>
>> All species that have been claimed or marked as possible in this region
>> are included.
>>
>> Though the primary purpose is to provide a reference checklist for the
>> contributors of IndianBIRDS journal, this would also serve the purpose for
>> creating pruned regional checklists that may be published elsewhere.
>>
>> The taxonomic sequence, species limits, scientific names and a majority
>> of English names follow Howard and Moore world checklist 4th edition (H&M4).
>>
>> These are turbulent times in avian systematics, when rapid advances in
>> avian molecular research unravel hidden relationships, when authors of
>> regional books create new 'splits' without peer reviewed publications, when
>> multiple global consortiums drive discordant global checklists - we have
>> decided to follow a source which is exemplary in its critical evaluation of
>> species limits basing it on peer reviewed literature.
>>
>> Hence, this list is not exactly the same as eBird / Clements list, or the
>> International Ornithological Committee's (IOC) list or the Birdlife
>> International's / Handbook of Birds of the World's lists, as indeed, each
>> differ from the others; though all these lists have drawn many
>> recommendations from H&M4.
>>
>> It is hoped that such a list will be helpful for professionals and
>> amateurs interested in south Asian ornithology.
>>
>> best rgds
>> Praveen J, Rajah Jayapal, Aasheesh Pittie
>>
>>  
>>
>
>
Subject: Re: video on Chinese Crested Tern restoration
From: "Ronald Orenstein ron.orenstein AT rogers.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Dec 2014 02:34:34 +0000 (UTC)
Very interesting!  I had no idea that the mantle colour was so distinctive - 
but one concern:  at one point in the film there is what appears to be a 
courting display between a Greater Crested and a Chinese Crested, and near the 
end there is a shot of a bird with a grey mantle and a black-tipped orange bill 
- a possible hybrid?  Is hybridization a threat to the Chinese Crested Tern? 

 Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com
 From: "Simba Chan simba.chan AT birdlife.org [orientalbirding]" 
 

 To: "orientalbirding AT yahoogroups.com" ; 
"Pacific Seabird Group (locochair AT pacificseabirdgroup.org)" 
; Twsg-forum  

 Sent: Thursday, December 25, 2014 6:51 PM
 Subject: [OB] video on Chinese Crested Tern restoration

 

 Dear friends,   Here is a short video for your Christmas and New Year 
holidays:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rMU407gLXF0   A link of the same 
video for those who live in China:   
http://v.youku.com/v_show/id_XODU0MDU0NjE2.html   it was done by two intern 
students (Andy Lee and Banson Leung) from the Ocean Park Conservation 
Foundation (Hong Kong). They stayed on the island with me from 12 to 28 June 
2014 (and have not caused too much trouble….)   Hope 2015 will be another 
good year for the Chinese Crested Tern. How about seeing some colour-flagged 
individuals in eastern Indonesia this time next year?   This project has been 
possible through the generous support of the Xiangshan Ocean and Fishery 
Bureau, the Zhejiang Museum of Natural History, the Japan Fund for Global 
Environment, the Ocean Park Conservation Foundation (Hong Kong), the Hong Kong 
Bird watching Society, the Wild Bird Society of Zhejiang, the team from Oregon 
State University and BirdLife International Preventing Extinctions Programme 
supporter - Mark Constantine. The Ocean and Fishery Bureau and Natural History 
Museum also provided significant logistical support there that helped make the 
project such a resounding success. The US Fish and Wildlife Service (Wildlife 
Without Borders) supported the project by providing decoys and playback 
equipment needed for social attraction. And we are still looking for support to 
ensure the continual success of this project. I hope this will be another Asian 
conservation success as what we have done to bring back the Black-faced 
Spoonbill.   With my best wishes for another great year.     Simba Chan 
BirdLife International   P.S. I DO NOT look like that usually. Do not use this 
as my normal portrait, particularly for obituary purposes. Please.         
    


 Please consider biodiversity and the environment before deciding whether to 
print this message and any attachments. 

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Subject: South Asia Bird Checklist / IndianBIRDS Website
From: "Praveen J paintedstork AT gmail.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Dec 2014 23:31:00 +0530
Dear Friend,


              You would be interested to learn that a 'bare' checklist of
south Asian birds is made available in IndianBIRDS website at the below
link.

http://www.indianbirds.in/south-asia/

All species that have been claimed or marked as possible in this region are
included.

Though the primary purpose is to provide a reference checklist for the
contributors of IndianBIRDS journal, this would also serve the purpose for
creating pruned regional checklists that may be published elsewhere.

The taxonomic sequence, species limits, scientific names and a majority of
English names follow Howard and Moore world checklist 4th edition (H&M4).

These are turbulent times in avian systematics, when rapid advances in
avian molecular research unravel hidden relationships, when authors of
regional books create new 'splits' without peer reviewed publications, when
multiple global consortiums drive discordant global checklists - we have
decided to follow a source which is exemplary in its critical evaluation of
species limits basing it on peer reviewed literature.

Hence, this list is not exactly the same as eBird / Clements list, or the
International Ornithological Committee's (IOC) list or the Birdlife
International's / Handbook of Birds of the World's lists, as indeed, each
differ from the others; though all these lists have drawn many
recommendations from H&M4.

It is hoped that such a list will be helpful for professionals and amateurs
interested in south Asian ornithology.

best rgds
Praveen J, Rajah Jayapal, Aasheesh Pittie
Subject: 返: video on Chinese Crested Tern restoration
From: "Simba Chan simba.chan AT birdlife.org [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Dec 2014 09:11:24 +0000
Dear Ronald,

There were two birds looked like hybrids in the colony this years. And there 
were some cases of courting and even copulating between these two species. 
However, on the whole their species identity is high (the two hybrids had very 
hard times to find a mate – these two birds were imprinted by Greater Crested 
Terns but were rejected by almost all other Greater Crested Terns) so I don’t 
think it is a very high potential threat. It is of course an interesting topic 
for further studies. 


Best wishes

Simba


差出人: Ronald Orenstein [mailto:ron.orenstein AT rogers.com]
送信日時: 2014年12月26日 11:35
宛先: Simba Chan; orientalbirding AT yahoogroups.com; Pacific Seabird Group 
(locochair AT pacificseabirdgroup.org); Twsg-forum 

件名: Re: [OB] video on Chinese Crested Tern restoration

Very interesting! I had no idea that the mantle colour was so distinctive - but 
one concern: at one point in the film there is what appears to be a courting 
display between a Greater Crested and a Chinese Crested, and near the end there 
is a shot of a bird with a grey mantle and a black-tipped orange bill - a 
possible hybrid? Is hybridization a threat to the Chinese Crested Tern? 


Ronald Orenstein
1825 Shady Creek Court
Mississauga, ON L5L 3W2
Canada
ronorenstein.blogspot.com
ronorensteinwriter.blogspot.com

________________________________
From: "Simba Chan simba.chan AT birdlife.org 
[orientalbirding]" 
> 

To: "orientalbirding AT yahoogroups.com" 
>; 
"Pacific Seabird Group 
(locochair AT pacificseabirdgroup.org)" 
>; 
Twsg-forum 
> 

Sent: Thursday, December 25, 2014 6:51 PM
Subject: [OB] video on Chinese Crested Tern restoration



Dear friends,

Here is a short video for your Christmas and New Year holidays:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rMU407gLXF0 


A link of the same video for those who live in China:


http://v.youku.com/v_show/id_XODU0MDU0NjE2.html 


it was done by two intern students (Andy Lee and Banson Leung) from the Ocean 
Park Conservation Foundation (Hong Kong). They stayed on the island with me 
from 12 to 28 June 2014 (and have not caused too much trouble….) 


Hope 2015 will be another good year for the Chinese Crested Tern. How about 
seeing some colour-flagged individuals in eastern Indonesia this time next 
year? 


This project has been possible through the generous support of the Xiangshan 
Ocean and Fishery Bureau, the Zhejiang Museum of Natural History, the Japan 
Fund for Global Environment, the Ocean Park Conservation Foundation (Hong 
Kong), the Hong Kong Bird watching Society, the Wild Bird Society of Zhejiang, 
the team from Oregon State University and BirdLife International Preventing 
Extinctions Programme supporter - Mark Constantine. The Ocean and Fishery 
Bureau and Natural History Museum also provided significant logistical support 
there that helped make the project such a resounding success. The US Fish and 
Wildlife Service (Wildlife Without Borders) supported the project by providing 
decoys and playback equipment needed for social attraction. And we are still 
looking for support to ensure the continual success of this project. I hope 
this will be another Asian conservation success as what we have done to bring 
back the Black-faced Spoonbill. 


With my best wishes for another great year.


Simba Chan
BirdLife International

P.S. I DO NOT look like that usually. Do not use this as my normal portrait, 
particularly for obituary purposes. Please. 








________________________________
Please consider biodiversity and the environment before deciding whether to 
print this message and any attachments. 

The content of this e-mail is intended solely for the use of the individual or 
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immediately. 

The BirdLife International Partnership is a Partnership of over 110 
conservation organizations around the world. BirdLife International the 
Secretariat to the Partnership is a UK registered company no. 2985746, 
registered Charity no. 1042125, registered address: Wellbrook Court, Girton 
Road, Cambridge CB3 0NA, UK. BirdLife International Secretariat Regional 
Offices: Amman, Brussels, Nairobi, Quito, Suva, Singapore, Tokyo. 





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------
Posted by: Simba Chan 
------------------------------------

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Subject: RE: video on Chinese Crested Tern restoration
From: "'John' burridge AT cox.net [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Dec 2014 19:05:27 -0500
Thank you for this fascinating video that brightened out holidays.

 

I hope that nobody will need a picture of you, this one or otherwise, for an 
obituary any time soon. 


 

All the best for 2015.

 

John Burridge

Rhode Island

USA 

 

From: orientalbirding AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:orientalbirding AT yahoogroups.com] 
On Behalf Of Simba Chan simba.chan AT birdlife.org [orientalbirding] 

Sent: Thursday, December 25, 2014 6:52 PM
To: orientalbirding AT yahoogroups.com; Pacific Seabird Group 
(locochair AT pacificseabirdgroup.org); Twsg-forum 

Subject: [OB] video on Chinese Crested Tern restoration

 

  

 

Dear friends,

 

Here is a short video for your Christmas and New Year holidays:

 

  
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rMU407gLXF0 


 

A link of the same video for those who live in China:

 

http://v.youku.com/v_show/id_XODU0MDU0NjE2.html

 

it was done by two intern students (Andy Lee and Banson Leung) from the Ocean 
Park Conservation Foundation (Hong Kong). They stayed on the island with me 
from 12 to 28 June 2014 (and have not caused too much trouble….) 


 

Hope 2015 will be another good year for the Chinese Crested Tern. How about 
seeing some colour-flagged individuals in eastern Indonesia this time next 
year? 


 

This project has been possible through the generous support of the Xiangshan 
Ocean and Fishery Bureau, the Zhejiang Museum of Natural History, the Japan 
Fund for Global Environment, the Ocean Park Conservation Foundation (Hong 
Kong), the Hong Kong Bird watching Society, the Wild Bird Society of Zhejiang, 
the team from Oregon State University and BirdLife International Preventing 
Extinctions Programme supporter - Mark Constantine. The Ocean and Fishery 
Bureau and Natural History Museum also provided significant logistical support 
there that helped make the project such a resounding success. The US Fish and 
Wildlife Service (Wildlife Without Borders) supported the project by providing 
decoys and playback equipment needed for social attraction. And we are still 
looking for support to ensure the continual success of this project. I hope 
this will be another Asian conservation success as what we have done to bring 
back the Black-faced Spoonbill. 


 

With my best wishes for another great year.

 

 

Simba Chan

BirdLife International

 

P.S. I DO NOT look like that usually. Do not use this as my normal portrait, 
particularly for obituary purposes. Please. 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  _____  

Please consider biodiversity and the environment before deciding whether to 
print this message and any attachments. 

The content of this e-mail is intended solely for the use of the individual or 
entity to whom it is addressed. If you have received this communication in 
error, be aware that forwarding it, copying it, or in any way disclosing its 
content to any other person, is strictly prohibited. If you have received this 
communication in error, please notify the author by replying to this e-mail 
immediately. 

The BirdLife International Partnership is a Partnership of over 110 
conservation organizations around the world. BirdLife International the 
Secretariat to the Partnership is a UK registered company no. 2985746, 
registered Charity no. 1042125, registered address: Wellbrook Court, Girton 
Road, Cambridge CB3 0NA, UK. BirdLife International Secretariat Regional 
Offices: Amman, Brussels, Nairobi, Quito, Suva, Singapore, Tokyo. 



Subject: video on Chinese Crested Tern restoration
From: "Simba Chan simba.chan AT birdlife.org [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Dec 2014 23:51:51 +0000
Dear friends,

Here is a short video for your Christmas and New Year holidays:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rMU407gLXF0

A link of the same video for those who live in China:


http://v.youku.com/v_show/id_XODU0MDU0NjE2.html 


it was done by two intern students (Andy Lee and Banson Leung) from the Ocean 
Park Conservation Foundation (Hong Kong). They stayed on the island with me 
from 12 to 28 June 2014 (and have not caused too much trouble....) 


Hope 2015 will be another good year for the Chinese Crested Tern. How about 
seeing some colour-flagged individuals in eastern Indonesia this time next 
year? 


This project has been possible through the generous support of the Xiangshan 
Ocean and Fishery Bureau, the Zhejiang Museum of Natural History, the Japan 
Fund for Global Environment, the Ocean Park Conservation Foundation (Hong 
Kong), the Hong Kong Bird watching Society, the Wild Bird Society of Zhejiang, 
the team from Oregon State University and BirdLife International Preventing 
Extinctions Programme supporter - Mark Constantine. The Ocean and Fishery 
Bureau and Natural History Museum also provided significant logistical support 
there that helped make the project such a resounding success. The US Fish and 
Wildlife Service (Wildlife Without Borders) supported the project by providing 
decoys and playback equipment needed for social attraction. And we are still 
looking for support to ensure the continual success of this project. I hope 
this will be another Asian conservation success as what we have done to bring 
back the Black-faced Spoonbill. 


With my best wishes for another great year.


Simba Chan
BirdLife International

P.S. I DO NOT look like that usually. Do not use this as my normal portrait, 
particularly for obituary purposes. Please. 



Please consider biodiversity and the environment before deciding whether to print this message and any attachments. The content of this e-mail is intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom it is addressed. If you have received this communication in error, be aware that forwarding it, copying it, or in any way disclosing its content to any other person, is strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify the author by replying to this e-mail immediately. The BirdLife International Partnership is a Partnership of over 110 conservation organizations around the world. BirdLife International the Secretariat to the Partnership is a UK registered company no. 2985746, registered Charity no. 1042125, registered address: Wellbrook Court, Girton Road, Cambridge CB3 0NA, UK. BirdLife International Secretariat Regional Offices: Amman, Brussels, Nairobi, Quito, Suva, Singapore, Tokyo.
Subject: Peninsular Malaysia observations & new accomm Fraser's Hill / 29-30 Nov 2014
From: "Remco Hofland cutia2005 AT yahoo.co.uk [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 19:06:47 +0000 (UTC)
Hi all,
My Sumba & Bali trip (see previous email) was actually just a pre-trip 
extension to my twitching a most-wanted lifer in peninsular Malaysia: Mountain 
Peacock-Pheasant. 

 On 29-30 Nov 2014, Arthur Geilvoet, David Bakewell and I visted Bukit Tinggi 
and Fraser's Hill, chasing a select group of possible lifers. Here are our main 
highlights: 

MOUNTAIN PEACOCK-PHEASANTProlonged views of two (displaying!!) males and a 
confiding female were had on Nov 29 at Bukit Tinggi. I posted several videos on 
surfbirds.com. Do not, I repeat, do not look at James Eaton's pictures on 
surfbirds.com taken during our visit, as you will want to go yourselves.... 



OLIVE-BACKED WOODPECKERProlonged views of two males (calling and territorially 
drumming) and a female in a mixed woodpecker flock in the Gap was a surprising 
find, as this is a scarce lowland specialist. I believe it was David Bakewell's 
first sighting here (and he has visited the Fraser Hill area very frequently 
the past 20 years). The exact spot was c 250m up from the 'Fraser's Hill 7 km' 
sign. 



In the same flock we saw Rufous, Checker-throated & Crimson-winged Woodpecker, 
as well as Lesser Yellownape. Greater Yellownape was also seen in the Gap, 
along with Rufous Piculet. Speckled Piculet was seen along Pine Tree Trail. The 
wanted Bamboo Woodpecker did not give itself up however. 



FERRUGINOUS PARTRIDGEOne calling at the Bukit Tinggi Peacock-Pheasant site. One 
calling extremely close to the road, but remaining out of view, at the 
Gap....too much traffic on a Sunday morning.... 



RUSTY-NAPED PITTA
One heard at Fraser's Hill.


SCALY-BREASTED BULBULLifer number two for me .. and as cute as expected. C. 5 
at Bukit Tinggi and c 7 below the Gap. 



LONG-BILLED SPIDERHUNTERLifer number three consisted of scope views of a 
preening and a feeding bird. 



YELLOW-CROWNED BARBETLifer number four. One expertly taped in by David at Bukit 
Tinggi. I never knew that barbets were tapeable....heard them dozens of times 
but seeing it is much better, especially when it was looking down at us so that 
we could appreciate all aspects of its facial patterning. 



MALAYAN LAUGHINGTHRUSHOne briefly seen by Arthur at Pine Tree Trail.


PYGMY BLUE FLYCATCHEROne seen at Pine Tree Trail.
Dips: Bamboo Woodpecker, Chestnut-naped Forktail and Railbabbler (now regular 
sightings at both Bukit Tinggi and the Gap). 



MAMMALS
I was also very pleased with a number of beautiful mammals, most noticeably
SiamangSev close to the parking at Bukit Tinggi, with many more heard at the 
Gap. 

White-thighed (Banded) LangurTwo separate pairs at the Gap.
Dusky LangurAt both Bukit Tinggi and Fraser's Hill.
Yellow-throated MartenOne crossing the (New) road at Fraser's Hill.
NEW ACCOMMODATION; Buona Vista B&B, TELEKOM LOOP
At Fraser's Hill, we were the first guests to stay at the new accommodation 
Buona Vista B&B. It is situated at the very top of the Telekom Loop, less than 
500m from where breeding Cutia has been found in the past. The B&B is run by 
Stephen Hogg (famous for his work with camera traps) and his family, and has 4 
rooms with each two beds. It is spacious, well-sited, has the best hot shower 
for miles around and Stephen's wife is an excellent cook. 



We saw (or heard) the following birds in the garden: Fire-tufted & Black-browed 
Barbet, Mountain Scops Owl (heard only), Rufous-bellied Swallow, Black Eagle, 
Spectacled Laughingthrush, Large (Javan) Cuckooshrike, Black-and-crimson 
Oriole, Orange-bellied Leafbird, White-throated Fantail, Long-tailed Sibia, 
Black-throated Sunbird, Streaked Spiderhunter & Grey-bellied Squirrel. Green 
Magpie, Long-tailed & Silver-breasted Broadbill, Blyth's Shrike-Babbler and 
Yellow-throated Marten are also regularly seen. 



The B&B can be reached at stephen.wildtrack AT gmail. com.
Best regards,
Remco Hofland

Subject: Call for records of Borneo Galliformes
From: "samuel.ei.jones AT gmail.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 24 Dec 2014 05:25:54 -0800
Dear all, 
 

 I, along with some colleagues, are in the process of collating a dataset on 
Bornean Galliformes for some current distributional analyses. This is taking 
shape through variety of sources (e.g. cam-trap survey data and opportunistic 
records). 

 

 We are particularly interested in records of Bulwers Pheasant, Bornean 
Peacock-pheasant and (Bornean) Crestless Fireback. More broadly though, we are 
interested in all and any records of pheasants and partridges throughout 
Borneo. 

 

 If you have any records, particularly of poorly-known species, that you would 
be willing to contribute and not already in published literature or through 
georeferenced sources (e.g. xeno-canto/ebird) please get in touch! 

 Basic site level information, detection type, number and date are most 
important, but extra notes will be of further use. 

 

 Thanks!
 

 Sam Jones
 

 
 samuel.ei.jones AT gmail.com
 

Subject: The 9th ARRCN Symposium 2015, Chumphon, Thailand are calling for abctract
From: "kaset sutasha kasetvet57 AT yahoo.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 23 Dec 2014 11:49:57 +0000 (UTC)
Sawasdee Dear Colleagues!

It is an honor to invite you for the 9th ARRCN Symposium 2015 in Chumphon and 
its exciting concurrent events in Thailand. 

The theme of this year’s symposium is "Global Raptor Migration – Better 
Monitoring for Conservation" The mission of ARRCN is the exchange of 
information among its members, to coordinate research on both resident and 
migratory species, and through training, education and improved public 
awareness to promote the conservation of raptors.The 9th ARRCN Symposium 2015 
will be held during 21st–25th October 2015 at the Novotel Hotel, Chumphon, 
Thailand, one of the most favored travel destinations in Asia. 

I am confident that Thailand's many attractions, friendly people, high quality 
facilities and accommodation, the truly spectacular and diverse scientific 
programs developed by the ARRCN and its partners, and the chance to visit Khao 
Dinsor, the Hawk Mountain of Asia, will provide you with a most enjoyable and 
memorable experience. 

We invite abstracts for Oral and Poster Presentations and short video films, 
based on original research on diurnal (Accipitriformes, Falconiformes) and 
nocturnal (Strigiformes) raptors from Asia, focused on the following topics: 
Conservation Biology, Ecology, Ethno-ornithology, Biogeography, Diversity, 
Migration, Taxonomy and molecular phylogeny, Pesticides, Lead poisoning and 
other threats, Rescue and rehabilitation, Bio-acoustics, Modelling & 
Bio-statistics, Conservation education, Status surveys, Captive breeding and 
husbandry, Species Protection, others. 


For further information, please visit  THE FLYWAY FOUNDATION

|   |
|   |  |   |   |   |   |   |
| THE FLYWAY FOUNDATIONTHE FLYWAY FOUNDATION is a non-profit body which helps 
promote appreciation of Thai fauna through supporting conservation-oriented 
research conducted by ... | 

|  |
| View on www.theflywayfou... | Preview by Yahoo |
|  |
|   |


Dr.Kaset Sutasha
Secretary of ARRCN Symposium 2015
Subject: Little Gull reported from Okhla Bird Sanctuary, Noida, New Delhi, India
From: "kolkatabird AT yahoo.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 22 Dec 2014 20:42:22 -0800
Dear All,
 Dr. James Lambert reports a juvenile/first-winter Little Gull (Larus minutus) 
from Okhla Bird Sanctuary (at Noida, on the Delhi-Uttar Pradesh state border ) 
on 16th December 2014. 

There was an earlier report of a Little Gull from Goa, and one from Pong Dam, 
Himachal Pradesh this year. 

 Little Gulls are considered vagrants in India and most earlier reports are 
from the Pong Dam area. 

 

 Cheers!
 Sumit
 

 Sumit K Sen
 Kolkata, India
  
Subject: records of Lesser Crested Terns in South China Sea
From: "Simba Chan simba.chan AT birdlife.org [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 22 Dec 2014 23:40:17 +0000
Dear friends,

Following my post on the crested terns last week, I would like to ask if you 
have records on Lesser Crested Terns in South China Sea. It seems this species 
is very rare in northern edge of the South China Sea, and the breeding record 
in Zhejiang Province in summer of 2014 is probably exceptional, but it is also 
very interesting as the closest documented breeding ground is probably 
Sulawesi, where the Greater Crested Terns (and even the Chinese Crested Terns) 
may spend their winter. 


I am now compiling a report on this breeding record (first in China and 
probably in SE Asia except eastern Indonesia). Would appreciate any suggestions 
and information. We can probably fill in some gaps of knowledge on seabirds in 
tropical Asia. 


With my best wishes in this festive season.

Simba Chan
BirdLife International Asia Division


Please consider biodiversity and the environment before deciding whether to print this message and any attachments. The content of this e-mail is intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom it is addressed. If you have received this communication in error, be aware that forwarding it, copying it, or in any way disclosing its content to any other person, is strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify the author by replying to this e-mail immediately. The BirdLife International Partnership is a Partnership of over 110 conservation organizations around the world. BirdLife International the Secretariat to the Partnership is a UK registered company no. 2985746, registered Charity no. 1042125, registered address: Wellbrook Court, Girton Road, Cambridge CB3 0NA, UK. BirdLife International Secretariat Regional Offices: Amman, Brussels, Nairobi, Quito, Suva, Singapore, Tokyo.
Subject: Japanese Paradise Flycatcher
From: "'James Holmes' jfholmes AT ucdavis.edu [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 20 Dec 2014 21:53:07 -0800
Anyone know if Japanese Paradise Flycatcher winters on Lanyu in Taiwan?  Do
numbers drop in winter?

 

Thanks


Jim Holmes

 
Subject: Spoonbilled Sandpiper
From: "Ole & Jeff Jakobsen olejeff AT hotmail.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 20 Dec 2014 21:17:57 +0000
I dag kl. 10:01 PMTo OBC,I am coming to Thailand 5. January and do like to look 
for Spoonbilled Sandpiper.Pak Thale - a little South of the Village has been 
the area to look for the bird. Is it also this year the best place "near" 
Bangkok to look for the bird. Is a little South of Pak Thale Village the most 
precise direction for finding the Spoonbilled Sandpiper? Kindest regards 

Ole Frode Jakobsen,Copenhagen, Denmark

olefrodejakobsen AT yahoo.com
Phone: 0045 50580091
Skype: olefrodejakobsen
 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Sundarbans oil spill
From: "'Sayam U. Chowdhury' sayam_uc AT yahoo.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 20 Dec 2014 14:55:21 +0000 (UTC)
 UN experts in Dhaka to support Sundarbans cleanup efforts (published 2 days 
ago) 


http://www.thedailystar.net/un-experts-in-dhaka-to-support-sundarbans-cleanup-efforts-56000 -----------------------------Sayam 
U. Chowdhury MPhil Student | Chevening ScholarDepartment of 
GeographyUniversity of CambridgeEmail: suc21 AT cam.ac.uksayam_uc AT yahoo.comSkype: 
sayam.ucCall:07425276464Facebook 


 On Saturday, December 20, 2014 11:34 AM, "Andy Adcock andyadcock AT ntlworld.com 
[orientalbirding]"  wrote: 

   

   Disaster....as well as the commoner species which will be effected, this is 
where a high proportion of Masked Finfoot live and breed. 

I hope there will be some international aid with the clean up?


http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/blog/2014/12/19/disaster-in-the-sundarbans/ 


Regards, Andy


-- 
Andy Adcock19Hooton RoadCarltonNottinghamNG41FZNottinghamshireEngland 07757 
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Subject: Sundarbans oil spill
From: "Andy Adcock andyadcock AT ntlworld.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 20 Dec 2014 11:34:20 +0000
Disaster....as well as the commoner species which will be effected, this is
where a high proportion of Masked Finfoot live and breed.

I hope there will be some international aid with the clean up?



http://www.surfbirds.com/community-blogs/blog/2014/12/19/disaster-in-the-sundarbans/ 



Regards, Andy



-- 
Andy Adcock
19Hooton Road
Carlton
Nottingham
NG41FZ
Nottinghamshire
England

07757 697726
Subject: OBC funds for conservation
From: "Hock ooichinhock AT gmail.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Dec 2014 07:18:51 +0800
http://orientalbirdclub.org/applications/

Ooi Chin Hock. 60122357123 iPhone
Subject: Greater Crested Terns in north-western Pacific
From: "Simba Chan simba.chan AT birdlife.org [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 06:09:29 +0000
Dear friends,

We are now working on a revised waterbird population estimation for the East 
Asian Australasian Flyway. I found the 1% threshold of Greater Crested Tern 
(subspecies Sterna bergii cristata, distribution: Japan, Taiwan, E. China, 
Indonesia - Philippines, E Australia, SW Pacific Is) to be 1,000 birds. It 
seems this is rather high to the Asian population. This summer I stayed on the 
Jiushan Islands of Zhejiang, China and counted up to 4,000 GCTs breeding there. 
The social attraction system we used on the island has apparently attracted 
most of the GCTs in eastern China to the island, as the number is much lower in 
other places we know this summer. I believe that 4,000 birds is a rather high 
proportion to the Greater Crested Terns found in Asia, or at least to the 
northern edge of its distribution. 


Sterna bergii cristata is quite numerous in northern and eastern Australia. 
This is probably the reason why the 1% threshold was set to be 1,000 birds. As 
many Australian birds have been colour-banded but to my knowledge there is no 
recovery of these flagged birds in Asia, while the birds banded in Taiwan have 
turned up in Zhejiang and Malaysia this year (and from satellite tracking 
results a few years ago, migrating pass the Philippines, southern China and 
Viet Nam), I believe these 'northern' breeding Greater Crested Terns (i.e. on 
coastal islands of the East China Sea) belong to a distinctive, migratory 
population. A new 1% threshold should be set for this population. 


Would like to invite your comments on this if you are familiar with this 
subspecies in eastern Asia/western Pacific. 


By the way, we plan to colour-band the crested terns (both Greater and Chinese, 
with luck, also Lesser) in Zhejiang in the summer of 2015. We may use the color 
sequence of red (upper)-yellow (or white) (lower) with an alphabet-number code. 
Please let us know if this colour sequence may cause confusion to any study of 
crested terns in the region (Asia, Australia and western Pacific). 


I mentioned the Lesser Crested Tern above because, a pair of Lesser Crested 
Terns turned up on the Jiushan islands this summer (May to July 2014). They 
even attempted to breed twice but failed (an egg was laid in the second attempt 
but the embryo died just before hatching). This is the second record of this 
species in China in recent years and the first breeding record in China (will 
send a full report to Birding Asia or other journals) 


With my best wishes,

Simba Chan
BirdLife International Asia Division


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Subject: Baer's Pochard and Chinese Merganser in China
From: "Simba Chan simba.chan AT birdlife.org [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2014 06:09:42 +0000
Dear OBers,

I have just learnt from weibo (China’s answer to Twitter) that 84 Baer’s 
Pochards were found at Taibai Lake of Shandong Province on 5 December. They 
were all gone by 13 December. I hope our Chinese colleagues could provide more 
information. 


A group of Chinese birdwatchers are working on a nationwide census on wintering 
Chinese Mergansers and I heard there are some good results in some locations. I 
hope our Chinese colleagues could also publish the result soon. 


Awareness on these species are getting higher in China and I believe we will 
have very positive results in cooperation of conservation on these species. 


With my best wishes

Simba Chan
BirdLife International





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conservation organizations around the world. BirdLife International the 
Secretariat to the Partnership is a UK registered company no. 2985746, 
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Road, Cambridge CB3 0NA, UK. BirdLife International Secretariat Regional 
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Subject: Sumba & Bali observations / Nov 2014
From: "Remco Hofland cutia2005 AT yahoo.co.uk [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 18:32:55 +0000 (UTC)
Hi all,
In late Nov 2014 I made a brief trip to Sumba and Bali, Indonesia. I prepared 
very badly for this trip (as I booked it only two days in advance and it was 
not a pure birding trip) and especially in Sumba I saw none of my wanted 
species (the hornbill, the cockatoo nor the Chestnut-backed Thrush). However, 
the following may be interesting to some: 

SumbaContrary to Burung-nusantara, I did not find the Newa Sumba Resort, 10 
mins drive from Tambolaka Airport, to be 'excellent birding'.  Birds I 
recorded in one afternoon and one early morning included Short-toed Eagle (with 
a snake dangling from its bill), Spotted Harrier, Brown Goshawk, Indonesian 
Honeyeater (very common at the resort in the afternoon but entirely absent the 
following morning), Sumba Brown Flycatcher, the very pretty Yellow-spectacled 
White-eye, Blood-breasted (Sumba) Flowerpecker, Plain-throated & 
Apricot-breasted Sunbird, Australasian Bushlark, Rainbow Beeeater, Common 
Sandpiper, (1 white male) Asian Paradise-Flycatcher and 1 Arctic Warbler. It 
was very hot and very dry and the habitat immediately adjacent to the resort 
consists of dry, degraded 'forest'. The resort itself is quite nice, with 
spacious wooden bungalows and good food, but there did not appear to be any 
snorkeling facilities. 


Contrary to Burung-nusantara, there now is only forest between kmp 68 and 71 
(not 72), c 10 km west of Lewa. I walked this stretch one early morning and saw 
Green Junglefowl, Oriental Honey-Buzzard, Spotted Harrier, Black-naped 
Fruitdove (sev in a fruiting tree), Marigold Lorikeet, Cinnamon-banded 
Kingfisher, Sumba Myzomela, Sumba Cuckooshrike, (Lesser) Wallacean Drongo, 
Arafura Fantail, Spectacled Monarch, Sumba Flycatcher, Ashy-bellied & 
Yellow-spectacled White-eye, Blood-breasted (Sumba) Flowerpecker, 
Apricot-breasted Sunbird, (only white males of) Asian Paradise-Flycatcher, 
quite a few Arctic Warblers, 1 Little Cuckoo-Dove, Black-naped Oriole, 
Grey-headed Canary Flycatcher and a few unidentified Apus swifts. A 
Five-coloured Munia was seen in roadside paddies about 20 km west of Lewa the 
previous afternoon, as was another Cinnamon-banded Kingfisher. 

Since the accomm mentioned in Burung-nusantara was closed, I could not contact 
any possible local guide, and decided against staying in Sumba (saving it for 
another, better-prepared trip). At Waingapu, onward flights to Kupang, Timor, 
turned out to be fully booked for the next two days, so I opted to fly back to 
Bali and chase some wanted birds there. 

BaliThis not being a pure birding trip, I basically- birded Bedugul Botanical 
Gardens two mornings- checked all rice paddies encountered for Java Sparrow and 
(my all-time Asian bogey-bird) Streaked Weaver, dipping on both :-) (but having 
great views of another lifer, White-headed Munia), and- spent one prolonged 
morning at Bali Barat National Park 

Best birds seen included
JAVAN BANDED PITTAI was surprised to hear 4 males singing and two (additional 
ones?) calling at Bedugul Botanical Gardens. Even though I did not have the 
right recordings on me, imitating their song was enough to get very good views 
of two males. The birds were heard in the area found when taking the first road 
left after entering the gardens, then take the first concrete footpath right, 
take left at its T end and then take the first right, with steps down entering 
a gully. 

SUNDA THRUSHOn my second morning of trying, one was seen well alongside a gully 
found after a stretch of c 80m lawn, after coming out of the gully described 
above. It also perched 6m up a tree. This gully also held two noisy 
FULVOUS-CHESTED JUNGLE FLYCATCHERs 

DARK-BACKED IMPERIAL PIGEONTwo heard only at Bedugul Botanical Gardens.
GREAT-BILLED HERONGreat views of 1 on an exposed reef, while boating out to 
Bali Barat at 6.30 am. 


LESSER ADJUTANTGreat views of 5 on the same exposed reef, while boating out to 
Bali Barat at 6.30 am. 

BALI MYNAFive ringed individuals were seen (and heard) displaying at Bali 
Barat's temple. 

BLACK-WINGED STARLING    Only one, flying past the Bali Myna area. Here, a 
female Green Junglefowl was also seen; White-shouldered Triller was common and 
two Wild Pigs and a Barking Deer also put in an appearance. 

RACKET-TAILED TREEPIEAs I did not know they occur (also) at Bali (& Java), but 
are absent from Sumatra, this surprise sighting of 1 in coastal scrub on the 
outskirts of Gilimanjuk was one of my highlights. 

SAVANNA NIGHTJAR7 roosting underneath mangrove scrub on the outskirts of 
Gilimanjuk; 1 calling and hunting low over Kuta beach one night. 

CERULEAN KINGFISHERGreat views of a fine, perched male, in the mangroves from 
where the boat to Bali Barat departed. 


JAVAN KINGFISHEROnly 1, in paddies just south of Bedugul.
Best regards,
Remco Hofland
 
Subject: Sulawesi observations / Aug 2014
From: "Remco Hofland cutia2005 AT yahoo.co.uk [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 17:50:13 +0000 (UTC)
Hi all,
In early August I posted a quick note about our Blue-faced Rail sightings at 
Tambun, N Sulawesi (and one on our Invisible Rails at Weda Resort, C 
Halmahera). Herewith are some other observations that might be interesting, 
from Sulawesi and the small island of Bunaken (an hr away by boat from Manado). 


GREAT-BILLED HERONOne was seen from the bus, while on our way from Pulau to 
Gorontalo, in a series of coastal (shrimp?) ponds c. 5 km south of Tinombo, on 
Aug 6 (RH only). (Btw, this road trip took 13.5 hrs and cost 275.000 INR pp in 
a shared small van) 

STRIATED HERON1 slaty-grey phased individual in Tangkoko mangroves. I don't 
know how rare this phase is but it was my first, and I have seen hundreds 
before... 

RUFOUS-WINGED BUZZARDOne in paddies near Wuasa on Aug 1. According to Birds of 
Wallacea this is not supposed to occur this far north (but things may have 
changed since this book was published). It was our only one of the trip. 

BAT HAWKOne of our evenings at Tambun, IG briefly sighted a raptor he thought 
might have been this species. 


RED-NECKED PHALAROPEA flock of 9 was flushed from the sea not far north of 
Bunaken Island (while on quite a succesful dolphin watching tour, with c 110 
dolphins seen: as far as we could tell they were Indo-Pacific Bottlenose 
Dolphin, Long-beaked Common Dolphin and Long-snouted Spinner Dolphin). 

ELEGANT PITTAOn the only morning we tried at Bunaken Island, sev responded to 
random taping in scrub across from Lorenso's (accomm) and within a few mins 
we'd seen one well. (One Purple Heron roosting in a palm tree here may have 
been a migrant?) 

Apart from these we saw the usual suspects at the usual sites (see 
Burung-nusantara and a selection of tripreports posted at Cloudbirders.com); 
DIPPED however were: 

Of all the endemics, Piping Crow& Sulawesi (Masked) Owl were heard only; 
furthermore, we dipped SnoringRail, Sulawesi Woodcock, Maroon-backed Whistler, 
(Sulawesi) Mountain Serin,Minahassa (Masked) Owl, Sulawesi (Short-crested) 
Myna, Scaly-breastedKingfisher, Pale-headed Munia, Rufous-throated Flycatcher, 
BarredHoney-Buzzard and Vinous-breasted Sparrowhawk.  Wedid not visit sites 
for the following endemics: Lompobattang Flycatcher,Pale-bellied Myna, 
Pale-bellied White-eye (all three only found around Makassar,in the south) and 
the recently-described Sulawesi Streaked Flycatcher andMatinan Blue Flycatcher. 

(Other) MAMMALS recorded
Celebes Crested Macaque – Macaca nigra: 3x a group, one lonemale, 
TangkokoSpectral Tarsier – Tarsius spectrum: 6, 4 and 8respectively in three 
different ficus trees, TangkokoBear Cuscus– Ailurops ursinus: 3-4 on 
different dates, Tangkoko     Dog-facedFlying Fox sp: 1 Tangkoko 

REPTILES recorded
Dog-faced Water Snake – Cerberusschneiderii: 1 of what was probably this 
species, lying under water, partlyconcealed by a rock, Tangkoko 
mangrovesBroad-banded Temple Pitviper – Tropidolaemus laticinctus: 1, found 
as it was beingharassed by Celebes Crested Macaques, Tangkoko (pix published at 
ecologyasia.org) 

Bornean Keeled Green Pitviper –Tropidolaemus subannulatus: 1 
TangkokoColubrine Sea Snake – Laticaudacolubrine: 1 while diving at Bunaken, 
at c 10m depth (IG, HG)CommonSun Skink – Mabuya multifasciata 

Best regards,
Remco Hofland & Ies & Hannah Goedbloed
Subject: film about "old magazine house" top destination for birders in karnataka, south india
From: "David Stanton goabirdingsafari AT gmail.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 19:36:34 +0530
hello
please watch my latest film about "old magazine house". this nature camp in
north west karnataka close to goa has become top destination for birders
and has a list of over 200 western ghats forest birds.
http://youtu.be/sm6HY1jFyw4


(i forgot to add the link in my last mail)


david
Subject: film about "old magazine house" top destination for birders in karnataka, south india
From: "David Stanton goabirdingsafari AT gmail.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2014 09:38:32 +0530
hello
please watch my latest film about "old magazine house". this nature camp in
north west karnataka close to goa has become top destination for birders
and has a list of over 200 western ghats forest birds.
Subject: The birds of Bharatpur and the babus of Delhi
From: "Subramanian Sankar subbush AT gmail.com [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2014 08:18:03 +0530
http://m.thehindu.com/opinion/open-page/the-birds-of-bharatpur-and-the-babus-of-delhi/article6578660.ece/ 


It appeared that a unit of the U.S. Army called Migratory Animal
Pathological Survey was interested in the project. The Army’s interest lay
in knowing whether bacteria were being transmitted by the migrating birds.
The project offered an excellent means of investigation and therefore had
acquired an ominous significance. For the novice Deputy Secretary, unused
to such international cloak-and-dagger stuff, it was all like a John Le
Carre novel with the field agent not knowing whether he was the hunter or
the hunted. The man’s words explained the caution on the part of the
officers he met and were terrifying.

Subramanian Sankar
Chennai


-- 
Sent from Gmail Mobile
Subject: RE: Re: Bird flu and industrialized farming
From: "'David Melville' david.melville AT xtra.co.nz [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2014 16:01:29 +1300
Hi Norman,

It appears that the thesis attachment was been 'lost' [I think OBC does not
allow attachmennts] - is there somewhere to download from?

Many thanks

David


-----Original Message-----
From: orientalbirding AT yahoogroups.com
[mailto:orientalbirding AT yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of 'norman deans van
swelm' Norman.vanswelm AT wxs.nl [orientalbirding]
Sent: 14 December 2014 12:42
To: nial moores; Dr. Martin WILLIAMS; OBC OBC
Subject: Re: [OB] Re: Bird flu and industrialized farming

No proof Nial let alone compelling proof! Yet the very day the recent
outbreak in The Netherlands became public, experts both here and from the EU
and FAO were cock sure: the culprit was a migrant bird. Not much different
from the previous outbreak in 2004/2005 when immediately passing Mallards
Anas platyrhynchos were blamed. Clearly all interested parties had
beforehand agreed to lay a smokescreen if and when an outbreak of poultry
flu occurred again.

Right at the start one Dutch virologist claimed it could very well be Bewick
Swans Cygnus columbianus as these were passing The Netherlands on their way
to England, he referred to the fact that H5N8 had been found in a wild swan
in Japan so obviously there could be a connection. 

Near the only infected farm in Germany a 'wild duck' was shot which turned
out to be a Teal Anas creccca which appeared to be infected with the virus.
Some time later samples of infected feaces from two Wigeon Anas penelope
were collected in the fields near one of the Dutch farms. A sigh of relief,
case closed: the Wigeon did it! 
As to the question how the Wigeon had been able to infect the poultry inside
the biosecure farm the explanation was that somehow infected feaces was
brought into the (not so) secure area. 
What we do know from the previous outbreak in 2004/2005 is that wastewater
and manure from infected farms in E.and SE Europe were released into nearby
lakes and fields and that consequently Mute Swans Cygnus olor  which fed in
the vicinity died en masse. Blaming wild birds makes it easier of course to
claim damages from the government and leads public opinion away from the
true source of the disease, the poultry industry. 
Ironicly a recent dissertation which was partly released this summer (see
attachment) had shown that freshly arrived 'clean' migrant ducks from
northern Europe were infected with Avian flu virusses after they had arrived
in The Netherlands .
Cheers, Norman


Nial Moores writes: >There are quite a few experts on wild birds on this
list. So hope it is okay to ask here: does anyone know of any confirmed
instance(s) please of a wild bird infecting poultry in a (relatively)
biosecure unit with Poultry Flu (or Avian Influenza as most still persist in
calling it)?  

We are aware of instances of sparrows, crows and other species near poultry
that were infected, but only really having knowledge of outbreaks in the
ROK, we are not yet aware of any instance where it was actually proven that
these birds were (a) not themselves infected by infected poultry; or (b)
that poultry in biosecure units were infected as a result of coming into
contact with them.  

We are therefore looking for truly compelling proof please - for example a
case in which AI-infected free-flying Baikal Teal, Eurasian Teal or Wigeon
have been found inside a poultry factory in which the poultry had earlier
been tested and showed no evidence of infection before those wild birds were
found there, but showed infection with the same strain subsequently, in
accordance with expected virus incubation rates.  And if there is such an
example, we are also seeking proof that the virus did not instead arrive
after the infected wild birds were found at the same (hypothetical and
relatively) biosecure poultry factory through the movement of  people,
including inspectors moving between outbreak farms, or poultry or transport
vehicles from elsewhere, legal or otherwise. 

If such undeniably strong evidence exists, is it possible please to share
the citation and / or a link to the paper(s) please?  Thank you.

Of course anything is possible, but this really is the kind of evidence that
we also need if we are to understand the use of "vice versa" in one of the
key messages in the December 3rd statement by the Scientific Task Force on
Avian Influenza and Wild Birds:


  "Most detections have been at relatively biosecure poultry production
facilities but with some detections in wild bird species - with wild birds
possibly being infected by poultry and vice versa"


  (Full text of this statement can be found at:
http://www.birdskorea.org/Our_Work/H5N1/BK-H5-Poultry-Flu.shtml)


  Best wishes,


  Nial Moores PhD (Conservation of Avian Biodiversity)
  Birds Korea 

  E-mail: Nial.Moores AT birdskorea.org
  http://www.birdskorea.org 
  http://www.birdskorea.or.kr 
  http://www.birdskoreablog.org

  Birds Korea: Dedicated to the conservation of birds and their habitats in
Korea and the wider Yellow Sea Eco-region. 





----------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
  From: orientalbirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
  To: orientalbirding AT yahoogroups.com
  Date: Thu, 11 Dec 2014 20:13:45 +0800
  Subject: [OB] Re: Bird flu and industrialized farming



  Thanks, Avin


  Link didn't appear, but here:
http://www.vancouversun.com/opinion/op-ed/Opinion+Industrialization+livestoc
k+farming+blame+avian/10453932/story.html


  - much as several of us have been arguing for some time.


  [Not FAO sponsored conservationists in some cases, tho; not strongly
enough anyway]


  Martin


  Dr Martin Williams. 



  

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------

------------------------------------

This group is run in association with the Oriental Bird Club. To find out
more about the Club and its conservation work, and to become a member,
please visit www.orientalbirdclub.org
------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links





------------------------------------
Posted by: "David Melville" 
------------------------------------

This group is run in association with the Oriental Bird Club. To find out more 
about the Club and its conservation work, and to become a member, please visit 
www.orientalbirdclub.org 

------------------------------------

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Subject: Re: Re: Bird flu and industrialized farming
From: "'norman deans van swelm' Norman.vanswelm AT wxs.nl [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2014 09:50:43 +0100
You are correct David, the attachment did not make it to OBC therefore I 
have send it to you personally.
Cheers, Norman


> It appears that the thesis attachment was been 'lost' [I think OBC does 
> not
> allow attachmennts] - is there somewhere to download from?
>
> Many thanks
>
> David
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: orientalbirding AT yahoogroups.com
> [mailto:orientalbirding AT yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of 'norman deans van
> swelm' Norman.vanswelm AT wxs.nl [orientalbirding]
> Sent: 14 December 2014 12:42
> To: nial moores; Dr. Martin WILLIAMS; OBC OBC
> Subject: Re: [OB] Re: Bird flu and industrialized farming
>
> No proof Nial let alone compelling proof! Yet the very day the recent
> outbreak in The Netherlands became public, experts both here and from the 
> EU
> and FAO were cock sure: the culprit was a migrant bird. Not much different
> from the previous outbreak in 2004/2005 when immediately passing Mallards
> Anas platyrhynchos were blamed. Clearly all interested parties had
> beforehand agreed to lay a smokescreen if and when an outbreak of poultry
> flu occurred again.
>
> Right at the start one Dutch virologist claimed it could very well be 
> Bewick
> Swans Cygnus columbianus as these were passing The Netherlands on their 
> way
> to England, he referred to the fact that H5N8 had been found in a wild 
> swan
> in Japan so obviously there could be a connection.
>
> Near the only infected farm in Germany a 'wild duck' was shot which turned
> out to be a Teal Anas creccca which appeared to be infected with the 
> virus.
> Some time later samples of infected feaces from two Wigeon Anas penelope
> were collected in the fields near one of the Dutch farms. A sigh of 
> relief,
> case closed: the Wigeon did it!
> As to the question how the Wigeon had been able to infect the poultry 
> inside
> the biosecure farm the explanation was that somehow infected feaces was
> brought into the (not so) secure area.
> What we do know from the previous outbreak in 2004/2005 is that wastewater
> and manure from infected farms in E.and SE Europe were released into 
> nearby
> lakes and fields and that consequently Mute Swans Cygnus olor  which fed 
> in
> the vicinity died en masse. Blaming wild birds makes it easier of course 
> to
> claim damages from the government and leads public opinion away from the
> true source of the disease, the poultry industry.
> Ironicly a recent dissertation which was partly released this summer (see
> attachment) had shown that freshly arrived 'clean' migrant ducks from
> northern Europe were infected with Avian flu virusses after they had 
> arrived
> in The Netherlands .
> Cheers, Norman
>
>
> Nial Moores writes: >There are quite a few experts on wild birds on this
> list. So hope it is okay to ask here: does anyone know of any confirmed
> instance(s) please of a wild bird infecting poultry in a (relatively)
> biosecure unit with Poultry Flu (or Avian Influenza as most still persist 
> in
> calling it)?
>
> We are aware of instances of sparrows, crows and other species near 
> poultry
> that were infected, but only really having knowledge of outbreaks in the
> ROK, we are not yet aware of any instance where it was actually proven 
> that
> these birds were (a) not themselves infected by infected poultry; or (b)
> that poultry in biosecure units were infected as a result of coming into
> contact with them.
>
> We are therefore looking for truly compelling proof please - for example a
> case in which AI-infected free-flying Baikal Teal, Eurasian Teal or Wigeon
> have been found inside a poultry factory in which the poultry had earlier
> been tested and showed no evidence of infection before those wild birds 
> were
> found there, but showed infection with the same strain subsequently, in
> accordance with expected virus incubation rates.  And if there is such an
> example, we are also seeking proof that the virus did not instead arrive
> after the infected wild birds were found at the same (hypothetical and
> relatively) biosecure poultry factory through the movement of  people,
> including inspectors moving between outbreak farms, or poultry or 
> transport
> vehicles from elsewhere, legal or otherwise.
>
> If such undeniably strong evidence exists, is it possible please to share
> the citation and / or a link to the paper(s) please?  Thank you.
>
> Of course anything is possible, but this really is the kind of evidence 
> that
> we also need if we are to understand the use of "vice versa" in one of the
> key messages in the December 3rd statement by the Scientific Task Force on
> Avian Influenza and Wild Birds:
>
>
>  "Most detections have been at relatively biosecure poultry production
> facilities but with some detections in wild bird species - with wild birds
> possibly being infected by poultry and vice versa"
>
>
>  (Full text of this statement can be found at:
> http://www.birdskorea.org/Our_Work/H5N1/BK-H5-Poultry-Flu.shtml)
>
>
>  Best wishes,
>
>
>  Nial Moores PhD (Conservation of Avian Biodiversity)
>  Birds Korea
>
>  E-mail: Nial.Moores AT birdskorea.org
>  http://www.birdskorea.org
>  http://www.birdskorea.or.kr
>  http://www.birdskoreablog.org
>
>  Birds Korea: Dedicated to the conservation of birds and their habitats in
> Korea and the wider Yellow Sea Eco-region.
>
>
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
> --
>  From: orientalbirding-noreply AT yahoogroups.com
>  To: orientalbirding AT yahoogroups.com
>  Date: Thu, 11 Dec 2014 20:13:45 +0800
>  Subject: [OB] Re: Bird flu and industrialized farming
>
>
>
>  Thanks, Avin
>
>
>  Link didn't appear, but here:
> http://www.vancouversun.com/opinion/op-ed/Opinion+Industrialization+livestoc
> k+farming+blame+avian/10453932/story.html
>
>
>  - much as several of us have been arguing for some time.
>
>
>  [Not FAO sponsored conservationists in some cases, tho; not strongly
> enough anyway]
>
>
>  Martin
>
>
>  Dr Martin Williams.
>
>
>
>
>
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> This group is run in association with the Oriental Bird Club. To find out
> more about the Club and its conservation work, and to become a member,
> please visit www.orientalbirdclub.org
> ------------------------------------
>
> Yahoo Groups Links
>
>
>



------------------------------------
Posted by: "norman deans van swelm" 
------------------------------------

This group is run in association with the Oriental Bird Club. To find out more 
about the Club and its conservation work, and to become a member, please visit 
www.orientalbirdclub.org 

------------------------------------

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Subject: RE: Forktail 30?
From: "'OBC admin' obc.admin AT virgin.net [orientalbirding]" <orientalbirding-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 14 Dec 2014 07:44:41 -0000
Forktail 30 is now at the printers and will be distributed to OBC members
before the end of the year.

OBC Admin

 

From: orientalbirding AT yahoogroups.com
[mailto:orientalbirding AT yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of 'Richard Klim'
richard AT klim.co.uk [orientalbirding]
Sent: 13 December 2014 18:37
To: orientalbirding AT yahoogroups.com
Subject: [OB] Forktail 30?

 

  

Last year, Forktail 29 was published considerably later than usual (in
November, although dated September 2013).  I'm sure that I'm not alone in
eagerly anticipating Forktail 30, but publication is clearly going to be
even later.  Does OBC still expect to publish an issue this year?

Thanks in advance for any update on the planned schedule.

Richard Klim
Somerset, UK





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[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------
Posted by: "OBC admin" 
------------------------------------

This group is run in association with the Oriental Bird Club. To find out more 
about the Club and its conservation work, and to become a member, please visit 
www.orientalbirdclub.org 

------------------------------------

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<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
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