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Updated on Saturday, July 12 at 11:06 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Grey Grasswren,©BirdQuest

12 Jul Re: First Monarch and she's laying eggs! ["Sheila Rosenberg SheilaR235 AT aol.com [NYSButterflies]" ]
12 Jul Re: First Monarch and she's laying eggs! ["CINDI GIRARD ccindigirard AT yahoo.com [NYSButterflies]" ]
12 Jul RE: First Monarch and she's laying eggs! ["Meena Madhav Haribal mmh3 AT cornell.edu [NYSButterflies]" ]
12 Jul First Monarch and she's laying eggs! ["'Colleen / spider99' spider99 AT stny.rr.com [NYSButterflies]" ]
11 Jul Primrose Moths are flying ["'Colleen / spider99' spider99 AT stny.rr.com [NYSButterflies]" ]
2 Jun west virginia white ["Henry Halama henryhalama AT verizon.net [NYSButterflies]" ]
26 May Boreal butterflies - Jutta Arctic ["Steven Daniel natdisc AT gmail.com [NYSButterflies]" ]
20 May Recent sightings - St. Lawrence County WV Whites, Giant Swallowtail, Meadow Frits ["Steven Daniel natdisc AT gmail.com [NYSButterflies]" ]
7 May FOS [Henry Halama ]
29 Apr elfins [Henry Halama ]
21 Apr spring azure [Henry Halama ]
14 Apr Mourning Cloak [Linda Eastman ]
13 Apr cabbage white [Henry Halama ]
11 Apr new New York group vs. old New York group vs. Facebook [Harry Pavulaan ]
7 Apr ? [Henry Halama ]
6 Apr Re: {New York Leps} Re: posting & sightings [Steven Daniel ]
6 Apr Mourning cloak and eastern commas [Steven Daniel ]
5 Apr Re: posting & sightings ["John and Sue Gregoire" ]
5 Apr Re: posting & sightings [Steven Daniel ]
5 Apr Re: posting & sightings ["John and Sue Gregoire" ]
5 Apr posting & sightings [Thomas Fiore ]
4 Apr My Error []
4 Apr RE: Mourning Cloak [Meena Madhav Haribal ]
3 Apr Re: Bronx Co. leps Friday & Sat. 3/21-22 []
3 Apr Mourning Cloak []
1 Apr mourning cloak [Henry Halama ]
27 Mar RE: Migratory Dragonfly Short Course - Sterling Nature Center [Meena Madhav Haribal ]
22 Mar Bronx Co. leps Friday & Sat. 3/21-22 [Thomas Fiore ]
17 Mar Re: {New York Leps} RE: Mourning cloak request [Steven Daniel ]
17 Mar Re: Mourning cloak request [r cech ]
17 Mar RE: Mourning cloak request [Meena Madhav Haribal ]
16 Mar Mourning cloak request [Steven Daniel ]
11 Mar Google Groups Invitation: New York Leps ["Steven Daniel (Google Groups)" ]
11 Mar Mourning Cloak! (and listserv discussion) [Steven Daniel ]
13 Jan Monsanto and Sulfur Butterflies [Gary Stell ]
23 Oct Re: Monarch butterflies, 2013 ["John and Sue Gregoire" ]
22 Oct Monarch butterflies, 2013 [Thomas Fiore ]
22 Oct Monarch butterflies, 2013 [Thomas Fiore ]
12 Oct Female Checkered Skipper in my yard! [Meena Madhav Haribal ]
11 Oct RE: Bronze Copper ["John and Sue Gregoire" ]
11 Oct RE: Bronze Copper [Meena Madhav Haribal ]
10 Oct Bronze Copper ["John and Sue Gregoire" ]
09 Oct Re: more on Monarchs [Ernest Williams ]
9 Oct more on Monarchs [Thomas Fiore ]
8 Oct RE: Ithaca butterflies [Meena Madhav Haribal ]
6 Oct Re: Ithaca butterflies [Henry Halama ]
6 Oct Ithaca butterflies [Meena Madhav Haribal ]
5 Oct LI Coastal Butterflies, 10/5 ["Rick" ]
29 Sep Re: a sad loss: Nicholas Wagerik, naturalist [Kristine Wallstrom ]
29 Sep Re: a sad loss: Nicholas Wagerik, naturalist [Kristine Wallstrom ]
26 Sep sightings [Andrew Block ]
26 Sep Monarchs and Sulphurs migrating [Meena Madhav Haribal ]
19 Sep Monarch migration ["John and Sue Gregoire" ]
12 Sep Eastern Long Islsnd [Henry Halama ]
10 Sep Unadilla leps [Andrew Block ]
11 Sep Catocala spp. [Meena Madhav Haribal ]
8 Sep Interesting commercial butterfly organization ["John and Sue Gregoire" ]
8 Sep south Brooklyn butterflies, Sept. 7 [Thomas Fiore ]
4 Sep Giant swallowtails and Monarch [Meena Madhav Haribal ]
31 Aug End of August butterflies [Henry Halama ]
30 Aug Re: Giant Swallowtails ["John and Sue Gregoire" ]
30 Aug Giant Swallowtails [Meena Madhav Haribal ]
28 Aug Giant Swallowtail []
24 Aug RE: Dr. Chip Taylor - Monarch Watch [Gary Stell ]
24 Aug Re: Dr. Chip Taylor - Monarch Watch ["John and Sue Gregoire" ]
24 Aug Re: Dr. Chip Taylor - Monarch Watch ["John and Sue Gregoire" ]
23 Aug Dr. Chip Taylor - Monarch Watch [Ber Carr ]
20 Aug Re: Great Basin form of Great Spangled Fritillary and some notes on milkweeds ["John and Sue Gregoire" ]
20 Aug Great Basin form of Great Spangled Fritillary and some notes on milkweeds [Meena Madhav Haribal ]
14 Aug Moth invasion ["fuzzbuckets" ]
6 Aug Re: Giant Swallowtails ["John and Sue Gregoire" ]
6 Aug Re: Giant Swallowtails ["John and Sue Gregoire" ]
6 Aug Giant Swallowtails ["John and Sue Gregoire" ]
5 Aug Leps in last few days [Meena Madhav Haribal ]
4 Aug Nellie Hill Preserve, Dutchess County - Aug. 3, 2013 []
25 Jul Events in the Finger Lakes for National Moth Week ["Bill E" ]

Subject: Re: First Monarch and she's laying eggs!
From: "Sheila Rosenberg SheilaR235 AT aol.com [NYSButterflies]" <NYSButterflies@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 12 Jul 2014 23:40:56 -0400
We were thrilled to record 19 Monarchs yesterday on NABA's Lake Placid, NY 
count, which is a higher than average number in the count's 21 year history! 
And to think that last year we had none. It will be interesting to learn the 
number of Monarchs that return to Mexico this year. 


Sheila Rosenberg

NYC and Paul Smiths, NY
On Jul 12, 2014, at 11:58 AM, 'Colleen / spider99' spider99 AT stny.rr.com 
[NYSButterflies] wrote: 


> 
> Hey Lep Lovers,
> I am so excited to have a female Monarch hanging around my milkweed this 
morning. She rests, then lays some eggs, then rests. Until recently, many of us 
took this for granted. Now it seems so much more important! 

>  
> Colleen Wolpert
> Apalachin, NY
>  
> “Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.” 
> ― Dr. Seuss
> 
> 
Subject: Re: First Monarch and she's laying eggs!
From: "CINDI GIRARD ccindigirard AT yahoo.com [NYSButterflies]" <NYSButterflies@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 12 Jul 2014 09:19:52 -0700
AWESOME!!!!!! 


On Saturday, July 12, 2014 12:17 PM, "Meena Madhav Haribal mmh3 AT cornell.edu 
[NYSButterflies]"  wrote: 

  


  
I saw mine (Monarch) on this Wednesday July 9 in Cornell Plantations on Cornell 
Campus. Today I was in my garden just a few moments ago and I found very few 
insects on the flowers.  A Great Spangled Fritillary just went past me, a few 
hoverflies and some insects similar to that but smaller, a few species of wasps 
and one damselfly (a female Powdered Dancer) and one dragonfly probably a 
glider, it was too quick for me to determine the species. No bumble bee of any 
kind, last year at this time I was taking pictures of verities of bumble bees. 
I have both native and non native flowers in bloom. 

  
  
Also when I was at a gas station I saw two Spot-winged gliders (dragonflies) 
were incessantly patrolling the patrol buyers and often seemed to snap an 
insect.  I am curious to know why there are so many gliders at gas stations? 
Are there any kinds of insects that are attracted to gasoline? 

  
Cheers 
Meena  
Meena Haribal 
Ithaca NY 14850 
 42.429007,-76.47111 
http://haribal.org/ 
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/  

  

________________________________
 
From: NYSButterflies AT yahoogroups.com  on behalf 
of 'Colleen / spider99' spider99 AT stny.rr.com [NYSButterflies] 
 

Sent: Saturday, July 12, 2014 11:58 AM
To: nyleps AT googlegroups.com; NYS Butterflies
Subject: [NYSButterflies] First Monarch and she's laying eggs! 
 



Hey Lep Lovers, 
I am so excited to have a female Monarch hanging around my milkweed this 
morning.  She rests, then lays some eggs, then rests.  Until recently, many 
of us took this for granted.  Now it seems so much more important! 

  
Colleen Wolpert 
Apalachin, NY 
  
“Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.” 
― Dr. Seuss  

      
 
Subject: RE: First Monarch and she's laying eggs!
From: "Meena Madhav Haribal mmh3 AT cornell.edu [NYSButterflies]" <NYSButterflies@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 12 Jul 2014 16:17:14 +0000
I saw mine (Monarch) on this Wednesday July 9 in Cornell Plantations on Cornell 
Campus. Today I was in my garden just a few moments ago and I found very few 
insects on the flowers. A Great Spangled Fritillary just went past me, a few 
hoverflies and some insects similar to that but smaller, a few species of wasps 
and one damselfly (a female Powdered Dancer) and one dragonfly probably a 
glider, it was too quick for me to determine the species. No bumble bee of any 
kind, last year at this time I was taking pictures of verities of bumble bees. 
I have both native and non native flowers in bloom. 






Also when I was at a gas station I saw two Spot-winged gliders (dragonflies) 
were incessantly patrolling the patrol buyers and often seemed to snap an 
insect. I am curious to know why there are so many gliders at gas stations? Are 
there any kinds of insects that are attracted to gasoline? 




Cheers

Meena

Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
42.429007,-76.47111
http://haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/


________________________________
From: NYSButterflies AT yahoogroups.com  on behalf 
of 'Colleen / spider99' spider99 AT stny.rr.com [NYSButterflies] 
 

Sent: Saturday, July 12, 2014 11:58 AM
To: nyleps AT googlegroups.com; NYS Butterflies
Subject: [NYSButterflies] First Monarch and she's laying eggs!



Hey Lep Lovers,
I am so excited to have a female Monarch hanging around my milkweed this 
morning. She rests, then lays some eggs, then rests. Until recently, many of us 
took this for granted. Now it seems so much more important! 


Colleen Wolpert
Apalachin, NY

"Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened."
? Dr. Seuss


Subject: First Monarch and she's laying eggs!
From: "'Colleen / spider99' spider99 AT stny.rr.com [NYSButterflies]" <NYSButterflies@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 12 Jul 2014 11:58:13 -0400
Hey Lep Lovers,
I am so excited to have a female Monarch hanging around my milkweed this 
morning. She rests, then lays some eggs, then rests. Until recently, many of us 
took this for granted. Now it seems so much more important! 


Colleen Wolpert
Apalachin, NY

"Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened." 
? Dr. Seuss 
Subject: Primrose Moths are flying
From: "'Colleen / spider99' spider99 AT stny.rr.com [NYSButterflies]" <NYSButterflies@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 11 Jul 2014 23:37:40 -0400
I am no longer sure where to post photos for these groups, but I know many 
of you enjoy checking Oenothera biennis flowers each year for the Primrose 
Moth. It attempts to hide during the day in the yellow flowers that pink as 
they fade. I had my first of the season in my yard today (7/11/14), so I 
thought I would alert others to be looking.
Enjoy,
Colleen Wolpert 



------------------------------------
Posted by: "Colleen / spider99" 
------------------------------------


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Subject: west virginia white
From: "Henry Halama henryhalama AT verizon.net [NYSButterflies]" <NYSButterflies@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 2 Jun 2014 08:35:39 -0700 (PDT)
yesterday, 6/1, I saw the following fos species in northern ulster county:

west virginia white, northern cloudywing and wild indigo duskywing.

henry halama
Woodstock
Subject: Boreal butterflies - Jutta Arctic
From: "Steven Daniel natdisc AT gmail.com [NYSButterflies]" <NYSButterflies@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 26 May 2014 07:46:00 -0400
A visit yesterday afternoon, May 25, to the Massawepie Mire, St. Lawrence 
County, rewarded Joan Zeller and I with good long looks at Jutta Arctic. We had 
2, and about an hour later, 2 more, near the same location. So perhaps these 
were the same individuals. They were pretty fresh, though one had a small bird 
bite out of the lower margin of the hind wing. They were fairly cooperative, 
and one landed on me, and was about to pose for a picture when another flew by 
and off it went. They would land on black spruce trunks and branches, and also 
did frequent puddling. A real treat to see, despite swarms of black flies and 
mosquitos! 


Other butterflies:
Brown elfin - around 30
Eastern pine elfin - 1
Azure spp - many dozens, puddling often puddling in small groups, perhaps 75+/-

An indication of how late the spring is here compared to most other parts of 
the state - trout lilies were in full bloom. 


Thanks to Jeff Bolsinger and Bernie Carr for great info on good access points 
for the large bog. 


Steven Daniel




------------------------------------
Posted by: Steven Daniel 
------------------------------------

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Subject: Recent sightings - St. Lawrence County WV Whites, Giant Swallowtail, Meadow Frits
From: "Steven Daniel natdisc AT gmail.com [NYSButterflies]" <NYSButterflies@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 20 May 2014 20:05:10 -0400
I last reported about my surprise at the numbers of West Virginia whites in the 
Cedar Lake, Edwards area. That weekend (9 - 11 May) I probably observed over a 
hundred different individuals, including mating pairs (photographed) and what 
appeared to be oviposition behavior on two-leaved toothwort. Since then numbers 
have dropped quite a bit - that appeared to be a peak emergence time, though 
many are still on the wing almost anywhere I go in this area in suitable 
habitat. And there appears to be plenty of good habitat in this region.. This 
part of the state, (along with Allegany SP) has the best population of WVW I 
have seen anywhere in NY. Today, in the Towns of Macomb and Rossie, Anne 
Johnson and I observed several individuals - probably a dozen or more in total 
- often flying in rich woodlands. Along roadsides some were nectaring on garlic 
mustard. There is not a lot of garlic mustard in these parts. Hopefully garlic 
mustard won't become the problem it is elsewhere in the state, and the strong 
population here will remain robust for some time to come. 


Other butterflies the last couple of days:
-Canadian tiger swallowtail (assume) - 5 - roadsides, towns of Rossie and 
Macomb today 5/20 

-Giant swallowtail 1 puddling along roadside 5/20
-Cabbage white - roadsides and fields - just a few
-Eastern pine elfin - 3 individuals in total, some nectaring on low bush 
blueberry 5/11, 5/19 Trout Lake Forest on cliffs above Cedar Lake 

-Azure spp - not certain if these are cherry gall azure (serotina) and/or 
northern spring azures ( lucia). Many individuals are flying in variety of 
habitats. I have pics of one nectaring on low bush blueberry. 

-Meadow fritillary - 6 very fresh individuals flying over meadow on State 
Forest land in Macomb 5/20 

- Gray Comma 5/19 Cedar Lake
- Juvenal's dusky wing 1 5/20 Macomb. 5/19 1 Cedar Lake (Trout Lake State 
Forest) 


On the moth front, lots of white-striped blacks are on the wing. At my light at 
Cedar Lake last night I had my first rosy maple moths of the season, plus good 
varieties of others awaiting more study time. 


Steven Daniel



------------------------------------
Posted by: Steven Daniel 
------------------------------------

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Subject: FOS
From: Henry Halama <henryhalama AT verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 7 May 2014 17:22:16 -0700 (PDT)
Today, 5/7, I observed the following butterflies in Northern Ulster county:

Cabbage White
Falcate Orangetip FOS
Eastern Pine Elfin FOS
Spring Azure
Eastern Tailed Blue FOS
Pearl Crescent FOS
Eastern Comma
Mourning Cloak
American Lady FOS 

Henry Halama
Woodstock


 













































FOS
Subject: elfins
From: Henry Halama <henryhalama AT verizon.net>
Date: Tue, 29 Apr 2014 14:05:38 -0700 (PDT)
yesterday, May 28, under sunny sky at temperature around 65F I observed in 
Amagansett, Eastern Long Island the following species: 

Brown Elfin, FOS, 15, some mating.
Hoary Elfin, FOS, 2 (my life butterfly)
Cabbage White 3
Henry Halama
Woodstock
Subject: spring azure
From: Henry Halama <henryhalama AT verizon.net>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 17:20:28 -0700 (PDT)
To day, 4/20I saw my FOS Spring Azure,more than a month late.
Henry Halama
Woodstock
Subject: Mourning Cloak
From: Linda Eastman <fuzzbuckets AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Apr 2014 07:45:43 -0700 (PDT)
Saw a first of season Mourning Cloak in Broadalbin, NY this AM.
Linda E. Eastman


in the Great Adirondacks of Upstate New York, barely in zone 4.
Subject: cabbage white
From: Henry Halama <henryhalama AT verizon.net>
Date: Sun, 13 Apr 2014 16:52:42 -0700 (PDT)
To day Iobserved 3 FOS Cabbage Whites,
1 Eastern Comma and4 Mourning Cloaks including 1 mating pair.
Every year I drill small holes in 1 or 2 Sugar Maples to provide the sap for 
nectaring. This year I also had help from an unknown insect. Mourning Cloaks 
always come, but never an Eastern Comma. 

Henry Halama
Woodstock
Subject: new New York group vs. old New York group vs. Facebook
From: Harry Pavulaan <harrypav AT hotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 11 Apr 2014 17:24:16 +0000
All:

 

After the last poll to transfer moderatorship of NYSButterflies in order to 
keep the group alive, I tried, several times, to get Yahoo Groups customer 
"service" to respond. Repeated (resent) emails were apparently ignored.I tried 
several times to contact Yahoo Groups but my inquiries were ignored. I had 
several phone numbers, but after being given a complete runaround and 
constantly directed back to the website request form, I gave up. 


 

Barring some way to "delete" the old group, I'd suggest we leave that group 
alive as an archive, but if possible move old Yahoo Group messages over to the 
Google Group, that would be nice, in the name of continuity. 


 

Regarding Facebook. I started the oceanstatebutterflies Yahoo discussion group 
several years ago with good success. After hearing of the success of the 
Massachusetts Facebook group, and the growing number of Facebook naturalist 
groups, it became quite evident that some folks, especially those handy with 
cameras, simply prefer Facebook groups over the traditional email discussion 
groups. I subsequently started the Rhode Island Butterflies and Moths Facebook 
group with the goal of bringing in more people who weren't interested in 
joining the Yahoo group, and several of the Yahoo members also joined the 
Facebook group. Facebook clearly seems to be the preferred method of posting 
for many people, not only for ease of posting photos but also sighting lists. 
The advantage is that folks can post almost instantly via Facebook and 
distribute images. In Yahoo, one must upload images to the photos folder. 


 

Both groups have advantages and disadvantages. The Facebook group is good for 
rapid dissemination of images and hot sightings, but not exactly the best for 
posting more detailed observations, or for archival purposes and management. 
The traditional discussion groups are better for posting longer lists and 
discussions. If both groups can be coordinated well (i.e. same moderator(s)), 
it would be advantageous. 


 

The growing preference of Facebook over the discussion groups reminds me of my 
daughters who no longer use email or talk on phones, but rather just text! 


 

Harry Pavulaan


 
 		 	   		  
Subject: ?
From: Henry Halama <henryhalama AT verizon.net>
Date: Mon, 7 Apr 2014 15:05:03 -0700 (PDT)
Yesterday, 4/6, under sunny skies and 60+F, I observed the following 
butterfliesduring my 3+mile hike in the Wilson's State Park in Ulster County: 

Question Mark FOS
Eastern Comma4
Mourning Cloak 3
most of them basking in full sun. What a heart warming experience in our still 
cold spring!! 

Henry Halama
Subject: Re: {New York Leps} Re: posting & sightings
From: Steven Daniel <natdisc AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 6 Apr 2014 21:37:09 -0400
John,
Thanks again for your comments and suggestions.  My thoughts below in red


On Apr 5, 2014, at 7:29 PM, John and Sue Gregoire  wrote:

> 1. Resend the invite to all yahoogroup members
> 
I don't think the invite worked, as it has to be addressed to the group (NY 
Butterflies) rather than individuals, so I don't think (could be wrong) that 
anyone was able to sign up from that invite. I am happy to send out invites to 
individuals, but I don't have access to the Yahoo group emails (only the 
moderator did.) 



> 2. Pick a termination date for the yahoogroup after which all messages will 
be on 

> the google site and the yahoo site ignored and let everyone know. I'm 
assuming that 

> no one can cancel the old group except John H. and that's not likely to 
happen 

> without divine intervention.

> I really don't have the authority (only John Hanyak did) to set an end date 
or terminate the group. I think it is just up to people who want to do so, to 
join the new group and post there. Personally, I will no longer be posting 
sightings to this group, but to the new NYLEPS Googlegroup, to avoid filling 
people's boxes with duplicates. 




> 3. Before the above, create a "welcome document" that explains the 
peculiarities of 

> google groups (not a link), with items like the posting address, how to post, 
how to 

> navigate within that group and anything else to ease the transition.
> 

It seems to me no different, really, than Yahoo, when it comes to posting or 
receiving emails (or none, or digest...each person can choose what they want to 
receive when they join.) To send an email to the group you just need to be a 
member. Then send it to nyleps AT googlegroups.com and it should go through. I'm 
happy to address any issues if folks have problems posting or signing up. 


To sign up go to http://groups.google.com/group/NYleps There should be a 
straightforward way to join the group. If you have a problem let me know and 
I'll send you an invite or add you. 



> I don't know much about googlegroups other than I don't care for the venue 
but 

> that's likely because its unknown to me and stange whereas i've run several
> yahoogroups and know that very well.
> 
> Whatever happened to Harry, and I think Meena's attempts to become moderators 
of the 

> yahoogroup. Did Yahoo ignore them?

Harry told me he tried a couple of times and never got a response.
Subject: Mourning cloak and eastern commas
From: Steven Daniel <natdisc AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 6 Apr 2014 21:23:04 -0400
As being reported around most of the state by now, we had 2 mourning cloaks and 
4 eastern commas at Powder Mills Park, Monroe County, late this afternoon. Air 
temp in low 50's. 


Don't think I've ever seen The Infant moth that Bill E. reported, so kept my 
eyes out. No moths at all. I wonder if it is more of an northern hardwood 
forest/acid woodland species (Covell lists birch as host), so we may not have 
them in this limy area. 


To eliminate the confusion of double postings, from here on I will be posting 
sightings, etc. to NYLEPS AT googlegroups.com. 



Steven Daniel
Rochester






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Subject: Re: posting & sightings
From: "John and Sue Gregoire" <khmo AT empacc.net>
Date: Sat, 5 Apr 2014 19:29:16 -0400
Thanks for the reply Steve. A couple of things needed to help the transition as 
I 

see it to follow. I'm sorry you, and others, dislike Facebook. There's is such 
a 

wealth of info there and we participate in severel moth groups. To keep 
something on 

the NYS level might I suggest that you:

1. Resend the invite to all yahoogroup members

2. Pick a termination date for the yahoogroup after which all messages will be 
on 

the google site and the yahoo site ignored and let everyone know. I'm assuming 
that 

no one can cancel the old group except John H. and that's not likely to happen
without divine intervention.

3. Before the above, create a "welcome document" that explains the 
peculiarities of 

google groups (not a link), with items like the posting address, how to post, 
how to 

navigate within that group and anything else to ease the transition.

I don't know much about googlegroups other than I don't care for the venue but
that's likely because its unknown to me and stange whereas i've run several
yahoogroups and know that very well.

Whatever happened to Harry, and I think Meena's attempts to become moderators 
of the 

yahoogroup. Did Yahoo ignore them?

Thanks for doing this and do try FB -you will be surprised and we've so much 
from 

all the folks across the US and Canada and beyond who share their knowledge 
there. 


Best,
John
-- 
John and Sue Gregoire
Field Ornithologists
Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
5373 Fitzgerald Road
Burdett,NY 14818-9626
 Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
"Conserve and Create Habitat"

On Sat, April 5, 2014 15:09, Steven Daniel wrote:
> John and all,
> As Tom Fiore has said, last year the new NY LEPS google group,
> https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/NYleps, was started because new 
people 

> couldn't post to the old Yahoo group.  The moderator of the Yahoo group, John
> Hanyak, passed away nearly 3 years ago, so for the last 3 years no new 
members have 

> been able to post, as they needed the moderator's approval. I know that it 
was 

> frustrating to, at least, some new members that wanted to post and couldn't. 
That 

> was, and remains, the rationale. A look at the stats from the last 2 years 
show 

> much fewer postings (last year especially) than in prior years. It seems to 
me that 

> the Yahoo group is slowly withering away.
>
> John - I don't know why you are not receiving email notifications? I checked 
your 

> status, and you are subscribed to receive all email. Your spam folder 
perhaps?? 

> Anyway.. I think it should be as simple as what we have been doing with 
Yahoo. I 

> receive email from other google groups with no issue. I don't know of 
problems 

> posting either, as long as you are a member (all members can post to the new 
google 

> group, and don't need moderator approval this time.)
>
> The new NY LEPS google group has a start with some members - 37 at this 
point. 

> Perhaps it will take a while to reach a critical mass. Or perhaps an email 
listserv 

> is no longer what folks want.  I don't know.
>
> Personally I think it would be good to have one New York butterfly/moth 
(maybe even 

> other insect observations) group where we could all hear what is happening 
all 

> around the state, and learn from others as well. And NY has some quite active 
and 

> accomplished lepidopterists and butterfly folks, several who have posted to 
the old 

> Yahoo group over the years. There is potential for a vibrant listserv for 
people at 

> all levels of interest and background. Several neighboring states and 
provinces 

> still have active Lep listservs (Mass, Ontario, Connecticut, Maryland, are 
some) - 

> I think NY could as well. If that's what you'd like to see, I'd encourage you 
to 

> sign up for the NY LEPS group, if you haven't done that yet.
>
> I have avoided Facebook for a variety of reasons, so, I don't think it likely 
that I 

> would sign up for a Facebook group.   But that's just me.
>
> I agree with John that getting double postings is confusing. At some point I 
will 

> stop double posting, and just post to the new NY LEPS google listserv.  I'd
> encourage others to do the same.
>
> If anyone is having trouble signing up for the new NY LEPS google group,
> https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/NYleps, I can sign you up or send you 
an 

> invitation. Just let me know. (I think the old invitation I sent to the 
entire has 

> expired, and not sure it worked either.)
>
> It's been a slow start to the season, but reports are starting to trickle in.
>
> Best wishes to everyone for a good butterfly and moth year!
>
> Steven Daniel
> Rochester
>
>
> On Apr 5, 2014, at 9:14 AM, John and Sue Gregoire  wrote:
>
>> Tom,
>>
>> This is highly confusing. While I am not a fan of Google Groups we joined 
last 

>> year.
>> We don't receive email notifications of posts there it would seem. If we 
stick 

>> with
>> google than someone needs to explain a lot of how to's: get email 
notifications, 

>> post, etc.
>>
>> By everyone posting to both or just the yahoo version we create more 
confusion. I 

>> suggest someone start a new Yahoogroup and then let this one die which will 
happen 

>> if we all resign from this one and use the new one. That way our email
>> notifications
>> will continue and we don't have to learn/live with another group structure.
>>
>> Alternatively,and perhaps a much better solution, start a NY Leps group on
>> Facebook
>> which is very easy to use and has many of the advantages of yahoo plus a 
very easy 

>> photo and file share mechanism. Several regional and national groups exist 
happily 

>> there and it has become our preferred source for lep conversation.
>>
>> Best,
>> John
>>
>> x xx
>> --
>> John and Sue Gregoire
>> Field Ornithologists
>> Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
>> 5373 Fitzgerald Road
>> Burdett,NY 14818-9626
>> Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
>> "Conserve and Create Habitat"
>>
>> On Sat, April 5, 2014 05:57, Thomas Fiore wrote:
>> > Hi all,
>> >
>> > as explained by Steve Daniel previously, this list (nysbutterflies) on
>> > yahoogroups seems 'stuck' in the sense that newer members cannot post
>> > anything - they can read what older (that is, longer-term) members
>> > report, but are unable to report themselves, due to vagaries of how
>> > the account was set up & also the lack of a current moderator. An
>> > alternative newer leps group is available, created by Steve, on google-
>> > groups - to report and read that list, one needs to sign up. It should
>> > be straightforward to do so -
>> >
>> > http://groups.google.com/group/NYleps
>> >
>> > if the above does not bring you to where sign-up (registration) is
>> > possible, try the below "Accept this invitation", as posted by Steve
>> > Daniel here on March 11. Once signed up there you should be able to
>> > report as well as read other reports on leps in NY state.
>> > ..........
>> > Google Groups Invitation: New York Leps
>> > Posted by: "Steven Daniel (Google Groups)" sdaniel69
>> > Date: Tue Mar 11, 2014
>> >
>> > An invitation to join this new google group for anything New York
>> > butterfly
>> > or moth related.
>> >
>> > About this group:
>> > A discussion group for all people interested in sharing observations,
>> > species
>> > lists, behavior, ecology, and all aspects of the lives of the
>> > butterflies and
>> > moths of New York State.
>> >
>> > Accept this invitation:
>> >
>> > 
http://groups.google.com/forum/subscribe?token=UPzf4xQAAABSGJ4PvgTkVeTQ-Frei5qA-F7cqcY-y_yzAHrrTpivXg&hl=en 

>> >
>> > Visit this group:
>> >
>> > http://groups.google.com/d/forum/NYleps?hl=en
>> >
>> > ................
>> > Some overwintered butterflies were flying on Hook Mt., Rockland Co, NY
>> > on Thursday April 3: E. Comma (8), & Mourning Cloak (10), all seen in
>> > afternoon with temp's at about 60 F. & sunny skies, light north wind.
>> > These overwintered individuals all seemed in good (fresh) condition.
>> > No flowers were in bloom and most annual plants were at their smallest
>> > stage of growth, just tiny hints of green at the ground-level. A very
>> > few other insects were about.
>> >
>> > good observations to all,
>> > Tom Fiore
>> > Manhattan
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>>
>
>




------------------------------------

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Subject: Re: posting & sightings
From: Steven Daniel <natdisc AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 5 Apr 2014 15:09:22 -0400
John and all,
As Tom Fiore has said, last year the new NY LEPS google group, 
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/NYleps, was started because new people 
couldn't post to the old Yahoo group. The moderator of the Yahoo group, John 
Hanyak, passed away nearly 3 years ago, so for the last 3 years no new members 
have been able to post, as they needed the moderator's approval. I know that it 
was frustrating to, at least, some new members that wanted to post and 
couldn't. That was, and remains, the rationale. A look at the stats from the 
last 2 years show much fewer postings (last year especially) than in prior 
years. It seems to me that the Yahoo group is slowly withering away. 


John - I don't know why you are not receiving email notifications? I checked 
your status, and you are subscribed to receive all email. Your spam folder 
perhaps?? Anyway.. I think it should be as simple as what we have been doing 
with Yahoo. I receive email from other google groups with no issue. I don't 
know of problems posting either, as long as you are a member (all members can 
post to the new google group, and don't need moderator approval this time.) 


The new NY LEPS google group has a start with some members - 37 at this point. 
Perhaps it will take a while to reach a critical mass. Or perhaps an email 
listserv is no longer what folks want. I don't know. 


Personally I think it would be good to have one New York butterfly/moth (maybe 
even other insect observations) group where we could all hear what is happening 
all around the state, and learn from others as well. And NY has some quite 
active and accomplished lepidopterists and butterfly folks, several who have 
posted to the old Yahoo group over the years. There is potential for a vibrant 
listserv for people at all levels of interest and background. Several 
neighboring states and provinces still have active Lep listservs (Mass, 
Ontario, Connecticut, Maryland, are some) - I think NY could as well. If that's 
what you'd like to see, I'd encourage you to sign up for the NY LEPS group, if 
you haven't done that yet. 


I have avoided Facebook for a variety of reasons, so, I don't think it likely 
that I would sign up for a Facebook group. But that's just me. 


I agree with John that getting double postings is confusing. At some point I 
will stop double posting, and just post to the new NY LEPS google listserv. I'd 
encourage others to do the same. 


If anyone is having trouble signing up for the new NY LEPS google group, 
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/NYleps, I can sign you up or send you 
an invitation. Just let me know. (I think the old invitation I sent to the 
entire has expired, and not sure it worked either.) 


It's been a slow start to the season, but reports are starting to trickle in.  

Best wishes to everyone for a good butterfly and moth year!

Steven Daniel
Rochester


On Apr 5, 2014, at 9:14 AM, John and Sue Gregoire  wrote:

> Tom,
> 
> This is highly confusing. While I am not a fan of Google Groups we joined 
last year. 

> We don't receive email notifications of posts there it would seem. If we 
stick with 

> google than someone needs to explain a lot of how to's: get email 
notifications, 

> post, etc.
> 
> By everyone posting to both or just the yahoo version we create more 
confusion. I 

> suggest someone start a new Yahoogroup and then let this one die which will 
happen 

> if we all resign from this one and use the new one. That way our email 
notifications 

> will continue and we don't have to learn/live with another group structure.
> 
> Alternatively,and perhaps a much better solution, start a NY Leps group on 
Facebook 

> which is very easy to use and has many of the advantages of yahoo plus a very 
easy 

> photo and file share mechanism. Several regional and national groups exist 
happily 

> there and it has become our preferred source for lep conversation.
> 
> Best,
> John
> 
> x xx
> -- 
> John and Sue Gregoire
> Field Ornithologists
> Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
> 5373 Fitzgerald Road
> Burdett,NY 14818-9626
> Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
> "Conserve and Create Habitat"
> 
> On Sat, April 5, 2014 05:57, Thomas Fiore wrote:
> > Hi all,
> >
> > as explained by Steve Daniel previously, this list (nysbutterflies) on
> > yahoogroups seems 'stuck' in the sense that newer members cannot post
> > anything - they can read what older (that is, longer-term) members
> > report, but are unable to report themselves, due to vagaries of how
> > the account was set up & also the lack of a current moderator. An
> > alternative newer leps group is available, created by Steve, on google-
> > groups - to report and read that list, one needs to sign up. It should
> > be straightforward to do so -
> >
> > http://groups.google.com/group/NYleps
> >
> > if the above does not bring you to where sign-up (registration) is
> > possible, try the below "Accept this invitation", as posted by Steve
> > Daniel here on March 11. Once signed up there you should be able to
> > report as well as read other reports on leps in NY state.
> > ..........
> > Google Groups Invitation: New York Leps
> > Posted by: "Steven Daniel (Google Groups)" sdaniel69
> > Date: Tue Mar 11, 2014
> >
> > An invitation to join this new google group for anything New York
> > butterfly
> > or moth related.
> >
> > About this group:
> > A discussion group for all people interested in sharing observations,
> > species
> > lists, behavior, ecology, and all aspects of the lives of the
> > butterflies and
> > moths of New York State.
> >
> > Accept this invitation:
> >
> > 
http://groups.google.com/forum/subscribe?token=UPzf4xQAAABSGJ4PvgTkVeTQ-Frei5qA-F7cqcY-y_yzAHrrTpivXg&hl=en 

> >
> > Visit this group:
> >
> > http://groups.google.com/d/forum/NYleps?hl=en
> >
> > ................
> > Some overwintered butterflies were flying on Hook Mt., Rockland Co, NY
> > on Thursday April 3: E. Comma (8), & Mourning Cloak (10), all seen in
> > afternoon with temp's at about 60 F. & sunny skies, light north wind.
> > These overwintered individuals all seemed in good (fresh) condition.
> > No flowers were in bloom and most annual plants were at their smallest
> > stage of growth, just tiny hints of green at the ground-level. A very
> > few other insects were about.
> >
> > good observations to all,
> > Tom Fiore
> > Manhattan
> >
> >
> 
> 
> 
Subject: Re: posting & sightings
From: "John and Sue Gregoire" <khmo AT empacc.net>
Date: Sat, 5 Apr 2014 09:14:15 -0400
Tom,

This is highly confusing. While I am not a fan of Google Groups we joined last 
year. 

We don't receive email notifications of posts there it would seem. If we stick 
with 

google than someone needs to explain a lot of how to's: get email 
notifications, 

post, etc.

By everyone posting to both or just the yahoo version we create more confusion. 
I 

suggest someone start a new Yahoogroup and then let this one die which will 
happen 

if we all resign from this one and use the new one. That way our email 
notifications 

will continue and we don't have to learn/live with another group structure.

Alternatively,and perhaps a much better solution, start a NY Leps group on 
Facebook 

which is very easy to use and has many of the advantages of yahoo plus a very 
easy 

photo and file share mechanism. Several regional and national groups exist 
happily 

there and it has become our preferred source for lep conversation.

Best,
John

x xx
-- 
John and Sue Gregoire
Field Ornithologists
Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
5373 Fitzgerald Road
Burdett,NY 14818-9626
 Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
"Conserve and Create Habitat"

On Sat, April 5, 2014 05:57, Thomas Fiore wrote:
> Hi all,
>
> as explained by Steve Daniel previously, this list (nysbutterflies) on
> yahoogroups seems 'stuck' in the sense that newer members cannot post
> anything - they can read what older (that is, longer-term) members
> report, but are unable to report themselves, due to vagaries of how
> the account was set up & also the lack of a current moderator.  An
> alternative newer leps group is available, created by Steve, on google-
> groups - to report and read that list, one needs to sign up. It should
> be straightforward to do so -
>
> http://groups.google.com/group/NYleps
>
> if the above does not bring you to where sign-up (registration) is
> possible, try the below "Accept this invitation", as posted by Steve
> Daniel here on March 11. Once signed up there you should be able to
> report as well as read other reports on leps in NY state.
> ..........
> Google Groups Invitation: New York Leps
> Posted by: "Steven Daniel (Google Groups)" sdaniel69
> Date: Tue Mar 11, 2014
>
> An invitation to join this new google group for anything New York
> butterfly
> or moth related.
>
> About this group:
> A discussion group for all people interested in sharing observations,
> species
> lists, behavior, ecology, and all aspects of the lives of the
> butterflies and
> moths of New York State.
>
> Accept this invitation:
>
> 
http://groups.google.com/forum/subscribe?token=UPzf4xQAAABSGJ4PvgTkVeTQ-Frei5qA-F7cqcY-y_yzAHrrTpivXg&hl=en 

>
> Visit this group:
>
> http://groups.google.com/d/forum/NYleps?hl=en
>
> ................
> Some overwintered butterflies were flying on Hook Mt., Rockland Co, NY
> on Thursday April 3: E. Comma (8), & Mourning Cloak (10), all seen in
> afternoon with temp's at about 60 F. & sunny skies, light north wind.
> These overwintered individuals all seemed in good (fresh) condition.
> No flowers were in bloom and most annual plants were at their smallest
> stage of growth, just tiny hints of green at the ground-level. A very
> few other insects were about.
>
> good observations to all,
> Tom Fiore
> Manhattan
>
>




------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NYSButterflies/

<*> Your email settings:
    Individual Email | Traditional

<*> To change settings online go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NYSButterflies/join
    (Yahoo! ID required)

<*> To change settings via email:
    NYSButterflies-digest AT yahoogroups.com 
    NYSButterflies-fullfeatured AT yahoogroups.com

<*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
    NYSButterflies-unsubscribe AT yahoogroups.com

<*> Your use of Yahoo Groups is subject to:
    https://info.yahoo.com/legal/us/yahoo/utos/terms/
Subject: posting & sightings
From: Thomas Fiore <tomfi2 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sat, 5 Apr 2014 05:57:30 -0400
Hi all,

as explained by Steve Daniel previously, this list (nysbutterflies) on  
yahoogroups seems 'stuck' in the sense that newer members cannot post  
anything - they can read what older (that is, longer-term) members  
report, but are unable to report themselves, due to vagaries of how  
the account was set up & also the lack of a current moderator.  An  
alternative newer leps group is available, created by Steve, on google- 
groups - to report and read that list, one needs to sign up. It should  
be straightforward to do so -

http://groups.google.com/group/NYleps

if the above does not bring you to where sign-up (registration) is  
possible, try the below "Accept this invitation", as posted by Steve  
Daniel here on March 11. Once signed up there you should be able to  
report as well as read other reports on leps in NY state.
..........
Google Groups Invitation: New York Leps
Posted by: "Steven Daniel (Google Groups)" sdaniel69
Date: Tue Mar 11, 2014

An invitation to join this new google group for anything New York  
butterfly
or moth related.

About this group:
A discussion group for all people interested in sharing observations,  
species
lists, behavior, ecology, and all aspects of the lives of the  
butterflies and
moths of New York State.

Accept this invitation:


http://groups.google.com/forum/subscribe?token=UPzf4xQAAABSGJ4PvgTkVeTQ-Frei5qA-F7cqcY-y_yzAHrrTpivXg&hl=en 


Visit this group:

http://groups.google.com/d/forum/NYleps?hl=en

................
Some overwintered butterflies were flying on Hook Mt., Rockland Co, NY  
on Thursday April 3: E. Comma (8), & Mourning Cloak (10), all seen in  
afternoon with temp's at about 60 F. & sunny skies, light north wind.  
These overwintered individuals all seemed in good (fresh) condition.  
No flowers were in bloom and most annual plants were at their smallest  
stage of growth, just tiny hints of green at the ground-level. A very  
few other insects were about.

good observations to all,
Tom Fiore
Manhattan
Subject: My Error
From: <bluewing AT stny.rr.com>
Date: Fri, 4 Apr 2014 08:20:12 -0400
I mistakenly posted a private message on NYSButterflies – my apologies.

- Bob Grosek
Binghamton, New York

Every species you meet is a gold medal finalist in the evolutionary race of 
life 
Subject: RE: Mourning Cloak
From: Meena Madhav Haribal <mmh3 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Fri, 4 Apr 2014 01:19:21 +0000
I too saw my first Mourning Cloak yesterday in Cornell Arboretum during my 
lunch walk! 




Meena



Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850

42.429007,-76.47111
http://haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/


________________________________
From: NYSButterflies AT yahoogroups.com  on behalf 
of bluewing AT stny.rr.com  

Sent: Thursday, April 3, 2014 8:54 PM
To: NYS Butterflies
Subject: [NYSButterflies] Mourning Cloak



I had a Mourning Cloak yesterday, April 02, in Vestal, NY. This was my first 
butterfly of season, seen in 50 degree weather, sunny skies, and some breeze. 


- Bob Grosek
Binghamton, New York

Every species you meet is a gold medal finalist in the evolutionary race of 
life 



Subject: Re: Bronx Co. leps Friday & Sat. 3/21-22
From: <bluewing AT stny.rr.com>
Date: Thu, 3 Apr 2014 21:03:47 -0400
Hi Tom -

I hope that you are doing well. I just had my first butterfly yesterday, a 
Mourning Cloak. 


<>

I’m a member of NYLeps but I don’t know how to post to that group. What is 
the E-address that I send my reports to? 


Thank you,

- Bob

From: Thomas Fiore 
Sent: Saturday, March 22, 2014 9:05 PM
To: nysbutterflies AT yahoogroups.com 
Subject: [NYSButterflies] Bronx Co. leps Friday & Sat. 3/21-22

  
Hi all, 



Among the lepidoptera found flying these 2 milder days in New York City, 2 
Mourning Cloaks noted Fri. 3/21, and today (Sat. 3/22) at least 5 Mourning 
Cloaks, and a good-looking E. Comma, all these in Van Cortlandt Park, Bronx 
County. Additionally there were a number of small moths, most under 1/2", 
although one of twice that wingspan was noticed today... & thus far none 
identified... (just one was photo'd, but that may be inconclusive, even if 
choices at this time of year are below 1,000...) 



Will be interesting to see when the first non-overwintering butterfly is 
noticed. Incidentally a small no. of Mourning Cloaks had been seen in the past 
2 weeks or so, in NYC & vicinity, by various observers in a number of locations 
on the few milder days we've had thus far this year. 



[I have posted to the new google-groups NYleps started by Steve Daniel in 
addition to this group's list. It's not fair that newer members of this group 
apparently cannot post anything, merely read & look at photos posted by older 
(longer-term) subscribers. I hope the new group Steve has started will be 
active, and that every member of this nysbutterflies group will consider 
joining & reporting-commenting-discussing the lepidoptera of the state, or 
region, as Steve & all see fit.] 



happy spring,


Tom Fiore
Manhattan
Subject: Mourning Cloak
From: <bluewing AT stny.rr.com>
Date: Thu, 3 Apr 2014 20:54:58 -0400
I had a Mourning Cloak yesterday, April 02, in Vestal, NY. This was my first 
butterfly of season, seen in 50 degree weather, sunny skies, and some breeze. 


- Bob Grosek
Binghamton, New York

Every species you meet is a gold medal finalist in the evolutionary race of 
life 
Subject: mourning cloak
From: Henry Halama <henryhalama AT verizon.net>
Date: Tue, 1 Apr 2014 16:40:20 -0700 (PDT)
Yesterday 3/31 I saw 2 FOS Mourning Cloaks in my woods in Woodstock. Today in 
Onteora S.P. in Ulster Co I found 8 MCand 1 FOS Eastern Comma. 

Both the Onteora Lake and the woodland ponds, where many amphibians breed, are 
still completely covered with ice. 

Henry Halama
Woodstock
Subject: RE: Migratory Dragonfly Short Course - Sterling Nature Center
From: Meena Madhav Haribal <mmh3 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Thu, 27 Mar 2014 18:05:03 +0000
You might want to post on NYOG too. 

-----Original Message-----
From: NYSButterflies AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:NYSButterflies AT yahoogroups.com] On 
Behalf Of Jim D'Angelo 

Sent: Thursday, March 27, 2014 2:01 PM
To: NE Odes; oneidabirds; gl_odonata; NYSButterflies; vernalpool
Subject: [NYSButterflies] Migratory Dragonfly Short Course - Sterling Nature 
Center 


Sorry to the other groups for the cross-post but I thought some people in them 
might be interested in dragonflies too. 


The Sterling Nature Center will be hosting a Migratory Dragonfly Short Course 
on April 25, 2014 from 9:30 am - 4:00 pm. Follow the link for more information 
and to register. Space is limited. 



http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07e93pfn6of558033d&llr=tnjebhdab 


Jim D'Angelo,
Sterling, NY


------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links





------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NYSButterflies/

<*> Your email settings:
    Individual Email | Traditional

<*> To change settings online go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NYSButterflies/join
    (Yahoo! ID required)

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    NYSButterflies-digest AT yahoogroups.com 
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    NYSButterflies-unsubscribe AT yahoogroups.com

<*> Your use of Yahoo Groups is subject to:
    https://info.yahoo.com/legal/us/yahoo/utos/terms/
Subject: Bronx Co. leps Friday & Sat. 3/21-22
From: Thomas Fiore <tomfi2 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sat, 22 Mar 2014 21:05:08 -0400
Hi all,

Among the lepidoptera found flying these 2 milder days in New York  
City, 2 Mourning Cloaks noted Fri. 3/21, and today (Sat. 3/22) at  
least 5 Mourning Cloaks, and a good-looking E. Comma, all these in Van  
Cortlandt Park, Bronx County.  Additionally there were a number of  
small moths, most under 1/2", although one of twice that wingspan was  
noticed today... & thus far none identified... (just one was photo'd,  
but that may be inconclusive, even if choices at this time of year are  
below 1,000...)

Will be interesting to see when the first non-overwintering butterfly  
is noticed. Incidentally a small no. of Mourning Cloaks had been seen  
in the past 2 weeks or so, in NYC & vicinity, by various observers in  
a number of locations on the few milder days we've had thus far this  
year.

[I have posted to the new google-groups NYleps started by Steve Daniel  
in addition to this group's list. It's not fair that newer members of  
this group apparently cannot post anything, merely read & look at  
photos posted by older (longer-term) subscribers.  I hope the new  
group Steve has started will be active, and that every member of this  
nysbutterflies group will consider joining & reporting-commenting- 
discussing the lepidoptera of the state, or region, as Steve & all see  
fit.]

happy spring,

Tom Fiore
Manhattan
Subject: Re: {New York Leps} RE: Mourning cloak request
From: Steven Daniel <natdisc AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2014 08:35:51 -0400
'Cloaks' are found throughout North America and Eurasia. Check out this website 
showing maps and descriptions. 

http://www.trauermantel.de/nymphalis_antiopa_subspecies.htm

Great info, Rick!

Steven Daniel

> On Mar 17, 2014, at 7:43 AM, rick cavasin  wrote:
> 
>> On 17 March 2014 07:05, Meena Madhav Haribal  wrote:
>> This is interesting.  Mourning Cloaks are found in Europe too I guess.
> 
> Yes, Asia as well.
>  
>> So those are different species? Or are we having the European species as 
well as north American? 

> 
> Shhhhhhhhhhh!!!!!
> 
> Are you trying to start a rumble?
> 
> Seriously, it depends on who you ask, and how they define what constitutes a 
"different species". As far as I know, nobody has tried to find out whether or 
not these two variants 

> of the Mourning Cloak ( lintnerii and hyperborea ) can successfully 
interbreed. I think that some regard the various Mourning Cloaks around the 
world as geographic subspecies, 

> some probably regard them as separate species.   
> 
> A lot of the interest in this ( at least up Ontario way ) was prompted by 
unusual observations from the 2012 season. Here's a quick summary from an 
article on my website: 

> 
> The Mourning Cloak, not normally thought of as migratory in these parts, also 
seemed to have come north in large numbers. This wave was foreshadowed by 
reports that numbers of Mourning Cloaks had been found washed up on the Lake 
Erie shoreline with other migrants. We subsequently observed larger, darker 
versions of this familiar butterfly moving through the area long after the 
local Mourning Cloaks had emerged from hibernation. In addition to being 
distinct in appearance, these interlopers were often observed "on the move", 
behaving like the other migrant species that had passed through the area 
earlier in the season. 

> 
> ( full article is here: 
http://www.ontariobutterflies.ca/galleries/migration-2012 ) 

> 
> There were lots of postings on this topic on the butterfly_obs list, and they 
can be accessed on the list website: 

> https://ca.groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/butterfly_obs/info
> 
> Non-members can read the postings, but I believe you have to be a member to 
access the files/photos. ( Norbert uploaded images of the various Cloak 
species/subspecies ) 

> 
> Posts about the migrant Cloaks washing up on the Lake Erie shoreline appeared 
on the Ontario list: 

> https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/onbutterflies ( check postings for 
spring 2012 ) 

> 
> Cheers, RC
> 
> -- 
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"New York Leps" group. 

> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an 
email to NYleps+unsubscribe AT googlegroups.com. 

> To post to this group, send email to NYleps AT googlegroups.com.
> Visit this group at http://groups.google.com/group/NYleps.
> For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
Subject: Re: Mourning cloak request
From: r cech <rcech AT nyc.rr.com>
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2014 04:45:34 -0700 (PDT)
Steve:  No update for now.  I signed up to the new Google group, and wanted 
to encourage others to do so, in case they missed earlier posts.  

Thanks for doing this.  Rick 

Steve posted:
 

> PS. Re: my last note about the new NYS butterfly listserv on google:  I'm 
> not sure my 'invitation" to join the new 
NYL... AT googlegroups.comworked. It appears there were some 
problems. If you would like to join 

> and are having trouble,  drop me a line and I'll add you.
>


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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Subject: RE: Mourning cloak request
From: Meena Madhav Haribal <mmh3 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2014 11:05:29 +0000
Hi Steven,



This is interesting. Mourning Cloaks are found in Europe too I guess. So those 
are different species? Or are we having the European species as well as north 
American? 




Meena



Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850

42.429007,-76.47111
http://haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/


________________________________
From: NYSButterflies AT yahoogroups.com  on behalf 
of Steven Daniel  

Sent: Sunday, March 16, 2014 11:41 PM
To: NYS Butterflies; nyleps AT googlegroups.com
Subject: [NYSButterflies] Mourning cloak request



I've been corresponding with a couple of lepidopterists - Ross Layberry from 
Ontario, and Norbert Kondla from Alberta. They are researching the two mourning 
cloak taxa we have in North America, and in New York as well. (Who knew -- I've 
been learning a lot on this.) Anyway...both occur in New York. The common one, 
at least in my photos over the years, is brighter (redder) and smaller - known 
as hyperborea. The other cloak is darker and larger - known as lintnerii. 
Lintnerii type locality is Schoharie, NY. So once spring comes(!) - keep a 
closer eye on the mourning cloaks. Although the type is Schoharie, it seems 
likely that lintnerii could occur anywhere. If you see one that looks different 
- larger and darker.... Norbert and Ross would love to hear. Pics would be 
great (specimen as well if anyone on this list collects). If anyone is 
interested in seeing a visual of th! e differences - and they are quite 
different appearing though it may not always be apparent - I can send pix or 
post them. 



Steven Daniel
Rochester


PS. Re: my last note about the new NYS butterfly listserv on google: I'm not 
sure my 'invitation" to join the new 
NYLEPS AT googlegroups.com worked. It appears 
there were some problems. If you would like to join and are having trouble, 
drop me a line and I'll add you. 



Subject: Mourning cloak request
From: Steven Daniel <natdisc AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2014 23:41:25 -0400
I've been corresponding with a couple of lepidopterists - Ross Layberry from 
Ontario, and Norbert Kondla from Alberta. They are researching the two mourning 
cloak taxa we have in North America, and in New York as well. (Who knew -- I've 
been learning a lot on this.) Anyway...both occur in New York. The common one, 
at least in my photos over the years, is brighter (redder) and smaller - known 
as hyperborea. The other cloak is darker and larger - known as lintnerii. 
Lintnerii type locality is Schoharie, NY. So once spring comes(!) - keep a 
closer eye on the mourning cloaks. Although the type is Schoharie, it seems 
likely that lintnerii could occur anywhere. If you see one that looks different 
- larger and darker.... Norbert and Ross would love to hear. Pics would be 
great (specimen as well if anyone on this list collects). If anyone is 
interested in seeing a visual of the differences - and they are quite different 
appearing though it may not always be apparent - I can send pix or post them. 


Steven Daniel
Rochester

PS. Re: my last note about the new NYS butterfly listserv on google: I'm not 
sure my 'invitation" to join the new NYLEPS AT googlegroups.com worked. It appears 
there were some problems. If you would like to join and are having trouble, 
drop me a line and I'll add you. 
Subject: Google Groups Invitation: New York Leps
From: "Steven Daniel (Google Groups)" <natdisc AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2014 21:08:14 +0000
 An invitation to join this new google group for anything New York butterfly 
or moth related.

About this group:
A discussion group for all people interested in sharing observations, species 
lists, behavior, ecology, and all aspects of the lives of the butterflies and 
moths of New York State.

Accept this invitation:


http://groups.google.com/forum/subscribe?token=UPzf4xQAAABSGJ4PvgTkVeTQ-Frei5qA-F7cqcY-y_yzAHrrTpivXg&hl=en 


Visit this group:

http://groups.google.com/d/forum/NYleps?hl=en

You can unsubscribe from this group using the following URL:


http://groups.google.com/d/forum/NYleps/unsubscribe/UPzf4xQAAABSGJ4PvgTkVeTQ-Frei5qA-F7cqcY-y_yzAHrrTpivXg?hl=en 


If you feel that this message is abuse, please inform the Google Groups staff 
by using the URL below. 

http://groups.google.com/d/abuse/YQAAAOunw_gtAAAAvhEki0oAAAAQTCfRLoAbPV8nG4XfZalYD9Wu6WQ?hl=en 
Subject: Mourning Cloak! (and listserv discussion)
From: Steven Daniel <natdisc AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2014 17:05:13 -0400
This morning I had just finished making the prediction that it would likely be 
weeks before the first butterfly of the season this year. What a winter we've 
had in the northeast. Last I heard the Great Lakes were 91% ice-covered. Yet as 
I was driving home, early afternoon, the sun was shining and the temp hovering 
around 50 degrees F. Some years I've had mourning cloaks and/or commas in 
protected micro climes at this air temp. It was too nice to stay in anyway, and 
I decided to take a walk in Powder Mills Park. No activity in places I've had 
early butterflies other years. Yet I kept wandering and saw some movement. Sure 
enough - one mourning cloak, small and beat up, was fluttering low around a log 
and landed. When I walked closer to get a better look, it took off and soared 
higher. That's it. The only sighting. But a good one. This brutal winter will 
pass...though tomorrow snow is predicted - a foot or more... 


Different topic - I am cross-posting to the new New York Leps Group (Google 
group) https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/nyleps that I started last May. 
We had 18 members sign up in 3 days in May last year, then decided to put it on 
hold, to try to 'fix' this Yahoo group. A problem, in my opinion, with this 
current Yahoo listserv, is that new members cannot post because, apparently, 
there is still no moderator, despite efforts to do so last year. So I am 
inviting all NYS Butterflies listserv members to join the new google group, New 
York Leps. Personally, I'd like to see an active, vibrant listserv develop 
again. There are many active butterfliers, moth-ers, lepidopterists, in every 
part of our state. I think a listserv needs a moderator, and new members need 
to be able to post. If this is something you think would be useful, please 
join. Once the season really begins, and post your sightings, musings, research 
report links, whatever is of interest lep related. As far as I know, this Yahoo 
group won't disappear, and it continues to be searchable. Meanwhile, I'll see 
if I can send out an official invite to this group. 


Steven Daniel
Rochester





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Subject: Monsanto and Sulfur Butterflies
From: Gary Stell <gd_stell AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 13 Jan 2014 01:07:46 -0500
This list maybe interested in the Monsanto controversy. But I have a specific 
question. I am aware of the huge use of our sulfur butterfly on alfalfa Do they 
use soybeans also? 

 
Gary Stell
formally Auburn, NY
Now: Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam  


Here's a couple recent Monsanto related articles that might help bring some 
important "facts" to Monsantos butterfly endeavors. One talks about their 
newest seed being released in South America. "Intacta" is a soybean that kills 
butterflies (lepidopteran pests) and I'm sure after a couple years trial in 
South America it will be coming to soybean fields near you soon. 




http://www.monsanto.com/products/pages/intacta-rr2-pro-soybeans.aspx



This is their most recent profit statement; 
http://www.businessweek.com/news/2014-01-08/monsanto-profit-tops-estimates-as-latin-america-soybeans-gain 




Food for people trumps food for butterflies. If more food can be produced with 
fewer pollinators more food wins. If Monsanto sells the seeds they will 
continue to make more money. Unless the food can be proven to be unsafe or 
people quit buying food produced with GMO crops simply because they don't 
believe the government "weeds" including milkweed and butterflies will continue 
to be diminished. Monsantos PR people are doing their job appearing to be 
interested by sponsoring the most visible monarch enthusiasts hoping to 
minimize the uproar. Monsantos' "best interest" is to make money for their 
stockholders within the law. If you've read the profit statements above you'll 
realize they're doing a great job making money with their seeds and roundup and 
at this point it doesn't appear they're looking to make any concessions when it 
comes to killing bugs or their food. These guys know how to influence people 
especially politicians. It's just overhead ;) 




There's a small company based here in Austin called Whole Foods that could be a 
"legitimate" partner in our endeavors. They make half of what Monsanto makes 
which is still a lot. Their entire mission is to provide their customers with 
safe wholesome food and yes, although they're working on better prices for us 
common people. they charge for it. Recently, because their customers are 
demanding it, they announced they have started an initiative to label products 
with GMO ingredients. They intentionally buy crops from Mexico and other South 
American countries to help them financially. There's great farmland in the 
biosphere of Mexico lying fallow because there's no market for the crops these 
farmers could produce. You can figure out the rest. 





  		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Monarch butterflies, 2013
From: "John and Sue Gregoire" <khmo AT empacc.net>
Date: Wed, 23 Oct 2013 09:52:41 -0400
Thanks for that report, Tom. Valuable info.

Cheers to the folks at hawk-watches. They also willingly watch for migrating
Odonates and do a great service to science.

Sue
-- 
John and Sue Gregoire
Field Ornithologists
Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
5373 Fitzgerald Road
Burdett,NY 14818-9626
 Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
"Conserve and Create Habitat"

On Tue, October 22, 2013 22:01, Thomas Fiore wrote:
> In keeping some track of autumn's southbound (and to rather lesser
> extent, northbound in the spring) migrations of Monarchs, it is
> increasingly useful to follow the reports from avian raptor-watching
> sites -particularly in the eastern half of this continent- in the
> places where North American migrant Monarchs may be seen [i.e. almost
> anywhere on the continent, to the extent that they can be found in a
> whole lot of territory] - and many of these raptor watching sites are,
> more & more keeping track, sometimes fairly close track, of Monarchs
> seen in migratory flight as their migration timing parallels in a nice
> way that of the hawks', other avian raptors', as well as vultures'
> migrations. There are possibly as many raptor-watching sites keeping
> daily counts / estimates of the Monarchs as through any other regular
> means on a geographic scale, for the primary migratory season, and
> especially in months of September and October, into November in many
> instances, with some such sites active also in parts or even all of
> August and December.
>
> The Monarch numbers noted below, from several established avian /
> migratory watch sites, are only partial indicators of this season's
> recent southbound passage. It can again be emphasized that a 'strong'
> year for Monarchs could easily provide numbers ten, twenty, and more
> times greater, than those being reported this year. There have also
> been previous years when the overall numbers of Monarchs seen, in
> migration and in breeding season, were a bit low and may have caused
> concerns. Concerns do seem higher than previously, through this year,
> some reasons for that concern well-elaborated by others on the list,
> and in the link previously provided to an interview with Chip Taylor
> of MonarchWatch.
>
> And so, for just one of (potentially!) many other examples in
> regularly-reported & tallied-each-day sightings, there were a flight
> of 250+ Monarchs reported for the day on Oct. 9, '13 and a flight of
> 230+ Monarchs Oct. 10, '13 at the Detroit River (MI) hawk watch site -
> as well as numbers not estimated, but said to be "abundant" at that
> same site on Oct. 8, '13.
>        On Oct.11, '13, with southerly wind, 40 Monarchs were still
> noted. By Oct. 16, '13 the Monarch count had dropped to just 6,
> suggesting that the peak flight was past. And snow was seen just a few
> days later in that area!  This is of course a very different flight
> pathway from the east coast, and these Monarchs are coming out of some
> of e.-central Canada. (NB, thanks to Jonathan Stein, official counter
> at the DR watch site, and all who count Monarchs as they head south
> along with the raptors, for the info.)
>
> I also list some of the records from the Fire Island, NY (outer
> barrier beach along the Atlantic ocean shore in Suffolk Co.) hawk
> watch, for those days when counters took note (some days may have had
> Monarch movements that were not recorded in the watch entry):
> 9/16/'13: ~ 75 Monarchs;   9/17/'13: 15 Monarchs;  9/18/'13: 8
> Monarchs;  9/24/'13: 15 Monarchs;  9/25/'13: 37 Monarchs;  9/30/'13:
> 11 Monarchs;  10/2/'13: 25 Monarchs;  10/7/'13: 9 Monarchs;  10/9/'13:
> 4 Monarchs... and again it can be emphasized that not all of the days
> when Monarchs were seen had them recorded in the hawk watch database,
> and certainly: the Monarchs flew on many additional days. (NB, for
> data supplied, thanks to Trudy Battaly, Drew Panko, & all the many
> others observers who kept count at that watch.)
>
> At a watch-site just west of Harrisburg, PA: Waggoner's Gap, the
> Monarch flight had been fairly steady, averaged over the 8 weeks of
> Sept. into Oct., averaging about a dozen per day - and a few days of
> 25+ counted; on some days: just one. (This watch-site is thoroughly
> monitored in autumn; D. Grove, R. Freed, K. Gingrich, & many others
> recorded data.)
>
> These are among some of many locations where Monarch migration was
> noted this fall of 2013, & while they (these numbers) are likely well
> below many a "better" year's potential daily numbers of this species,
> it is yet a nice indicator that there were some number of these
> migratory insects on the move, and with a little luck, at least modest
> numbers will reach the Mexican wintering grounds in the hills not so
> very far from Mexico City. The migratory Monarch flight may well
> continue some weeks longer in some areas in the east &/or s.-central
> portions of the U.S., more so in the s. states.  It is not unheard of
> (in some years) to have migratory Monarchs sighted into December at
> some locations well north of the southern U.S. - although that is not
> too often seen in NY state - even at the shore on Long Island or N.Y.
> City where end-of-autumn temperatures can be moderated by the
> immediate proximity of the ocean. This is also looking like a decent
> year for blooming of late-flowering Seaside Goldenrod, in the places
> where that plant has remained; a good later-season nectar source.
> There are at least a few other flowering plants (both native and non-
> native) that can provide nectar sources for Monarchs as well as many
> other butterflies & insects as late fall comes along and continues. A
> point being offered that there is at least some bit of hope with this
> year's Monarch movement (however paltry-seeming in comparison to many
> better years' migrations.) while the obvious converse is that the
> numbers are low and there is some legitimate concern; what happens in
> the next year will provide more insight as to whether the N. American
> migratory Monarchs' situation worsens or brightens. If you have a
> place to do so, plant or seed in some milkweed, and see what lands on
> it in coming years.
>
> Tom Fiore,
> Manhattan




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Subject: Monarch butterflies, 2013
From: Thomas Fiore <tomfi2 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Tue, 22 Oct 2013 22:01:12 -0400
In keeping some track of autumn's southbound (and to rather lesser  
extent, northbound in the spring) migrations of Monarchs, it is  
increasingly useful to follow the reports from avian raptor-watching  
sites -particularly in the eastern half of this continent- in the  
places where North American migrant Monarchs may be seen [i.e. almost  
anywhere on the continent, to the extent that they can be found in a  
whole lot of territory] - and many of these raptor watching sites are,  
more & more keeping track, sometimes fairly close track, of Monarchs  
seen in migratory flight as their migration timing parallels in a nice  
way that of the hawks', other avian raptors', as well as vultures'  
migrations. There are possibly as many raptor-watching sites keeping  
daily counts / estimates of the Monarchs as through any other regular  
means on a geographic scale, for the primary migratory season, and  
especially in months of September and October, into November in many  
instances, with some such sites active also in parts or even all of  
August and December.

The Monarch numbers noted below, from several established avian /  
migratory watch sites, are only partial indicators of this season's  
recent southbound passage. It can again be emphasized that a 'strong'  
year for Monarchs could easily provide numbers ten, twenty, and more  
times greater, than those being reported this year. There have also  
been previous years when the overall numbers of Monarchs seen, in  
migration and in breeding season, were a bit low and may have caused  
concerns. Concerns do seem higher than previously, through this year,  
some reasons for that concern well-elaborated by others on the list,  
and in the link previously provided to an interview with Chip Taylor  
of MonarchWatch.

And so, for just one of (potentially!) many other examples in  
regularly-reported & tallied-each-day sightings, there were a flight  
of 250+ Monarchs reported for the day on Oct. 9, '13 and a flight of  
230+ Monarchs Oct. 10, '13 at the Detroit River (MI) hawk watch site -  
as well as numbers not estimated, but said to be "abundant" at that  
same site on Oct. 8, '13.
       On Oct.11, '13, with southerly wind, 40 Monarchs were still  
noted. By Oct. 16, '13 the Monarch count had dropped to just 6,  
suggesting that the peak flight was past. And snow was seen just a few  
days later in that area!  This is of course a very different flight  
pathway from the east coast, and these Monarchs are coming out of some  
of e.-central Canada. (NB, thanks to Jonathan Stein, official counter  
at the DR watch site, and all who count Monarchs as they head south  
along with the raptors, for the info.)

I also list some of the records from the Fire Island, NY (outer  
barrier beach along the Atlantic ocean shore in Suffolk Co.) hawk  
watch, for those days when counters took note (some days may have had  
Monarch movements that were not recorded in the watch entry):   
9/16/'13: ~ 75 Monarchs;   9/17/'13: 15 Monarchs;  9/18/'13: 8  
Monarchs;  9/24/'13: 15 Monarchs;  9/25/'13: 37 Monarchs;  9/30/'13:  
11 Monarchs;  10/2/'13: 25 Monarchs;  10/7/'13: 9 Monarchs;  10/9/'13:  
4 Monarchs... and again it can be emphasized that not all of the days  
when Monarchs were seen had them recorded in the hawk watch database,  
and certainly: the Monarchs flew on many additional days. (NB, for  
data supplied, thanks to Trudy Battaly, Drew Panko, & all the many  
others observers who kept count at that watch.)

At a watch-site just west of Harrisburg, PA: Waggoner's Gap, the  
Monarch flight had been fairly steady, averaged over the 8 weeks of  
Sept. into Oct., averaging about a dozen per day - and a few days of  
25+ counted; on some days: just one. (This watch-site is thoroughly  
monitored in autumn; D. Grove, R. Freed, K. Gingrich, & many others  
recorded data.)

These are among some of many locations where Monarch migration was  
noted this fall of 2013, & while they (these numbers) are likely well  
below many a "better" year's potential daily numbers of this species,  
it is yet a nice indicator that there were some number of these  
migratory insects on the move, and with a little luck, at least modest  
numbers will reach the Mexican wintering grounds in the hills not so  
very far from Mexico City. The migratory Monarch flight may well  
continue some weeks longer in some areas in the east &/or s.-central  
portions of the U.S., more so in the s. states.  It is not unheard of  
(in some years) to have migratory Monarchs sighted into December at  
some locations well north of the southern U.S. - although that is not  
too often seen in NY state - even at the shore on Long Island or N.Y.  
City where end-of-autumn temperatures can be moderated by the  
immediate proximity of the ocean. This is also looking like a decent  
year for blooming of late-flowering Seaside Goldenrod, in the places  
where that plant has remained; a good later-season nectar source.  
There are at least a few other flowering plants (both native and non- 
native) that can provide nectar sources for Monarchs as well as many  
other butterflies & insects as late fall comes along and continues. A  
point being offered that there is at least some bit of hope with this  
year's Monarch movement (however paltry-seeming in comparison to many  
better years' migrations.) while the obvious converse is that the  
numbers are low and there is some legitimate concern; what happens in  
the next year will provide more insight as to whether the N. American  
migratory Monarchs' situation worsens or brightens. If you have a  
place to do so, plant or seed in some milkweed, and see what lands on  
it in coming years.

Tom Fiore,
Manhattan
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--
Subject: Monarch butterflies, 2013
From: Thomas Fiore <tomfi2 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Tue, 22 Oct 2013 22:01:12 -0400
In keeping some track of autumn's southbound (and to rather lesser  
extent, northbound in the spring) migrations of Monarchs, it is  
increasingly useful to follow the reports from avian raptor-watching  
sites -particularly in the eastern half of this continent- in the  
places where North American migrant Monarchs may be seen [i.e. almost  
anywhere on the continent, to the extent that they can be found in a  
whole lot of territory] - and many of these raptor watching sites are,  
more & more keeping track, sometimes fairly close track, of Monarchs  
seen in migratory flight as their migration timing parallels in a nice  
way that of the hawks', other avian raptors', as well as vultures'  
migrations. There are possibly as many raptor-watching sites keeping  
daily counts / estimates of the Monarchs as through any other regular  
means on a geographic scale, for the primary migratory season, and  
especially in months of September and October, into November in many  
instances, with some such sites active also in parts or even all of  
August and December.

The Monarch numbers noted below, from several established avian /  
migratory watch sites, are only partial indicators of this season's  
recent southbound passage. It can again be emphasized that a 'strong'  
year for Monarchs could easily provide numbers ten, twenty, and more  
times greater, than those being reported this year. There have also  
been previous years when the overall numbers of Monarchs seen, in  
migration and in breeding season, were a bit low and may have caused  
concerns. Concerns do seem higher than previously, through this year,  
some reasons for that concern well-elaborated by others on the list,  
and in the link previously provided to an interview with Chip Taylor  
of MonarchWatch.

And so, for just one of (potentially!) many other examples in  
regularly-reported & tallied-each-day sightings, there were a flight  
of 250+ Monarchs reported for the day on Oct. 9, '13 and a flight of  
230+ Monarchs Oct. 10, '13 at the Detroit River (MI) hawk watch site -  
as well as numbers not estimated, but said to be "abundant" at that  
same site on Oct. 8, '13.
       On Oct.11, '13, with southerly wind, 40 Monarchs were still  
noted. By Oct. 16, '13 the Monarch count had dropped to just 6,  
suggesting that the peak flight was past. And snow was seen just a few  
days later in that area!  This is of course a very different flight  
pathway from the east coast, and these Monarchs are coming out of some  
of e.-central Canada. (NB, thanks to Jonathan Stein, official counter  
at the DR watch site, and all who count Monarchs as they head south  
along with the raptors, for the info.)

I also list some of the records from the Fire Island, NY (outer  
barrier beach along the Atlantic ocean shore in Suffolk Co.) hawk  
watch, for those days when counters took note (some days may have had  
Monarch movements that were not recorded in the watch entry):   
9/16/'13: ~ 75 Monarchs;   9/17/'13: 15 Monarchs;  9/18/'13: 8  
Monarchs;  9/24/'13: 15 Monarchs;  9/25/'13: 37 Monarchs;  9/30/'13:  
11 Monarchs;  10/2/'13: 25 Monarchs;  10/7/'13: 9 Monarchs;  10/9/'13:  
4 Monarchs... and again it can be emphasized that not all of the days  
when Monarchs were seen had them recorded in the hawk watch database,  
and certainly: the Monarchs flew on many additional days. (NB, for  
data supplied, thanks to Trudy Battaly, Drew Panko, & all the many  
others observers who kept count at that watch.)

At a watch-site just west of Harrisburg, PA: Waggoner's Gap, the  
Monarch flight had been fairly steady, averaged over the 8 weeks of  
Sept. into Oct., averaging about a dozen per day - and a few days of  
25+ counted; on some days: just one. (This watch-site is thoroughly  
monitored in autumn; D. Grove, R. Freed, K. Gingrich, & many others  
recorded data.)

These are among some of many locations where Monarch migration was  
noted this fall of 2013, & while they (these numbers) are likely well  
below many a "better" year's potential daily numbers of this species,  
it is yet a nice indicator that there were some number of these  
migratory insects on the move, and with a little luck, at least modest  
numbers will reach the Mexican wintering grounds in the hills not so  
very far from Mexico City. The migratory Monarch flight may well  
continue some weeks longer in some areas in the east &/or s.-central  
portions of the U.S., more so in the s. states.  It is not unheard of  
(in some years) to have migratory Monarchs sighted into December at  
some locations well north of the southern U.S. - although that is not  
too often seen in NY state - even at the shore on Long Island or N.Y.  
City where end-of-autumn temperatures can be moderated by the  
immediate proximity of the ocean. This is also looking like a decent  
year for blooming of late-flowering Seaside Goldenrod, in the places  
where that plant has remained; a good later-season nectar source.  
There are at least a few other flowering plants (both native and non- 
native) that can provide nectar sources for Monarchs as well as many  
other butterflies & insects as late fall comes along and continues. A  
point being offered that there is at least some bit of hope with this  
year's Monarch movement (however paltry-seeming in comparison to many  
better years' migrations.) while the obvious converse is that the  
numbers are low and there is some legitimate concern; what happens in  
the next year will provide more insight as to whether the N. American  
migratory Monarchs' situation worsens or brightens. If you have a  
place to do so, plant or seed in some milkweed, and see what lands on  
it in coming years.

Tom Fiore,
Manhattan
Subject: Female Checkered Skipper in my yard!
From: Meena Madhav Haribal <mmh3 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sat, 12 Oct 2013 22:02:18 +0000
Hi all,

I spent an hour enjoying a female Checkered Skipper feed and rest. I have 
several late blooming plants like Gaillardia, Verbena and clovers. The 
butterfly spent most of its time on Verbena and occasionally nectared on 
Gaillardia and once on clovers. It had regular interval between feeding. It 
would feed on a few clump of flowers and then go a rest or usually bask for 1 + 
minute, then again feed. It visited same flower clumps of Verbena several 
times, I did not for sure see if it went to same individual flowers too, I was 
wondering why was it doing that. It seemed warm enough that it did not need to 
bask, but it did bask. Also why wait for some time before coming for next round 
of nectaring. I am wondering if the flowers take a minute to replenish the 
nectar they are loosing. If they ae then it is very fast production of nectar! 
It would be fun to know how the nectar is produced. 




I spent time from 3.45 pm to almost 5.00 pm when the butterfly spent time doing 
what I described above. It knew exactly where the flowers were. After basking 
at various locations it straight headed to Verbena flowers. Around 5.00 pm, 
after visiting Verbena flowers it took off high straight towards trees. Then I 
lost it. May be it called it a day and went to roost in a tree. 




I took lots of pictures and video too.



I don't know how long it spent at those flowers before I saw it. May be 
tomorrow it will spend the time again in my garden. 




I also had visit from a female Sympetrum, which looked like a Safforn winged, 
but it did not sit long time enough to photograph it. 




Sorry about the spots and blurriness of the pictures as I am uploading the ones 
from an old camera, which I grabbed quickly before I thought the butterfly 
would fly away. I am yet to look at the photos from the other camera. 





https://plus.google.com/u/0/photos?hl=en&pid=5933989993766429826&oid=111169522173716942833 




The second picture is on Verbena. Can anyone identify the species of Verbena?




https://plus.google.com/u/0/photos?hl=en&pid=5933989998914910898&oid=111169522173716942833 




I am hoping it will come back again!



Oh one more thing it looked like she had eggs poking out at the tip of her 
abdomen! 




Cheers

Meena





Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
http://haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/
Subject: RE: Bronze Copper
From: "John and Sue Gregoire" <khmo AT empacc.net>
Date: Fri, 11 Oct 2013 10:33:45 -0400
That would be about a half mile from where I saw these two, also nice and 
fresh. How 

about the rest of the state? Is this a local population?

Sue
-- 
John and Sue Gregoire
Field Ornithologists
Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
5373 Fitzgerald Road
Burdett,NY 14818-9626
 Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
"Conserve and Create Habitat"

On Thu, October 10, 2013 21:03, Meena Madhav Haribal wrote:
> Hi Sue,
> Yesterday Carolyn Klass told me that she and Bob Dirig had something like 25 
fresh 

> looking Bronze Coppers along Rock Cabin road near the marshy area in Montour 
Falls. 

> To them it looked like third brood. They are generally seen till late 
September. 

>
> Cheers
> Meena
>
>
>
> Meena Haribal
> Ithaca NY 14850
> http://haribal.org/
> http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/
> ________________________________________
> From: NYSButterflies AT yahoogroups.com [NYSButterflies AT yahoogroups.com] on 
behalf of 

> John and Sue Gregoire [khmo AT empacc.net]
> Sent: Thursday, October 10, 2013 8:55 PM
> To: nysbutterflies
> Subject: [NYSButterflies] Bronze Copper
>
> Found two today, in Montour Falls, Schuyler Co.. I don't know how well 
distributed 

> these are or what their abundance is. Can anyone fill me in?
>
> Sue G.
> --
> John and Sue Gregoire
> Field Ornithologists
> Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
> 5373 Fitzgerald Road
> Burdett,NY 14818-9626
>  Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
> "Conserve and Create Habitat"
>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>
>
>




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Subject: RE: Bronze Copper
From: Meena Madhav Haribal <mmh3 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Fri, 11 Oct 2013 01:03:45 +0000
Hi Sue, 
Yesterday Carolyn Klass told me that she and Bob Dirig had something like 25 
fresh looking Bronze Coppers along Rock Cabin road near the marshy area in 
Montour Falls. To them it looked like third brood. They are generally seen till 
late September. 


Cheers
Meena



Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
http://haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/
________________________________________
From: NYSButterflies AT yahoogroups.com [NYSButterflies AT yahoogroups.com] on behalf 
of John and Sue Gregoire [khmo AT empacc.net] 

Sent: Thursday, October 10, 2013 8:55 PM
To: nysbutterflies
Subject: [NYSButterflies] Bronze Copper

Found two today, in Montour Falls, Schuyler Co.. I don't know how well 
distributed 

these are or what their abundance is. Can anyone fill me in?

Sue G.
--
John and Sue Gregoire
Field Ornithologists
Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
5373 Fitzgerald Road
Burdett,NY 14818-9626
 Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
"Conserve and Create Habitat"





------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links





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Subject: Bronze Copper
From: "John and Sue Gregoire" <khmo AT empacc.net>
Date: Thu, 10 Oct 2013 20:55:51 -0400
Found two today, in Montour Falls, Schuyler Co.. I don't know how well 
distributed 

these are or what their abundance is. Can anyone fill me in?

Sue G.
-- 
John and Sue Gregoire
Field Ornithologists
Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
5373 Fitzgerald Road
Burdett,NY 14818-9626
 Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
"Conserve and Create Habitat"





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Subject: Re: more on Monarchs
From: Ernest Williams <ewilliam AT hamilton.edu>
Date: Wed, 09 Oct 2013 08:22:30 -0400
The plummeting numbers of monarchs is the story of the season, and I can 
add a little here and where New York fits into the situation (I've 
worked a lot on this recently).

There are three continuing threats to monarch numbers and one shorter 
term problem.

* Threat 1: Declining abundance of milkweeds. The link below has an 
excellent explanation from Chip Taylor about this threat (widespread 
herbicide treatment in GM corn and soybean crops; conversion of other 
land into corn fields because of pressure for corn ethanol; etc.). Just 
read it.

* Threat 2: Degradation of the fir forests where the overwintering 
colonies form. Despite what Chip says in the link below, logging 
continues in the Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve, the location of 
the colonies. There is less commercial logging (it has not stopped), but 
small scale logging continues unabated. Satellite photos show the 
continuing loss of trees.

* Threat 3: Climate change. Increasing intensity of storms is causing 
freezes and mud slides around the overwintering colonies, and warming is 
forecast to move the fir zone higher on the mountains. Within decades, 
these mountain tops may no longer support overwintering colonies.

* Short-term problem. A cold spring in the southern tier of states 
slowed monarch migration and reproduction this past spring. As a result, 
this summer is producing only 3 to 4 generations rather than a more 
usual 4 to 5 generations. The population builds in size through 
successive generations, and there was less build-up this year.

The positive side: Monarchs are insects, and insects can lay a lot of 
eggs, so populations can rebound to the extent that habitat exists for 
them. And organisms adapt/evolve. West coast monarchs now roost in 
Eucalyptus, but centuries ago, there weren't any Eucalyptus in 
California. What does this means for monarchs now? No one knows for 
sure. But for a far-out future possibility, read Barbara Kingsolver's 
Flight Behavior.

Monarch numbers in New York have not correlated in the past with 
measurements of the overwintering numbers because northeastern 
butterflies are a small part of the overall eastern monarch migration. 
But we have abundant milkweed and are not primarily an agricultural area 
(therefore less herbicide usage), so New York monarchs may be a more 
important component of the future monarch migration.

Ernest




On 10/9/13 4:35 AM, Thomas Fiore wrote:
> Hi all,
>
> Some on this list have likely read this, or something similar: Chip 
> Taylor of Monarch Watch interview:
>
> 
http://e360.yale.edu/feature/tracking_the_causes_of_sharp__decline_of_the_monarch_butterfly/2634/ 

>
>
> Tom Fiore,
> Manhattan
>

-- 
*Ernest H. Williams
William R. Kenan Professor of Biology
Hamilton College
Clinton, NY 13323
315-859-4387
ewilliam AT hamilton.edu
http://academics.hamilton.edu/biology/ewilliam/default.html

*
**
Subject: more on Monarchs
From: Thomas Fiore <tomfi2 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Wed, 9 Oct 2013 04:35:42 -0400
Hi all,

Some on this list have likely read this, or something similar: Chip  
Taylor of Monarch Watch interview:


http://e360.yale.edu/feature/tracking_the_causes_of_sharp__decline_of_the_monarch_butterfly/2634/ 


Tom Fiore,
Manhattan
Subject: RE: Ithaca butterflies
From: Meena Madhav Haribal <mmh3 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Tue, 8 Oct 2013 01:11:24 +0000
Thanks to Henry Halama and Tom Fiore for telling me that it was not possible to 
see Juvenal's Duskywing so late in the season. Duskywing had lots of spots on 
the forewing similar to that of male Juvenal's Duskywing, so I presumed it was 
Juvenal's. As I looked into book, it might as well have been female Wild Indigo 
Duskywing. I should have photographed it! Next time! 




As I wrote I was not paying a detailed attention to Hesperidae as a whole as I 
was out looking for a bird. 


Last year around this time we had Fiery skippers flying. Oh well!



Cheers

Meena



Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
http://haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/

________________________________
From: Meena Madhav Haribal
Sent: Sunday, October 06, 2013 7:21 AM
To: NYSButterflies AT yahoogroups.com
Subject: Ithaca butterflies


I was out in Hog's Hole at the end of Southern Cayuga lake. I too had an 
interesting mix of butterflies, some of which I did not pay too much of 
attention as I was looking for Nelson's Sparrow. 




Monarchs - 8 heading south or nectaring, one had one of the hind-wings 
completely missing but still heading south with a same speed as its 
cohort/colleague! 


Eastern-tailed blue - 2 one looked like a fresh specimen, clean and crisp male 
and the second was a female! 


Dun's skipper - 1 I think did not pay too much of attention, but was an overall 
brown skipper 


An orange skipper - did not bother to identify, but had fully orange underside.

Juvenal's duskywing 1

Cabbage white lots some heading south and some nectaring or basking

Clouded Sulphur 3 or 4 nectaring or basking

Orange Sulphur 1 heading south



Plus, I had several Familiar Bluets Enallagma civile and one darner with 
greenish spots, one Green Darner and one female Sympetrum (meadowhawk). 




There were many more all kinds of insects out there including a large wasp and 
a dragon fly mimic an antlion?. 




Meena



Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
http://haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/

________________________________
From: NYSButterflies AT yahoogroups.com [NYSButterflies AT yahoogroups.com] on behalf 
of Rick [rcech AT nyc.rr.com] 

Sent: Saturday, October 05, 2013 9:51 PM
To: NYSButterflies AT yahoogroups.com
Subject: [NYSButterflies] LI Coastal Butterflies, 10/5



I was out with Emily Peyton today (beautiful weather) at Jones Beach / Robert 
Moses State Park. 


We had a reasonably nice assortment of butterflies:

Cabbage White (5-10)
Orange Sulphur (4-5)
Cloudless Sulphur (1)
American Copper (1)
American Lady (2)
Common Buckeye (2) [reddish outer ventral fall form]
Monarch (20-30)

The Monarch flight along the southern coast varied from sputtering to locally 
noticeable, and (as one might expect) increased during the day. At one time, 
4-5 individuals were seen together nectaring on a singl! e goldenrod. This was 
nothing like the wave of individuals seen in strong years, but it appears that 
the last pre-migration brood reached some northern climes, where milkweed was 
abundant, and produced at least a token migratory brood to return south. And 
its still early, the numbers could swell as the season progresses. 


Rick Cech


Subject: Re: Ithaca butterflies
From: Henry Halama <henryhalama AT verizon.net>
Date: Sun, 6 Oct 2013 14:55:23 -0700 (PDT)
The Duskywing you saw was most likely Wild Indigo, since Juvenals don't fly 
past June. 

Henry Halama

From: Meena Madhav Haribal 
To: "NYSButterflies AT yahoogroups.com"  
Sent: Sunday, October 6, 2013 7:21 AM
Subject: [NYSButterflies] Ithaca butterflies

  
I was out in Hog's Hole at the end of Southern Cayuga lake. I too had an 
interesting mix of butterflies, some of which I did not pay too much of 
attention as I was looking for Nelson's Sparrow. 

 
Monarchs - 8 heading south or nectaring, one had one of the hind-wings 
completely missing but still heading south with a same speed as its 
cohort/colleague! 

Eastern-tailed blue - 2 one looked like a fresh specimen, clean and crisp male 
and the second was a  female! 

Dun's skipper - 1 I think did not pay too much of attention, but was an overall 
brown skipper 

An orange skipper - did not bother to identify, but had fully orange underside.
Juvenal's duskywing 1
Cabbage white lots some heading south and some nectaring or basking
Clouded Sulphur 3 or 4 nectaring or basking
Orange Sulphur 1 heading south
 
Plus, I had several Familiar Bluets Enallagma civile and one darner with 
greenish spots, one Green Darner and one female Sympetrum (meadowhawk). 

 
There were many more all kinds of insects out there including a large wasp 
and  a dragon fly mimic an antlion?. 

 
Meena
 
Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
http://haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/

From: NYSButterflies AT yahoogroups.com [NYSButterflies AT yahoogroups.com] on behalf 
of Rick [rcech AT nyc.rr.com] 

Sent: Saturday, October 05, 2013 9:51 PM
To: NYSButterflies AT yahoogroups.com
Subject: [NYSButterflies] LI Coastal Butterflies, 10/5


I was out with Emily Peyton today (beautiful weather) at Jones Beach / Robert 
Moses State Park. 

 
We had a reasonably nice assortment of butterflies:
 
Cabbage White (5-10)
Orange Sulphur (4-5)
Cloudless Sulphur (1)
American Copper (1)
American Lady (2)
Common Buckeye (2) [reddish outer ventral fall form]
Monarch (20-30)
 
The Monarch flight along the southern coast varied from sputtering to locally 
noticeable, and (as one might expect) increased during the day. At one time, 
4-5 individuals were seen together nectaring on a singl! e goldenrod. This was 
nothing like the wave of individuals seen in strong years, but it appears that 
the last pre-migration brood reached some northern climes, where milkweed was 
abundant, and produced at least a token migratory brood to return south. And 
it’s still early, the numbers could swell as the season progresses. 

 
Rick Cech
Subject: Ithaca butterflies
From: Meena Madhav Haribal <mmh3 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Sun, 6 Oct 2013 11:21:45 +0000
I was out in Hog's Hole at the end of Southern Cayuga lake. I too had an 
interesting mix of butterflies, some of which I did not pay too much of 
attention as I was looking for Nelson's Sparrow. 




Monarchs - 8 heading south or nectaring, one had one of the hind-wings 
completely missing but still heading south with a same speed as its 
cohort/colleague! 


Eastern-tailed blue - 2 one looked like a fresh specimen, clean and crisp male 
and the second was a female! 


Dun's skipper - 1 I think did not pay too much of attention, but was an overall 
brown skipper 


An orange skipper - did not bother to identify, but had fully orange underside.

Juvenal's duskywing 1

Cabbage white lots some heading south and some nectaring or basking

Clouded Sulphur 3 or 4 nectaring or basking

Orange Sulphur 1 heading south



Plus, I had several Familiar Bluets Enallagma civile and one darner with 
greenish spots, one Green Darner and one female Sympetrum (meadowhawk). 




There were many more all kinds of insects out there including a large wasp and 
a dragon fly mimic an antlion?. 




Meena



Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
http://haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/

________________________________
From: NYSButterflies AT yahoogroups.com [NYSButterflies AT yahoogroups.com] on behalf 
of Rick [rcech AT nyc.rr.com] 

Sent: Saturday, October 05, 2013 9:51 PM
To: NYSButterflies AT yahoogroups.com
Subject: [NYSButterflies] LI Coastal Butterflies, 10/5



I was out with Emily Peyton today (beautiful weather) at Jones Beach / Robert 
Moses State Park. 


We had a reasonably nice assortment of butterflies:

Cabbage White (5-10)
Orange Sulphur (4-5)
Cloudless Sulphur (1)
American Copper (1)
American Lady (2)
Common Buckeye (2) [reddish outer ventral fall form]
Monarch (20-30)

The Monarch flight along the southern coast varied from sputtering to locally 
noticeable, and (as one might expect) increased during the day. At one time, 
4-5 individuals were seen together nectaring on a singl! e goldenrod. This was 
nothing like the wave of individuals seen in strong years, but it appears that 
the last pre-migration brood reached some northern climes, where milkweed was 
abundant, and produced at least a token migratory brood to return south. And 
its still early, the numbers could swell as the season progresses. 


Rick Cech


Subject: LI Coastal Butterflies, 10/5
From: "Rick" <rcech AT nyc.rr.com>
Date: Sat, 5 Oct 2013 21:51:17 -0400
I was out with Emily Peyton today (beautiful weather) at Jones Beach /
Robert Moses State Park.

 

We had a reasonably nice assortment of butterflies:

 

Cabbage White (5-10)

Orange Sulphur (4-5)

Cloudless Sulphur (1)

American Copper (1)

American Lady (2)

Common Buckeye (2) [reddish outer ventral fall form]

Monarch (20-30)

 

The Monarch flight along the southern coast varied from sputtering to
locally noticeable, and (as one might expect) increased during the day. At
one time, 4-5 individuals were seen together nectaring on a single
goldenrod. This was nothing like the wave of individuals seen in strong
years, but it appears that the last pre-migration brood reached some
northern climes, where milkweed was abundant, and produced at least a token
migratory brood to return south. And it's still early, the numbers could
swell as the season progresses.

 

Rick Cech
Subject: Re: a sad loss: Nicholas Wagerik, naturalist
From: Kristine Wallstrom <kwallstrom AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sun, 29 Sep 2013 08:31:23 -0400
Sorry for the private but broadcast comment.

On Sep 29, 2013, at 8:13 AM, Kristine Wallstrom wrote:

> Tomas, I'm sitting here weeping quietly, so moving and beautifully written.
> On Sep 29, 2013, at 7:00 AM, Thomas Fiore wrote:
> 
>> Nicholas Wagerik, known to all who knew him as "Nick", passed away earlier 
this month in New York City. Nick became known to hundreds and hundreds of the 
regulars as well as visitors to Central Park, in New York City, yet he also was 
known in a much wider circle, as a superb naturalist and teacher/mentor to so 
many who wanted to learn more in a wide array of subjects in natural history. 
Nick was a birder and had found a great many rarities over the years, beginning 
in his younger days in the 1960's, and to the more recent years was perhaps the 
most trusted of birders in Central Park when a difficult identification 
presented itself. That knowledge, skill, patience and intelligence increasingly 
manifested in a deep & abiding love and serious interest in invertebrate life: 
insects in particular and perhaps beginning with interest in lepidoptera (moths 
and butterflies), then odonata (dragonflies and damselflies), and in more 
recent years branching out to study of many "things with wings". These 
interests were backed by painstaking study and reading of the literature, and 
made known to so many others through Nick's generosity of spirit, sharing 
widely what he had learned with such effort and intensity. For some, who got to 
know him in that way, the experience was very nearly life-changing, or at a 
minimum, career-altering. He had the respect of many who were and are the 
experts in their respective fields in natural history study; he could speak 
with the authority of deep learning and experience on many subjects. It was 
also ~ all-importantly to many who got to know him ~ a simple joy to spend a 
few hours or more in the company of someone so dedicated and immersed in what 
he simply loved to do. His interests were all "amateur" (in the highest sense 
of that word, the root of which simply means, "to love") and his "day" job 
-actually an evening job- was at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York, 
where he was among the most senior of employees, with four decades there. It 
was during the days off, or before starting at the opera in the evenings, as 
well as during the generous summer break that that institution permits, that 
Nick got to "go out and play" as he would sometimes phrase it. In his younger 
days, he ventured out away from N.Y. City and would find flora (he was also a 
suberb and deeply learned botanist) and fauna of sorts that often was new to 
the locality, sometimes new to the county, perhaps even to the state where he 
found himself. A day in the field with Nick was almost always a treasure-trove 
of discovery, with far more observation & interpretation of "things in nature" 
than many very talented naturalists normally are involved with. Where he went 
exploring, new delights and new understanding most often went too. It is sad to 
know that he left us, much too soon and early, yet so many have great memories 
and experiences as well as some furthering of both knowledge and enthusiasm in 
study of nature: he left on us an indelible imprint. In recent years, his 
favorite areas within Central Park were well-known, being the Turtle Pond & the 
Shakespeare Garden, although he also wandered through many other areas, and in 
years past, was amenable to visiting parks and preserves all around the city 
and the greater NYC metropolitan area. He also was such an avid reader that he 
would regularly have one of whatever books had recently been published in the 
field of nature study, so that it was not unusual that he might make mention 
of, say, the diversity of mammals to be found in China, or what odonates could 
be seen in some Central American locality, or what flora was possible to find 
on some particular remote ocean island. In all of these and many more areas, he 
could speak about such as though he might have been there and studied in 
person, yet he had not - the readings he did took him around the world - and as 
much or more than most, he was able to speak on these subjects with an 
authority that impressed even those who had been, had studied and also knew a 
great deal on such subjects. He was in some ways, a throwback to an idea of a 
classical nature scholar, and he had only very recently begun to make use of 
this pervasive media and medium (i.e., the internet) for learning and 
communications. Family, friends and acquaintances from all over will dearly 
miss him. 

>> 
>> 
>> There is a family remembrance to take place today, in the part of the city 
where he grew up in Staten Island. At some time in the future, perhaps in 
spring of the year, there will be a larger gathering in celebration and 
remembrance of this kind, truly generous, and much-loved man. His influence on 
a number of generations of students of nature is unfathomable - and ongoing. 

>> 
________________________________________________________________________________________________ 

>> A little more on Nick, in what many who knew him will immediately find so 
familiar and indicating his irresistible enthusiasm: 

>> 
>> From "Season at the Point: The Birds and Birders of Cape May",  by Jack 
Connor (1991, Atlantic Monthly Press) The setting is familiar to many, the 
hawk-watch platform at Cape May Point, at the southern tip of New Jersey. This 
account is from some years ago - as will be evident with such optics now easily 
available to focus closely on insects and anything else at close range. It was 
also a time when studying butterflies, dragonflies and other insects was very 
new to "birders" in N. America. 

>> 
>> [from pages 107-109]:  
>> About noon an impromptu demo begins, this one conducted by a young man 
standing waist-deep in the small plot of goldenrod and asters to the right of 
the platform. "I've had eleven species of butterflies right in this patch since 
the sun broke through," he tells the birders standing above him at the railing, 
then reads from his notebook: "Gray hairstreak, eastern tailed-blue, white-M 
hairstreak, buckeye, orange sulphur, cabbage white, variegated fritillary, 
pearl crescent, American painted lady, sachem, and least skipper." He is Nick 
Wagerik from New York City. A magnifying glass hangs from a string looped 
around his binoculars. He steps slowly from one plant to the next, touching the 
stalks below the white and gold flowers as carefully as a hothouse gardener 
inspecting orchids. 

>> "What's that small one there?" asks a hawkwatcher from the platform. "Sort 
of rust colored." 

>> "That's a least skipper. There's an American painted lady. There's a pair 
of least skippers mating. There's a buckeye. There's an ailanthus webworm 
moth." 

>> 	"Moths fly in daytime?"
>> "Oh yeah. There are so many moths; lots of them are diurnal. Birders think 
identifying fall warblers is hard. Just look at the Peterson moth book 
sometime." 

>> "Here's a gray hairstreak," Wagerik says, pointing to a butterfly the size 
of a nickel with a dot of orange flame at its rear end the size of a match 
head. "See the little tails on the hindwings? They're not really tails. It's 
thought they mimic antennae, to draw predators to the wrong end. See how it's 
rubbing them back and forth? You find them sometimes with those little false 
tails missing. The bird went for the wrong end, and the butterfly flew away in 
the other direction." 

>> A dozen birders are now leaning over the railing, several struggling to aim 
their binoculars where Wagerik points. "Last June when the birds were slow," 
says one woman, "I thought I'd try to learn the flowers and insects." 

>> "Good for you. You'll never concentrate on birds the same way. Birds got me 
started too. But now I'm really into insects, not just butterflies and moths. 
Dragonflies, ants, wasps. I love wasps." 

>> 	"But where do the butterflies go when the sun isn't out?"
>> Wagerik laughs. "They disappear. Look! Here's a gray hairstreak with part 
of its hindwing eaten off! That's what I was talking about. A bird probably got 
him." 

>> At this, four birders hurry down the ramp to join Wagerk in the weeds. He 
hands the first his magnifying glass, and she bends close to look, then passes 
the lens to the birder behind her. 

>> "There are just about as many butterflies in North America as birds," says 
Wagerik, addressing the birders still on the platform. "Seven hundred and fifty 
species or so. Butterflies migrate too, and so do a lot of other insects - the 
green darner, the heroic darner. In England they get Monarch butterflies that 
have crossed the Atlantic- here's a white-M hairstreak!" 

>> A middle-aged man in a Phillies cap high-steps over quickly, takes the 
magnifying glass Wagerik hands him, turns his cap around backward, and bends 
close. The M is a chalk-white pin scratch on the underside of the insect's tiny 
gray wing. "Lovely!" he says, "I guess that's a lifer for me." 

>> Others climb down to lean over. Wagerik loops his magnifying glass off his 
binoculars and passes it around. Ten birders have now joined him in the patch, 
wading through he weeds, crouching to turn over leaves, and pointing to 
butterflies as they swirl into the air, flashing their colors like flakes of 
confetti. 

>> "Cape May is just as famous among butterfly watchers as it is among 
birders," Wagerik tells them. "Southerly breezes blow southern butterflies up 
here just as they bring southern birds after they've finished nesting. but you 
need the right winds, and it's like birds: you can never predict it." 

>> He looks over his shoulder in the direction of Delaware. "I'm still waiting 
for the big push." 

>> 
>> For far more on Nick Wagerik's activities with insect life and more, in a 
place he so often frequented and among many friends, see Marie Winn's "Central 
Park in the Dark: More Mysteries of Urban Wildlife" (2008, Farrar, Strauss & 
Giroux, and [paper] 2009, Picador). Marie Winn's 'Central Park Nature News 
website/blog also has hundreds of entries archived that include Nick's many 
years of finding &/or identifying all manner of things in Central Park. Also, a 
good friend and colleague-in-nature of Nick's, Ed Lam, has co-authored 
checklists of both butterflies and odonates seen in Central Park, and those 
checklists can be read via Ed Lam's website. Nick was most definitely 
instrumental in bringing into focus Ed's first interests in odonates, and his 
current study and forthcoming field guide to the dragonflies of North America, 
as well as his acclaimed field guide to damselflies. 

>> _______________________________________
>> Dear Nick, rest in peace.  You made a difference!
>> 
>> Tom Fiore,
>> Manhattan
>> 
>> 
> 
Subject: Re: a sad loss: Nicholas Wagerik, naturalist
From: Kristine Wallstrom <kwallstrom AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sun, 29 Sep 2013 08:13:03 -0400
Tomas, I'm sitting here weeping quietly, so moving and beautifully written.
On Sep 29, 2013, at 7:00 AM, Thomas Fiore wrote:

> Nicholas Wagerik, known to all who knew him as "Nick", passed away earlier 
this month in New York City. Nick became known to hundreds and hundreds of the 
regulars as well as visitors to Central Park, in New York City, yet he also was 
known in a much wider circle, as a superb naturalist and teacher/mentor to so 
many who wanted to learn more in a wide array of subjects in natural history. 
Nick was a birder and had found a great many rarities over the years, beginning 
in his younger days in the 1960's, and to the more recent years was perhaps the 
most trusted of birders in Central Park when a difficult identification 
presented itself. That knowledge, skill, patience and intelligence increasingly 
manifested in a deep & abiding love and serious interest in invertebrate life: 
insects in particular and perhaps beginning with interest in lepidoptera (moths 
and butterflies), then odonata (dragonflies and damselflies), and in more 
recent years branching out to study of many "things with wings". These 
interests were backed by painstaking study and reading of the literature, and 
made known to so many others through Nick's generosity of spirit, sharing 
widely what he had learned with such effort and intensity. For some, who got to 
know him in that way, the experience was very nearly life-changing, or at a 
minimum, career-altering. He had the respect of many who were and are the 
experts in their respective fields in natural history study; he could speak 
with the authority of deep learning and experience on many subjects. It was 
also ~ all-importantly to many who got to know him ~ a simple joy to spend a 
few hours or more in the company of someone so dedicated and immersed in what 
he simply loved to do. His interests were all "amateur" (in the highest sense 
of that word, the root of which simply means, "to love") and his "day" job 
-actually an evening job- was at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York, 
where he was among the most senior of employees, with four decades there. It 
was during the days off, or before starting at the opera in the evenings, as 
well as during the generous summer break that that institution permits, that 
Nick got to "go out and play" as he would sometimes phrase it. In his younger 
days, he ventured out away from N.Y. City and would find flora (he was also a 
suberb and deeply learned botanist) and fauna of sorts that often was new to 
the locality, sometimes new to the county, perhaps even to the state where he 
found himself. A day in the field with Nick was almost always a treasure-trove 
of discovery, with far more observation & interpretation of "things in nature" 
than many very talented naturalists normally are involved with. Where he went 
exploring, new delights and new understanding most often went too. It is sad to 
know that he left us, much too soon and early, yet so many have great memories 
and experiences as well as some furthering of both knowledge and enthusiasm in 
study of nature: he left on us an indelible imprint. In recent years, his 
favorite areas within Central Park were well-known, being the Turtle Pond & the 
Shakespeare Garden, although he also wandered through many other areas, and in 
years past, was amenable to visiting parks and preserves all around the city 
and the greater NYC metropolitan area. He also was such an avid reader that he 
would regularly have one of whatever books had recently been published in the 
field of nature study, so that it was not unusual that he might make mention 
of, say, the diversity of mammals to be found in China, or what odonates could 
be seen in some Central American locality, or what flora was possible to find 
on some particular remote ocean island. In all of these and many more areas, he 
could speak about such as though he might have been there and studied in 
person, yet he had not - the readings he did took him around the world - and as 
much or more than most, he was able to speak on these subjects with an 
authority that impressed even those who had been, had studied and also knew a 
great deal on such subjects. He was in some ways, a throwback to an idea of a 
classical nature scholar, and he had only very recently begun to make use of 
this pervasive media and medium (i.e., the internet) for learning and 
communications. Family, friends and acquaintances from all over will dearly 
miss him. 

> 
> 
> There is a family remembrance to take place today, in the part of the city 
where he grew up in Staten Island. At some time in the future, perhaps in 
spring of the year, there will be a larger gathering in celebration and 
remembrance of this kind, truly generous, and much-loved man. His influence on 
a number of generations of students of nature is unfathomable - and ongoing. 

> 
________________________________________________________________________________________________ 

> A little more on Nick, in what many who knew him will immediately find so 
familiar and indicating his irresistible enthusiasm: 

> 
> From "Season at the Point: The Birds and Birders of Cape May",  by Jack 
Connor (1991, Atlantic Monthly Press) The setting is familiar to many, the 
hawk-watch platform at Cape May Point, at the southern tip of New Jersey. This 
account is from some years ago - as will be evident with such optics now easily 
available to focus closely on insects and anything else at close range. It was 
also a time when studying butterflies, dragonflies and other insects was very 
new to "birders" in N. America. 

> 
> [from pages 107-109]:  
> About noon an impromptu demo begins, this one conducted by a young man 
standing waist-deep in the small plot of goldenrod and asters to the right of 
the platform. "I've had eleven species of butterflies right in this patch since 
the sun broke through," he tells the birders standing above him at the railing, 
then reads from his notebook: "Gray hairstreak, eastern tailed-blue, white-M 
hairstreak, buckeye, orange sulphur, cabbage white, variegated fritillary, 
pearl crescent, American painted lady, sachem, and least skipper." He is Nick 
Wagerik from New York City. A magnifying glass hangs from a string looped 
around his binoculars. He steps slowly from one plant to the next, touching the 
stalks below the white and gold flowers as carefully as a hothouse gardener 
inspecting orchids. 

> "What's that small one there?" asks a hawkwatcher from the platform. "Sort of 
rust colored." 

> "That's a least skipper. There's an American painted lady. There's a pair 
of least skippers mating. There's a buckeye. There's an ailanthus webworm 
moth." 

> 	"Moths fly in daytime?"
> "Oh yeah. There are so many moths; lots of them are diurnal. Birders think 
identifying fall warblers is hard. Just look at the Peterson moth book 
sometime." 

> "Here's a gray hairstreak," Wagerik says, pointing to a butterfly the size of 
a nickel with a dot of orange flame at its rear end the size of a match head. 
"See the little tails on the hindwings? They're not really tails. It's thought 
they mimic antennae, to draw predators to the wrong end. See how it's rubbing 
them back and forth? You find them sometimes with those little false tails 
missing. The bird went for the wrong end, and the butterfly flew away in the 
other direction." 

> A dozen birders are now leaning over the railing, several struggling to aim 
their binoculars where Wagerik points. "Last June when the birds were slow," 
says one woman, "I thought I'd try to learn the flowers and insects." 

> "Good for you. You'll never concentrate on birds the same way. Birds got me 
started too. But now I'm really into insects, not just butterflies and moths. 
Dragonflies, ants, wasps. I love wasps." 

> 	"But where do the butterflies go when the sun isn't out?"
> Wagerik laughs. "They disappear. Look! Here's a gray hairstreak with part of 
its hindwing eaten off! That's what I was talking about. A bird probably got 
him." 

> At this, four birders hurry down the ramp to join Wagerk in the weeds. He 
hands the first his magnifying glass, and she bends close to look, then passes 
the lens to the birder behind her. 

> "There are just about as many butterflies in North America as birds," says 
Wagerik, addressing the birders still on the platform. "Seven hundred and fifty 
species or so. Butterflies migrate too, and so do a lot of other insects - the 
green darner, the heroic darner. In England they get Monarch butterflies that 
have crossed the Atlantic- here's a white-M hairstreak!" 

> A middle-aged man in a Phillies cap high-steps over quickly, takes the 
magnifying glass Wagerik hands him, turns his cap around backward, and bends 
close. The M is a chalk-white pin scratch on the underside of the insect's tiny 
gray wing. "Lovely!" he says, "I guess that's a lifer for me." 

> Others climb down to lean over. Wagerik loops his magnifying glass off his 
binoculars and passes it around. Ten birders have now joined him in the patch, 
wading through he weeds, crouching to turn over leaves, and pointing to 
butterflies as they swirl into the air, flashing their colors like flakes of 
confetti. 

> "Cape May is just as famous among butterfly watchers as it is among birders," 
Wagerik tells them. "Southerly breezes blow southern butterflies up here just 
as they bring southern birds after they've finished nesting. but you need the 
right winds, and it's like birds: you can never predict it." 

> He looks over his shoulder in the direction of Delaware. "I'm still waiting 
for the big push." 

> 
> For far more on Nick Wagerik's activities with insect life and more, in a 
place he so often frequented and among many friends, see Marie Winn's "Central 
Park in the Dark: More Mysteries of Urban Wildlife" (2008, Farrar, Strauss & 
Giroux, and [paper] 2009, Picador). Marie Winn's 'Central Park Nature News 
website/blog also has hundreds of entries archived that include Nick's many 
years of finding &/or identifying all manner of things in Central Park. Also, a 
good friend and colleague-in-nature of Nick's, Ed Lam, has co-authored 
checklists of both butterflies and odonates seen in Central Park, and those 
checklists can be read via Ed Lam's website. Nick was most definitely 
instrumental in bringing into focus Ed's first interests in odonates, and his 
current study and forthcoming field guide to the dragonflies of North America, 
as well as his acclaimed field guide to damselflies. 

> _______________________________________
> Dear Nick, rest in peace.  You made a difference!
> 
> Tom Fiore,
> Manhattan
> 
> 
Subject: sightings
From: Andrew Block <ablock22168 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Sep 2013 18:21:37 -0700 (PDT)
9/25/13 - 10 Commerce Dr., New Rochelle, NY

1 Clouded Sulphur
1 Cloudless Sulphur

Andrew

Andrew v. F. Block
Consulting Naturalist/Wildlife Biologist
20 Hancock Avenue, Apt. 3
Yonkers, Westchester Co., New York 10705-4629
Phone:914-963-3080; Cell: 914-319-9701
Subject: Monarchs and Sulphurs migrating
From: Meena Madhav Haribal <mmh3 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Thu, 26 Sep 2013 16:19:26 +0000
Hi all,
I see quite a few of Sulphurs sp migrating and occasionally a monarch passes by 
my fourth floor office window. This is happening in last two or three days. 


Cheers
Meena

Dr. Meena Haribal
Boyce Thompson Institute
Ithaca NY 14850
Ph: 607-3011167
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/
http://haribal.org/


Subject: Monarch migration
From: "John and Sue Gregoire" <khmo AT empacc.net>
Date: Thu, 19 Sep 2013 08:52:13 -0400
After a dearth in sightings, we saw 7 here at home, and 4 more in the Finger 
Lakes 

National Forest, some 5-10 miles from here. All were in very good shape. Over 
the 

summer we saw maybe 6 all season long. They were successful somewhere to our 
north! 


Sue
-- 
John and Sue Gregoire
Field Ornithologists
Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
5373 Fitzgerald Road
Burdett,NY 14818-9626
 Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
"Conserve and Create Habitat"





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Subject: Eastern Long Islsnd
From: Henry Halama <henryhalama AT verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 2013 14:04:23 -0700 (PDT)
During my stay in Amagansett from 9/ 30 to 9/10 I observed the following 
butterflies on Eastern South Fork: 


Black and Eastern Tiger Swallowtails
Cabbage White
Clouded, Cloudless and Orange Sulphurs
American Copper
Red-banded Hairstreak
Summer Azure
Eastern Tailed Blue
Pearl Crescent
American Lady
Monarch
Silver-spotted Skipper
Swarthy, Least, Peck's, Tawny-edged Skippers
Long Dash
Witches
Sachem, Hobomok, and Zabulon Skippers.

Only one Monarch was migrating along the Beach and 2 additionalwere observed 
nectaring. The highlight were 4 Shearwaters quite close to the beach. 


Henry Halama
Woodstock
Subject: Unadilla leps
From: Andrew Block <ablock22168 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 2013 18:46:16 -0700 (PDT)
9/7/13 - Buckhorn Lake, Unadilla, Otsego Co., NY

3 Cabbage Whites
2 White Admirals

Andrew

Andrew v. F. Block
Consulting Naturalist/Wildlife Biologist
20 Hancock Avenue, Apt. 3
Yonkers, Westchester Co., New York 10705-4629
Phone:914-963-3080; Cell: 914-319-9701
Subject: Catocala spp.
From: Meena Madhav Haribal <mmh3 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 2013 01:43:38 +0000
Hi all,



Yesterday night or rather today early morning between 2.25 am to 6.45 am, I had 
eight large Catocala spp at my moth sheet. It was a quite a sight! I think 
three of them were Dejected Underwing Catocala dejecta and five of Youthful 
Underwings C. subnata. Some of them were older specimen and others looked 
comparatively fresh. Also lots of Noctua pronuba, I have not been looking for 
Lesser Yellow Underwing among them. In this month I had two or three more other 
species of Catocala so far. 


You can take a look at them at this link. 
https://plus.google.com/u/0/photos/118047473426099383469/albums/5922168672318399313?partnerid=gplp0 




I am looking forward tonight's moths!



Cheers

Meena



Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
http://haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/
Subject: Interesting commercial butterfly organization
From: "John and Sue Gregoire" <khmo AT empacc.net>
Date: Sun, 8 Sep 2013 08:33:31 -0400
Was sent the following info from AZ. First is the place and second is a review.
john



 



-- 
John and Sue Gregoire
Field Ornithologists
Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
5373 Fitzgerald Road
Burdett,NY 14818-9626
 Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
"Conserve and Create Habitat"





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Subject: south Brooklyn butterflies, Sept. 7
From: Thomas Fiore <tomfi2 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sun, 8 Sep 2013 05:58:58 -0400
On Saturday Sept. 7, I visited Brooklyn (Kings Co., N.Y. City) & the  
Floyd Bennett Field unit of Gateway National Recreation Area, mostly  
seeking butterflies in mid-late afternoon, & primarily in their  
community garden area plus a bit of the native grass & flower habitat  
still remaining & not mowed or off-limits to the public.  The weather  
was fine, warming to the high 70's-80 F. with a stiff S/SW breeze  
picking up along this big, open, near-shore site.

I encountered these:

Black Swallowtail 5+
Cabbage White 25+
Clouded Sulphur 1
Orange Sulphur 12+
American Copper 2
Red-banded Hairstreak 3
Common Buckeye 1
Monarch 3
Silver-spotted Skipper 2
Swarthy Skipper 4
Least Skipper 3+
Peck's Skipper 1
Tawny-edged Skipper 2
Sachem 250+
Zabulon Skipper 7+

It was good to see some Monarchs, but just 3 at this site (or area) in  
early Sept. is a very poor showing; hopefully some more will drift in  
over the coming weeks, on their way southwest.  I kept an eye out for  
larger Sulphurs, as some Cloudless have, as rather expected at the  
shore here, been sighted in recent weeks, & more still could, but I  
had just the usual Orange, plus one bright & clear Clouded Sulphur,  
and a couple of the hybrid types, that is of the preceding 2 common  
species.  The obvious highlight were all the swarming Sachems and in  
all sorts of condition, with males & females about equally  
represented. A few Fiery (skippers) could have also been present in  
this fiesta of Sachem-swarming, but I did not definitively see any.  
The Zabulon Skippers were mostly worn, but a dark female form "Zab."  
was in good shape. A single Peck's Skipper was in prime shape, and  
brightest of all was the single Common Buckeye I noticed, in a natural  
area with barren patches, a good sort of habitat to check for that  
species (even in tall-grass areas, the buckeyes will sometimes be in a  
patch with less grass). Red-banded Hairstreaks are well-known from  
some parts of this parcel of land and were not such a surprise there.  
The Am. Coppers were a bit worn, and the Swarthy Skippers likewise;  
nice to find them here, as I sometimes worry that their population  
might not continue on there, as they've 'winked out' in some other,  
more-marginal places. In the community gardens, plenty of flowers were  
in bloom all thru, and one might hope for further butterflies there  
for some weeks yet to come, and it was worth a stroll thru the narrow  
"lanes" in the garden interior paths, as there are a plethora of  
decent nectaring plants all about, one example being the many sedum in  
good bloom as well as multitudinous other plants.

Good observations to all,

Tom Fiore,
Manhattan
Subject: Giant swallowtails and Monarch
From: Meena Madhav Haribal <mmh3 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Wed, 4 Sep 2013 18:35:56 +0000
Hi all,
During the lunch hour, walk in the Cornell Plantations produced 6 Giant 
Swallowtails, four of them on one flower cluster of buddleia as there was a 
female among them. Female was followed by one male, they flew high into the 
air, he courting her. They flew together for quite some time before they 
disappeared from my view. The other males came back to nectaring. 


As I was getting into my office building, I saw Monarch fly south. Hopefully 
this one makes into Mexico! 


Also there was an Eastern-tailed Blue nectaring on clover.

Cheers
Meena

Dr. Meena Haribal
Boyce Thompson Institute
Ithaca NY 14850
Ph: 607-3011167
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/
http://haribal.org/


Subject: End of August butterflies
From: Henry Halama <henryhalama AT verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 31 Aug 2013 11:12:46 -0700 (PDT)
In last few days of August I saw the following butterflies in Northern Ulster 
County: 


Black Swallowtail
Giant
Eastern Tiger
Spicebush
Cabbage White
Clouded Sulphur
Orange Sulphur
American Copper
Gray Hairstreak
Summer Azure
Eastern Tailed Blue
Great Spangled Frit.
Pearl Crescent
Eastern Comma
American Lady
Appalachian Brown
Silver-spotted Skipper
Wild Indigo DW
Least Skipper
Peck's Skipper
Zabulon Skipper
Broad-winged Skipper

Henry Halama
Woodstock

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------


Subject: Re: Giant Swallowtails
From: "John and Sue Gregoire" <khmo AT empacc.net>
Date: Fri, 30 Aug 2013 19:10:48 -0400
We have enjoyed Giant Swallowtails at our butterfly bushes for the last two 
weeks. 

Thrilled this afternoon by passage of a fresh Monarch.
John
-- 
John and Sue Gregoire
Field Ornithologists
Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
5373 Fitzgerald Road
Burdett,NY 14818-9626
 Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
"Conserve and Create Habitat"

On Fri, August 30, 2013 15:49, Meena Madhav Haribal wrote:
> Today in the Mundy wildflower garden, I had three individuals flying around. 
One as 

> if to get my attention, flew right in front of me in a zigzag manner.  Last
> Wednesday also I saw an individual. So this must be a second brood or all 
emerged in 

> this period while skipping the previous season of emergence as I did not see 
any in 

> the previous emergence period.
>
> Meena
>
> Dr. Meena Haribal
> Boyce Thompson Institute
> Ithaca NY 14850
> Ph: 607-3011167
> http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/
> http://haribal.org/
>
>
>
>
>
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> 
Subject: Giant Swallowtails
From: Meena Madhav Haribal <mmh3 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Fri, 30 Aug 2013 19:49:45 +0000
Today in the Mundy wildflower garden, I had three individuals flying around. 
One as if to get my attention, flew right in front of me in a zigzag manner. 
Last Wednesday also I saw an individual. So this must be a second brood or all 
emerged in this period while skipping the previous season of emergence as I did 
not see any in the previous emergence period. 


Meena

Dr. Meena Haribal
Boyce Thompson Institute
Ithaca NY 14850
Ph: 607-3011167
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/
http://haribal.org/





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------


Subject: Giant Swallowtail
From: <bluewing AT stny.rr.com>
Date: Wed, 28 Aug 2013 21:03:29 -0400
I saw a Giant Swallowtail on Airport Road in Binghamton this afternoon.

- Bob Grosek
Binghamton, New York

Every species you meet is a gold medal finalist in the evolutionary race of 
life 



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------


Subject: RE: Dr. Chip Taylor - Monarch Watch
From: Gary Stell <gd_stell AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 24 Aug 2013 10:01:53 -0400
Yes last year was a very good monarch year in the East but not in the Midwest. 
I have seen two monarchs in my yard this season in Auburn. I watch a 5 acre 
milkweed stand neat Meridian north of me. I have also seen two monarchs in that 
field. There is some evidence that the population is so low the females are 
having difficulty finding a mate. 

Sterling Nature center also has a large stand of milkweed. In that past there 
are always more monarch there than southern Cayuga County. It appears that 
during the spring migration they arrive there and decide to not cross Lake 
Ontario. 

Jim what does it look like this year?  
Gary StellAuburn, NY 

To: NYSButterflies AT yahoogroups.com
From: khmo AT empacc.net
Date: Sat, 24 Aug 2013 09:02:50 -0400
Subject: Re: [NYSButterflies] Dr. Chip Taylor - Monarch Watch
















 



  


    
      
      
 What, they HAVE Monarchs in Tupper? That's great! We've seen only 1 all 
summer, nad 


noone but Meena (Ithaca) has seen any either.



Nor are we seeing Red Admirals or Buckeyes, but did have a single Giant 
Swallowtail 


on the Butterfly Bush a few days ago. Pretty slow going for butterflies this 
year. 




Sue

-- 

John and Sue Gregoire

Field Ornithologists

Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory

5373 Fitzgerald Road

Burdett,NY 14818-9626

 Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/

"Conserve and Create Habitat"



On Fri, August 23, 2013 11:03, Ber Carr wrote:

> Folks - Sorry for the late notice but I just heard about this program. Chip 
Taylor 


> founder of Monarch Watch and a prof at the university of Kansas will be at 
the WILD 


> center in Tupper Lake tonite. Tomorrow afternoon, he will be conducting 
another 


> program that will include tagging monarchs and discussions on his research.

>

> Bernie Carr

> Syracuse, NY

>

>

> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

>

>

>

> ------------------------------------

>

> 
Subject: Re: Dr. Chip Taylor - Monarch Watch
From: "John and Sue Gregoire" <khmo AT empacc.net>
Date: Sat, 24 Aug 2013 09:49:19 -0400
I was wondering about the efficacy of tagging monarchs this year in view of all 
the 

almost negative sighting reports??? It would seen that any interference would 
be 

undesirable.
John
-- 
John and Sue Gregoire
Field Ornithologists
Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
5373 Fitzgerald Road
Burdett,NY 14818-9626
 Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
"Conserve and Create Habitat"

On Sat, August 24, 2013 09:02, John and Sue Gregoire wrote:
> What, they HAVE Monarchs in Tupper? That's great! We've seen only 1 all 
summer, nad 

> noone but Meena (Ithaca) has seen any either.
>
> Nor are we seeing Red Admirals or Buckeyes, but did have a single Giant 
Swallowtail 

> on the Butterfly Bush a few days ago. Pretty slow going for butterflies this 
year. 

>
> Sue
> --
> John and Sue Gregoire
> Field Ornithologists
> Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
> 5373 Fitzgerald Road
> Burdett,NY 14818-9626
>  Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
> "Conserve and Create Habitat"
>
> On Fri, August 23, 2013 11:03, Ber Carr wrote:
>> Folks - Sorry for the late notice but I just heard about this program.  Chip
>> Taylor
>> founder of Monarch Watch and a prof at the university of Kansas will be at 
the 

>> WILD
>> center in Tupper Lake tonite. Tomorrow afternoon, he will be conducting 
another 

>> program that will include tagging monarchs and discussions on his research.
>>
>> Bernie Carr
>> Syracuse, NY
>>
>>
>> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
>>
>>
>>
>> ------------------------------------
>>
>> 
Subject: Re: Dr. Chip Taylor - Monarch Watch
From: "John and Sue Gregoire" <khmo AT empacc.net>
Date: Sat, 24 Aug 2013 09:02:50 -0400
What, they HAVE Monarchs in Tupper? That's great! We've seen only 1 all summer, 
nad 

noone but Meena (Ithaca) has seen any either.

Nor are we seeing Red Admirals or Buckeyes, but did have a single Giant 
Swallowtail 

on the Butterfly Bush a few days ago. Pretty slow going for butterflies this 
year. 


Sue
-- 
John and Sue Gregoire
Field Ornithologists
Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
5373 Fitzgerald Road
Burdett,NY 14818-9626
 Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
"Conserve and Create Habitat"

On Fri, August 23, 2013 11:03, Ber Carr wrote:
> Folks - Sorry for the late notice but I just heard about this program. Chip 
Taylor 

> founder of Monarch Watch and a prof at the university of Kansas will be at 
the WILD 

> center in Tupper Lake tonite. Tomorrow afternoon, he will be conducting 
another 

> program that will include tagging monarchs and discussions on his research.
>
> Bernie Carr
> Syracuse, NY
>
>
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> 
Subject: Dr. Chip Taylor - Monarch Watch
From: Ber Carr <mycocarex AT hotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 23 Aug 2013 15:03:31 +0000
Folks - Sorry for the late notice but I just heard about this program. Chip 
Taylor founder of Monarch Watch and a prof at the university of Kansas will be 
at the WILD center in Tupper Lake tonite. Tomorrow afternoon, he will be 
conducting another program that will include tagging monarchs and discussions 
on his research. 


Bernie Carr
Syracuse, NY
 		 	   		  

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------


Subject: Re: Great Basin form of Great Spangled Fritillary and some notes on milkweeds
From: "John and Sue Gregoire" <khmo AT empacc.net>
Date: Tue, 20 Aug 2013 08:48:31 -0400
Meena,

This is intriguing. 20 miles from you and seeing only healthy milkweed and 
moths. 

And I am surrounded by industrial agriculture.

Agree butterflies in general are scarce. So scarce each one elicits a smile and 
a 

cheery hello.

Sue
-- 
John and Sue Gregoire
Field Ornithologists
Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
5373 Fitzgerald Road
Burdett,NY 14818-9626
 Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
"Conserve and Create Habitat"

On Mon, August 19, 2013 20:54, Meena Madhav Haribal wrote:
> Hi all,
>
> This past Saturday, in Connecticut Hills on Cayutaville Road, I came across 
this 

> almost Great Basin form of Great Spangled Fritillary, though it has some 
orange. I 

> could not say whether it was a female or a male. Here is a link to the 
butterfly. 

> 
https://plus.google.com/u/0/photos/118047473426099383469/albums/5913992565303375697 

>
>
>
> I feel some species have been late this year. I have been still seeing quite 
a few 

> European Skippers, also saw a late Eastern Tiger Swallowtail nectaring on 
milkweeds 

> flowers. I have observed this among moths too.
>
>
>
> This year most of my A. syriaca and A. tuberosa did not flower well. 
Yesterday I 

> was in Park Preserve and saw some flowering and many unflowered A. syriaca. 
This is 

> late season to see flowering A. syriaca. One more thing I found this year is
> somewhere in-between half the length of the milkweed plants there was break, 
as if 

> some body broke it. And this happened to all three species of milkweeds - A. 

> syriaca, A. incarnata and A. tubersoa. I think some kind of insects made this 

> dent, but could not say what. Has anyone else noticed this? So I am wondering 
what 

> is going on with the milkweeds.
>
>
>
> Also I found many moths that I photographed this year were deformed, either 
wing or 

> some part of their body was deformed. Anyone else has noticed this? Does it 
have to 

> do anything with the wet season we have had?
>
>
>
> Butterflies have been scarce this year in general or I am not out when the
> butterflies are out!
>
>
>
> Meena
>
>
>
> Meena Haribal
> Ithaca NY 14850
> http://haribal.org/
> http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/
>
>
>
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> 
Subject: Great Basin form of Great Spangled Fritillary and some notes on milkweeds
From: Meena Madhav Haribal <mmh3 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Tue, 20 Aug 2013 00:54:39 +0000
Hi all,

This past Saturday, in Connecticut Hills on Cayutaville Road, I came across 
this almost Great Basin form of Great Spangled Fritillary, though it has some 
orange. I could not say whether it was a female or a male. Here is a link to 
the butterfly. 
https://plus.google.com/u/0/photos/118047473426099383469/albums/5913992565303375697 




 I feel some species have been late this year. I have been still seeing quite a 
few European Skippers, also saw a late Eastern Tiger Swallowtail nectaring on 
milkweeds flowers. I have observed this among moths too. 




This year most of my A. syriaca and A. tuberosa did not flower well. Yesterday 
I was in Park Preserve and saw some flowering and many unflowered A. syriaca. 
This is late season to see flowering A. syriaca. One more thing I found this 
year is somewhere in-between half the length of the milkweed plants there was 
break, as if some body broke it. And this happened to all three species of 
milkweeds - A. syriaca, A. incarnata and A. tubersoa. I think some kind of 
insects made this dent, but could not say what. Has anyone else noticed this? 
So I am wondering what is going on with the milkweeds. 




Also I found many moths that I photographed this year were deformed, either 
wing or some part of their body was deformed. Anyone else has noticed this? 
Does it have to do anything with the wet season we have had? 




Butterflies have been scarce this year in general or I am not out when the 
butterflies are out! 




Meena



Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
http://haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------


Subject: Moth invasion
From: "fuzzbuckets" <fuzzbuckets AT yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 14 Aug 2013 17:40:29 -0000
We are being invaded by moths> 10 - 12 a night in the house! Can anyone ID them 
for us? 



http://s1117.photobucket.com/user/lindainbroadalbin/media/2013_0812misc0056cr_zps0367d232.jpg.html?filters[user]=124666331&filters[recent]=1&sort=1&o=0 


Thanks,
Linda



------------------------------------


Subject: Re: Giant Swallowtails
From: "John and Sue Gregoire" <khmo AT empacc.net>
Date: Tue, 6 Aug 2013 09:22:42 -0400
Sorry, computer glitch sent this to the list in error!
J
-- 
John and Sue Gregoire
Field Ornithologists
Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
5373 Fitzgerald Road
Burdett,NY 14818-9626
 Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
"Conserve and Create Habitat"

On Tue, August 6, 2013 09:21, John and Sue Gregoire wrote:
> Wow! What oak is it -white? Congrats on the Monarch. We've been doing a 
survey and 

> this would be one of very few in NYS! Saw two giant Swallowtails yesterday 
but they 

> wouldn't slow for a photo.
> john
> --
> John and Sue Gregoire
> Field Ornithologists
> Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
> 5373 Fitzgerald Road
> Burdett,NY 14818-9626
>  Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
> "Conserve and Create Habitat"
>
> On Tue, August 6, 2013 09:02, John and Sue Gregoire wrote:
>> Visits to several sites in Seneca and Schuyler Counties yesterday produced a 
fair 

>> diversity of butterflies. We saw 3 Giant Swallowtails at the Caywood Point 
section 

>> of the Finger Lakes National Forest, on Seneca Lake. Black and Tiger 
Swallowtails 

>> were present also as well as Common Checkered Skippers and some of the more 
common 

>> species. Not a lot of anything, but the Giants were exciting.
>>
>> No Monarchs.
>>
>> At night it has been very cool, in the 40s, so not many moths either. A few
>> Gluphisia, and a striking Melanchra adjunct last night. Hope it warms up!
>>
>> Sue
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> John and Sue Gregoire
>> Field Ornithologists
>> Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
>> 5373 Fitzgerald Road
>> Burdett,NY 14818-9626
>>  Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
>> "Conserve and Create Habitat"
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> ------------------------------------
>>
>> 
Subject: Re: Giant Swallowtails
From: "John and Sue Gregoire" <khmo AT empacc.net>
Date: Tue, 6 Aug 2013 09:21:38 -0400
Wow! What oak is it -white? Congrats on the Monarch. We've been doing a survey 
and 

this would be one of very few in NYS! Saw two giant Swallowtails yesterday but 
they 

wouldn't slow for a photo.
john
-- 
John and Sue Gregoire
Field Ornithologists
Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
5373 Fitzgerald Road
Burdett,NY 14818-9626
 Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
"Conserve and Create Habitat"

On Tue, August 6, 2013 09:02, John and Sue Gregoire wrote:
> Visits to several sites in Seneca and Schuyler Counties yesterday produced a 
fair 

> diversity of butterflies. We saw 3 Giant Swallowtails at the Caywood Point 
section 

> of the Finger Lakes National Forest, on Seneca Lake. Black and Tiger 
Swallowtails 

> were present also as well as Common Checkered Skippers and some of the more 
common 

> species. Not a lot of anything, but the Giants were exciting.
>
> No Monarchs.
>
> At night it has been very cool, in the 40s, so not many moths either. A few
> Gluphisia, and a striking Melanchra adjunct last night. Hope it warms up!
>
> Sue
>
>
>
> --
> John and Sue Gregoire
> Field Ornithologists
> Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
> 5373 Fitzgerald Road
> Burdett,NY 14818-9626
>  Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
> "Conserve and Create Habitat"
>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> 
Subject: Giant Swallowtails
From: "John and Sue Gregoire" <khmo AT empacc.net>
Date: Tue, 6 Aug 2013 09:02:30 -0400
Visits to several sites in Seneca and Schuyler Counties yesterday produced a 
fair 

diversity of butterflies. We saw 3 Giant Swallowtails at the Caywood Point 
section 

of the Finger Lakes National Forest, on Seneca Lake. Black and Tiger 
Swallowtails 

were present also as well as Common Checkered Skippers and some of the more 
common 

species. Not a lot of anything, but the Giants were exciting.

No Monarchs.

At night it has been very cool, in the 40s, so not many moths either. A few
Gluphisia, and a striking Melanchra adjunct last night. Hope it warms up!

Sue



-- 
John and Sue Gregoire
Field Ornithologists
Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
5373 Fitzgerald Road
Burdett,NY 14818-9626
 Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
"Conserve and Create Habitat"





------------------------------------


Subject: Leps in last few days
From: Meena Madhav Haribal <mmh3 AT cornell.edu>
Date: Mon, 5 Aug 2013 01:48:34 +0000
Hi all, 
In a last week or so I have had various leps of interest. 
Last Sunday at the Cornell Arboretum, I saw my first Common Buckeye of the 
season. I do not think anyone else ahs reported them so far. I also had several 
Meadow Fritillaries, one was looking to lay eggs. 

On Wednesday I had a Spicebush swallowtail in the Mundy Wildflower garden.
Yesterday somewhere near Ovid a GAINT SWALLOWTAIL butterfly crossed the Rt. 89. 
In the MNWR area on Tow-path road I had several species of butterflies as 
follows 

Monarch - 1
Several Anglewings at least one each of Eastern Comma and Question Mark.
Red Admiral 2
Mouring Cloak 1
Black Swallowtails 3
Wood Nymph 1
Ringlet (several)
White Admiral (several)
In the morning yesterday at Salt Point 
Several Eastern-tailed blues, size variation was amazing.
Ringlets several
Cabbage whites abundant
Wood Nymph 1
Black Swallowtails
Juvenal's Duskywing
Clouded Yellows
And in my own garden yesterday there were several Juvenal's Duskywings and a 
Silver Spotted Skipper and lots of cabbage whites feeding on assorted nectar 
plants. 


Moths wise it has been very slow. Four days ago was a better night when I had 
three species of daggers (Cotton Wood, Interrupted and Ochre), Dark Grey Lichen 
Moth (first time for me), Raspberry Pyrausta and many other smaller beautiful 
pyralids and a couple of species of Catocala. 


 These moths could be viewed at 
https://plus.google.com/u/0/photos/118047473426099383469/albums/5907700059485657345 



https://plus.google.com/u/0/photos?pid=5906962784832311922&oid=118047473426099383469 
. 





Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
http://haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/
________________________________________
From: NYSButterflies AT yahoogroups.com [NYSButterflies AT yahoogroups.com] on behalf 
of AKMirth AT aol.com [AKMirth AT aol.com] 

Sent: Sunday, August 04, 2013 9:02 PM
To: NYSButterflies AT yahoogroups.com
Subject: [NYSButterflies] Nellie Hill Preserve, Dutchess County - Aug. 3, 2013

On Saturday, Aug. 3, we went to Nellie Hill Preserve in Dutchess County with 
the hope of seeing Giant Swallowtails. We were not disappointed, but the real 
treat was seeing 7 Juniper Hairstreaks, 6 of them nectaring on Queen Anne's 
Lace. There is a lot of Monarda in bloom right now. 


Black Swallowtail (1)
Giant Swallowtail (4)
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (common)
Spicebush Swallowtail (several)
Cabbage White (a few)
Juniper Hairstreak (7 - 1 up in a red cedar, the others nectaring on Queen 
Anne's Lace) 

Eastern Tailed-Blue (a few)
Great Spangled Fritillary (a few)
Pearl Crescent (a few)
Viceroy (1)
Common Wood-Nymph (a few)
Silver-spotted Skipper (common)
Zabulon Skipper (2)
Dun Skipper (1)

Karlo and Alison Mirth
Forest Hills, Queens


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------


Subject: Nellie Hill Preserve, Dutchess County - Aug. 3, 2013
From: AKMirth AT aol.com
Date: Sun, 4 Aug 2013 21:02:04 -0400 (EDT)
On Saturday, Aug. 3, we went to Nellie Hill Preserve in Dutchess County with 
the hope of seeing Giant Swallowtails. We were not disappointed, but the real 
treat was seeing 7 Juniper Hairstreaks, 6 of them nectaring on Queen Anne's 
Lace. There is a lot of Monarda in bloom right now. 


Black Swallowtail (1)
Giant Swallowtail (4)
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (common)
Spicebush Swallowtail (several)
Cabbage White (a few)
Juniper Hairstreak (7 - 1 up in a red cedar, the others nectaring on Queen 
Anne's Lace) 

Eastern Tailed-Blue (a few)
Great Spangled Fritillary (a few)
Pearl Crescent (a few)
Viceroy (1)
Common Wood-Nymph (a few)
Silver-spotted Skipper (common)
Zabulon Skipper (2)
Dun Skipper (1)

Karlo and Alison Mirth
Forest Hills, Queens


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------


Subject: Events in the Finger Lakes for National Moth Week
From: "Bill E" <wrevans AT clarityconnect.com>
Date: Thu, 25 Jul 2013 15:44:15 -0000
Hi all,

I'm not sure what the status of this group is now with regard to the transition 
of owners and the ability of new members to post, but I wanted to let you all 
know of some moth events in the Finger Lakes region this weekend for National 
Moth Week. The events, along with links to a running species list and photos, 
are available at the following link: 


http://www.oldbird.org/mothweek/2013FingerLakesMothEvents.html

As of this morning I believe we are approaching 200 species documented with 
photographic evidence, and the mothing weather this weekend is looking pretty 
good. 


Bill Evans 
Town of Danby









------------------------------------