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Updated on Saturday, December 3 at 11:28 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Black-throated Blue Warbler,©Shawneen Finnegan

3 Dec CALL FOR (odonate) ABSTRACTS: 2017 Northeast Natural History Conference [Joshua Rose ]
23 Feb Dragonfly program ["'Chip Krilowicz' chippop AT verizon.net [NEodes]" ]
24 Jan Annual DSA Meeting State College ["'Michael Moore' mcmoore32 AT gmail.com [NEodes]" ]
6 Dec Re: Mystery Darner ["Michael Blust blustm AT greenmtn.edu [NEodes]" ]
6 Dec Mystery Darner ["fsmodel AT aol.com [NEodes]" ]
12 Nov 6 species still flying in Delaware! ["'Michael Moore' mcmoore32 AT gmail.com [NEodes]" ]
21 Oct Season nearing and end ["Hal White halwhite AT udel.edu [NEodes]" ]
10 Oct Re: [TexOdes] [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US record of Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis []
28 Sep Another Blue-faced Meadowhawk ["david.eib AT acs-inc.com [NEodes]" ]
28 Sep Archilestes grandis ["'Cin and Bill kobak' bilcinkob AT comcast.net [NEodes]" ]
23 Sep RE: Black-tipped Darner on Long Island, NY ["'Steve Walter' swalter15 AT verizon.net [NEodes]" ]
22 Sep Re: Band-winged Meadowhawk photo added [1 Attachment] ["'tache AT pa.net' tache@pa.net [NEodes]" ]
22 Sep Band-winged Meadowhawk ["'tache AT pa.net' tache@pa.net [NEodes]" ]
20 Sep Long Island Pine Barrens Sep. 20 ["'Steve Walter' swalter15 AT verizon.net [NEodes]" ]
18 Sep Migrating Black saddleback ["Meena Madhav Haribal mmh3 AT cornell.edu [NEodes]" ]
17 Sep Meadowhawk behavior [3 Attachments] ["'tache AT pa.net' tache@pa.net [NEodes]" ]
17 Sep Re: No Blue-faced Meadowhawks ["Hal White halwhite AT udel.edu [NEodes]" ]
16 Sep RE: No Blue-faced Meadowhawks ["'Chip Krilowicz' chippop AT verizon.net [NEodes]" ]
16 Sep No Blue-faced Meadowhawks ["'Steve Walter' swalter15 AT verizon.net [NEodes]" ]
6 Sep RE: ID? ["Meena Madhav Haribal mmh3 AT cornell.edu [NEodes]" ]
5 Sep Re: ID? ["Steve Hummel mshummel AT iowatelecom.net [NEodes]" ]
05 Sep ID? [2 Attachments] ["LINDA GRAETZ lrg2534 AT verizon.net [NEodes]" ]
02 Sep Black-tipped Darner on Long Island, NY ["'Steve Walter' swalter15 AT verizon.net [NEodes]" ]
2 Sep Mottled Darners, Saratoga County, NY ["Michael Moore mcmoore32 AT gmail.com [NEodes]" ]
31 Aug Re: Hamilton County, NY ["Michael Moore mcmoore32 AT gmail.com [NEodes]" ]
31 Aug Re: Hamilton County, NY ["'John and Sue Gregoire' khmo AT empacc.net [NEodes]" ]
31 Aug Hamilton County, NY ["Michael Moore mcmoore32 AT gmail.com [NEodes]" ]
26 Aug Saratog Springs Sites? ["'Michael Moore' mcmoore32 AT gmail.com [NEodes]" ]
25 Aug Re: RE: [nyog] Odes in last week ["Thomas W Donnelly tdonelly AT binghamton.edu [NEodes]" ]
25 Aug RE: [nyog] Odes in last week ["Meena Madhav Haribal mmh3 AT cornell.edu [NEodes]" ]
24 Aug Ant hatch right now ["James MacDougall jm3 AT me.com [NEodes]" ]
24 Aug Re: [nyog] Odes in last week ["'John and Sue Gregoire' khmo AT empacc.net [NEodes]" ]
23 Aug Odes in last week ["Meena Madhav Haribal mmh3 AT cornell.edu [NEodes]" ]
21 Aug Blue-faced Meadowhawk and Great Spreadwing on Staten Island, NY ["david.eib AT acs-inc.com [NEodes]" ]
21 Aug Band-winged Meadowhawks in Delaware! ["'Michael Moore' mcmoore32 AT gmail.com [NEodes]" ]
16 Aug Fwd: Great swamp ["Soheil Zendeh sohzendeh AT gmail.com [NEodes]" ]
13 Aug Zebra Clubtail in Dutchess County, NY ["'Steve Walter' swalter15 AT verizon.net [NEodes]" ]
13 Aug ID Help ["'Willie D'Anna and Betsy Potter' dannapotter AT roadrunner.com [NEodes]" ]
12 Aug Idylwild WMA, MD ["'Michael Moore' mcmoore32 AT gmail.com [NEodes]" ]
11 Aug Cumberland County, ME - 10 August 2014 ["Nicholas Block nlb.birder AT gmail.com [NEodes]" ]
11 Aug Ponkapoag Bog, Norfolk County, MA - 11 August 2014 ["Nicholas Block nlb.birder AT gmail.com [NEodes]" ]
7 Aug Re: 5 Pennant Day in NJ ["Michael Moore mcmoore32 AT gmail.com [NEodes]" ]
7 Aug RE: 5 Pennant Day in NJ ["Meena Madhav Haribal mmh3 AT cornell.edu [NEodes]" ]
7 Aug Re: 5 Pennant Day in NJ ["Joshua Rose opihi AT mindspring.com [NEodes]" ]
7 Aug 5 Pennant Day in NJ ["'Michael Moore' mcmoore32 AT gmail.com [NEodes]" ]
5 Aug Tully Dam ["Joshua Rose opihi AT mindspring.com [NEodes]" ]
28 Jul Barnstable County, MA - 27 July 2014 ["Nicholas Block nlb.birder AT gmail.com [NEodes]" ]
27 Jul Westchester Co, NY Macromia, and More ["'Steve Walter' swalter15 AT verizon.net [NEodes]" ]
22 Jul Leach's Pond, Borderland State Park, Sharon - Easton, MA, 21 July 2014 ["Soheil Zendeh sohzendeh AT gmail.com [NEodes]" ]
20 Jul Topsfield MA - Painted & Spangled Skimmers ["Joshua Rose opihi AT mindspring.com [NEodes]" ]
20 Jul Re: Unidentified Damsel ["Blair Nikula odenews AT odenews.org [NEodes]" ]
20 Jul Unidentified Damsel ["'Willie D'Anna and Betsy Potter' dannapotter AT roadrunner.com [NEodes]" ]
19 Jul Borderland State Park, MA, 17 July 2014 (and a RFI) ["Nicholas Block nlb.birder AT gmail.com [NEodes]" ]
14 Jul Re: FW: Odes at Great Brook Farm State Park, Carlisle MA, 2014.07.11 ["'John and Sue Gregoire' khmo AT empacc.net [NEodes]" ]
14 Jul FW: Odes at Great Brook Farm State Park, Carlisle MA, 2014.07.11 ["'Soheil Zendeh' sohzendeh AT gmail.com [NEodes]" ]
14 Jul Re: Double-striped Bluets ["'John and Sue Gregoire' khmo AT empacc.net [NEodes]" ]
14 Jul FW: A little bit of odonate chasing this week-end ["Meena Madhav Haribal mmh3 AT cornell.edu [NEodes]" ]
13 Jul Re: Odes at Great Brook Farm State Park, Carlisle MA, 2014.07.11 ["Jason Forbes jason AT brewsterslinnet.com [NEodes]" ]
13 Jul Double-striped Bluets ["'Steve Walter' swalter15 AT verizon.net [NEodes]" ]
13 Jul FW: A little bit of odonate chasing this week-end ["Meena Madhav Haribal mmh3 AT cornell.edu [NEodes]" ]
13 Jul Worcester and Norfolk counties, MA - 7/12/14 ["Nicholas Block nlb.birder AT gmail.com [NEodes]" ]
13 Jul Re: Delaware Sightings and comments on low numbers of some species ["'John and Sue Gregoire' khmo AT empacc.net [NEodes]" ]
13 Jul Re: Delaware Sightings and comments on low numbers of some species ["Joshua Rose opihi AT mindspring.com [NEodes]" ]
13 Jul Delaware Sightings and comments on low numbers of some species ["'Michael Moore' mcmoore32 AT gmail.com [NEodes]" ]
12 Jul Odes at Great Brook Farm State Park, Carlisle MA, 2014.07.11 ["Soheil Zendeh sohzendeh AT gmail.com [NEodes]" ]
10 Jul A good day ["'John and Sue Gregoire' khmo AT empacc.net [NEodes]" ]
10 Jul Re: Annual "Dragonfly Big Day" results from Richmond County, NY ["'John and Sue Gregoire' khmo AT empacc.net [NEodes]" ]
09 Jul Annual "Dragonfly Big Day" results from Richmond County, NY ["david.eib AT acs-inc.com [NEodes]" ]
9 Jul Re: Ashburnham odes ["Joshua Rose opihi AT mindspring.com [NEodes]" ]
09 Jul Re: Ashburnham odes ["Hal White halwhite AT udel.edu [NEodes]" ]
8 Jul Ashburnham odes ["Joshua Rose opihi AT mindspring.com [NEodes]" ]
08 Jul Re: Returning to important habitats ["Hal White halwhite AT udel.edu [NEodes]" ]
7 Jul RE: Returning to important habitats ["Christopher Hill chill AT coastal.edu [NEodes]" ]
7 Jul Returning to important habitats ["Earle Baldwin earlebaldwin AT gmail.com [NEodes]" ]
6 Jul Re: Carlisle Cranberry Bog Odes ["'John and Sue Gregoire' khmo AT empacc.net [NEodes]" ]
6 Jul Carlisle Cranberry Bog Odes ["'Alan & Lisa Ankers' alankers AT comcast.net [NEodes]" ]

Subject: CALL FOR (odonate) ABSTRACTS: 2017 Northeast Natural History Conference
From: Joshua Rose <opihi AT mindspring.com>
Date: Sat, 3 Dec 2016 23:21:05 -0500
The below quote is from Bryan Pfeiffer , relayed with 
his permission, so please reply to his e-mail address and not me, because 
I’ll be very little help: 


“I’m seeking to build a critical mass of Odonata presentations at the 
Northeast Natural History Conference to be held in Cromwell, Connecticut, from 
April 21-23, 2017. As a session organizer for the conference, I’m welcoming 
abstracts on odonatology or closely related orders. Once I receive four worthy 
submissions, we’ll be able to put on a formal “session” during the 
conference. Find details about the gathering at: 
https://www.eaglehill.us/NENHC_2017/NENHC2017.shtml. Please email abstract 
ideas to me at bryan.pfeiffer AT uvm.edu. Thanks!” 


JSR





Joshua S. Rose, Ph.D.
Amherst, MA
http://bugguide.net/user/view/2399
http://www.facebook.com/opihi



_______________________________________________
Odonata-l mailing list
Odonata-l AT listhost.ups.edu
https://mailweb.pugetsound.edu/mailman/listinfo/odonata-l
Subject: Dragonfly program
From: "'Chip Krilowicz' chippop AT verizon.net [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2015 16:10:32 -0500
HI:

 

Earlier this month our local nature club's program topic was a beginners
guide to dragonflies "Let there be Dragons".  I decided to video it. It can
be reached at http://youtu.be/kugEFrUxDD8?list=UU-bmNJEutY_UtUGoDpz7Qig .

 

It was given by John Black (New Jersey Naturalist) and it is 45 minutes
long.  I used a Sony HDR-PJ540 with Sony's blue tooth mic which Mr. Black
agreed to having it clipped to his shirt.  I decided just to focus on the
PowerPoint screen only.  It's my first attempt and my videoing
presentation's is a work in progress.  After odeing for several years I did
learn something.    Getting the video from Sony's format to greater than 15
minutes on Youtube is an accomplishment in itself.

 

Regards,

 

Chip Krilowicz

Haddonfield, NJ

Audubonwildlifesociety.org

 
Subject: Annual DSA Meeting State College
From: "'Michael Moore' mcmoore32 AT gmail.com [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 24 Jan 2015 11:38:05 -0500
Announcing that the 2015 Annual Meeting of the Dragonfly Society of the
Americas (DSA) will be held in State College, PA on 25-28 June. 

The meeting website is now live and can be accessed here:

https://sites.google.com/a/udel.edu/nedsa/home/2015 

The meeting will combine local field trips with one day of talks (Saturday)
and lots of opportunity to socialize.  Pre-meeting and post-meeting 2-day
field trips are also being planned.  Anyone with an interest in Odonates is
welcome and encouraged to attend.  

 

Mike Moore

Newark, DE

  Mcmoore32 AT gmail.com

 

Websites:

 
Delmarva Dragonflies and Damselflies
(https://sites.google.com/a/udel.edu/deodes/)

  Voices of Delaware Birds
(https://sites.google.com/site/delawarebirdsongs/)

  Birds of the
Gilbert Water Ranch
(https://sites.google.com/site/birdsofthegilbertwaterranch/)

  AZFO Rare Bird
Photos (http://www.azfo.org/gallery/1main/photos_recent.html)

 

 
Subject: Re: Mystery Darner
From: "Michael Blust blustm AT greenmtn.edu [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 6 Dec 2014 21:01:28 -0500
Hi Frank,

I would call this a Shadow Darner (*Aeshna umbrosa*) based on the paddle
type cerci with a spine on the tip.  The markings on the dorsum of the
abdomen are small, as they should be.  There are also larger markings under
the abdomen - I am used to these being whitish rather than blue, but
otherwise the pattern is good for Shadow Darner.  The thoracic stripes look
OK except for the dot, which might be a reflection rather than a dot, but
it is hard to tell.  The only other paddle tailed darner in MA is the
lance-tip, (*A. constricta*) and that does not fit the pattern as well.

Cheers,
Mike

*Michael H. Blust*
Returned Peace Corps Volunteer, Mexico
Prof. Emer. Green Mountain College

On Sat, Dec 6, 2014 at 6:40 PM, fsmodel AT aol.com [NEodes] <
NEodes-noreply AT yahoogroups.com> wrote:

>
>
> Hi,
>
>  Can anyone help me identify this darner, photographed on September 28,
> 2013 at North Common Meadow, Petersham, MA. To me, it looks a lot like a
> Canada Darner, but lacks the "cut out" on the top thoracic stripe.
>
>  https://www.flickr.com/photos/fsmodel/15775342970/
>
>  Thanks,
> Frank Model
> Laguna Woods, CA
> formerly Amherst, MA
>
>  
>
Subject: Mystery Darner
From: "fsmodel AT aol.com [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 6 Dec 2014 18:40:42 -0500
Hi,


Can anyone help me identify this darner, photographed on September 28, 2013 at 
North Common Meadow, Petersham, MA. To me, it looks a lot like a Canada Darner, 
but lacks the "cut out" on the top thoracic stripe. 



https://www.flickr.com/photos/fsmodel/15775342970/


Thanks,
Frank Model
Laguna Woods, CA
formerly Amherst, MA
Subject: 6 species still flying in Delaware!
From: "'Michael Moore' mcmoore32 AT gmail.com [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2014 17:01:46 -0500
Greetings,

 

Today I took advantage of what may be the last warm day of the year, since a
steep cold front is moving through tonight.  I checked out Lum's Pond and
the Sedge Meadow in New Castle County, Delaware.  I was quite delighted to
find 6 species and established new late flight dates by three days for the
Delmarva for Blue-faced Meadowhawk (S. ambiguum) and Spotted Spreadwing (L.
congener).  

 

List below.  

 

Mike Moore

Newark, DE

  Mcmoore32 AT gmail.com

 

Websites:

 
Delmarva Dragonflies and Damselflies
(https://sites.google.com/a/udel.edu/deodes/)

  Voices of Delaware Birds
(https://sites.google.com/site/delawarebirdsongs/)

  Birds of the
Gilbert Water Ranch
(https://sites.google.com/site/birdsofthegilbertwaterranch/)

  AZFO Rare Bird
Photos (http://www.azfo.org/gallery/1main/photos_recent.html)

 

 

Mike

 

Species: 6 

 

NAME                   SCIENTIFIC NAME      MAX CNT  

 

DELAWARE, LUM'S POND - 

Spotted Spreadwing     Lestes  congener     40       

Citrine Forktail       Ischnura hastata     1        

Shadow Darner          Aeshna umbrosa       1        

Blue-faced Meadowhawk  Sympetrum ambiguum   3        

Autumn Meadowhawk      Sympetrum vicinum    40       

 

DELAWARE, SUMMIT BRIDGE PONDS - 

Citrine Forktail       Ischnura hastata     60       

Common Green Darner    Anax  junius         1        

Autumn Meadowhawk      Sympetrum vicinum    35       

 
Subject: Season nearing and end
From: "Hal White halwhite AT udel.edu [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Oct 2014 07:32:57 -0400
Saturday afternoon (10/18/2014), the day before our first widespread 
frost, I ventured out into a brisk 20 mph breeze, partly cloudy skies, 
and temperatures falling through the 60's. Despite the less than ideal 
conditions, I visited two sites (Lums Pond State Park and a sedge meadow 
along the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal) and managed to see 8 species of 
Odonates in New Castle Co., Delaware.

/Aeshna umbros//a/ (Shadow Darner) - netted a male along the power line 
and saw another there and one at the sedge meadow.
/Anax junius/ (Common Green Darner) - saw only one in the grass along 
the edge of the large ball field at Lums pond S.P.
/Libellula (incesta)/ (Slaty Skimmer) - probably this species seen from 
my car near the entrance station at Lums Pond
/Pantala (flavescens)/ (Wandering Glider) - two seen at the sedge 
meadow, both back lighted and hard to be sure they weren't /hymenaea/.
/Sympetrum ambiguum/ (Blue-faced Meadowhawk) - very common! at the 
Buttonbush bay, also at the Whale Wallow at Lums Pond S. P.
/S. vicinum/ (Autumn Meadowhawk) - fairly common at the sedge meadow, a 
few along the power line at Lums Pond
/Lestes congener /(Spotted Spreadwing) - 3 males and a couple of pairs 
seen at the Buttonbush Bay.
/Ischnura hastata/ (Citrine Forktail)- one male at the sedge meadow. I 
didn't wade to see more.

I did see one lonely Monarch flying south.

Hal White
Newark Delaware
Subject: Re: [TexOdes] [se-odonata] New Mexico: First US record of Phyllogomphoides nayaritensis
From: <may AT aesop.rutgers.edu>
Date: Fri, 10 Oct 2014 13:16:11 -0400
Aarrrrgh! But thanks.

Mike


> For editing purposes, note that it is listed as "Clear-faced" in 
theindices on pp 643 and 649 as well.Mike B.*Michael H. Blust*Returned 
Peace Corps Volunteer, MexicoProf. Emer. Green Mountain CollegeOn Fri, Oct 
10, 2014 at 12:44 PM,  wrote:>> Dennis is exactly 
correct. Now that it comes up, I remember him convincing> me that West 
Mexican Leaftail would be best. That's what I'd propose for> the DSA names 
committee. I'll try to get a note in the next ARGIA to> clarify this and a 
few other gaffes. Just remember, hereafter it's what I> meant, not what I 
said.>> Mike May>> > Simple answer, now that I look again. Its Clear-faced 
Clubtail at the> species, West Mexican Leaftail on the list of species at 
the front, where I> had just looked. Mike decided to change it to West 
Mexican, and it didnt> get changed in both places. So only one version, 
two names. We will> hopefully settle on West Mexican.DennisOn Oct 10, 2014, 
at 8:57 AM, Chris> Hill  wrote:> Curiouser and curiouser 
- my third> edition, like Eds, has Clear-faced Leaftail for 
Phyllogomphoides> nayaritensis Belle.Apparently there was more than one 
version of the> Third Edition (Green Cover) in circulation?> > Chris> > > 
On Oct 10, 2014,> at 11:23 AM, Dennis Paulson dennispaulson AT comcast.net 
[TexOdes]  noreply AT yahoogroups.com> wrote:> >> >> >> This is a 
second sending. There> seems to be no problem, as the Third Edition of 
Needham, Westfall & May in> fact uses West Mexican Leaftail for this 
species! Did you have a manuscript> copy of that book before it was 
published, Ed?>> >> Dennis>> > >> 
************************************************************************>> 
Christopher E. Hill> Biology Department> Coastal Carolina University>> 
Conway, SC 29528-1954> 843-349-2567> chill AT coastal.edu>> 
http://ww2.coastal.edu/chill/chill.htm> > > > > -----Dennis Paulson1724 NE> 
98 St.Seattle, WA 98115206-528-1382dennispaulson AT comcast.net>>>>> 
_______________________________________________> Odonata-l mailing list> 
Odonata-l AT listhost.ups.edu> 
https://mailweb.pugetsound.edu/mailman/listinfo/odonata-l>




_______________________________________________
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Odonata-l AT listhost.ups.edu
https://mailweb.pugetsound.edu/mailman/listinfo/odonata-l
Subject: Another Blue-faced Meadowhawk
From: "david.eib AT acs-inc.com [NEodes]" <NEodes@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 28 Sep 2014 21:59:32 -0700
9/27/14, North Mount Loretto State Forest, Staten Island NY
 

 Remarkably, I've found a second S. ambiguum on Staten Island, practically on 
the opposite end of the county from the location where the first was found last 
month. The habitat type is almost identical though - a marsh that has mostly 
dried to a muddy meadow, bordered by deciduous woodland. The site was alive 
with Sympetrum activity; over 40 individuals were counted in fairly close 
proximity. I captured enough to confirm a mix of S. internum and S. obtrusum. 
The territorial conflicts were non-stop. The ambiguum actually landed at my 
feet while I skirted the area just inside the tree line. This individual was 
extremely flighty, and I only got one poor quality shot before it was driven 
off by an individual of one of the other species. Despite walking around the 
area for another 45 minutes, it was not relocated. However, this certainly does 
call into question the theory of a single randomly wandering individual. While 
2 specimens does not a population make, there does seem to be mounting evidence 
of a (limited) dispersal northward. The question is whether or not this will 
trend in coming years, and how long it may take for any successful colonization 
to result in locations in between the current northern limit of their range in 
south Jersey and here in southern New York. I would recommend to NJ Odonatists 
that they look in on any nearby spots that reasonably match the habitat 
description above. It makes sense that if several individuals (I have to 
sincerely doubt that I've managed to find the only 2 that are here) have 
reached New York, others must have stopped off and remained at suitable habitat 
along the way. 

 

 Dave Eib
 Richmond County Odonate Atlas
 daveeib AT gmail.com 
Subject: Archilestes grandis
From: "'Cin and Bill kobak' bilcinkob AT comcast.net [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Sep 2014 18:00:05 -0400
Don't often see spreadwings in our yard, so when we do, we stop what we're
doing to identify it. Had a gorgeous male great spreadwing (Archilestes
grandis) perch over our backyard water garden today, the first one seen here
in many years.

 

Cindi Kobak

North Guilford, CT (New Haven County)
Subject: RE: Black-tipped Darner on Long Island, NY
From: "'Steve Walter' swalter15 AT verizon.net [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 23 Sep 2014 20:45:53 -0400
I found another Black-tipped Darner (Aeshna tuberculifera) today at the same
location, this time perched in low vegetation around the little pond - so
now the second record for Long Island. What to make of that? Same
individual? Resident population? Wanderers finding the same site? I am
reminded that I have seen some indication of migration in Aeshnas. I recall
seeing some on the move in Massachusetts (Plum Island, I think it was) in
August 1998 - couldn't tell what they were in flight. On October 13, 2003, I
found a couple of perched Aeshnas at Lighthouse Point in East Haven,
Connecticut. This is a coastal concentration point for migrants of many
types (birds, butterflies, dragonflies). So just looking at the pictures of
one that I had never labeled in my picture collection, it appears to be a
Black-tipped. A perfect story, except the other one looks like a Canada
Darner. Food for thought.

 

Steve Walter

Bayside, NY

 

From: NEodes AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:NEodes AT yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
'Steve Walter' swalter15 AT verizon.net [NEodes]
Sent: Tuesday, September 02, 2014 8:11 PM
To: NEOdes Odes
Subject: [NEodes] Black-tipped Darner on Long Island, NY

 

  

I'm a few days late with this report, but I needed to verify the ID (thanks
to Nick Donnelly) and get through a busy holiday weekend. On August 29, I
found what would appear to be the first Long Island record of Black-tipped
Darner (Aeshna tuberculifera) near Melville in western Suffolk County, NY. A
decent enough flight shot can be seen on my web site
http://www.stevewalternature.com/ (click the dragonfly tab).

 

Steve Walter

Bayside, NY 


Subject: Re: Band-winged Meadowhawk photo added [1 Attachment]
From: "'tache AT pa.net' tache@pa.net [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2014 12:02:02 -0400
<*>[Attachment(s) from tache AT pa.net included below]

Sorry:

Quoting "tache AT pa.net" :

> According to OCentral, S. semicinctum is found in Perry Co. PA. I  
> have never seen one, however.
>
> Photo taken 9/22/2014. 1145.
>
> A very dry shale road beside a shale pit across the road from a  
> swampy lowland near a spring-fed creek.
>
> Got one look at her(?), hence only one "good enough--hopefully--for  
> an ID" shot before she took off. I've been back many times--no joy.
>
> All Sympetrum IDs come with standard disclaimer.
>
> Good hunting/jbw
>
> J.B.Wheatley
> www.northoftheridge.com
>




<*>Attachment(s) from tache AT pa.net:

<*> 1 of 1 Photo(s) 
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/NEodes/attachments/901533008;_ylc=X3oDMTJxZW5ycDN1BF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzM3NDY5NDMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDgzMTI1BHNlYwNhdHRhY2htZW50BHNsawN2aWV3T25XZWIEc3RpbWUDMTQxMTQwMTcyOA-- 

  <*> IMG_6733.jpg

------------------------------------
Posted by: "tache AT pa.net" 
------------------------------------


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Subject: Band-winged Meadowhawk
From: "'tache AT pa.net' tache@pa.net [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 22 Sep 2014 11:58:44 -0400
According to OCentral, S. semicinctum is found in Perry Co. PA. I have  
never seen one, however.

Photo taken 9/22/2014. 1145.

A very dry shale road beside a shale pit across the road from a swampy  
lowland near a spring-fed creek.

Got one look at her(?), hence only one "good enough--hopefully--for an  
ID" shot before she took off. I've been back many times--no joy.

All Sympetrum IDs come with standard disclaimer.

Good hunting/jbw

J.B.Wheatley
www.northoftheridge.com


------------------------------------
Posted by: "tache AT pa.net" 
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Subject: Long Island Pine Barrens Sep. 20
From: "'Steve Walter' swalter15 AT verizon.net [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 21:09:58 -0400
In what figures to be my last ode trip of the year, I took my friend Karlo
Mirth out to the Long Island Pine Barrens (NY) today to try and get him
September insect specialties. The first stop was in search of Leonard's
Skipper (butterfly), but perhaps we were too late in the season to get any.
After that, it was about odes - and that was productive and interesting.

 

At Wildwood Lake in Riverhead, Saffron-winged Meadowhawks (Sympetrum
costiferum) were plentiful and accommodating. This is a species of large
sand bottomed lakes, a rare habitat in downstate New York - so a rare
species in these parts. A smaller, mud bottomed pond is adjacent but
separated from Wildwood. I showed Karlo how the change in habitat resulted
in a change in the resident meadowhawk species. He got a firsthand look when
an Autumn Meadowhawk (S. vicinum) landed on his shoulder (a harbinger of
things to come). We did see one Autumn afterwards in trees overlooking the
big lake - so a lesson learned that it's still worth paying attention. Still
present on the big lake were Skimming Bluet (Enallagma geminatum), Variable
Dancer (Argia fumipennis), and the interesting population of Swamp
Spreadwing (Lestes vigilax) that hangs on late into the season and attains
pruinosity seldom mentioned in field guides.

 

The next interesting stop was Frog Pond, where we realized this region was
in a drought. The pond - where I have waded knee high in summer - was
completely dry. Nonetheless, there was an abundance of Spotted Spreadwings
(Lestes congener) and Cherry-faced Meadowhawks (Sympetrum internum). I see a
pattern here with meadowhawks. Another distinct habitat and a different
species. I'm still trying to figure out if Ruby Meadowhawk is legitimate. If
so, there out ought to be specific places to seek it out. 

 

The Sand Pit Ponds in Manorville proved similar to Frog Pond, with the same
species noted there. However, a tiny bit of water remained and had Azure
Bluets (Enallagma aspersum) at it. We also pulled out one Sweetflag
Spreadwing (Lestes forcipatus).

 

The Calverton Ponds were the final and most interesting stop. Very low water
was encountered again, with an incredible amount of what is basically
exposed mud flat. In fact, four species of shorebirds were present, most
surprisingly a White-rumped Sandpiper. A Northern Water Snake, which I had
never seen on Long Island, was lying on land that typically would be
underwater. With the changed pond configuration and more clouds than
expected in the afternoon, the target species here proved unexpectedly
difficult to get, or at least to confirm. After moving to a different
section of the pond, we started to do better on odes. The first surprise was
a Halloween Pennant (Celithemis eponina), 11 days later than my previous
late date of Sept. 9. Then it was a Spangled Skimmer (Libellula cyanea), a
male no less, which I had never seen in September. Then it was a female
Band-winged Meadowhawk (Sympetrum semicinctum), not rare but an enigmatic
species on Long Island (no consistent spots), which I had not seen before at
the Calverton Ponds. (Quite a productive day for meadowhawks, this was -
thanks to everyone that offered feedback on the Blue-faced). 

 

A late for this site Swamp Spreadwing (Lestes vigilax) was found. This was a
female displaying pruinosity, so certainly interesting to look at (we had
seen males at Wildwood). Some Slender Spreadwings (Lestes rectangularis)
were present, as well, to add to the spreadwing identification lesson. We
also saw a large teneral dragonfly emerge and go up into the trees, at first
thought a surprise at this late date. Upon determining what it was, it made
sense. It was a Carolina Saddlebags (Tramea carolina), which will just
migrate south when it gets itself together. Oh yes, what about the species
we were actually looking for here? I finally was able to confirm a male
Mottled Darner (Aeshna clepsydra) - a lifer for Karlo - when one landed on
him! And this is a species that is seldom seen landing on anything. You
can't make this stuff up. If anyone is interested in seeing the Mottled
Darner on Karlo, the picture is on my web site
(http://www.stevewalternature.com/ , click the Dragonfly tab). Shortly
after, we observed a female ovipositing nearby.

 

Steve Walter

Bayside, NY 

 

 

 
Subject: Migrating Black saddleback
From: "Meena Madhav Haribal mmh3 AT cornell.edu [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2014 16:53:53 +0000
Hi all,
I just watched a migrating Black Saddlebag fly over my fourth floor window, may 
be at a distance of 5 feet (closest). It was facing west and flying south with 
northwest wind like Monarchs often do! 


Meena

Meena Haribal
409, Boyce Thompson Institute (BTI)
Phone 6073011167
Email: mmh3 AT cornell.edu
http://haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/
Ithaca area moths: http://tinyurl.com/kn6q2p4
Dragonfly book sample pages: http://www.haribal.org/140817samplebook.pdf

Subject: Meadowhawk behavior [3 Attachments]
From: "'tache AT pa.net' tache@pa.net [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 19:07:11 -0400
<*>[Attachment(s) from tache AT pa.net included below]

 From the Tuscarora State Forest, western Perry County, Central Pennsylvania.

There is a colony of Sympetrum in a pair of vernal pools on top of a  
local ridge.

I check on them every year. It is a small colony, so I have, so far,  
been reluctant to actually net any.

The primary pool is ~1/4 acre, mostly sedge filled and surrounded by a  
belt of moss. The moss belt is only inundated after very heavy rains  
or snow melt.

Several Meadowhawks were active today. Mostly, I would have called  
them S. rubicundulum, but a pair in wheel looked sufficiently  
different that I'm not at all certain.

The dragonflies were active when the sun shone, less so when clouds  
blocked the sun.

The pair in wheel were actively engaged regardless of the cloud cover.  
Eventually, they split up. The female appeared to be dropping her eggs  
directly into the moss. The male hover guarded her. This went on for  
approximately 90 seconds.

In accordance with the universal laws of nature photography, once the  
behavior became interesting, the sky became cloudy. Therefore, I could  
not capture any moving shots.

I have enclosed a shot of the mating pair, a very poor shot of the  
female w/eggs, and a close-up of a male.

I hope to go back on Saturday and net a couple of males--get pictures  
of the hamules--if I can.

Good hunting/J.B. Wheatley


<*>Attachment(s) from tache AT pa.net:

<*> 3 of 3 Photo(s) 
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/NEodes/attachments/1777321665;_ylc=X3oDMTJxNmcwcTNoBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzM3NDY5NDMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDgzMTI1BHNlYwNhdHRhY2htZW50BHNsawN2aWV3T25XZWIEc3RpbWUDMTQxMDk5NTI0MA-- 

  <*> IMG_6822.jpg
  <*> IMG_6840.jpg
  <*> IMG_6825.jpg

------------------------------------
Posted by: "tache AT pa.net" 
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

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Subject: Re: No Blue-faced Meadowhawks
From: "Hal White halwhite AT udel.edu [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 08:28:44 -0400
/S. ambiguum/ is very common but very! local here in northern Delaware. 
Populations fluctuate widely from year to year at their temporary 
woodland pond habitats depending on when the ponds dry up or fill up 
each year. They have an uncanny ability to hang around the pools several 
months after they have dried up seemingly to "know" that that is where 
they need to be when the water returns.

Hal White

On 9/16/2014 11:19 PM, 'Chip Krilowicz' chippop AT verizon.net [NEodes] wrote:
>
> HI;
>
> Sympetrum ambiguum and Libellua vibrans  are residents in South 
> Jersey.  They both like wooded ponds.  I have several sightings of 
> each this year in NJ. And also found S. ambiguum at a dry vernal pool 
> in Valley Forge Park, Pa last week.  Cape May County  is a strong hold 
> for S Ambiguum.  I am planning to go there tomorrow and will poke 
> around to see what is there.
>
> Regards,
>
> Chip Krilowicz
>
> Haddonfield, NJ
>
> *From:*NEodes AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:NEodes AT yahoogroups.com] *On 
> Behalf Of *'Steve Walter' swalter15 AT verizon.net [NEodes]
> *Sent:* Tuesday, September 16, 2014 8:35 PM
> *To:* NEOdes Odes
> *Subject:* [NEodes] No Blue-faced Meadowhawks
>
> A few weeks ago, someone mentioned something about posting negative 
> data. So here goes, unfortunately. Back in the 1990's, I had found 
> Blue-faced Meadowhawks (Sympetrum ambiguum) on at least a couple of 
> occasions at Cape May Point State Park. I had a low quality camera 
> when I last got it in 1999, so I've been wanting to upgrade my 
> pictures for quite a while. I tried once about 10 years ago and came 
> up empty. That led me to think that maybe late August was a tad early. 
> I figured mid-September would be perfect, as it is for most 
> Sympetrums. But no luck in thorough searching yesterday. And I figured 
> this would be a sure fire consolation if I had missed the real target 
> for making the long trek to southern New Jersey -- the Whiskered Tern 
> (old world bird species, in case anyone doesn't know). Fortunately, 
> that worked out. So no new dragonfly pictures on my web site, but the 
> tern for anyone that's interested http://www.stevewalternature.com/ .
>
> Back to dragonflies, which this list is about. So what's the deal with 
> the Blue-faced Meadowhawk? That's two misses for me now. I had assumed 
> it was resident at Cape May, near the northern limit of its range. 
> Could it be possible that it's irruptive -- like Great Blue Skimmer, 
> for instance -- and would show up in the same proper habitats in its 
> flight years? Sympetrums do wander. That could account for Dave Eib's 
> find in Staten Island, NY. Just speculating, since I don't live in or 
> visit the right places to have better insight.
>
> And by the way, on the second day of northerly winds, Cape May was 
> full of the migratory species.
>
> Steve Walter
>
> Bayside, NY
>
> 
Subject: RE: No Blue-faced Meadowhawks
From: "'Chip Krilowicz' chippop AT verizon.net [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 23:19:17 -0400
HI;

 

Sympetrum ambiguum and Libellua vibrans  are residents in South Jersey.
They both like wooded ponds.  I have several sightings of each this year in
NJ. And also found S. ambiguum at a dry vernal pool in Valley Forge Park, Pa
last week.  Cape May County  is a strong hold for S Ambiguum.  I am planning
to go there tomorrow and will poke around to see what is there. 

 

 

Regards,

Chip Krilowicz

Haddonfield, NJ

 

 

From: NEodes AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:NEodes AT yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
'Steve Walter' swalter15 AT verizon.net [NEodes]
Sent: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 8:35 PM
To: NEOdes Odes
Subject: [NEodes] No Blue-faced Meadowhawks

 

  

A few weeks ago, someone mentioned something about posting negative data. So
here goes, unfortunately. Back in the 1990's, I had found Blue-faced
Meadowhawks (Sympetrum ambiguum) on at least a couple of occasions at Cape
May Point State Park. I had a low quality camera when I last got it in 1999,
so I've been wanting to upgrade my pictures for quite a while. I tried once
about 10 years ago and came up empty. That led me to think that maybe late
August was a tad early. I figured mid-September would be perfect, as it is
for most Sympetrums. But no luck in thorough searching yesterday. And I
figured this would be a sure fire consolation if I had missed the real
target for making the long trek to southern New Jersey - the Whiskered Tern
(old world bird species, in case anyone doesn't know). Fortunately, that
worked out. So no new dragonfly pictures on my web site, but the tern for
anyone that's interested http://www.stevewalternature.com/ . 

 

Back to dragonflies, which this list is about. So what's the deal with the
Blue-faced Meadowhawk? That's two misses for me now. I had assumed it was
resident at Cape May, near the northern limit of its range. Could it be
possible that it's irruptive - like Great Blue Skimmer, for instance - and
would show up in the same proper habitats in its flight years? Sympetrums do
wander. That could account for Dave Eib's find in Staten Island, NY. Just
speculating, since I don't live in or visit the right places to have better
insight.

 

And by the way, on the second day of northerly winds, Cape May was full of
the migratory species.

 

Steve Walter

Bayside, NY  


Subject: No Blue-faced Meadowhawks
From: "'Steve Walter' swalter15 AT verizon.net [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 20:34:54 -0400
A few weeks ago, someone mentioned something about posting negative data. So
here goes, unfortunately. Back in the 1990's, I had found Blue-faced
Meadowhawks (Sympetrum ambiguum) on at least a couple of occasions at Cape
May Point State Park. I had a low quality camera when I last got it in 1999,
so I've been wanting to upgrade my pictures for quite a while. I tried once
about 10 years ago and came up empty. That led me to think that maybe late
August was a tad early. I figured mid-September would be perfect, as it is
for most Sympetrums. But no luck in thorough searching yesterday. And I
figured this would be a sure fire consolation if I had missed the real
target for making the long trek to southern New Jersey - the Whiskered Tern
(old world bird species, in case anyone doesn't know). Fortunately, that
worked out. So no new dragonfly pictures on my web site, but the tern for
anyone that's interested http://www.stevewalternature.com/ . 

 

Back to dragonflies, which this list is about. So what's the deal with the
Blue-faced Meadowhawk? That's two misses for me now. I had assumed it was
resident at Cape May, near the northern limit of its range. Could it be
possible that it's irruptive - like Great Blue Skimmer, for instance - and
would show up in the same proper habitats in its flight years? Sympetrums do
wander. That could account for Dave Eib's find in Staten Island, NY. Just
speculating, since I don't live in or visit the right places to have better
insight.

 

And by the way, on the second day of northerly winds, Cape May was full of
the migratory species.

 

Steve Walter

Bayside, NY  
Subject: RE: ID?
From: "Meena Madhav Haribal mmh3 AT cornell.edu [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 6 Sep 2014 00:58:27 +0000
I concur with Steve Hummel, it is an Eastern Forktail.



Yesterday and today, I have seen several migrating Black-saddlebags, which 
generally fly over my office window. I also had a migrating Monarch butterfly 
too, which has become rare creature these days. 




Cheers

Meena





Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
42.429007,-76.47111
http://haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/
Ithaca area moths: http://tinyurl.com/kn6q2p4
Dragonfly book sample pages: http://www.haribal.org/140817samplebook.pdf



________________________________
From: NEodes AT yahoogroups.com  on behalf of LINDA GRAETZ 
lrg2534 AT verizon.net [NEodes]  

Sent: Friday, September 5, 2014 4:47 PM
To: neodes AT yahoogroups.com
Subject: [NEodes] ID? [2 Attachments]

Hello NE Ode Group. I recently joined at the suggestion of Glen Corbiere. This 
is the text of an email I sent him several weeks ago: 

Dear Mr. Corbiere,
Attached is a photograph of a damselfly male taken July 20 in Warwick, MA. The 
exclamation point markings on the thorax made me think it was a Fragile 
Forktail, but the blue on the abdomen would contradict that. Could this be an 
unusually marked Eastern Forktail, male? A hybrid?? I am enclosing a dorsal 
view as well. 

Thank you for your assistance.   Linda Graetz   Waltham, MA

He suggested I share the images via this group and/or Facebook (I don't do 
Facebook). 


I'm curious to know what species some of you think this is. (I'm guessing that 
it's more likely an Eastern Forktail?) 


Subject: Re: ID?
From: "Steve Hummel mshummel AT iowatelecom.net [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 5 Sep 2014 16:03:20 -0500
Hi Linda,
This is an Eastern Forktail (Ischnura verticalis). The species occasionally has 
the exclamation point marking like the fragile. Not a hybrid, just a genetic 
variation. I've seen it several times here in Iowa. 

Steve

Steve Hummel
mshummel AT iowatelecom.net
Great Plains Administrator
OdonataCentral

On Sep 5, 2014, at 3:47 PM, LINDA GRAETZ lrg2534 AT verizon.net [NEodes] wrote:

Hello NE Ode Group. I recently joined at the suggestion of Glen Corbiere. This 
is the text of an email I sent him several weeks ago: 

Dear Mr. Corbiere,
Attached is a photograph of a damselfly male taken July 20 in Warwick, MA. The 
exclamation point markings on the thorax made me think it was a Fragile 
Forktail, but the blue on the abdomen would contradict that. Could this be an 
unusually marked Eastern Forktail, male? A hybrid?? I am enclosing a dorsal 
view as well. 

Thank you for your assistance.   Linda Graetz   Waltham, MA

He suggested I share the images via this group and/or Facebook (I don't do 
Facebook). 


I'm curious to know what species some of you think this is. (I'm guessing that 
it's more likely an Eastern Forktail?) 






Subject: ID? [2 Attachments]
From: "LINDA GRAETZ lrg2534 AT verizon.net [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 05 Sep 2014 16:47:46 -0400
Hello NE Ode Group. I recently joined at the suggestion of Glen Corbiere. This 
is the text of an email I sent him several weeks ago: 

Dear Mr. Corbiere,
Attached is a photograph of a damselfly male taken July 20 in Warwick, MA. The 
exclamation point markings on the thorax made me think it was a Fragile 
Forktail, but the blue on the abdomen would contradict that. Could this be an 
unusually marked Eastern Forktail, male? A hybrid?? I am enclosing a dorsal 
view as well. 

Thank you for your assistance.   Linda Graetz   Waltham, MA

He suggested I share the images via this group and/or Facebook (I don't do 
Facebook). 


I'm curious to know what species some of you think this is. (I'm guessing that 
it's more likely an Eastern Forktail?) 




Subject: Black-tipped Darner on Long Island, NY
From: "'Steve Walter' swalter15 AT verizon.net [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 02 Sep 2014 20:11:25 -0400
I'm a few days late with this report, but I needed to verify the ID (thanks
to Nick Donnelly) and get through a busy holiday weekend. On August 29, I
found what would appear to be the first Long Island record of Black-tipped
Darner (Aeshna tuberculifera) near Melville in western Suffolk County, NY. A
decent enough flight shot can be seen on my web site
http://www.stevewalternature.com/ (click the dragonfly tab).

 

Steve Walter

Bayside, NY 
Subject: Mottled Darners, Saratoga County, NY
From: "Michael Moore mcmoore32 AT gmail.com [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 2 Sep 2014 09:01:15 -0400
Greetings

During breaks getting my daughter settled in at Skidmore College, I have
continued to explore for odonates.  Yesterday (1 Sept) I spent the morning
at Moreau Lake State Park in Saratoga County.  I discovered this by just
searching Google Maps for wetlands on public land near Saratoga Springs.
The main lake was pretty boring but the series of beaverponds N of the main
lake were productive and I ended up with 16 species.

I think my most significant find was a small colony of Mottled Darners
(Aeshna clepsydra).  They were restricted to one 100 yd or so stretch of
the lake shore and there were 7-8 males patrolling small territories and
fighting a lot.  I believe this species has a very spotty distribution in
NY, although there appear to be previous records in the western part of
Saratoga County.

The rest of the lake was dominated by Canada Darners (A. canadensis) and
one small pond that was filling in and almost a meadow also had
Green-striped Darner (A. verticalis).

The major spectacle, however, was the Meadowhawks (Sympetrum).  Hundreds,
if not thousands, of tandem pairs were ovipositing along the edge of every
pond.  Most were Autumn Meadowhawks (S. vicinum) but there were also lots
of Cherry-faced types (S. internum or one of its look a likes or hybrids -
all with tan or brown faces) mixed in.  I searched as best I could for
other Sympetrum species, but did not detect any.

Full list:

Northern Spreadwing (
*Lestes disjunctus) - 12*
Slender Spreadwing
* (L. rectangularis) - 7*
Variable Dancer (Argi fumipennis) - 1
Familiar Bluet (Enallagma civile) - 1
Marsh/Hagen's Bluet (E. ebrium or hageni) - 3
Skimming Bluet (E. geminatum) - 15
Eastern Forktail (Ischnura verticalis) - 12
Canada Darner (Aeshna canadensis) - 40
Mottled Darner (A. clepsydra) - 7
Green-striped Darner (A. verticalis) - 3
Prince Baskettail (Epitheca princeps) - 2
Eastern Pondhawk (Erythemis simplicicolis) - 1
Widow Skimmer (Libellula luctosa) - 4
Common Whitetail (Plathemis lydia) - 1
Cherry-faced type Meadowhawk (Sympetrum internum or other) - 150+
Autumn Meadowhawk (S vicinum) - 1000+

Mike Moore
Newark, DE
Subject: Re: Hamilton County, NY
From: "Michael Moore mcmoore32 AT gmail.com [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 13:16:07 -0400
Thanks for the info John.  Dennis's book shows it ranging throughout the
northern tier, but his maps are small and necessarily not that accurate.  I
guess that shows what happens when you keep your eyes open in an area where
you would normally not look for odes.  It was just in a little forest
clearing by a rushing river.  No idea where the breeding habitat would be,
but I often find other species of Sympetrum widely dispersed in the woods.

Mike


On Sun, Aug 31, 2014 at 10:12 AM, John and Sue Gregoire 
wrote:

> Saw danae and had to go look it up. Turns out you have a county record.
> during the
> ode survey it was only found in Essex county and historically only in one
> other
> county in far western NY! Congrats!
> John
> --
> John and Sue Gregoire
> Field Ornithologists
> Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
> 5373 Fitzgerald Road
> Burdett,NY 14818-9626
>  Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
> "Conserve and Create Habitat"
>
> On Sun, August 31, 2014 09:56, Michael Moore mcmoore32 AT gmail.com [NEodes]
> wrote:
> > Greetings
> >
> > Yesterday my wife and I hiked to Auger Falls which is in Hamilton County
> NY
> > north of Wells on Rt 30.
> >
> > This is an amazingly beautiful natural area with the falls rushing
> through
> > a gorge.  It is mostly dense dark forest.  Ordinarily, I would not
> > recommend it as a place for odonates but since I have never been in this
> > area before, of the 4 species we saw, 2 were lifers for me!
> >
> > The parking area was being patrolled by a darner (Aeshna sp) but it
> > disappeared when we got out of the car.  At the falls in a little sunny
> > patch I was surprised when a dark meadowhawk landed on my shoe!  This
> > turned out to be a Black Meadowhawk (Sympetrum danae), my first lifer.
> We
> > saw another large Aeshna flying down the river but again no ID.  On the
> way
> > out we found a Spotted Spreadwing (Lestes congener) by the trail.
> >
> > Back at the parking lot, the darner was back and I went to stalk it with
> my
> > camera since I did not bring the net.  I felt little hope of getting an
> ID
> > since I would need a miracle flight shot.  However, to my delight the
> > darner almost immediately hung up in a small tree at eye level and
> allowed
> > me to photograph it from every possible angle.  Since it was being so
> > cooperative, I walked up to it and to my amazement I was able to capture
> it
> > by hand!  I have done this to spreadwings before, but never thought there
> > was any hope of ever doing this with a darner.  This of course allowed me
> > to photograph it from every angle in the hand.  It turned out to be an
> > andromorphic female Canada Darner (A. canadensis), another lifer for me.
> >
> > Finally, there was an Autumn Meadowhawk perched on a weed by the parking
> > lot to complete my 4 odonate day.  If only every day I could find 50%
> > lifers!
> >
> > Mike Moore
> > Newark, DE
> >
>
>
>
Subject: Re: Hamilton County, NY
From: "'John and Sue Gregoire' khmo AT empacc.net [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 10:12:55 -0400
Saw danae and had to go look it up. Turns out you have a county record. during 
the 

ode survey it was only found in Essex county and historically only in one other
county in far western NY! Congrats!
John
-- 
John and Sue Gregoire
Field Ornithologists
Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
5373 Fitzgerald Road
Burdett,NY 14818-9626
 Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
"Conserve and Create Habitat"

On Sun, August 31, 2014 09:56, Michael Moore mcmoore32 AT gmail.com [NEodes] 
wrote: 

> Greetings
>
> Yesterday my wife and I hiked to Auger Falls which is in Hamilton County NY
> north of Wells on Rt 30.
>
> This is an amazingly beautiful natural area with the falls rushing through
> a gorge.  It is mostly dense dark forest.  Ordinarily, I would not
> recommend it as a place for odonates but since I have never been in this
> area before, of the 4 species we saw, 2 were lifers for me!
>
> The parking area was being patrolled by a darner (Aeshna sp) but it
> disappeared when we got out of the car.  At the falls in a little sunny
> patch I was surprised when a dark meadowhawk landed on my shoe!  This
> turned out to be a Black Meadowhawk (Sympetrum danae), my first lifer.  We
> saw another large Aeshna flying down the river but again no ID.  On the way
> out we found a Spotted Spreadwing (Lestes congener) by the trail.
>
> Back at the parking lot, the darner was back and I went to stalk it with my
> camera since I did not bring the net.  I felt little hope of getting an ID
> since I would need a miracle flight shot.  However, to my delight the
> darner almost immediately hung up in a small tree at eye level and allowed
> me to photograph it from every possible angle.  Since it was being so
> cooperative, I walked up to it and to my amazement I was able to capture it
> by hand!  I have done this to spreadwings before, but never thought there
> was any hope of ever doing this with a darner.  This of course allowed me
> to photograph it from every angle in the hand.  It turned out to be an
> andromorphic female Canada Darner (A. canadensis), another lifer for me.
>
> Finally, there was an Autumn Meadowhawk perched on a weed by the parking
> lot to complete my 4 odonate day.  If only every day I could find 50%
> lifers!
>
> Mike Moore
> Newark, DE
>




------------------------------------
Posted by: "John and Sue Gregoire" 
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

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Subject: Hamilton County, NY
From: "Michael Moore mcmoore32 AT gmail.com [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2014 09:56:45 -0400
Greetings

Yesterday my wife and I hiked to Auger Falls which is in Hamilton County NY
north of Wells on Rt 30.

This is an amazingly beautiful natural area with the falls rushing through
a gorge.  It is mostly dense dark forest.  Ordinarily, I would not
recommend it as a place for odonates but since I have never been in this
area before, of the 4 species we saw, 2 were lifers for me!

The parking area was being patrolled by a darner (Aeshna sp) but it
disappeared when we got out of the car.  At the falls in a little sunny
patch I was surprised when a dark meadowhawk landed on my shoe!  This
turned out to be a Black Meadowhawk (Sympetrum danae), my first lifer.  We
saw another large Aeshna flying down the river but again no ID.  On the way
out we found a Spotted Spreadwing (Lestes congener) by the trail.

Back at the parking lot, the darner was back and I went to stalk it with my
camera since I did not bring the net.  I felt little hope of getting an ID
since I would need a miracle flight shot.  However, to my delight the
darner almost immediately hung up in a small tree at eye level and allowed
me to photograph it from every possible angle.  Since it was being so
cooperative, I walked up to it and to my amazement I was able to capture it
by hand!  I have done this to spreadwings before, but never thought there
was any hope of ever doing this with a darner.  This of course allowed me
to photograph it from every angle in the hand.  It turned out to be an
andromorphic female Canada Darner (A. canadensis), another lifer for me.

Finally, there was an Autumn Meadowhawk perched on a weed by the parking
lot to complete my 4 odonate day.  If only every day I could find 50%
lifers!

Mike Moore
Newark, DE
Subject: Saratog Springs Sites?
From: "'Michael Moore' mcmoore32 AT gmail.com [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Aug 2014 15:25:05 -0400
Hi


I will be spending the next week or so in the vicinity of Saratoga Springs
NY.  I may have a short amount of time to sneak out looking for odonates.
If anyone knows any sites in that general area that would be good to
explore, especially for northern darners, I would appreciate the
information.  Reply off list if you want.

 

Thanks

 

Mike

 

Michael C Moore

Newark, DE

 

Email. Mcmoore32 AT gmail.com

 
Subject: Re: RE: [nyog] Odes in last week
From: "Thomas W Donnelly tdonelly AT binghamton.edu [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 11:39:23 -0400
One thing to note about eyes, especially female eyes.  During cop, male
dragonflies grasp the head of the female.  For some species the coupling
mechanism is such that often the epiproct clips and gouges the eye.
 Hagenius is especially prone to this, but I have seen it also in Gomphus
adelphus.  In both cases the ability of the female to function with a tear
seems not to be diminished.

Nick Donnelly


On Mon, Aug 25, 2014 at 8:52 AM, Meena Madhav Haribal mmh3 AT cornell.edu
[NEodes]  wrote:

>
>
> Thanks Sue! I have found in fact eyes seem to have some elasticity. I have
> seen several individuals with smashed or dented eyes. I believe they hit
> some hard objects and that was why they had dent in their eyes, like a car
> would have when hit on the sides. I saw one individual at Sapsucker Woods
> with one dented eye sitting on a same perch for at least three days!
>
> Cheers
> Meena
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: nyog AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:nyog AT yahoogroups.com]
> Sent: Sunday, August 24, 2014 10:01 AM
> To: nyog AT yahoogroups.com
> Cc: Neodes
> Subject: Re: [nyog] Odes in last week
>
> Nice photos! Maybe the spines are somewhat flexible. Chitin on the eyes is
> pretty hard, judging by the way they mate and thrash around but in exuviae
> it seems a little thinner than the chitin on the rest of the body.
>
> Sue
> --
> John and Sue Gregoire
> Field Ornithologists
> Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
> 5373 Fitzgerald Road
> Burdett,NY 14818-9626
> Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
> "Conserve and Create Habitat"
>
> On Sat, August 23, 2014 10:33, Meena Madhav Haribal mmh3 AT cornell.edu
> [nyog] wrote:
> > Hi all,
> >
> > These days I have been spending lot of time observing behaviors of
> > odonates. Last week-end I went to a garden of a private property. I
> > was there early morning when the temps were in mid 60s and sun was just
> hitting the pond.
> >
> >
> >
> > I found most of the individuals were cleaning themselves very
> > meticulously. It was eyes, mandibles and the body in that order. I
> > managed to get photos of four individuals doing this all spent varying
> > amount of time on each task. Blue Dasher cleaned its eyes and then
> > spent lot of time cleaning mandibles, it seemed it was brushing its
> teeth with spines on its forelegs.
> >
> >
> >
> > Another individual spent and lot of time cleaning its eyes. It amazes
> > me they use spines to clean the eyes. At least the claws are very
> > sharp when they hold on to me, I can feel the claws piercing my skin.
> > I am not sure how sharp are the other spines, but looking at them they
> > seem to be fairly sharp, how strong are there eyes and what materials
> > they are made of. I would like to feel the spines on their legs
> > sometime. But it seems every creature cleans itself early in the
> > morning. The other day I found a wasp at my moth sheet early morning
> > cleaning itself in the same manner. So today morning I watched it at
> > it was getting warm, but I think it was still cold so it was still not
> active. For both these creatures it seems eyes are very important and they
> clean them every morning.
> >
> >
> >
> > Now about some feeding behavior I observed of Tule Bluets. I was
> > clipping some branches in my yard when I spied a bluet and it was a
> > new creature to my yard. So I went inside to get my camera. I came
> > back and it was sitting on the same perch. I got some picture, Then it
> > started to look for preys. It skimmed each and every clover flower top
> and caught something small which I could not recognize the prey.
> > But soon it spied an insect flying near by. It darted and caught it in
> midair. As
> > it was feeding on the insect I could get plenty of pictures before it
> > disappeared from my camera view. Later I identified the prey insect as
> > Agallia (Agalliota) quadripunctata. As the bluet was feeding on it,
> > its eyes were pale in the beginning, but as the time passed the prey's
> > eyes became dark colored and looked totally dead.
> >
> >
> >
> > You can see some of the photos at
> > https://www.flickr.com/photos/91426175 AT N00/sets/72157646713237006/
> >
> >
> >
> > When it was not raining in the afternoon, I took a couple of days walk
> > in the Mundy Wildflower garden on the Cornell Campus. There for two
> > days in row I saw Haterina Americana -American Rubyspot female on a
> > rock and also I saw one mated pair for the first time ever in 5 or 6
> > years of seeing lots of these insects. The pair was shy and kept hiding
> for me.
> >
> >
> >
> > For those who like the species here is the list of insects I have seen
> > in the last week
> >
> >
> >
> > Ebony Jewelwing
> >
> > American Rubyspot
> >
> > Spotted Spreadwing
> >
> > Slender Spreadwing
> >
> > Powdered Dancer
> >
> > Violet Dancer
> >
> > Marsh bluet
> >
> > Tule Bluet
> >
> > Eastern Forktail
> >
> > Fragile Forktail
> >
> > Sedge Sprite
> >
> > and some females of bluets
> >
> > Canada Darners
> >
> > Boyeria sp.
> >
> > Common Green Darners
> >
> > Common Whitetail
> >
> > Widow Skimmer
> >
> > Twelve-spotted Skimmer
> >
> > Cherry-faced Meadowhawk
> >
> > Autumn Meadowhawk
> >
> > Wandering Glider
> >
> > Black Saddlebag
> >
> >
> >
> > The previous Sunday I was in Candor NY on Catatonk creek, where I
> > found at least 6 individuals of Least Clubtails.
> >
> >
> >
> > I am still in search of Stylurus species in our area. I was supposed
> > to go kayaking on Tioughnioga river today, but got cancelled as the
> > weather was iffy. Tomorrow I am planning to be on West Canada Creek in
> > Herkimer county, hope I will see something interesting.
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > [https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3870/15005425721_ec1f1ebacf_z.jpg] > ps://www.flickr.com/photos/91426175 AT N00/sets/72157646713237006/>
> >
> > Cleaning and feeding by odonates - an album on Flickr Cleaning
> > behavior early morning and feeding of odonates Read
> > more... > 006/>
> >
> >
> > Cheers
> >
> > Meena
> >
> > Meena Haribal
> > Ithaca NY 14850
> > 42.429007,-76.47111
> > http://haribal.org/
> > http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/
> > Ithaca area moths: http://tinyurl.com/kn6q2p4 Dragonfly book sample
> > pages: http://www.haribal.org/140817samplebook.pdf
> >
> >
> >
> >
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> Posted by: "John and Sue Gregoire" 
> ------------------------------------
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> Yahoo Groups Links
>
>  
>
Subject: RE: [nyog] Odes in last week
From: "Meena Madhav Haribal mmh3 AT cornell.edu [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2014 12:52:34 +0000
Thanks Sue! I have found in fact eyes seem to have some elasticity. I have seen 
several individuals with smashed or dented eyes. I believe they hit some hard 
objects and that was why they had dent in their eyes, like a car would have 
when hit on the sides. I saw one individual at Sapsucker Woods with one dented 
eye sitting on a same perch for at least three days! 


Cheers
Meena

-----Original Message-----
From: nyog AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:nyog AT yahoogroups.com] 
Sent: Sunday, August 24, 2014 10:01 AM
To: nyog AT yahoogroups.com
Cc: Neodes
Subject: Re: [nyog] Odes in last week

Nice photos! Maybe the spines are somewhat flexible. Chitin on the eyes is 
pretty hard, judging by the way they mate and thrash around but in exuviae it 
seems a little thinner than the chitin on the rest of the body. 


Sue
--
John and Sue Gregoire
Field Ornithologists
Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
5373 Fitzgerald Road
Burdett,NY 14818-9626
 Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
"Conserve and Create Habitat"

On Sat, August 23, 2014 10:33, Meena Madhav Haribal mmh3 AT cornell.edu [nyog] 
wrote: 

> Hi all,
>
> These days I have been spending lot of time observing behaviors of 
> odonates. Last week-end I went to a garden of a private property. I 
> was there early morning when the temps were in mid 60s and sun was just 
hitting the pond. 

>
>
>
> I found most of the individuals were cleaning themselves very 
> meticulously.  It was eyes, mandibles and the body in that order. I 
> managed to get photos of four individuals doing this all spent varying 
> amount of time on each task. Blue Dasher cleaned its eyes and then 
> spent lot of time cleaning mandibles, it seemed it was brushing its teeth 
with spines on its forelegs. 

>
>
>
>  Another individual spent and lot of time cleaning its eyes. It amazes 
> me they use spines to clean the eyes. At least the claws are very 
> sharp when they hold on to me, I can feel the claws piercing my skin.  
> I am not sure how sharp are the other spines, but looking at them they 
> seem to be fairly sharp, how strong are there eyes and what materials 
> they are made of.  I would like to feel the spines on their legs 
> sometime.  But it seems every creature cleans itself early in the 
> morning. The other day I found a wasp at my moth sheet early morning 
> cleaning itself in the same manner.  So today morning I watched it at 
> it was getting warm, but I think it was still cold so it was still not 
active. For both these creatures it seems eyes are very important and they 
clean them every morning. 

>
>
>
> Now about some feeding behavior I observed of Tule Bluets.  I was 
> clipping some branches in my yard when I spied a bluet and it was a 
> new creature to my yard. So I went inside to get my camera. I came 
> back and it was sitting on the same perch. I got some picture, Then it 
> started to look for preys. It skimmed each and every clover flower top and 
caught something small which I could not recognize the prey. 

> But soon it spied an insect flying near by. It darted and caught it in 
midair. As 

> it was feeding on the insect I could get plenty of pictures before it 
> disappeared from my camera view. Later I identified the prey insect as 
> Agallia (Agalliota) quadripunctata.  As the bluet was feeding on it, 
> its eyes were pale in the beginning, but as the time passed the prey's 
> eyes became dark colored and looked totally dead.
>
>
>
> You can see some of the photos at
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/91426175 AT N00/sets/72157646713237006/
>
>
>
> When it was not raining in the afternoon, I took a couple of days walk 
> in the Mundy Wildflower garden on the Cornell Campus. There for two 
> days in row I saw Haterina Americana -American Rubyspot female on a 
> rock and also I saw one mated pair for the first time ever in 5 or 6 
> years of seeing lots of these insects. The pair was shy and kept hiding for 
me. 

>
>
>
> For those who like the species here is the list of insects I have seen 
> in the last week
>
>
>
> Ebony Jewelwing
>
> American Rubyspot
>
> Spotted Spreadwing
>
> Slender Spreadwing
>
> Powdered Dancer
>
> Violet Dancer
>
> Marsh bluet
>
> Tule Bluet
>
> Eastern Forktail
>
> Fragile Forktail
>
> Sedge Sprite
>
> and some females of bluets
>
> Canada Darners
>
> Boyeria sp.
>
> Common Green Darners
>
> Common Whitetail
>
> Widow Skimmer
>
> Twelve-spotted Skimmer
>
> Cherry-faced Meadowhawk
>
> Autumn Meadowhawk
>
> Wandering Glider
>
> Black Saddlebag
>
>
>
> The previous Sunday I was in Candor NY on Catatonk creek, where I 
> found at least 6 individuals of Least Clubtails.
>
>
>
> I am still in search of Stylurus  species in our area. I was supposed 
> to go kayaking on Tioughnioga river today, but got cancelled as the 
> weather was iffy. Tomorrow I am planning to be on West Canada Creek in 
> Herkimer county, hope I will see something interesting.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> [https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3870/15005425721_ec1f1ebacf_z.jpg] ps://www.flickr.com/photos/91426175 AT N00/sets/72157646713237006/>
>
> Cleaning and feeding by odonates - an album on Flickr Cleaning 
> behavior early morning and feeding of odonates Read 
> more... 006/>
>
>
> Cheers
>
> Meena
>
> Meena Haribal
> Ithaca NY 14850
> 42.429007,-76.47111
> http://haribal.org/
> http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/
> Ithaca area moths: http://tinyurl.com/kn6q2p4 Dragonfly book sample 
> pages: http://www.haribal.org/140817samplebook.pdf
>
>
>
>




------------------------------------
Posted by: "John and Sue Gregoire" 
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links





------------------------------------
Posted by: Meena Madhav Haribal 
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
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Subject: Ant hatch right now
From: "James MacDougall jm3 AT me.com [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 17:38:42 -0400
Massive ant hatch underway right now in Topsfield. A few Aeschna are hawking. 
Sunday at 5:35 pm. 


Sent from the field by:
Jim MacDougall
978-857-6826

------------------------------------
Posted by: James MacDougall 
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

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<*> Your email settings:
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Subject: Re: [nyog] Odes in last week
From: "'John and Sue Gregoire' khmo AT empacc.net [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Aug 2014 10:01:14 -0400
Nice photos! Maybe the spines are somewhat flexible. Chitin on the eyes is 
pretty 

hard, judging by the way they mate and thrash around but in exuviae it seems a
little thinner than the chitin on the rest of the body.

Sue
-- 
John and Sue Gregoire
Field Ornithologists
Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
5373 Fitzgerald Road
Burdett,NY 14818-9626
 Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
"Conserve and Create Habitat"

On Sat, August 23, 2014 10:33, Meena Madhav Haribal mmh3 AT cornell.edu [nyog] 
wrote: 

> Hi all,
>
> These days I have been spending lot of time observing behaviors of odonates. 
Last 

> week-end I went to a garden of a private property. I was there early morning 
when 

> the temps were in mid 60s and sun was just hitting the pond.
>
>
>
> I found most of the individuals were cleaning themselves very meticulously. 
It was 

> eyes, mandibles and the body in that order. I managed to get photos of four
> individuals doing this all spent varying amount of time on each task. Blue 
Dasher 

> cleaned its eyes and then spent lot of time cleaning mandibles, it seemed it 
was 

> brushing its teeth with spines on its forelegs.
>
>
>
> Another individual spent and lot of time cleaning its eyes. It amazes me they 
use 

> spines to clean the eyes. At least the claws are very sharp when they hold on 
to 

> me, I can feel the claws piercing my skin. I am not sure how sharp are the 
other 

> spines, but looking at them they seem to be fairly sharp, how strong are 
there eyes 

> and what materials they are made of. I would like to feel the spines on their 
legs 

> sometime. But it seems every creature cleans itself early in the morning. The 

> other day I found a wasp at my moth sheet early morning cleaning itself in 
the same 

> manner. So today morning I watched it at it was getting warm, but I think it 
was 

> still cold so it was still not active. For both these creatures it seems eyes 
are 

> very important and they clean them every morning.
>
>
>
> Now about some feeding behavior I observed of Tule Bluets. I was clipping 
some 

> branches in my yard when I spied a bluet and it was a new creature to my 
yard. So I 

> went inside to get my camera. I came back and it was sitting on the same 
perch. I 

> got some picture, Then it started to look for preys. It skimmed each and 
every 

> clover flower top and caught something small which I could not recognize the 
prey. 

> But soon it spied an insect flying near by. It darted and caught it in 
midair. As 

> it was feeding on the insect I could get plenty of pictures before it 
disappeared 

> from my camera view. Later I identified the prey insect as Agallia 
(Agalliota) 

> quadripunctata.  As the bluet was feeding on it, its eyes were pale in the
> beginning, but as the time passed the prey's eyes became dark colored and 
looked 

> totally dead.
>
>
>
> You can see some of the photos at
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/91426175 AT N00/sets/72157646713237006/
>
>
>
> When it was not raining in the afternoon, I took a couple of days walk in the 
Mundy 

> Wildflower garden on the Cornell Campus. There for two days in row I saw 
Haterina 

> Americana -American Rubyspot female on a rock and also I saw one mated pair 
for the 

> first time ever in 5 or 6 years of seeing lots of these insects. The pair was 
shy 

> and kept hiding for me.
>
>
>
> For those who like the species here is the list of insects I have seen in the 
last 

> week
>
>
>
> Ebony Jewelwing
>
> American Rubyspot
>
> Spotted Spreadwing
>
> Slender Spreadwing
>
> Powdered Dancer
>
> Violet Dancer
>
> Marsh bluet
>
> Tule Bluet
>
> Eastern Forktail
>
> Fragile Forktail
>
> Sedge Sprite
>
> and some females of bluets
>
> Canada Darners
>
> Boyeria sp.
>
> Common Green Darners
>
> Common Whitetail
>
> Widow Skimmer
>
> Twelve-spotted Skimmer
>
> Cherry-faced Meadowhawk
>
> Autumn Meadowhawk
>
> Wandering Glider
>
> Black Saddlebag
>
>
>
> The previous Sunday I was in Candor NY on Catatonk creek, where I found at 
least 6 

> individuals of Least Clubtails.
>
>
>
> I am still in search of Stylurus species in our area. I was supposed to go 
kayaking 

> on Tioughnioga river today, but got cancelled as the weather was iffy. 
Tomorrow I am 

> planning to be on West Canada Creek in Herkimer county, hope I will see 
something 

> interesting.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> 
[https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3870/15005425721_ec1f1ebacf_z.jpg] 

>
> Cleaning and feeding by odonates - an album on Flickr
> Cleaning behavior early morning and feeding of odonates
> Read 
more... 

>
>
> Cheers
>
> Meena
>
> Meena Haribal
> Ithaca NY 14850
> 42.429007,-76.47111
> http://haribal.org/
> http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/
> Ithaca area moths: http://tinyurl.com/kn6q2p4
> Dragonfly book sample pages: http://www.haribal.org/140817samplebook.pdf
>
>
>
>




------------------------------------
Posted by: "John and Sue Gregoire" 
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NEodes/

<*> Your email settings:
    Individual Email | Traditional

<*> To change settings online go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NEodes/join
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<*> To change settings via email:
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Subject: Odes in last week
From: "Meena Madhav Haribal mmh3 AT cornell.edu [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 23 Aug 2014 14:33:30 +0000
Hi all,

These days I have been spending lot of time observing behaviors of odonates. 
Last week-end I went to a garden of a private property. I was there early 
morning when the temps were in mid 60s and sun was just hitting the pond. 




I found most of the individuals were cleaning themselves very meticulously. It 
was eyes, mandibles and the body in that order. I managed to get photos of four 
individuals doing this all spent varying amount of time on each task. Blue 
Dasher cleaned its eyes and then spent lot of time cleaning mandibles, it 
seemed it was brushing its teeth with spines on its forelegs. 




 Another individual spent and lot of time cleaning its eyes. It amazes me they 
use spines to clean the eyes. At least the claws are very sharp when they hold 
on to me, I can feel the claws piercing my skin. I am not sure how sharp are 
the other spines, but looking at them they seem to be fairly sharp, how strong 
are there eyes and what materials they are made of. I would like to feel the 
spines on their legs sometime. But it seems every creature cleans itself early 
in the morning. The other day I found a wasp at my moth sheet early morning 
cleaning itself in the same manner. So today morning I watched it at it was 
getting warm, but I think it was still cold so it was still not active. For 
both these creatures it seems eyes are very important and they clean them every 
morning. 




Now about some feeding behavior I observed of Tule Bluets. I was clipping some 
branches in my yard when I spied a bluet and it was a new creature to my yard. 
So I went inside to get my camera. I came back and it was sitting on the same 
perch. I got some picture, Then it started to look for preys. It skimmed each 
and every clover flower top and caught something small which I could not 
recognize the prey. But soon it spied an insect flying near by. It darted and 
caught it in midair. As it was feeding on the insect I could get plenty of 
pictures before it disappeared from my camera view. Later I identified the prey 
insect as Agallia (Agalliota) quadripunctata. As the bluet was feeding on it, 
its eyes were pale in the beginning, but as the time passed the prey's eyes 
became dark colored and looked totally dead. 




You can see some of the photos at 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/91426175 AT N00/sets/72157646713237006/ 




When it was not raining in the afternoon, I took a couple of days walk in the 
Mundy Wildflower garden on the Cornell Campus. There for two days in row I saw 
Haterina Americana -American Rubyspot female on a rock and also I saw one mated 
pair for the first time ever in 5 or 6 years of seeing lots of these insects. 
The pair was shy and kept hiding for me. 




For those who like the species here is the list of insects I have seen in the 
last week 




Ebony Jewelwing

American Rubyspot

Spotted Spreadwing

Slender Spreadwing

Powdered Dancer

Violet Dancer

Marsh bluet

Tule Bluet

Eastern Forktail

Fragile Forktail

Sedge Sprite

and some females of bluets

Canada Darners

Boyeria sp.

Common Green Darners

Common Whitetail

Widow Skimmer

Twelve-spotted Skimmer

Cherry-faced Meadowhawk

Autumn Meadowhawk

Wandering Glider

Black Saddlebag



The previous Sunday I was in Candor NY on Catatonk creek, where I found at 
least 6 individuals of Least Clubtails. 




I am still in search of Stylurus species in our area. I was supposed to go 
kayaking on Tioughnioga river today, but got cancelled as the weather was iffy. 
Tomorrow I am planning to be on West Canada Creek in Herkimer county, hope I 
will see something interesting. 









[https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3870/15005425721_ec1f1ebacf_z.jpg] 


Cleaning and feeding by odonates - an album on Flickr
Cleaning behavior early morning and feeding of odonates
Read 
more... 



Cheers

Meena

Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
42.429007,-76.47111
http://haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/
Ithaca area moths: http://tinyurl.com/kn6q2p4
Dragonfly book sample pages: http://www.haribal.org/140817samplebook.pdf


Subject: Blue-faced Meadowhawk and Great Spreadwing on Staten Island, NY
From: "david.eib AT acs-inc.com [NEodes]" <NEodes@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 21 Aug 2014 20:50:57 -0700
Today I decided to take a lunchtime stroll around 1:40 and walked down the road 
from my office to a spot where the surrounding woods were leveled some years 
back to allow the construction of an underground gas pipeline. The long stretch 
of clearing is referred to as the "Wetlands Gate", and is oddly quite 
productive despite being less than pristine habitat. The site and surrounding 
forest floor regularly flood during spring thaw, continue as vernal pools 
through mid-summer, and by August become a muddy meadow dominated by grasses, 
buttonbush and, unfortunately, increasingly dense phragmites. This afternoon 
the Wetlands Gate was fairly dry, and didn't show much promise. Several female 
Lestes flew out of my way, and appeared to be L. disjunctus australis, the most 
common (sub)species found here. A male Sympetrum shot up as I passed, which I 
dismissed as the usual internum/rubicundulum type usually seen at this 
particular locale (S.vicinum is seen infrequently here, even when at peak 
numbers in other areas around the Island). But as I passed a buttonbush thicket 
at the back of the meadow, a Sympetrum bounced up and down and it's face caught 
the sun - and reflected a beautiful turquoise blue. This was something of a 
jaw-dropping moment, and I had my handy point-and-shoot out a moment later. 
Sure enough, blue face and somewhat duller eyes, brown and gray striped thorax, 
and black abdominal bands almost touching dorsally on S4 through S7, and 
completely ringed on S8 and S9, erased any doubt. Sympetrum ambiguum does not 
appear on previous NY state surveys for Richmond County, and its appearance 
here is a bit bewildering. The sun was not my friend, sadly, and all of the 
photos I got were rather blown out, although good enough for ID purposes. I did 
attempt to relocate the specimen at about 6:30 this evening to try for better 
photos, with no luck. If anyone knows of records for this species in lower New 
York State I would be very interested. 

 
 On a less surprising but also rewarding note, my quest to locate Great 
Spreadwings (Archilestes grandis) last Saturday at Long Pond State Park met 
with success less than 50 feet from the trail head. A spectacular male crossed 
my path and - unlike the male I found last year - proceeded to perch out in the 
open so I could shoot away to my heart's content. A male and female were 
located along the same trail last August. While there is an actual "Long Pond" 
here, an Odonate wonderland, L.grandis seems to be more interested in the 
flooded trenches and temporary pools that dot the trails, behavior consistent 
with reports of their spread northeastward. 

 

 Happy bugging all!
 

 Dave Eib
 Richmond County Odonate Atlas
 Staten Island, New York 
 
Subject: Band-winged Meadowhawks in Delaware!
From: "'Michael Moore' mcmoore32 AT gmail.com [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2014 11:15:00 -0400
Greetings

 

Yesterday, I followed up a tip from Michael Smith that he had found
Band-winged Meadowhawks (Sympetrum semicinctum) a couple of years ago near a
retention pond behind Leon's Garden World on Rte. 202 in Wilmington, DE.
This species has not been recorded in Delaware since 2004 and was on my
"probably extirpated" list.  

 

When I got there, I found there was  a lovely wet meadow created by the berm
around the pond and indeed there was a nice little colony of Band-winged
Meadowhawks in this meadow.  I found 5 individual males and two ovipositing
tandem pairs.  See "Recent Photos" on my website for my photos.  If you
count all of Delaware as being in the Delmarva Peninsula (politically if not
strictly geographically correct), this is the only currently known location
for this species on the Delmarva.  

 

I also visited the Sedge Meadow and spent the afternoon along the Brandywine
River in Brandywine Creek State Park.  Nothing unusual at the former.  At
the latter I was looking for Arrow Clubtail (Stylurus spiniceps).  No luck
on the latter but I did find 2 Fawn Darners (Boyeria vinosa, of which I
obtained a really crappy flight shot, but my first photo of this species)
and three Clamp-tipped Emeralds (Somatochlora tenebrosa).    

 

I also had a Painted Skimmer at Brandywine which establishes a new late
flight date for the Delmarva (old date was 08 August).  

 

Because I visited a variety of habitats, I did end the day with 29 species.
Lists below.

 

Mike Moore

Newark, DE

  Mcmoore32 AT gmail.com

 

Websites:

 
Delmarva Dragonflies and Damselflies
(https://sites.google.com/a/udel.edu/deodes/)

  Voices of Delaware Birds
(https://sites.google.com/site/delawarebirdsongs/)

  Birds of the
Gilbert Water Ranch
(https://sites.google.com/site/birdsofthegilbertwaterranch/)

  AZFO Rare Bird
Photos (http://www.azfo.org/gallery/1main/photos_recent.html)

 

Species: 29 

 

NAME                       SCIENTIFIC NAME                   MAX CNT  

 

DELAWARE, BRANDYWINE STATE PARK - 

Ebony Jewelwing            Calopteryx maculata               4        

Powdered Dancer            Argia moesta                      18       

Common Green Darner        Anax  junius                      2        

Fawn Darner                Boyeria vinosa                    2        

Black-shouldered Spinyleg  Dromogomphus spinosus             5        

Prince Baskettail          Epitheca (Epicordulia) princeps   3        

Clamp-tipped Emerald       Somatochlora tenebrosa            3        

Widow Skimmer              Libellula luctuosa                3        

Painted Skimmer            Libellula semifasciata            1        

Common Whitetail           Plathemis lydia                   6        

 

DELAWARE, LEON'S GARDEN WORLD RETENTION POND RT 202 - 

Ebony Jewelwing            Calopteryx maculata               1        

Variable Dancer            Argia fumipennis                  7        

Orange Bluet               Enallagma signatum                1        

Eastern Forktail           Ischnura verticalis               1        

Common Green Darner        Anax  junius                      4        

Halloween Pennant          Celithemis eponina                8        

Eastern Pondhawk           Erythemis simplicicollis          30       

Slaty Skimmer              Libellula incesta                 5        

Widow Skimmer              Libellula luctuosa                25       

Twelve-spotted Skimmer     Libellula pulchella               3        

Blue Dasher                Pachydiplax longipennis           35       

Eastern Amberwing          Perithemis tenera                 12       

Common Whitetail           Plathemis lydia                   6        

Band-winged Meadowhawk     Sympetrum semicinctum             9        

Black Saddlebags           Tramea lacerata                   4        

 

DELAWARE, SUMMIT BRIDGE PONDS - 

Slender Spreadwing         Lestes  rectangularis             25       

Azure Bluet                Enallagma aspersum                30       

Big Bluet                  Enallagma durum                   1        

Citrine Forktail           Ischnura hastata                  150      

Fragile Forktail           Ischnura posita                   20       

Rambur's Forktail          Ischnura ramburii                 1        

Eastern Forktail           Ischnura verticalis               2        

Common Green Darner        Anax  junius                      5        

Calico Pennant             Celithemis elisa                  2        

Eastern Pondhawk           Erythemis simplicicollis          20       

Slaty Skimmer              Libellula incesta                 2        

Twelve-spotted Skimmer     Libellula pulchella               3        

Blue Dasher                Pachydiplax longipennis           200      

Common Whitetail           Plathemis lydia                   2        

Carolina Saddlebags        Tramea carolina                   40       

Black Saddlebags           Tramea lacerata                   3        

 

Birder's Diary - www.BirdersDiary.com - 8/21/2014

 
Subject: Fwd: Great swamp
From: "Soheil Zendeh sohzendeh AT gmail.com [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2014 17:07:00 -0400
Folks,

On Thursday, Aug 14, I had an opportunity to hike for about 3 hours through
Great Swamp in Wakefield - Kingston, RI. It's an area I've wanted to
explore for many decades and I finally had the chance to do so as a break
from a family vacation in Narraganset. Without a good map and no clear
directions, I wandered along a number of paths in deep swampy woods and
along meadows. There were a few pools of open water but I never found any
of the big ponds -- I guess there must be some in there somewhere!

It was cool, sunny, breezy day. I was there 2:30 - 5:30 pm. Temps were in
the mid to high 70s. The ode variety was low but there were patches with
high densities of pondhawks, Autumn Meadowhawks and (of course) Blue
Dashers. Here are some photos:


https://picasaweb.google.com/102611087159208870022/GreatSwampRI14August2014?authuser=0&feat=directlink 


All comments and corrections welcome as usual. In particular, I would like
confirmation on my life Big Bluet (Enallagma durum) and my first New
England Great Blue Skimmer (Libellula vibrans). On the latter, my apologies
for a poor photo in bad light.

Here is my list for the day with approximate numbers:

Slender Spreadwing (Lestes rectangularis) 1
Big Bluet (Enallagma durum) 1
Eastern Forktail (Ischnura verticalis) 1
Cruising darners (Aeshna?) 3
Halloween Pennant (Celithemis eponina) 1
Eastern Pondhawk (Erythemis simplicicollis)  30
Slaty Skimmer (Libellula incesta) 3
Great Blue Skimmer (Libellula vibrans) 1
Blue Dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis) 20
Autumn Meadowhawk (Sympetrum vicinum) 6






*Soheil Zendeh42 Baker AvenueLexington, MA 02421781-863-2392
home617-763-5637 cell*
Subject: Zebra Clubtail in Dutchess County, NY
From: "'Steve Walter' swalter15 AT verizon.net [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2014 19:36:35 -0400
I'm a few days late with this, but this is my first chance to post. I was
invited by a relocated old friend to see his home in Dutchess County, NY for
the first time on August 9. Beyond that, he gave me a tour of natural areas
and habitats in the vicinity. One of the stops was the Cary Institute of
Ecological Studies in the town of Millbrook. For the most part, the grounds
consist of fields. Along the way, we drove over a bridge over what is the
East Branch Wappinger Creek. As we did, the thought crossed my mind that the
river below looked appropriate for Zebra Clubtail (Stylurus scudderi), and I
think said that out loud. He let me out of the car right there on the
bridge. Immediately upon looking down, I saw two dragonflies tussling. Both
landed on a tree overhanging the river. Zebra Clubtails they were. I'm not
sure if there are records for Dutchess, but a check of the atlas showed a
big blank for the county. While once known from the Cross River in
Westchester, this would be the southernmost extant population in the state.
But I suspect the species could occur in more places where it's not known. A
picture can be seen at my web site (http://www.stevewalternature.com/ ,
click the dragonfly tab).

 

Steve Walter

Bayside, NY
Subject: ID Help
From: "'Willie D'Anna and Betsy Potter' dannapotter AT roadrunner.com [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 13 Aug 2014 11:01:30 -0400
Hi everyone,

 

Betsy and I recently made a trip to the Jefferson County and St. Lawrence
County area of northern NY.  We visited the Indian River Lakes area
(Muskellunge Lake and Grass Lake) as well as Cedar Lake (just south of Trout
Lake) and Bonaparte Swamp (Nature Conservancy property at Lake Bonaparte).
I was hoping to see some different darners - around home, all I see is Anax
junius - and I was successful, even managing to net a few.  I had one that I
suspect is a Black-tipped Darner (Aeshna tuberculifera).  However, the next
day at the same spot, I netted a Shadow Darner (A. umbrosa) and I wondered
if it could just be a variant of the latter.  This was a forested area with
a nice clear lake and much emergent vegetation in spots along the edges.

 

Photos are on my Flickr site: https://www.flickr.com/photos/107683885 AT N07/

 

The possible Black-tipped Darner is currently on the third row from the top.
Any comments on this individual or any of the others would be greatly
appreciated.

 

Thanks!

Willie

------------------

Willie D'Anna

Betsy Potter

Wilson, NY

dannapotterATroadrunner.com

http://www.betsypottersart.com  

2013 Big Year: http://www.betsypottersart.com/willie-s-photos/2013-big-year/

Big Year List:
http://www.happtech.com/BigYearDanna/CurrentList/ShowCurrentListTable.aspx

Odenates: http://www.betsypottersart.com/willie-s-photos/dragonflies

 
Subject: Idylwild WMA, MD
From: "'Michael Moore' mcmoore32 AT gmail.com [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 12 Aug 2014 10:43:28 -0400
Greetings

 

On Saturday, 09 August 2014, Hal White and I spent the day exploring
Idylwild Wildlife Management Area near Federalsburg, MD.  

 

We found 22 species (list below).  Probably because we have not visited this
area much in August, we established late flight dates for three species on
the Delmarva:  Yellow-sided Skimmer (Libellula flavida), Elfin Skimmer
(Nannothemis bella) and Pale Bluet (Enallagma pallidum).  

 

The continuing Pale Bluets were certainly our best find of the day and the
only Enallagma we found.  We found 3 males on the "Long Pond" in the same
locations (almost the same twigs) where they have been for the last two
years: in the breaks in the emergent vegetation perched on tiny twigs in the
shade of the overhanging trees and bushes.  They are very easy to overlook
in these locations.  You have to peer under the overhanging vegetation.  We
found two adult males and one immature male (tan and black instead of blue
and black).  The presence of the recently emerged immature male suggests
their flight season may continue a while longer.  I wonder if their habit of
perching inconspicuously in the shade makes them less vulnerable to
predation that other bluets, especially from Pondhawks, which accounts for
their late flight season.  

 

The Yellow-sided Skimmer we found was a teneral female so their flight
season may also continue for a while.  On the other hand, we only found a
single Elfin Skimmer, so they may be nearly done.

 

Striped Emeralds (Somatochlora) started flying around 1:30 PM.  We saw about
6-8 individuals  The only one we (OK, Hal) was able to catch was a Mocha
Emerald (S. linearis), but others looked smaller and there were almost
certainly Fine-lined (S. filosa), but they stayed out of reach of Hal's net
and my camera.  

 

I posted new pictures of female Bar-winged Skimmer (L. axilena) and a
naturally perched Swift (Georgia) River Cruiser (Macromia illinoisensis
georgina) to my website below.  You can view these under "Recent Photos" or
in the regular species accounts.  

 

Mike Moore

Newark, DE

  Mcmoore32 AT gmail.com

 

Websites:

 
Delmarva Dragonflies and Damselflies
(https://sites.google.com/a/udel.edu/deodes/)

  Voices of Delaware Birds
(https://sites.google.com/site/delawarebirdsongs/)

  Birds of the
Gilbert Water Ranch
(https://sites.google.com/site/birdsofthegilbertwaterranch/)

  AZFO Rare Bird
Photos (http://www.azfo.org/gallery/1main/photos_recent.html)

 

Species: 22

 

Calopteryx maculata        Ebony Jewelwing       4        

Lestes  vigilax            Swamp Spreadwing      4        

Argia apicalis             Blue-fronted Dancer   5        

Argia fumipennis           Variable Dancer       3        

Argia tibialis             Blue-tipped Dancer    1        

Enallagma pallidum         Pale Bluet            3        

Ischnura kellicotti        Lilypad Forktail      9        

Ischnura posita            Fragile Forktail      12       

Nasiaeschna pentacantha    Cyrano Darner         3        

Macromia illinoiensis      Swift River Cruiser   2        

Somatochlora linearis      Mocha Emerald         3        

Celithemis eponina         Halloween Pennant     2        

Erythemis simplicicollis   Eastern Pondhawk      25       

Libellula axilena          Bar-winged Skimmer    1        

Libellula flavida          Yellow-sided Skimmer  1        

Libellula incesta          Slaty Skimmer         85       

Libellula luctuosa         Widow Skimmer         1        

Libellula vibrans          Great Blue Skimmer    30       

Nannothemis bella          Elfin Skimmer         1        

Pachydiplax longipennis    Blue Dasher           60       

Perithemis tenera          Eastern Amberwing     40       

Plathemis lydia            Common Whitetail      1        

 

Birder's Diary - www.BirdersDiary.com - 8/12/2014

 

 
Subject: Cumberland County, ME - 10 August 2014
From: "Nicholas Block nlb.birder AT gmail.com [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2014 16:36:25 -0400
Hello all,

On a weekend trip to visit family in Maine, I was fortunate to have a few
hours to explore a couple sites near Freeport in Cumberland County
yesterday. The two main spots I checked were Runaround Pond and Florida
Lake. Both were excellent, with Florida Lake being moreso! I found 25
species total, including two life darners (Black-tipped and Mottled). The
site lists and estimated numbers seen are below, and some photos are here:
http://goo.gl/TMuWZb

*Runaround Pond* (including the downstream section across the road from the
parking lot)

Ebony Jewelwing (Calopteryx maculata) - 1 male downstream
Swamp Spreadwing (Lestes vigilax) - 75+
Powdered Dancer (Argia moesta) - 4 males downstream
Variable Darner (Aeshna interrupta) - 1 male
Black-tipped Darner (Aeshna tuberculifera) - 1 male
Aeshna sp. - several cruising out-of-reach over the pond
Common Green Darner (Anax junius) - 4 males
Fawn Darner (Boyeria vinosa) - 1 male downstream
Dragonhunter (Hagenius brevistylus) - 1 female downstream
Eastern Pondhawk (Erythemis simplicicollis) - 1 male
Slaty Skimmer (Libellula incesta) - 2 males
Blue Dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis) - 3 males
Autumn Meadowhawk (Sympetrum vicinum) - 2

*Poland Range Road*

Skimming Bluet (Enallagma geminatum) - 1 male
Eastern Forktail (Ischnura verticalis) - 1 male
Canada Darner (Aeshna canadensis) - 4 males
Twelve-spotted Skimmer (Libellula pulchella) - 2

*Florida Lake*

Northern Spreadwing (Lestes disjunctus) - 30+
Slender Spreadwing (Lestes rectangularis) - 1 male
Violet Dancer (Argia fumipennis violacea) - 15
Canada Darner (Aeshna canadensis) - 5 males
Mottled Darner (Aeshna clepsydra) - 2 males
Black-tipped Darner (Aeshna tuberculifera) - 2 ovipositing females
Common Green Darner (Anax junius) - 5 males
Fawn Darner (Boyeria vinosa) - 1
Calico Pennant (Celithemis elisa) - 5
Frosted Whiteface (Leucorrhinia frigida) - 10+
Dot-tailed Whiteface (Leucorrhinia intacta) - 3
Slaty Skimmer (Libellula incesta) - 12
Widow Skimmer (Libellula luctuosa) - 5
Twelve-spotted Skimmer (Libellula pulchella) - 3
Ruby/Cherry-faced Meadowhawk (Sympetrum rubicundulum/internum) - 15
Autumn Meadowhawk (Sympetrum vicinum) - 2

Cheers,
Nick Block
North Easton, MA
Subject: Ponkapoag Bog, Norfolk County, MA - 11 August 2014
From: "Nicholas Block nlb.birder AT gmail.com [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2014 14:29:55 -0400
Hello all,

Nathan Goldberg and I made a very quick trip this morning (~9:15-10:15) to
Ponkapoag Bog in Canton, Norfolk County, MA. I was hoping for some Aeshna
darners and/or Somatochlora emeralds, but the only one of these we saw was
a female Aeshna for about one second. We still found 15 odonate species,
though, including some excellent damselflies. The shaded areas of the
boardwalk seem like a great spot to find Vesper Bluet! The full list and
estimated numbers seen are below, and some photos are here: http://goo.gl/
NsTTQz

Swamp Spreadwing (Lestes vigilax) - 2 males
Violet Dancer (Argia fumipennis violacea) - 5
Vesper Bluet (Enallagma vesperum) - 4
Fragile Forktail (Ischnura posita) - 1 male
Sphagnum Sprite (Nehalennia gracilis) - 4 males
Aeshna sp. - 1 female
Prince Baskettail (Epitheca princeps) - 2 males
Halloween Pennant (Celithemis eponina) - 1 male
Eastern Pondhawk (Erythemis simplicicollis) - 5
Slaty Skimmer (Libellula incesta) - 5 males
Painted Skimmer (Libellula semifasciata) - 2
Blue Dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis) - 1 male
Common Whitetail (Plathemis lydia) - 3 females
Ruby/Cherry-faced Meadowhawk (Sympetrum rubicundulum/internum) - 5 males
Autumn Meadowhawk (Sympetrum vicinum) - 1 female

Cheers,
Nick Block
North Easton, MA
Subject: Re: 5 Pennant Day in NJ
From: "Michael Moore mcmoore32 AT gmail.com [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2014 13:40:10 -0400
I also found it odd that three species were still flying in NJ that are done in 
Delaware. These are Elfin, Spangled and Painted Skimmers. However, I looked up 
the flight dates on njodes.com and all these species fly into Sept there. The 
Pine Barrens are generally sunnier and hotter than surrounding ares but I am 
not sure what that has to do with it. 


Most of the Sympetrum here emerge in late June and July and then disappear for 
a couple of weeks from the breeding ponds. Presumably they go into the uplands 
to feed but we rarely find them there. I have speculated they may spend time in 
the treetops. They reappear in full breeding colors at the ponds around early 
September. They also seem to prefer fishless ponds, which these definitely were 
not. 


Mike Moore



Sent from my iPad

> On Aug 7, 2014, at 1:25 PM, "Meena Madhav Haribal mmh3 AT cornell.edu [NEodes]" 
 wrote: 

> 
> May be they have a second brood or second generation of Nannothemis in New 
Jersey! 

> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: NEodes AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:NEodes AT yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of 
Joshua Rose opihi AT mindspring.com [NEodes] 

> Sent: Thursday, August 07, 2014 1:04 PM
> To: neodes
> Subject: Re: [NEodes] 5 Pennant Day in NJ
> 
> I'm struck by the fact that Mike saw so many Nannothemis on Tuesday in New 
Jersey. I spent a few hours Tuesday at Tully Dam, as I posted previously. When 
I visited Tully in May it was loaded with Nannothemis, it was one of the most 
common odonates in the bog that day. But on Tuesday I couldn't find a single 
one. 

> 
> Of course, the even bigger contrast is that Mike didn't list a single 
Sympetrum of any species, while I had dozens (hundreds?) of individuals and at 
least 3 species, possibly 5 or 6. So maybe it's just that autumn is starting in 
Massachusetts while it's still summertime in New Jersey. This whole latitude 
thing, man, wow.... 

> 
> Cheers,
> 
> Josh
> 
> Joshua S. Rose, Ph.D.
> Amherst, MA
> http://bugguide.net/user/view/2399
> http://www.facebook.com/opihi
> 
> On Aug 7, 2014, at 11:04 AM, 'Michael Moore' mcmoore32 AT gmail.com [NEodes] 
 wrote: 

> > 
> > On Tuesday, 05 Aug 2014, I ventured over into the New Jersey Pine Barrens. 
My target was Celithemis martha (Martha's Pennant). I followed directions Chip 
Krilowicz gave me last year to the lake at Winslow Wildlife Management Area. 
This is a spectacular location with a large, sand bottomed, grass fringed lake 
with a large sphagnum bog adjacent (I could not find a name for this pond on 
any of my maps. I would appreciate it if someone who knows it would tell me). 
C. martha was common here. I also found several other species I look for in the 
Pine Barrens, including Enallagma doubledayi (Atlantic Bluet), Nannothemis 
bella (Elfin Skimmer), Celithemis verna(Double-ringed Pennant), Libellula 
flavida (Yellow-sided Skimmer) and Nehalennia integricollis (Southern Sprite). 
Certainly this pond would also have many other specialties earlier in the year. 
I later visited both Pakim Pond and the Wharton Gunnery Range Pond. Although I 
have had good luck at the former earlier in the year, it was kind of 
disappointing this time with L. incest (Slaty Skimmer) and P. longipennis (Blue 
Dasher) really dominating. Water was low at the Gunnery Range Pond but I 
managed two more specialties,Enallagma pictum (Scarlet Bluet) and C. fasciata 
(Banded Pennant). The latter made for a 5 Celithemis day! I had 26 species 
total for the day. 

> > 
> > The other thing that stood out about the day was the number of predations I 
observed. Almost the first C. martha I found was a tandem pair ovipositing over 
the water. As I watched, a Largemouth Bass leaped out of the water and ate 
them! Later I saw a female C. martha captured by Pondhawk in midair. A few 
minutes later I saw another Pondhawk capture a teneral Forktail in midair. 
Finally I came across a spider halfway through consuming an Argia fummipennis 
(Variable Dancer)! 

> > 
> 
> ------------------------------------
> 
> ------------------------------------
> 
> ------------------------------------
> 
> Yahoo Groups Links
> 
> 
Subject: RE: 5 Pennant Day in NJ
From: "Meena Madhav Haribal mmh3 AT cornell.edu [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2014 17:25:30 +0000
May be they have a second brood or second generation of Nannothemis in New 
Jersey! 


-----Original Message-----
From: NEodes AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:NEodes AT yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of 
Joshua Rose opihi AT mindspring.com [NEodes] 

Sent: Thursday, August 07, 2014 1:04 PM
To: neodes
Subject: Re: [NEodes] 5 Pennant Day in NJ

I'm struck by the fact that Mike saw so many Nannothemis on Tuesday in New 
Jersey. I spent a few hours Tuesday at Tully Dam, as I posted previously. When 
I visited Tully in May it was loaded with Nannothemis, it was one of the most 
common odonates in the bog that day. But on Tuesday I couldn't find a single 
one. 


Of course, the even bigger contrast is that Mike didn't list a single Sympetrum 
of any species, while I had dozens (hundreds?) of individuals and at least 3 
species, possibly 5 or 6. So maybe it's just that autumn is starting in 
Massachusetts while it's still summertime in New Jersey. This whole latitude 
thing, man, wow.... 


Cheers,

Josh


Joshua S. Rose, Ph.D.
Amherst, MA
http://bugguide.net/user/view/2399
http://www.facebook.com/opihi



On Aug 7, 2014, at 11:04 AM, 'Michael Moore' mcmoore32 AT gmail.com [NEodes] 
 wrote: 

>  
> On Tuesday, 05 Aug 2014, I ventured over into the New Jersey Pine Barrens. My 
target was Celithemis martha (Martha's Pennant). I followed directions Chip 
Krilowicz gave me last year to the lake at Winslow Wildlife Management Area. 
This is a spectacular location with a large, sand bottomed, grass fringed lake 
with a large sphagnum bog adjacent (I could not find a name for this pond on 
any of my maps. I would appreciate it if someone who knows it would tell me). 
C. martha was common here. I also found several other species I look for in the 
Pine Barrens, including Enallagma doubledayi (Atlantic Bluet), Nannothemis 
bella (Elfin Skimmer), Celithemis verna(Double-ringed Pennant), Libellula 
flavida (Yellow-sided Skimmer) and Nehalennia integricollis (Southern Sprite). 
Certainly this pond would also have many other specialties earlier in the year. 
I later visited both Pakim Pond and the Wharton Gunnery Range Pond. Although I 
have had good luck at the former earlier in the year, it was kind of 
disappointing this time with L. incest (Slaty Skimmer) and P. longipennis (Blue 
Dasher) really dominating. Water was low at the Gunnery Range Pond but I 
managed two more specialties,Enallagma pictum (Scarlet Bluet) and C. fasciata 
(Banded Pennant). The latter made for a 5 Celithemis day! I had 26 species 
total for the day. 

>  
> The other thing that stood out about the day was the number of predations I 
observed. Almost the first C. martha I found was a tandem pair ovipositing over 
the water. As I watched, a Largemouth Bass leaped out of the water and ate 
them! Later I saw a female C. martha captured by Pondhawk in midair. A few 
minutes later I saw another Pondhawk capture a teneral Forktail in midair. 
Finally I came across a spider halfway through consuming an Argia fummipennis 
(Variable Dancer)! 

> 




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Subject: Re: 5 Pennant Day in NJ
From: "Joshua Rose opihi AT mindspring.com [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2014 13:04:17 -0400
Im struck by the fact that Mike saw so many Nannothemis on Tuesday in New 
Jersey. I spent a few hours Tuesday at Tully Dam, as I posted previously. When 
I visited Tully in May it was loaded with Nannothemis, it was one of the most 
common odonates in the bog that day. But on Tuesday I couldnt find a single 
one. 


Of course, the even bigger contrast is that Mike didnt list a single Sympetrum 
of any species, while I had dozens (hundreds?) of individuals and at least 3 
species, possibly 5 or 6. So maybe its just that autumn is starting in 
Massachusetts while its still summertime in New Jersey. This whole latitude 
thing, man, wow. 


Cheers,

Josh


Joshua S. Rose, Ph.D.
Amherst, MA
http://bugguide.net/user/view/2399
http://www.facebook.com/opihi



On Aug 7, 2014, at 11:04 AM, 'Michael Moore' mcmoore32 AT gmail.com [NEodes] 
 wrote: 

>  
> On Tuesday, 05 Aug 2014, I ventured over into the New Jersey Pine Barrens. My 
target was Celithemis martha (Marthas Pennant). I followed directions Chip 
Krilowicz gave me last year to the lake at Winslow Wildlife Management Area. 
This is a spectacular location with a large, sand bottomed, grass fringed lake 
with a large sphagnum bog adjacent (I could not find a name for this pond on 
any of my maps. I would appreciate it if someone who knows it would tell me). 
C. martha was common here. I also found several other species I look for in the 
Pine Barrens, including Enallagma doubledayi (Atlantic Bluet), Nannothemis 
bella (Elfin Skimmer), Celithemis verna(Double-ringed Pennant), Libellula 
flavida (Yellow-sided Skimmer) and Nehalennia integricollis (Southern Sprite). 
Certainly this pond would also have many other specialties earlier in the year. 
I later visited both Pakim Pond and the Wharton Gunnery Range Pond. Although I 
have had good luck at the former earlier in the year, it was kind of 
disappointing this time with L. incest (Slaty Skimmer) and P. longipennis (Blue 
Dasher) really dominating. Water was low at the Gunnery Range Pond but I 
managed two more specialties,Enallagma pictum (Scarlet Bluet) and C. fasciata 
(Banded Pennant). The latter made for a 5 Celithemis day! I had 26 species 
total for the day. 

>  
> The other thing that stood out about the day was the number of predations I 
observed. Almost the first C. martha I found was a tandem pair ovipositing over 
the water. As I watched, a Largemouth Bass leaped out of the water and ate 
them! Later I saw a female C. martha captured by Pondhawk in midair. A few 
minutes later I saw another Pondhawk capture a teneral Forktail in midair. 
Finally I came across a spider halfway through consuming an Argia fummipennis 
(Variable Dancer)! 

> 




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Subject: 5 Pennant Day in NJ
From: "'Michael Moore' mcmoore32 AT gmail.com [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 7 Aug 2014 11:04:57 -0400
Greetings

 

On Tuesday, 05 Aug 2014, I ventured over into the New Jersey Pine Barrens.
My target was Celithemis martha (Martha's Pennant).  I followed directions
Chip Krilowicz gave me last year to the lake at Winslow Wildlife Management
Area.  This is a spectacular location with a large, sand bottomed, grass
fringed lake with a large sphagnum bog adjacent (I could not find a name for
this pond on any of my maps.  I would appreciate it if someone who knows it
would tell me).   C. martha was common here.  I also found several other
species I look for in the Pine Barrens, including Enallagma doubledayi
(Atlantic Bluet), Nannothemis bella (Elfin Skimmer), Celithemis verna
(Double-ringed Pennant), Libellula flavida (Yellow-sided Skimmer) and
Nehalennia integricollis (Southern Sprite).   Certainly this pond would also
have many other specialties earlier in the year.  I later visited both Pakim
Pond and the Wharton Gunnery Range Pond.  Although I have had good luck at
the former earlier in the year, it was kind of disappointing this time with
L. incest (Slaty Skimmer) and P. longipennis (Blue Dasher) really
dominating.  Water was low at the Gunnery Range Pond but I managed two more
specialties, Enallagma pictum (Scarlet Bluet) and C. fasciata (Banded
Pennant).  The latter made for a 5 Celithemis day!  I had 26 species total
for the day.  

 

The other thing that stood out about the day was the number of predations I
observed.  Almost the first C. martha I found was a tandem pair ovipositing
over the water.  As I watched, a Largemouth Bass leaped out of the water and
ate them!  Later I saw a female C. martha captured by Pondhawk in midair.
A few minutes later I saw another Pondhawk capture a teneral Forktail in
midair.  Finally I came across a spider halfway through consuming an Argia
fummipennis  (Variable Dancer)!

 

Photos have been posted on my website (See "Recent Photos" if you just want
to see the new ones).

 

Lists for each location below.

 

Mike Moore

Newark, DE

  Mcmoore32 AT gmail.com

 

Websites:

 
Delmarva Dragonflies and Damselflies
(https://sites.google.com/a/udel.edu/deodes/)

  Voices of Delaware Birds
(https://sites.google.com/site/delawarebirdsongs/)

  Birds of the
Gilbert Water Ranch
(https://sites.google.com/site/birdsofthegilbertwaterranch/)

  AZFO Rare Bird
Photos (http://www.azfo.org/gallery/1main/photos_recent.html)

 

 

 

NEW JERSEY, GUNNERY RANGE POND - 

Swamp Spreadwing       Lestes  vigilax            6        

Scarlet Bluet          Enallagma pictum           5        

Fragile Forktail       Ischnura posita            3        

Comet Darner           Anax  longipes             2        

Calico Pennant         Celithemis elisa           7        

Banded Pennant         Celithemis fasciata        1        

Martha's Pennant       Celithemis martha          1        

Eastern Pondhawk       Erythemis simplicicollis   9        

Slaty Skimmer          Libellula incesta          25       

Blue Dasher            Pachydiplax longipennis    20       

Eastern Amberwing      Perithemis tenera          3        

Common Whitetail       Plathemis lydia            1        

Carolina Saddlebags    Tramea carolina            1        

 

NEW JERSEY, PAKIM POND - 

Swamp Spreadwing       Lestes  vigilax            4        

Fragile Forktail       Ischnura posita            3        

Calico Pennant         Celithemis elisa           3        

Eastern Pondhawk       Erythemis simplicicollis   8        

Slaty Skimmer          Libellula incesta          75       

Blue Dasher            Pachydiplax longipennis    80       

 

NEW JERSEY, WINSLOW WMA - 

Swamp Spreadwing       Lestes  vigilax            35       

Variable Dancer        Argia fumipennis           3        

Atlantic Bluet         Enallagma doubledayi       12       

Citrine Forktail       Ischnura hastata           20       

Fragile Forktail       Ischnura posita            15       

Eastern Forktail       Ischnura verticalis        1        

Southern Sprite        Nehalennia integricollis   5        

Calico Pennant         Celithemis elisa           15       

Halloween Pennant      Celithemis eponina         2        

Martha's Pennant       Celithemis martha          45       

Double-ringed Pennant  Celithemis verna           7        

Eastern Pondhawk       Erythemis simplicicollis   25       

Spangled Skimmer       Libellula cyanea           2        

Yellow-sided Skimmer   Libellula flavida          4        

Slaty Skimmer          Libellula incesta          80       

Needham's Skimmer      Libellula needhami         1        

Painted Skimmer        Libellula semifasciata     6        

Elfin Skimmer          Nannothemis bella          40       

Blue Dasher            Pachydiplax longipennis    6        

Eastern Amberwing      Perithemis tenera          1        

Carolina Saddlebags    Tramea carolina            6        

Black Saddlebags       Tramea lacerata            1        

 

Birder's Diary - www.BirdersDiary.com - 8/7/2014

 

 

 
Subject: Tully Dam
From: "Joshua Rose opihi AT mindspring.com [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 5 Aug 2014 23:54:08 -0400
Howdy folks,

I unexpectedly found myself with the afternoon off today, and decided to head 
for the spillway at Tully Dam. I was hoping for a Somatochlora or two, but 
struck out there. In fact, had no Corduliids at all, and no Aeshnids either (at 
least not that I could ID; did see a couple flying up near treetop level). And 
pretty sparse for damselflies; only three species, and only one individual each 
of two of them. No sign of the hordes of Amphiagrion or Nannothemis which were 
here in May. Painted Skimmers were still flying though, somewhat surprisingly, 
and even in larger numbers than I recall seeing in May. 


Dancer (Argia sp.) - presumably A. fumipennis, a female
Eastern Forktail (Ischnura verticalis) - a female, orange phase
Sphagnum Sprite (Nehalennia gracilis) - stumbled into a pocket of a dozen or 
so. Interestingly, it was lakeward from the bog and pretty far from any actual 
Sphagnum moss. 


Black-shouldered Spinyleg (Dromogomphus spinosus) - surprised to see this at 
the bog; guess it wandered up from the lake 


Calico Pennant (Celithemis elisa) - fairly common in the bog
Eastern Pondhawk (Erythemis simplicicollis) - 1 green jacket as the old 
Audubon guide called it 

Spangled Skimmer (Libellula cyanea) - maybe a half-dozen just before the bog
Slaty Skimmer (L. incesta) - 1, what looked like a very big old female of this 
species 

Widow Skimmer (L. luctuosa) - 2-3 female-types right around the concrete wall 
at the edge of the bog 

Painted Skimmer (L. semifasciata) - several, seemingly a bit late, mostly 
downstream where the bog becomes sort of creek-like 

Blue Dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis) - one female-type downstream
Eastern Amberwing (Perithemis tenera) - a few in the bog, but all females; I 
guess the males must have been down at the lake, I didnt make it down there 

Black-legged Meadowhawks (Sympetrum obternicundulum) - by far the most common 
odonate, dozens, mostly in the bog 

Autumn Meadowhawk (S. vicinum) - saw a few pale-legged bugs amid the many 
black-legged ones 

Band-winged Meadowhawk (S. semicinctum) - several, mostly downstream 

Cheers,

Josh



Joshua S. Rose, Ph.D.
Amherst, MA
http://bugguide.net/user/view/2399
http://www.facebook.com/opihi





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Subject: Barnstable County, MA - 27 July 2014
From: "Nicholas Block nlb.birder AT gmail.com [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 2014 20:58:01 -0400
Hello all,

Mike Andersen and I visited a few sites in Barnstable County, MA,
yesterday. We found 28 species before the rains arrived - not a bad day in
the field at all! The highlights for me were my life Atlantic and
Attenuated bluets, as well as my first good looks at Martha's Pennant.
Thanks very much to Ken Shea for some location info! The full species lists
and estimated numbers seen are below, and some photos can be seen here:
http://goo.gl/yLVe1M

*Eastham, MA:*

spreadwing sp. (Lestes sp.) - 8
Violet Dancer (Argia fumipennis violacea) - 10
Familiar Bluet (Enallagma civile) - 50
Orange Bluet (Enallagma signatum) - 8
Vesper Bluet (Enallagma vesperum) - 1
Prince Baskettail (Epitheca princeps) - 4
Halloween Pennant (Celithemis eponina) - 1
Slaty Skimmer (Libellula incesta) - 15
Blue Dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis) - 20
Spot-winged Glider (Pantala hymenaea) - 1
Eastern Amberwing (Perithemis tenera) - 30
Autumn Meadowhawk (Sympetrum vicinum ) - 1

*Wellfleet, MA:*

Ebony Jewelwing (Calopteryx maculata) - 1
Amber-winged Spreadwing (Lestes eurinus) - 5
Violet Dancer (Argia fumipennis violacea) - 8
Azure Bluet (Enallagma aspersum) - 1
Familiar/Atlantic Bluet (Enallagma civile/doubledayi) - 1
Attenuated Bluet (Enallagma daeckii) - 1
Skimming Bluet (Enallagma geminatum) - 20
Slender Bluet (Enallagma traviatum) - 3
Lilypad Forktail (Ischnura kellicotti) - 1
Eastern Forktail (Ischnura verticalis) - 5
Common Green Darner (Anax junius) - 1
Black-shouldered Spinyleg (Dromogomphus spinosus) - 1
Common Sanddragon (Progomphus obscurus) - 1
Calico Pennant (Celithemis elisa) - 2
Halloween Pennant (Celithemis eponina) - 5
Banded Pennant (Celithemis fasciata) - 1
Spangled Skimmer (Libellula cyanea) - 1
Slaty Skimmer (Libellula incesta) - 15
Blue Dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis) - 40
Eastern Amberwing (Perithemis tenera) - 40
Autumn Meadowhawk (Sympetrum vicinum) - 1
Eastern Pondhawk (Erythemis simplicicollis) - 2

*Truro, MA:*

Violet Dancer (Argia fumipennis violacea) - 1
Atlantic Bluet (Enallagma doubledayi) - 10
Skimming Bluet (Enallagma geminatum) - 6
Common Green Darner (Anax junius) - 1
Common Sanddragon (Progomphus obscurus) - 2
Calico Pennant (Celithemis elisa) - 2
Halloween Pennant (Celithemis eponina) - 1
Banded Pennant (Celithemis fasciata) - 1
Martha's Pennant (Celithemis martha) - 5
Slaty Skimmer (Libellula incesta) - 5
Blue Dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis) - 10
Eastern Amberwing (Perithemis tenera) - 15

Cheers,
Nick Block
North Easton, MA
Subject: Westchester Co, NY Macromia, and More
From: "'Steve Walter' swalter15 AT verizon.net [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 18:48:32 -0400
On July 26, I came across a Swift River Cruiser (Macromia illinoiensis) (or
is it Illinois River Cruiser?) patrolling intermittently (very intermittent
when it clouded over and rained) on the Croton River in Westchester County,
NY. This is an enigmatic species in the county (so much so that I don't know
what to call it). There are two records at Ward Pound Ridge Reservation,
where it is surely a stray. As far as I know, it is not known as a breeder
in the county, and the atlas shows a big blank for it. So this is an
interesting record. On a personal note, it might be the first time I've
watched a river cruiser actually cruising over a river for an extended
amount of time. I do recall seeing brief passer bys on a river in
Connecticut one time - even having one land on my fishing rod.

 

That was a surprise. What I had gone there for was to upgrade my photo
collection of Dusky Dancer (Argia translata), which was necessary because
this, my most reliable location for the species, is not on my normal travel
route. So I had not been there since I got into SLR photography almost a
decade ago. That mission was accomplished. One of my favorite pictures of
the day can be seen at my website , for anyone interested
(http://www.stevewalternature.com/ , click the dragonfly tab). Among other
species seen were Blue-fronted and Variable Dancers (A. apicalis and
fumipennis), and Stream, Orange, and Big Bluets (Enallagma exsulans,
signatum, and durum) - an interesting mixture. The Croton is a tributary of
the Hudson, which should explain how durum gets into that picture. It would
have been a better mix if I had come up with Tule Bluet (carunculatum),
which I had found reliably there in the past. I'm not sure why I missed
that. Perhaps there was more emergent vegetation in the past. Does anyone
know if it's a species that comes to water later in the day (like Orange or
Vesper)?

 

For the afternoon, I went to Teatown Lake Reservation. It's going on 20
years since Ken Soltesz took me to a spot to see my first Mocha Emerald
(Somatochlora linearis). It's the right time of year, so I figured I'd give
it a shot. I managed to find, after all these years, what seemed to be the
spot - a small and mucky intermittent brook in the woods. But it was
overcast. When the skies brightened, a long and patient wait was rewarded.
First it was male, which with some effort was finally seen well enough to be
sure that there wasn't a clamp at the tip. A while later, a female appeared
and I watched her ovipositing for about five minutes. It was interesting in
that she was doing this mainly in the surrounding mud, but occasionally
dipping in the water. 

 

Things got more interesting in that same spot. I was surprised by two other
species pairs (both ovipositing). The first was Common Whitetail (Plathymis
lydia), a surprise in that I didn't expect breeding in this kind of habitat.
The second surprise was, in this non-irruption year, my first Great Blue
Skimmers (Libellula vibrans) of the year. If that wasn't enough, there were
two great butterflies around - Harvester and White M Hairstreak. Not bad for
one little spot.

 

Steve Walter

Bayside, NY    
Subject: Leach's Pond, Borderland State Park, Sharon - Easton, MA, 21 July 2014
From: "Soheil Zendeh sohzendeh AT gmail.com [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 10:08:05 -0400
Folks,

I checked out Leach's Pond (really just the southwest corner of it) in
Borderland State Park for a couple of hours yesterday. Still lots of odes
but the species composition is changing slowly. Lots of Lilypad Forktails
and Slaty Skimmers now, just one Ebony Jewelwing. Photos are in my
Borderland  album:


https://picasaweb.google.com/102611087159208870022/BorderlandStateParkSharonEastonMA?authuser=0&feat=directlink 


As usual, I had trouble with the spreadwings. When my friend Alan Ankers
went there over the weekend he reported seeing all Swamp Spreadwings and no
Elegants. Of the ones I managed to photograph I think I got one of each.
Please let me know what you make of them. And of course comments and
corrections on anything else are welcome as well.

Here is a list of odes with approximate numbers:

Ebony Jewelwings (Calopteryx maculata) 1
Elegant Spreadwing (Lestes inaequalis) 1
Swamp Spreadwing (Lestes vigilax) 2
Skimming Bluet (Enallagma geminatum) 4
Violet Dancer (Argia fumipennis) 10
Scarlet Bluet (Enallagma pictum) 8
Slender Bluet (Enallagma traviatum) 1
Lilypad Forktail (Ischnura kellicotti) 15+
Fragile Forktail (Ischnura posita) 3
Banded Pennant (Celithemis fasciata) 8 (2 - 3 ovipositing)
*Eastern Pondhawk (Erithemis simplicicolis) 6*
Slaty Skimmer (Libellula incesta) 30+
Blue dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis) 15
Common Whitetail (Plathemis lydia) 4
Meadowhawk (Sympetrum sp) possibly Autumn? Can you tell from a teneral?


-- 





*Soheil Zendeh42 Baker AvenueLexington, MA 02421781-863-2392
home617-763-5637 cell*
Subject: Topsfield MA - Painted & Spangled Skimmers
From: "Joshua Rose opihi AT mindspring.com [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 23:00:48 -0400
Howdy folks,

Visiting my parents in Topsfield (Essex County) MA today. They live in a fairly 
new development with a couple of ornamental ponds and some stormwater basins 
that have moist spots of various degrees of persistence. I spent about an hour 
or so wandering the edges today and turned up a variety of things, 13 species, 
none especially rare, though one or two seemed a tad late. Surprised to *not* 
see any Slaty Skimmers, as I saw most of the species that usually co-occur with 
it... 



Familiar (?) Bluet (Enallagma civile) - photographed a male in a meadow. Got 
decent shots of the appendages. Funny-looking, upper appendage bulbous and much 
bigger than the lower. Will have to post the pics when I get them uploaded for 
other people to double-check my ID. 


Orange Bluet (E. signatum) - tandem pair flying over the larger, less vegetated 
pond 


Fragile Forktail (Ischnura posita) - 1 male, possibly a female or two

Eastern Forktail (I. verticalis) - several, by far the most common damsel


Prince Baskettail (Epitheca princeps) - PERCHED!! And stayed perched even after 
I took full-frame photos of it and walked away! That *never* happens to me with 
this species! 


Eastern Amberwing (Perithemis tenera) - at least 2 males

Blue Dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis) - gobs and gobs and yet more gobs of 
them. There were a lot. Very numerous. And also highly abundant. 


Common Pondhawk (Erythemis simplicicollis) - a few scattered around, half a 
dozen or so. 


Common Whitetail (Plathemis lydia) - 1 male

Spangled Skimmer (Libellula cyanea) - nice male. Unfortunately I had to scare 
it away to get photos of the perched baskettail nearby. 


Widow Skimmer (L. luctuosa) - male in one of the stormwater basins, female and 
another male in a weedy meadow. 


Painted Skimmer (L. semifasciata) - 1 in a meadow. Maybe the biggest surprise, 
seemed late and not terribly good habitat. Old-looking individual. Was unable 
to get a photo. 


Carolina Saddlebags (Tramea carolina) - 1 in one of the stormwater basins


Cheers,

Josh


Joshua S. Rose, Ph.D.
Amherst, MA
http://bugguide.net/user/view/2399
http://www.facebook.com/opihi




------------------------------------
Posted by: Joshua Rose 
------------------------------------


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Subject: Re: Unidentified Damsel
From: "Blair Nikula odenews AT odenews.org [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 13:51:09 -0400
Well, it's always dicey identifying teneral damselflies from photos, but 
this seems like a pretty good match for Slender Bluet (E. traviatum).

Blair Nikula

On 7/20/2014 12:48 PM, 'Willie D'Anna and Betsy Potter' 
dannapotter AT roadrunner.com [NEodes] wrote:
>
> Hi everyone,
>
> Betsy and I did some bugging (odes and butterflies) at Allegany State 
> Park in southwestern NY on Thursday.  The weather did not cooperate, 
> as it remained cool and mostly overcast.  Of the few odes that I 
> caught, one I was unable to identify.  It appears to be a male damsel, 
> with a small bump under abdominal segment 2, and longish cerci.  I am 
> totally baffled by this little guy and would appreciate any thoughts 
> about it.
>
> Photos here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/107683885 AT N07/
>
> Thanks!
>
> Willie
>
> ------------------
>
> Willie D'Anna
>
> Betsy Potter
>
> Wilson, NY
>
> dannapotterATroadrunner.com
>
> http://www.betsypottersart.com 
>
> 2013 Big Year: 
> http://www.betsypottersart.com/willie-s-photos/2013-big-year/
>
> Big Year List: 
> http://www.happtech.com/BigYearDanna/CurrentList/ShowCurrentListTable.aspx
>
> Odenates: http://www.betsypottersart.com/willie-s-photos/dragonflies
>
> 

-- 
2 Gilbert Lane
Harwich Port, MA  02646
http://www.odenews.org/
http://www.capecodbirds.org/

You can't depend on your eyes when your imagination is out of focus - Mark 
Twain 

Subject: Unidentified Damsel
From: "'Willie D'Anna and Betsy Potter' dannapotter AT roadrunner.com [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 12:48:29 -0400
Hi everyone,

 

Betsy and I did some bugging (odes and butterflies) at Allegany State Park
in southwestern NY on Thursday.  The weather did not cooperate, as it
remained cool and mostly overcast.  Of the few odes that I caught, one I was
unable to identify.  It appears to be a male damsel, with a small bump under
abdominal segment 2, and longish cerci.  I am totally baffled by this little
guy and would appreciate any thoughts about it.

 

Photos here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/107683885 AT N07/

 

Thanks!

Willie

------------------

Willie D'Anna

Betsy Potter

Wilson, NY

dannapotterATroadrunner.com

http://www.betsypottersart.com  

2013 Big Year: http://www.betsypottersart.com/willie-s-photos/2013-big-year/

Big Year List:
http://www.happtech.com/BigYearDanna/CurrentList/ShowCurrentListTable.aspx

Odenates: http://www.betsypottersart.com/willie-s-photos/dragonflies

 
Subject: Borderland State Park, MA, 17 July 2014 (and a RFI)
From: "Nicholas Block nlb.birder AT gmail.com [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2014 00:33:09 -0400
Hello all,

Borderland State Park (Bristol/Norfolk county line, MA) is still hopping
with odes. I stopped by Leach Pond for about an hour this morning with my
sons. I was able to record 19 species while trying to simultaneously make
sure my boys didn't throw themselves in the pond. The highlight for me was
definitely my life Martha's Pennants. I was looking for my life Attenuated
Bluets (not seen), and an ovipositing pair of Martha's Pennants came
cruising by! My first thought when I saw them went something like, "What's
that little Slaty Skimmer doing in tandem with a female penn--OH!!
AWESOME!" I was unable to get a photo b/c they didn't stop. A couple other
highlights were a fly-by Dragonhunter along the stream at the west end of
Leach Pond and plenty of Scarlet Bluets. The full species list is below.
Here are a few photos I managed to grab while my boys were distracted:
http://goo.gl/eegXQN

Ebony Jewelwing (Calopteryx maculata) - 4
Swamp Spreadwing (Lestes vigilax) - 40+
Variable Dancer (Argia fumipennis) - 12
Skimming Bluet (Enallagma geminatum) - 10
Scarlet Bluet (Enallagma pictum) - 15
Orange Bluet (Enallagma signatum) - 2
Fragile Forktail (Ischnura posita) - 2
Lilypad Forktail (Ischnura kellicotti) - 20
Dragonhunter (Hagenius brevistylus) - 1
Prince Baskettail (Epitheca princeps) - 1
Mocha Emerald (Somatochlora linearis) - 3
Martha's Pennant (Celithemis martha) - 2
Eastern Pondhawk (Erythemis simplicicollis) - 5
Spangled Skimmer (Libellula cyanea) - 2
Slaty Skimmer (Libellula incesta) - 20
Blue Dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis) - 50+
Eastern Amberwing (Perithemis tenera) - 1
Common Whitetail (Plathemis lydia) - 4
Ruby/Cherry-faced Meadowhawk (Sympetrum rubicundulum/internum) - 2

On a different note, I may be headed to Cape Cod with a friend to bird next
weekend, and I'd like to do a little ode-ing if the weather cooperates. Can
anyone recommend some "must-see" spots? Looking at the Barnstable
checklist, these would be lifers for me:
Attenuated Bluet
Atlantic Bluet
Little Bluet
Furtive Forktail
Mottled Darner
Black-tipped Darner
Green-striped Darner
Spine-crowned Clubtail

Any assistance finding these species would be much appreciated!

Cheers,
Nick Block
Easton, MA
Subject: Re: FW: Odes at Great Brook Farm State Park, Carlisle MA, 2014.07.11
From: "'John and Sue Gregoire' khmo AT empacc.net [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 22:28:56 -0400
Nice odes! Neat videos! Sure they are "dueling"?

Sue
-- 
John and Sue Gregoire
Field Ornithologists
Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
5373 Fitzgerald Road
Burdett,NY 14818-9626
 Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
"Conserve and Create Habitat"

On Mon, July 14, 2014 17:11, 'Soheil Zendeh' sohzendeh AT gmail.com [NEodes] 
wrote: 

> Folks,
>
>
>
> Here is additional information from Jason Forbes about the odes etc at Great 
Brook 

> Farm State Park o Friday July 7:
>
>
>
> Lestes sp included Elegant (L. inaequalis) and Common (Northern)/Slender (L.
> disjunctus/L. rectangularis) at least.
> Turquoise Bluet (E. divagans) - tandem pair on the pond 
(https://flic.kr/p/oj1yjQ) 

> darner over the cornfield - I actually suspect Swamp (Epiaeschna heros) and 
not 

> Aeshna but it wasn't very cooperative
> Emerald sp - photos show it to be Mocha (S. linearis): 
https://flic.kr/p/o2HobY 

> Meadowhawks included both Cherry-faced/Ruby types (S. internum/S. 
rubicundulum) and 

> Autumn (S. vicinum).
>
>
>
> Jason's dueling Snapping Turtle video:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/gp/brewsterslinnet/P238X8/
>
>
>
> My youtube video:
>
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EldtGvNoT6g
>
>
>
>
>
> Soheil Zendeh
>
> 42 Baker Avenue
>
> Lexington, MA 02421
>
>
>
> cell 617-763-5637
>
> home 781-863-2392
>
>
>
> sohzendeh AT gmail.com
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> From: Soheil Zendeh [mailto:sohzendeh AT gmail.com]
> Sent: Saturday, July 12, 2014 1:12 PM
> To: NEodes AT yahoogroups.com
> Subject: Odes at Great Brook Farm State Park, Carlisle MA, 2014.07.11
>
>
>
> Folks,
>
>
>
> On Friday, July 11, Jason Forbes, Alan Ankers and I explored Great Brook Farm 
SP in 

> Carlisle MA from 1:30 to about 4:30. There are a variety of habitats here, 
from 

> still ponds with lilypads to rushing streams,woods with big trees and 
clearings, and 

> a corn field. We did not find any rare odes, but the number and variety were 
fun to 

> see. I was particularly pleased to see many Orange Bluets, a single Azure 
Bluet and 

> a half a dozen Unicorn Clubtails. It was late enough in the day so that 
streams were 

> in deep shadow and we did not find any stream specialists other than Ebony
> Jewelwings.
>
>
>
> In one of the ponds we watched a titanic fight, worthy of Jurassic Park, 
between two 

> enormous Snapping Turtles. I'll post the video of the fight on youtube -- I 
have to 

> find the appropriate sound track for it first!
>
>
>
> This is the album of pictures from yesterday:
>
> 
https://picasaweb.google.com/102611087159208870022/GreatBrookFarmStateParkCarlisleMAJuly112014?authuser=0 

> 
 

> &feat=directlink
>
>
>
> Here is a list of the odes we found with approximate numbers:
>
>
>
> Ebony Jewelwing (Calopteryx maculata) 4
>
> Spreadwing (Lestes sp) 4
>
> Variable Dancer (Argia fumipennis) 3
>
> Azure Bluet (Enallagma aspersum) 1
>
> Skimming Bluet (Enallagma geminatum) 3
>
> Orange Bluet (Enallagma signatum) 30+
>
> Fragile Forktail (Ischnura posita) 1
>
> Eastern Forktail (Ischnura verticalis) 6
>
> Darner (Aeschna sp) 1 (over corn field)
>
> Common Green Darner (Anax junius) 2
>
> Unicorn Clubtail (Arigomphus villosipes) 6
>
> Lancet Clubtail (Gomphus exilis) 2
>
> Emerald (Somatochlora or Corculia sp) 1 (extremely narrow-waisted, flew high)
>
> Eastern Pondhawk (Erythemis simplicicollis) 15+
>
> Spangled Skimmer (Libellula cyanea) 10
>
> Slaty Skimmer (Libelulla incesta) 20+
>
> Widow Skimmer (Libellula luctuosa) 8
>
> Twelve-spotted Skimmer (Libellula pulchella) 4
>
> Painted Skimmer (Libellula semifasciata) 2
>
> Blue Dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis) 20+
>
> Eastern Amberwing (Perithemis tenera) 2
>
> Common Whitetail (Plathemis lydia) 15
>
> Meadowhawk (Sympetrum sp) 3
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> --
> Soheil Zendeh
> 42 Baker Avenue
> Lexington, MA 02421
>
> 781-863-2392 home
> 617-763-5637 cell
>
>




------------------------------------
Posted by: "John and Sue Gregoire" 
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

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Subject: FW: Odes at Great Brook Farm State Park, Carlisle MA, 2014.07.11
From: "'Soheil Zendeh' sohzendeh AT gmail.com [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 17:11:53 -0400
Folks,

 

Here is additional information from Jason Forbes about the odes etc at Great 
Brook Farm State Park o Friday July 7: 


 

Lestes sp included Elegant (L. inaequalis) and Common (Northern)/Slender (L. 
disjunctus/L. rectangularis) at least. 

Turquoise Bluet (E. divagans) - tandem pair on the pond 
(https://flic.kr/p/oj1yjQ) 

darner over the cornfield - I actually suspect Swamp (Epiaeschna heros) and not 
Aeshna but it wasn't very cooperative 

Emerald sp - photos show it to be Mocha (S. linearis): https://flic.kr/p/o2HobY
Meadowhawks included both Cherry-faced/Ruby types (S. internum/S. rubicundulum) 
and Autumn (S. vicinum). 


 

Jason's dueling Snapping Turtle video:

https://www.flickr.com/gp/brewsterslinnet/P238X8/

 

My youtube video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EldtGvNoT6g

 

 

Soheil Zendeh

42 Baker Avenue

Lexington, MA 02421

 

cell 617-763-5637

home 781-863-2392

 

sohzendeh AT gmail.com

 

 

 

 

From: Soheil Zendeh [mailto:sohzendeh AT gmail.com] 
Sent: Saturday, July 12, 2014 1:12 PM
To: NEodes AT yahoogroups.com
Subject: Odes at Great Brook Farm State Park, Carlisle MA, 2014.07.11

 

Folks,

 

On Friday, July 11, Jason Forbes, Alan Ankers and I explored Great Brook Farm 
SP in Carlisle MA from 1:30 to about 4:30. There are a variety of habitats 
here, from still ponds with lilypads to rushing streams,woods with big trees 
and clearings, and a corn field. We did not find any rare odes, but the number 
and variety were fun to see. I was particularly pleased to see many Orange 
Bluets, a single Azure Bluet and a half a dozen Unicorn Clubtails. It was late 
enough in the day so that streams were in deep shadow and we did not find any 
stream specialists other than Ebony Jewelwings. 


 

In one of the ponds we watched a titanic fight, worthy of Jurassic Park, 
between two enormous Snapping Turtles. I'll post the video of the fight on 
youtube -- I have to find the appropriate sound track for it first! 


 

This is the album of pictures from yesterday:


https://picasaweb.google.com/102611087159208870022/GreatBrookFarmStateParkCarlisleMAJuly112014?authuser=0 
 
&feat=directlink 


 

Here is a list of the odes we found with approximate numbers:

 

Ebony Jewelwing (Calopteryx maculata) 4

Spreadwing (Lestes sp) 4

Variable Dancer (Argia fumipennis) 3

Azure Bluet (Enallagma aspersum) 1

Skimming Bluet (Enallagma geminatum) 3

Orange Bluet (Enallagma signatum) 30+

Fragile Forktail (Ischnura posita) 1

Eastern Forktail (Ischnura verticalis) 6

Darner (Aeschna sp) 1 (over corn field)

Common Green Darner (Anax junius) 2

Unicorn Clubtail (Arigomphus villosipes) 6

Lancet Clubtail (Gomphus exilis) 2

Emerald (Somatochlora or Corculia sp) 1 (extremely narrow-waisted, flew high)

Eastern Pondhawk (Erythemis simplicicollis) 15+

Spangled Skimmer (Libellula cyanea) 10

Slaty Skimmer (Libelulla incesta) 20+

Widow Skimmer (Libellula luctuosa) 8

Twelve-spotted Skimmer (Libellula pulchella) 4

Painted Skimmer (Libellula semifasciata) 2

Blue Dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis) 20+

Eastern Amberwing (Perithemis tenera) 2

Common Whitetail (Plathemis lydia) 15

Meadowhawk (Sympetrum sp) 3

 

 

 

-- 
Soheil Zendeh
42 Baker Avenue
Lexington, MA 02421

781-863-2392 home
617-763-5637 cell
Subject: Re: Double-striped Bluets
From: "'John and Sue Gregoire' khmo AT empacc.net [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 09:58:53 -0400
Steve et al,

From what I have seen over the past few years, Double-striped tend to have 
local 

stabilized populations. Each year I see them in certain ponds, but not others
nearby. I heard a few years ago that they are spreading, but haven't really 
seen 

that.

Anybody else have observations to share?

Sue
-- 
John and Sue Gregoire
Field Ornithologists
Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
5373 Fitzgerald Road
Burdett,NY 14818-9626
 Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
"Conserve and Create Habitat"

On Sun, July 13, 2014 20:34, 'Steve Walter' swalter15 AT verizon.net [NEodes] 
wrote: 

> I'm going to give a little pub to a species that doesn't get much here. This
> is Northeast Odes, and the northeast isn't the stronghold of the
> Double-striped Bluet (Enallagma basidens). I didn't find a new site, but
> went to a site that I was told of by Ken Soltesz years ago - Lasdon Park in
> Westchester County, NY. My recollection is that I had no trouble finding
> them when I first tried. I figured it would be easy to find them any time I
> needed to. It wasn't quite that way during the atlas period. Maybe it was
> just too late in the season when I was remembering to look. But even after
> that, I needed to upgrade my picture collection to SLR quality. I last
> photographed the species in 2004 (in Texas), when I was using a little point
> and shoot. Still, a couple of more failed efforts earlier in this decade.
>
>
>
> Concerns that they no longer occurred at Lasdon Park were alleviated
> Saturday. Finally, I found some - 4 pairs on the pond. Not sure if that
> means that they're elsewhere when not mating. For the most part, my
> observations were of pairs in tandem. A couple of males did eventually
> separate, so I got individual photos. One interesting event was a female
> Slender Bluet (Enallagma traviatum) seemingly attempting to latch on to a
> Double-striped pair. That wasn't going to amount to much, so she proceeded
> to just oviposit nearby. I've posted pictures at my web site
> http://www.stevewalternature.com/ (click the dragonfly tab).
>
>
>
> I can't say that I became an expert on Double-striped Bluet from this one
> outing, but I will proclaim it the anti-aspersum (Azure Bluet). Whereas
> aspersum prefers fishless ponds, I believe that in looking for basidens I
> may have set a new record for most Largemouth Bass seen while looking for
> odes.
>
>
>
> Steve Walter
>
> Bayside, NY
>
>




------------------------------------
Posted by: "John and Sue Gregoire" 
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

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Subject: FW: A little bit of odonate chasing this week-end
From: "Meena Madhav Haribal mmh3 AT cornell.edu [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 10:19:12 +0000
I spent some time at Wildlife ponds of Potomac Campground in the Finger Lakes 
National Forest. My highlights were one of each Comet Darner (Anax longipes) 
and Carolina Saddlebags (Tramea Carolina). 


Then there were thousands I would say of Marsh Bluets on the ponds, in all 
stages. Some were freshly emerging and some were mated and laying eggs others 
were trying for an opportunity to mate. I watched many males and their feeding 
behaviors away from the water. They would fly to a leaf underside, some times 
making contact with the leaves other times just passing. I checked the leaves 
for underside to see if I could see any insects, but I did not see, but they 
came up with tiny insects which I could not identify. Insects were barely 
visible in their mouths. Next time I will take a magnifying lens to see what 
they could be feeding on. Interestingly, I came across two males of dark form, 
which I photographed extensively, but the wind was not co-operative. Every time 
I shot the branch moved, but finally I did manage to get some decent pictures. 


Other than that there was a Aurora Damselfly, a Stream Bluet, and several Swamp 
Spreadwings, and many Slender Spreadwings both females and males often chasing 
Marsh Bluets. Once I watched a Marsh Bluet chase a Slender Spreadwing male. 
Then there was usual assortment of skimmers -Widow, Twelve Spotted, and Common 
Whitetails chasing each others of their own species or other species. 




In the morning, I was at a gas station at the junction of Rt 366 and Rt 13, 
where I watched two Spot-winged Gliders hunting insects while filling the gas, 
spots were clearly visible even without the binoculars and often they snapped 
something, I do not know what. But I am curious, as often I see them at the gas 
stations. So is it possible that they are eating on the insects that get 
attracted by petrol or hydrocarbon smell? 




At home in my yard, there were two female Powdered Dancers and a Black 
Saddlebags was patrolling the sky. There was another skimmer type odonate which 
I had just glimpses as it took off my yard and flew behind a large tree. 




And Oh there were lots of Green Darners (A. junius) too at the Wildlife pond 
for those people who are discussing scarcity of those insects in some 
locations. 


Cheers

Meena

Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
42.429007,-76.47111
http://haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/

Subject: Re: Odes at Great Brook Farm State Park, Carlisle MA, 2014.07.11
From: "Jason Forbes jason AT brewsterslinnet.com [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2014 22:10:34 -0400
I've finally had a chance to double-check my photos and can confirm/add a 
couple things of interest. 

Lestes sp included Elegant (L. inaequalis) and Common (Northern)/Slender (L. 
disjunctus/L. rectangularis) at least. 

Turquoise Bluet (E. divagans) - tandem pair on the pond 
(https://flic.kr/p/oj1yjQ) 

darner over the cornfield - I actually suspect Swamp (Epiaeschna heros) and not 
Aeshna but it wasn't very cooperative 

Emerald sp - photos show it to be Mocha (S. linearis): https://flic.kr/p/o2HobY
Meadowhawks included both Cherry-faced/Ruby types (S. internum/S. rubicundulum) 
and Autumn (S. vicinum). 


Also, I was pleasantly surprised today (7/13) by a Brush-tipped Emerald (S. 
walshii) at the Beaver Brook ponds in Belmont, MA. It was flying close enough 
get an identifiable photo with the 28-135mm kit lens: https://flic.kr/p/ojcKBD. 


Jason


On Jul 12, 2014, at 1:12 PM, Soheil Zendeh sohzendeh AT gmail.com [NEodes] 
 wrote: 

> 
> Here is a list of the odes we found with approximate numbers:
> 
> Ebony Jewelwing (Calopteryx maculata) 4
> Spreadwing (Lestes sp) 4
> Variable Dancer (Argia fumipennis) 3
> Azure Bluet (Enallagma aspersum) 1
> Skimming Bluet (Enallagma geminatum) 3
> Orange Bluet (Enallagma signatum) 30+
> Fragile Forktail (Ischnura posita) 1
> Eastern Forktail (Ischnura verticalis) 6
> Darner (Aeschna sp) 1 (over corn field)
> Common Green Darner (Anax junius) 2
> Unicorn Clubtail (Arigomphus villosipes) 6
> Lancet Clubtail (Gomphus exilis) 2
> Emerald (Somatochlora or Corculia sp) 1 (extremely narrow-waisted, flew high)
> Eastern Pondhawk (Erythemis simplicicollis) 15+
> Spangled Skimmer (Libellula cyanea) 10
> Slaty Skimmer (Libelulla incesta) 20+
> Widow Skimmer (Libellula luctuosa) 8
> Twelve-spotted Skimmer (Libellula pulchella) 4
> Painted Skimmer (Libellula semifasciata) 2
> Blue Dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis) 20+
> Eastern Amberwing (Perithemis tenera) 2
> Common Whitetail (Plathemis lydia) 15
> Meadowhawk (Sympetrum sp) 3
> 

--
Jason Forbes
Waltham, MA
jason AT brewsterslinnet.com
www.brewsterslinnet.com





------------------------------------
Posted by: Jason Forbes 
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Subject: Double-striped Bluets
From: "'Steve Walter' swalter15 AT verizon.net [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2014 20:34:20 -0400
I'm going to give a little pub to a species that doesn't get much here. This
is Northeast Odes, and the northeast isn't the stronghold of the
Double-striped Bluet (Enallagma basidens). I didn't find a new site, but
went to a site that I was told of by Ken Soltesz years ago - Lasdon Park in
Westchester County, NY. My recollection is that I had no trouble finding
them when I first tried. I figured it would be easy to find them any time I
needed to. It wasn't quite that way during the atlas period. Maybe it was
just too late in the season when I was remembering to look. But even after
that, I needed to upgrade my picture collection to SLR quality. I last
photographed the species in 2004 (in Texas), when I was using a little point
and shoot. Still, a couple of more failed efforts earlier in this decade.

 

Concerns that they no longer occurred at Lasdon Park were alleviated
Saturday. Finally, I found some - 4 pairs on the pond. Not sure if that
means that they're elsewhere when not mating. For the most part, my
observations were of pairs in tandem. A couple of males did eventually
separate, so I got individual photos. One interesting event was a female
Slender Bluet (Enallagma traviatum) seemingly attempting to latch on to a
Double-striped pair. That wasn't going to amount to much, so she proceeded
to just oviposit nearby. I've posted pictures at my web site
http://www.stevewalternature.com/ (click the dragonfly tab).

 

I can't say that I became an expert on Double-striped Bluet from this one
outing, but I will proclaim it the anti-aspersum (Azure Bluet). Whereas
aspersum prefers fishless ponds, I believe that in looking for basidens I
may have set a new record for most Largemouth Bass seen while looking for
odes. 

 

Steve Walter

Bayside, NY
Subject: FW: A little bit of odonate chasing this week-end
From: "Meena Madhav Haribal mmh3 AT cornell.edu [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2014 23:37:25 +0000
I spent some time at Wildlife ponds of Potomac Campground in the Finger Lakes 
National Forest. My highlights were one of each Comet Darner (Anax longipes) 
and Carolina Saddlebags (Tramea Carolina). 


Then there were thousands I would say of Marsh Bluets on the ponds, in all 
stages. Some were freshly emerging and some were mated and laying eggs others 
were trying for an opportunity to mate. I watched many males and their feeding 
behaviors away from the water. They would fly to a leaf underside, some times 
making contact with the leaves other times just passing. I checked the leaves 
for underside to see if I could see any insects, but I did not see, but they 
came up with tiny insects which I could not identify. Insects were barely 
visible in their mouths. Next time I will take a magnifying lens to see what 
they could be feeding on. Interestingly, I came across two males of dark form, 
which I photographed extensively, but the wind was not co-operative. Every time 
I shot the branch moved, but finally I did manage to get some decent pictures. 
This is the first time I have seen the dark forms of males in our region. 




Other than that there was a Aurora Damselfly, a Stream Bluet, and several Swamp 
Spreadwings, and many Slender Spreadwings both females and males often chasing 
Marsh Bluets. Once I watched a Marsh Bluet chase a Slender Spreadwing male. 
Then there was usual assortment of skimmers -Widow, Twelve Spotted, and Common 
Whitetails chasing each others of their own species or other species. 




In the morning, I was at a gas station at the junction of Rt 366 and Rt 13, 
where I watched two Spot-winged Gliders hunting insects while filling the gas, 
spots were clearly visible even without the binoculars and often they snapped 
something, I do not know what. But I am curious, as often I see them at the gas 
stations. So is it possible that they are eating on the insects that get 
attracted by petrol or hydrocarbon smell? 




At home in my yard, there were two female Powdered Dancers and a Black 
Saddlebags was patrolling the sky. There was another skimmer type odonate which 
I had just glimpses as it took off my yard and flew behind a large tree. 




And Oh there were lots of Green Darners (A. junius) too at the Wildlife pond 
for those people who are discussing scarcity of those insects in some 
locations. 


Cheers

Meena

Meena Haribal
Ithaca NY 14850
42.429007,-76.47111
http://haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/




Subject: Worcester and Norfolk counties, MA - 7/12/14
From: "Nicholas Block nlb.birder AT gmail.com [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2014 17:24:55 -0400
Hello all,

I had an excellent day afield yesterday, visiting sites in Worcester and
Norfolk counties, MA. I focused on the bog in Ashburnham, Worcester County,
looking specifically for emeralds, Sphagnum Sprite, and Bog Copper. I was
excited to find many coppers, 6 corduliid species, and the sprite.
Afterward, I briefly visited the Westborough end of the Crane Swamp Trail
(Worcester) and the Mill River in Norfolk, searching for a couple life
butterflies. For the day, I found 31 odonate species and 16 butterfly
species. Below are full ode and butterfly lists from the three sites (my
lifers are in all caps), and some photos from the day can be seen here:
http://goo.gl/qyFG9R

*Ashburnham, Worcester County, MA*

Aurora Damsel (Chromagrion conditum) - 2 in wheel
Stream Bluet (Enallagma exsulans) - 1 male
Fragile Forktail (Ischnura posita) - 9
SPHAGNUM SPRITE (Nehalennia gracilis) - 3 females
PETITE EMERALD (Dorocordulia lepida) - 6
Racket-tailed Emerald (Dorocordulia libera) - 10+
Common Baskettail (Epitheca cynosura) - 2 males
Clamp-tipped Emerald (Somatochlora tenebrosa) - 1 male
BRUSH-TIPPED EMERALD (Somatochlora walshii) - 1 male
Williamson's Emerald (Somatochlora williamsoni) - 2
Calico Pennant (Celithemis elisa) - 1
Chalk-fronted Corporal (Ladona julia) - 4 females
Frosted Whiteface (Leucorrhinia frigida) - 6
Spangled Skimmer (Libellula cyanea) - 2
Slaty Skimmer (Libellula incesta) - 2
Twelve-spotted Skimmer (Libellula pulchella) - 2
Common Whitetail (Plathemis lydia) - 8

Eastern/Canadian Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio sp.) - 1 apparent intergrade
BOG COPPER (Lycaena epixanthe) - 30+
Summer Azure (Celastrina neglecta) - 10
Appalachian Brown (Satyrodes appalachia) - 5
Dun Skipper (Euphyes vestris) - 1


*Crane Swamp Trail, Westborough, Worcester County, MA*

Common Green Darner (Anax junius) - 4
Eastern Pondhawk (Erythemis simplicicollis) - 4
Slaty Skimmer (Libellula incesta) - 10
Twelve-spotted Skimmer (Libellula pulchella) - 6
Blue Dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis) - 25
Common Whitetail (Plathemis lydia) - 1 male
Ruby Meadowhawk (Sympetrum rubicundulum) - 5 males
Autumn Meadowhawk (Sympetrum vicinum) - 1

Striped Hairstreak (Satyrium liparops) - 1
Summer Azure (Celastrina neglecta) - 1
Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta) - 1
Appalachian/Eyed Brown (Satyrodes sp.) - 3
Least Skipper (Ancyloxypha numitor) - 5
MULBERRY WING (Poanes massasoit) - 7
Dun Skipper (Euphyes vestris) - 2


*Miller Street field and Mill River, Norfolk, Norfolk County, MA*

Ebony Jewelwing (Calopteryx maculata) - 4
Variable Dancer (Argia fumipennis) - 7
Skimming Bluet (Enallagma geminatum) - 5
Orange Bluet (Enallagma signatum) - 5
Lancet Clubtail (Gomphus exilis) - 2
Calico Pennant (Celithemis elisa) - 25+
Halloween Pennant (Celithemis eponina) - 2
Eastern Pondhawk (Erythemis simplicicollis) - 4
Slaty Skimmer (Libellula incesta) - 4
Widow Skimmer (Libellula luctuosa) - 8
Twelve-spotted Skimmer (Libellula pulchella) - 2
Blue Dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis) - 20+
Common Whitetail (Plathemis lydia) - 2
Ruby/Cherry-faced Meadowhawk (Sympetrum sp.) - 3
Band-winged Meadowhawk (Sympetrum semicinctum) - 4
Mocha Emerald (Somatochlora linearis) - 1 male

Clouded Sulphur (Colias philodice) - 8
Gray Hairstreak (Strymon melinus) - 2
Eastern Tailed-Blue (Cupido comyntas) - 2
Viceroy (Limenitis archippus) - 1
Pearl Crescent (Phyciodes tharos) - 5
Baltimore Checkerspot (Euphydryas phaeton) - 3
Wild Indigo Duskywing (Erynnis baptisiae) - 1

Cheers,
Nick Block
Easton, Bristol County, MA
Subject: Re: Delaware Sightings and comments on low numbers of some species
From: "'John and Sue Gregoire' khmo AT empacc.net [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2014 09:40:22 -0400
Josh, We've been following Anax emergence for 11 years now (Central Finger 
Lakes,NY) 

and this is turning into the third most productive. Plenty of junius (green) at
local ponds (although we only saw a few at NEDSA) and we've had longipes 
(comet) 

flying in numbers and at several ponds for well over a month. Their emergence 
is 

just beginning and seems to be running close to norm for our study pond.

Strangely, Tramea carolina (Carolina saddlebags) showed up here in the central
Finger Lakes along with the first longipes migrants. This is the second or 
third 

spring where we have observed this "invasion of the reds".

Perhaps like the Baltimore Oriole, now uncommon in Baltimore and abundant here, 
bugs 

are also slowly moving northward.

Best,
John
-- 
John and Sue Gregoire
Field Ornithologists
Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
5373 Fitzgerald Road
Burdett,NY 14818-9626
 Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
"Conserve and Create Habitat"

On Sun, July 13, 2014 09:16, Joshua Rose opihi AT mindspring.com [NEodes] wrote:
> On Jul 13, 2014, at 8:10 AM, 'Michael Moore' mcmoore32 AT gmail.com [NEodes]
>  wrote:
>>
>> To me this season is about the absence or low number of some species. 
Migrant 

>> species in particular seem to be absent.
>>
>> The Sedge Meadow is usually a stronghold for both species of Anax darners 
and 

>> saddlebags. I saw only three Common Green Darners (Anax junius) and no Comet 

>> Darner (A. longipes) there. Usually there would be 30 junius and 2-3 
longipes. 

>
> There have been multiple comments on the SE-Odonata e-mail listserv similarly 
noting 

> the absence or scarcity of Anax junius this year.
>
> Im not sure that Ive seen a single one yet, though I havent been looking 
hard for 

> that species in particular, and have briefly glimpsed a couple of darners 
that were 

> probably that species. I heard a few people at the NE DSA say that they had 
seen 

> one or two but missed them myself.
>
> Maybe we should start calling them just Green Darner, because they dont 
seem 

> particularly common at the moment.
>
> Is anyone out there looking at larvae in places that usually have Anax junius 
and 

> noticed any differences or trends?
>
> JSR
>
>
> Joshua S. Rose, Ph.D.
> Amherst, MA
> http://bugguide.net/user/view/2399
> http://www.facebook.com/opihi
>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> ------------------------------------
>
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> Yahoo Groups Links
>
>
>
>
>




------------------------------------
Posted by: "John and Sue Gregoire" 
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Subject: Re: Delaware Sightings and comments on low numbers of some species
From: "Joshua Rose opihi AT mindspring.com [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2014 09:16:48 -0400
On Jul 13, 2014, at 8:10 AM, 'Michael Moore' mcmoore32 AT gmail.com [NEodes] 
 wrote: 

>   
> To me this season is about the absence or low number of some species. Migrant 
species in particular seem to be absent. 

>  
> The Sedge Meadow is usually a stronghold for both species of Anax darners and 
saddlebags. I saw only three Common Green Darners (Anax junius) and no Comet 
Darner (A. longipes) there. Usually there would be 30 junius and 2-3 longipes. 


There have been multiple comments on the SE-Odonata e-mail listserv similarly 
noting the absence or scarcity of Anax junius this year. 


Im not sure that Ive seen a single one yet, though I havent been looking 
hard for that species in particular, and have briefly glimpsed a couple of 
darners that were probably that species. I heard a few people at the NE DSA 
say that they had seen one or two but missed them myself. 


Maybe we should start calling them just Green Darner, because they dont seem 
particularly common at the moment. 


Is anyone out there looking at larvae in places that usually have Anax junius 
and noticed any differences or trends? 


JSR


Joshua S. Rose, Ph.D.
Amherst, MA
http://bugguide.net/user/view/2399
http://www.facebook.com/opihi





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Subject: Delaware Sightings and comments on low numbers of some species
From: "'Michael Moore' mcmoore32 AT gmail.com [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2014 08:10:37 -0400
Greetings

 

Yesterday I spent a couple of hours visiting the Sedge Meadow and then the
"Buttonbush Bay", a vernal pool in Lum's Pond State Park, both near my house
in Delaware.

 

To me this season is about the absence or low number of some species.
Migrant species in particular seem to be absent.

 

The Sedge Meadow is usually a stronghold for both species of Anax darners
and saddlebags.  I saw only three Common Green Darners (Anax junius) and no
Comet Darner (A. longipes) there.  Usually there would be 30 junius and 2-3
longipes.    Although Carolina Saddlebags (Tramea carolina) were in normal
numbers, there were no Black Saddlebags (T. lacerata) at the pond, just one
over the entrance road.  This remarkable.  Normally there would be 50 here.
Gliders (Pantela sp.) also seem to be nearly absent from Delaware.  This
year I have only seen one of each species.  Finally, the Sedge Meadow is
usually a good spot for Twelve-spotted Skimmers (Libellula pulchella) but
there were none.  

 

The Amber-winged Spreadwings (Lestes eurinus) discovered earlier in the year
at the Sedge Meadow no longer appear to be flying.  It will interesting to
see next year if this species becomes established at this location or was
just a one year occurrence.  

 

Although not in the category of migrant species, Forktails (Ischnura sp)
continue to be nearly absent at most locations in Delaware.  Normally one of
the commonest genera, I only see them this year a couple at a time.  

 

On the more positive note, Bar-winged Skimmers (L. axilena) continue to have
a good year, after being nearly absent for the last couple of years.  The
bay in Lum's Pond also continues to have good numbers of spreadwings.  It
was especially nice to see several Sweetflag Spreadwings (Lestes
forcipatus), a species I do not see every year.  There were good numbers of
Spotted Spreadwings (L. congener) but most were tenerals.  In fact, about
90% of the spreadwings I saw were tenerals.  That suggests to me that
survival of adults is pretty poor at this pond, likely due to predation.  

 

I was surprised that the only Meadowhawk present at the Lum's Pond bay was
one of the less common, Cherry-faced/Jane's/Ruby types rather than the more
expected Blue-faced (Sympetrum ambiguum) or Autumn (S. vicinum).
Unfortunately, it flew immediately into the trees before I could net it.  

 

This is also a good year for striped emeralds (Somatochlora sp.) and I have
seen at least one on nearly every outing.  On this trip there was a female
Mocha Emerald (S. linearis) flying a beat near parking area 4 at Lum's Pond.
I got several good flight photos but one inept swing of the net and I never
saw it again!

 

I found 25 species on the day, 17 at each location.   Lists below.

 

Mike Moore

Newark, DE

  Mcmoore32 AT gmail.com

 

Websites:

 
Delmarva Dragonflies and Damselflies
(https://sites.google.com/a/udel.edu/deodes/)

  Voices of Delaware Birds
(https://sites.google.com/site/delawarebirdsongs/)

  Birds of the
Gilbert Water Ranch
(https://sites.google.com/site/birdsofthegilbertwaterranch/)

  AZFO Rare Bird
Photos (http://www.azfo.org/gallery/1main/photos_recent.html)

 

 

 

Species: 25

 

NAME                     SCIENTIFIC NAME            MAX CNT  

 

DELAWARE, LUM'S POND Buttonbush Bay 

Spotted Spreadwing       Lestes  congener           20       

Sweetflag Spreadwing     Lestes  forcipatus         5        

Slender Spreadwing       Lestes  rectangularis      8        

Blue-fronted Dancer      Argia apicalis             25       

Azure Bluet              Enallagma aspersum         4        

Fragile Forktail         Ischnura posita            4        

Common Green Darner      Anax  junius               2        

Mocha Emerald            Somatochlora linearis      1        

Eastern Pondhawk         Erythemis simplicicollis   4        

Bar-winged Skimmer       Libellula axilena          4        

Slaty Skimmer            Libellula incesta          2        

Painted Skimmer          Libellula semifasciata     5        

Great Blue Skimmer       Libellula vibrans          2        

Blue Dasher              Pachydiplax longipennis    30       

Common Whitetail         Plathemis lydia            2        

Cherry-faced Meadowhawk type   Sympetrum internum type         1        

Carolina Saddlebags      Tramea carolina            3        

 

DELAWARE, SUMMIT BRIDGE PONDS SEDGE MEADOW

Slender Spreadwing       Lestes  rectangularis      2        

Azure Bluet              Enallagma aspersum         6        

Familiar Bluet           Enallagma civile           1        

Citrine Forktail         Ischnura hastata           40       

Fragile Forktail         Ischnura posita            2        

Eastern Forktail         Ischnura verticalis        4        

Common Green Darner      Anax  junius               3        

Calico Pennant           Celithemis elisa           1        

Halloween Pennant        Celithemis eponina         1        

Eastern Pondhawk         Erythemis simplicicollis   7        

Spangled Skimmer         Libellula cyanea           4        

Slaty Skimmer            Libellula incesta          3        

Blue Dasher              Pachydiplax longipennis    400      

Common Whitetail         Plathemis lydia            2        

Autumn Meadowhawk        Sympetrum vicinum          10       

Carolina Saddlebags      Tramea carolina            35       

Black Saddlebags         Tramea lacerata            1        

 

Birder's Diary - www.BirdersDiary.com - 7/13/2014
Subject: Odes at Great Brook Farm State Park, Carlisle MA, 2014.07.11
From: "Soheil Zendeh sohzendeh AT gmail.com [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 12 Jul 2014 13:12:27 -0400
Folks,

On Friday, July 11, Jason Forbes, Alan Ankers and I explored Great Brook
Farm SP in Carlisle MA from 1:30 to about 4:30. There are a variety of
habitats here, from still ponds with lilypads to rushing streams,woods with
big trees and clearings, and a corn field. We did not find any rare odes,
but the number and variety were fun to see. I was particularly pleased to
see many Orange Bluets, a single Azure Bluet and a half a dozen Unicorn
Clubtails. It was late enough in the day so that streams were in deep
shadow and we did not find any stream specialists other than Ebony
Jewelwings.

In one of the ponds we watched a titanic fight, worthy of Jurassic Park,
between two enormous Snapping Turtles. I'll post the video of the fight on
youtube -- I have to find the appropriate sound track for it first!

This is the album of pictures from yesterday:

https://picasaweb.google.com/102611087159208870022/GreatBrookFarmStateParkCarlisleMAJuly112014?authuser=0&feat=directlink 


Here is a list of the odes we found with approximate numbers:

Ebony Jewelwing (Calopteryx maculata) 4
*Spreadwing (Lestes sp) 4*
*Variable Dancer (Argia fumipennis) 3*
Azure Bluet (Enallagma aspersum) 1
Skimming Bluet (Enallagma geminatum) 3
Orange Bluet (Enallagma signatum) 30+
Fragile Forktail (Ischnura posita) 1
Eastern Forktail (Ischnura verticalis) 6
Darner (Aeschna sp) 1 (over corn field)
Common Green Darner (Anax junius) 2
Unicorn Clubtail (Arigomphus villosipes) 6
Lancet Clubtail (Gomphus exilis) 2
Emerald (Somatochlora or Corculia sp) 1 (extremely narrow-waisted, flew
high)
Eastern Pondhawk (Erythemis simplicicollis) 15+
Spangled Skimmer (Libellula cyanea) 10
Slaty Skimmer (Libelulla incesta) 20+
Widow Skimmer (Libellula luctuosa) 8
Twelve-spotted Skimmer (Libellula pulchella) 4
Painted Skimmer (Libellula semifasciata) 2
Blue Dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis) 20+
Eastern Amberwing (Perithemis tenera) 2
Common Whitetail (Plathemis lydia) 15
Meadowhawk (Sympetrum sp) 3



-- 





*Soheil Zendeh42 Baker AvenueLexington, MA 02421 781-863-2392
<781-863-2392> home617-763-5637 <617-763-5637> cell*
Subject: A good day
From: "'John and Sue Gregoire' khmo AT empacc.net [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 10 Jul 2014 21:18:48 -0400
Took off on foot today to visit some of the habitat around my home. Hoofed it 
around 

fields, streams, ditches, woodland ponds and man-made ponds and came up with a
respectable 29 species. Most were found in ponds of assorted age and depth, 
some in 

the ditches and woods as indicated. Farm fields were unproductive, probably due 
to 

the lack of insects, but fallow fields were nurseries for a lot of assorted
tenerals.

End of June, early July is the time of highest diversity here. Right now 
Aeshnas 

have yet to emerge and the early species are gone, so this is mid-season for 
us. 


This is in central NY, the Finger Lakes region, in the hills between Seneca and
Cayuga Lakes-10 July 2014.

14 Zygoptera
Lestes dryas-Emerald Spreadwing-woods
Lestes rectangularis-Slender Spreadwing woods, etc.
Lestes vigilax-Swamp Spreadwing- woods
Amphiagrion saucium Eastern Red Damsel in the ditch
Enallagma aspersum-Azure Bluet-woods and ponds
E. antennatum-Rainbow Bluet
E. basidens-Double-striped Bluet
E. civile-Familiar Bluet
E. ebrium-Marsh Bluet
E. geminatum-Skimming Bluet
E. signatum-Orange Bluet
Ischnura posita-Fragile Forktail-various sites
I. verticalis-Eastern Forktail-"
Nehalennia irene-Sedge Sprite-woods

15 Anisoptera
Anax junius-Common Green Darner
A. longipes-Comet Darner
Gomphus exilis-Lancet Clubtail
Cordulegaster obliqua-Arrowhead Spiketail-stream
Epitheca princeps-Prince Baskettail
Celithemis elisa-Calico Pennant
Erythemis simplicicollis-Eastern Pondhawk
Pacydiplax longipennis-Blue Dasher
Perithemis tenera-Eastern Amberwing
Libellula luctuosa-Widow Skimmer
L. lydia-Common Whitetail
L. pulchella-12 Spotted Skimmer
Sympetrum internum-Cherry-faced Meadowhawk
Tramea carolina-Carolina Saddlebags
T. lacerata-Black Saddlebags

Off to the local bog tomorrow.

Sue





-- 
John and Sue Gregoire
Field Ornithologists
Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
5373 Fitzgerald Road
Burdett,NY 14818-9626
 Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
"Conserve and Create Habitat"





------------------------------------
Posted by: "John and Sue Gregoire" 
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Subject: Re: Annual "Dragonfly Big Day" results from Richmond County, NY
From: "'John and Sue Gregoire' khmo AT empacc.net [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 10 Jul 2014 09:08:20 -0400
Great list Dave. All those Celithemis! NY is such a big state, we're 200 miles
inland from you and don't stand (much of) a chance of seeing other than elisa 
and 

eponina. Some nice Libellulids on your list too. Never been to Staten Island 
but 

hear there is some nice habitat. Thanks to the instability of the land, I 
assume? 

Also assuming Sandy did not have a terrible effect on the Odonate population.

Sue
-- 
John and Sue Gregoire
Field Ornithologists
Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
5373 Fitzgerald Road
Burdett,NY 14818-9626
 Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
"Conserve and Create Habitat"

On Wed, July 9, 2014 21:19, david.eib AT acs-inc.com [NEodes] wrote:
>
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style="font-size:10pt;">Greetings all.  On Saturday, July 5th > we conducted our annual “Dragonfly Big Day” across the wetlands and > woodlands of Staten Island, the southernmost point of NY state, and were > pleased to have some new participants join us for a highly enjoyable > day.  As always, time (and energy) limitations dictated that we bypass a > number of locations where some rarities and habitat specialists have turned up > in the past, and concentrate on wetlands where the greatest diversity was > likely to occur.  The results were quite satisfying, especially given the > fact that we had an unusually slow start to the flight season on the Island > this year.

style="font-size:10pt;"> 

class="MsoNormal">Participants:  Anne > Purcell, Catherine Barron, Tom Preston, Clay Wollney, Seth Wollney, Dave Eib > (reporting)

style="font-size:10pt;"> 

class="MsoNormal">Locations surveyed:  Long > Pond State Park, Clay Pit Ponds State Park Preserve, Saw Mill Park (and > surroundings), High Rock Park, LaTourette Park (includes Old Mill Road and the > “Field of Dreams”)

style="font-size:10pt;"> 

class="MsoNormal">Species > (Anisoptera):

style="font-size:10pt;"> 

class="MsoNormal">Common Green Darner (Anax > junius)    8

class="MsoNormal">Comet Darner (Anax > longipes)    1

class="MsoNormal">Swamp Darner (Epiaeschna > heros)    5

class="MsoNormal">Unicorn Clubtail > (Arigomphus villosipes)    1

class="MsoNormal">Prince Baskettail (Epitheca > princeps)    2

class="MsoNormal">Common Whitetail (Plathemis > lydia)    17

class="MsoNormal">Eastern Pondhawk (Erythemis > simplicicolis)    8

class="MsoNormal">Great Blue Skimmer > (Libellula vibrans)    20

class="MsoNormal">Painted Skimmer (Libellula > semifasciata)    27

class="MsoNormal">Twelve-spotted Skimmer > (Libellula pulchella)    1

class="MsoNormal">Widow Skimmer (Libellula > luctuosa)    3

class="MsoNormal">Bar-winged Skimmer > (Libellula axilena)    2

class="MsoNormal">Slaty Skimmer (Libellula > incesta)    61

class="MsoNormal">Spangled Skimmer (Libellula > cyanea)    3

class="MsoNormal">Needham’s Skimmer > (Libellula needhami)    10

class="MsoNormal">Black Saddlebags (Tramea > lacerata)    15

class="MsoNormal">Carolina Saddlebags (Tramea > carolina)    11

class="MsoNormal">Spot-winged Glider (Pantala > hymenaea)    62

class="MsoNormal">Wandering Glider (Pantala > flavescens)    3

class="MsoNormal">Calico Pennant (Celithemis > elisa)    3

class="MsoNormal">Banded Pennant (Celithemis > fasciata)    3

class="MsoNormal">Double-ringed Pennant > (Celithemis verna)    1

class="MsoNormal">Halloween Pennant > (Celithemis eponina)    2

class="MsoNormal">Eastern Amberwing > (Perithemis tenera)    21

class="MsoNormal">Blue Dasher (Pachydiplax > longipennis)    551

class="MsoNormal">White-faced Meadowhawk > (Sympetrum obtrusum)    1

class="MsoNormal">Sympetrum sp. > (rubicundulum/internum type)    > 5

style="font-size:10pt;">Seaside Dragonlet (Erythrodiplax > berenice)    9

class="MsoNormal"> style="font-size:10pt;"> 

class="MsoNormal">Total species > (Anisoptera):  28     Individuals > counted:  856

style="font-size:10pt;"> 

class="MsoNormal"> style="font-size:10pt;"> 

class="MsoNormal">Species > (Zygoptera):

style="font-size:10pt;"> 

class="MsoNormal">Ebony Jewelwing (Calopteryx > maculata)    4

class="MsoNormal">Slender Spreadwing (Lestes > rectangularis)    6

class="MsoNormal">Swamp Spreadwing (Lestes > vigilax)    5

class="MsoNormal">Skimming Bluet (Enallagma > geminatum)    38

class="MsoNormal">Orange Bluet (Enallagma > signatum)    21

class="MsoNormal">Slender Bluet (Enallagma > traviatum)    6

class="MsoNormal">Azure Bluet (Enallagma > aspersum)    2

class="MsoNormal">Familiar Bluet (Enallagma > civile)   3

style="font-size:10pt;">Eastern Forktail (Ischnura > verticalis)    7

class="MsoNormal">Fragile Forktail (Ischnura > posita)    11

class="MsoNormal"> style="font-size:10pt;"> 

class="MsoNormal">Total species > (Zygoptera):  10     Individuals > counted:  103

style="font-size:10pt;">

class="MsoNormal"> 

class="MsoNormal">Ok, yes, I am all too aware of > the pitfalls of calling a Sympetrum species in the field, especially > around these parts, but as previous surveys have shown that we do indeed > have S. obtrusum here, and since the little guy had the purest > of chalk-white grins with nary a speck of red, yellow or > "dirtiness", I feel a small leap of faith is justified.

class="MsoNormal"> 

class="MsoNormal">Thanks to our hearty > participants, and hope to see you next year (and some new folks as > well)!

style="font-size:10pt;"> 

class="MsoNormal">Dave Eib

class="MsoNormal">Richmond County Odonate > Atlas

style="font-size:10pt;">daveeib AT gmail.com

style="font-size:10pt;">

style="font-size:10pt;">

> >
> > > >
> > > > > > > > > > > > > > ------------------------------------ Posted by: "John and Sue Gregoire" ------------------------------------ ------------------------------------ Yahoo Groups Links <*> To visit your group on the web, go to: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NEodes/ <*> Your email settings: Individual Email | Traditional <*> To change settings online go to: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/NEodes/join (Yahoo! ID required) <*> To change settings via email: NEodes-digest AT yahoogroups.com NEodes-fullfeatured AT yahoogroups.com <*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to: NEodes-unsubscribe AT yahoogroups.com <*> Your use of Yahoo Groups is subject to: https://info.yahoo.com/legal/us/yahoo/utos/terms/
Subject: Annual "Dragonfly Big Day" results from Richmond County, NY
From: "david.eib AT acs-inc.com [NEodes]" <NEodes@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 09 Jul 2014 18:19:24 -0700
Greetings all. On Saturday, July 5th we conducted our annual “Dragonfly Big 
Day” across the wetlands and woodlands of Staten Island, the southernmost 
point of NY state, and were pleased to have some new participants join us for a 
highly enjoyable day. As always, time (and energy) limitations dictated that we 
bypass a number of locations where some rarities and habitat specialists have 
turned up in the past, and concentrate on wetlands where the greatest diversity 
was likely to occur. The results were quite satisfying, especially given the 
fact that we had an unusually slow start to the flight season on the Island 
this year. 

  
 Participants: Anne Purcell, Catherine Barron, Tom Preston, Clay Wollney, Seth 
Wollney, Dave Eib (reporting) 

  
 Locations surveyed: Long Pond State Park, Clay Pit Ponds State Park Preserve, 
Saw Mill Park (and surroundings), High Rock Park, LaTourette Park (includes Old 
Mill Road and the “Field of Dreams”) 

  
 Species (Anisoptera):
  
 Common Green Darner (Anax junius)    8
 Comet Darner (Anax longipes)    1
 Swamp Darner (Epiaeschna heros)    5
 Unicorn Clubtail (Arigomphus villosipes)    1
 Prince Baskettail (Epitheca princeps)    2
 Common Whitetail (Plathemis lydia)    17
 Eastern Pondhawk (Erythemis simplicicolis)    8
 Great Blue Skimmer (Libellula vibrans)    20
 Painted Skimmer (Libellula semifasciata)    27
 Twelve-spotted Skimmer (Libellula pulchella)    1
 Widow Skimmer (Libellula luctuosa)    3
 Bar-winged Skimmer (Libellula axilena)    2
 Slaty Skimmer (Libellula incesta)    61
 Spangled Skimmer (Libellula cyanea)    3
 Needham’s Skimmer (Libellula needhami)    10
 Black Saddlebags (Tramea lacerata)    15
 Carolina Saddlebags (Tramea carolina)    11
 Spot-winged Glider (Pantala hymenaea)    62
 Wandering Glider (Pantala flavescens)    3
 Calico Pennant (Celithemis elisa)    3
 Banded Pennant (Celithemis fasciata)    3
 Double-ringed Pennant (Celithemis verna)    1
 Halloween Pennant (Celithemis eponina)    2
 Eastern Amberwing (Perithemis tenera)    21
 Blue Dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis)    551
 White-faced Meadowhawk (Sympetrum obtrusum)    1
 Sympetrum sp. (rubicundulum/internum type)    5
 Seaside Dragonlet (Erythrodiplax berenice)    9
  
 Total species (Anisoptera):  28     Individuals counted:  856
  
  
 Species (Zygoptera):
  
 Ebony Jewelwing (Calopteryx maculata)    4 
 Slender Spreadwing (Lestes rectangularis)    6
 Swamp Spreadwing (Lestes vigilax)    5
 Skimming Bluet (Enallagma geminatum)    38
 Orange Bluet (Enallagma signatum)    21
 Slender Bluet (Enallagma traviatum)    6
 Azure Bluet (Enallagma aspersum)    2
 Familiar Bluet (Enallagma civile)   3
 Eastern Forktail (Ischnura verticalis)    7
 Fragile Forktail (Ischnura posita)    11
  
 Total species (Zygoptera):  10     Individuals counted:  103
 

  
 Ok, yes, I am all too aware of the pitfalls of calling a Sympetrum species in 
the field, especially around these parts, but as previous surveys have shown 
that we do indeed have S. obtrusum here, and since the little guy had the 
purest of chalk-white grins with nary a speck of red, yellow or "dirtiness", I 
feel a small leap of faith is justified. 

  
 Thanks to our hearty participants, and hope to see you next year (and some new 
folks as well)! 

  
 Dave Eib
 Richmond County Odonate Atlas
 daveeib AT gmail.com
 

 

Subject: Re: Ashburnham odes
From: "Joshua Rose opihi AT mindspring.com [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 9 Jul 2014 10:36:01 -0400
On Jul 9, 2014, at 8:56 AM, Hal White  wrote:

> Josh, I used to collect Odonata in a bog in Ashburnham. If it is the same one 
you are talking about, it has a railroad bed along one side. Anyway, I remember 
getting Somatochlora walshii there. In the fall it was a great place to get 
wild cranberries. Hal 

> 
> P.S. happy Birthday!

Hi Hal,

There was indeed a railroad bed through the area. And I think I saw some 
cranberries in flower, and a ton of blueberries that were sadly not ripe yet. 


I heard off-list from Tom Murray that someone has netted S. forcipata and S. 
incurvata at this site. Throw in your S. walshii, makes me glad that my 
intuition about the place being good Somatochlora habitat was accurate, even if 
my net was a bit too slow and clumsy to confirm it. All the more reason to go 
back again! Some of us at the recent NE DSA were talking about possible joint 
expeditions of MA and VT odonatists later this summer, maybe we can include 
this spot on the itinerary. 


Thanks for the birthday wishes!

JSR


Joshua S. Rose, Ph.D.
Amherst, MA
http://bugguide.net/user/view/2399
http://www.facebook.com/opihi




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Subject: Re: Ashburnham odes
From: "Hal White halwhite AT udel.edu [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 09 Jul 2014 08:56:11 -0400
Josh, I used to collect Odonata in a bog in Ashburnham. If it is the 
same one you are talking about, it has a railroad bed along one side. 
Anyway, I remember getting /Somatochlora walshii/ there. In the fall it 
was a great place to get wild cranberries. Hal

P.S. happy Birthday!

On 7/8/2014 11:46 PM, Joshua Rose opihi AT mindspring.com [NEodes] wrote:
> Howdy folks,
>
> Was awarded with a few free hours for my 45th birthday, river/creek/stream 
prospects seemed dim after last nights torrential downpour, so elected to 
spend them in a bog in Ashburnham. Tom Murray had shown me this spot back in 
May, with butterflies in mind, but it looked like great Somatochlora habitat, 
so I wanted to check it out when the right time of year arrived. 

>
> I started seeing green-eyed beauties almost as soon as I entered the bog 
proper. However, the only ones I could net, or see clearly enough to ID, were 
Dorocordulia libera, Racket-tailed Emeralds. Im fairly certain that I saw at 
least two Somatochlora species on the wing (one much bigger and straighter than 
the other), but could not net either. Also some sort of small-ish green-marked 
darner which similarly eluded species confirmation. Need to bring some company 
next time, extra pairs of eyes and extra nets, maybe a group of us could corral 
some Somatochloras where I couldnt do it on my own. 

>
> A list:
>
> Sphagnum Sprite (Nehelennia gracilis) 3+, solo male and tandem pair
> Bluet (Enallagma sp.) 1 male, civile/ebrium/etc.-type coloration, could not 
get close enough to examine appendages 

> no forktails nor spreadwings of any sort, though I stayed on the road and 
didnt wade out onto the Sphagnum mat, as I was alone, nobody knew where I was, 
and my cell phone signal was vanishingly weak. Also no clubtails of any 
species, and surprisingly not one pondhawk nor Blue Dasher. 

>
> Darner sp. - smelled like A. umbrosa to me, between habitat, behavior, flight 
style, etc. Or possibly a Gomphaeshna but a tad late 

> Racket-tailed Emerald (Dorocordulia libera) a pair in the wheel plus at least 
3-4 males patrolling 

> Somatochlora sp. (I think)
> Skimmer (Libellula sp.) one lone female, I think a Slaty (L. incesta) but did 
not dwell on it for too long. 

> 12-spotted Skimmer (L. pulchella) 3+ males patrolling over the pools of water 
that interrupted the road in several places 

> Common Whitetail (Plathemis lydia) a dozen or more on the same pools as L. 
pulchella; apparently patrolling much smaller territories 

> White Corporal (Ladona exusta) 2 males which I think were this species; 
managed poor photos of one. Late? 

>
> Also had a very different-smelling darner (more A. junius-ish) over the 
parking lot of the Route 202 Grill in Athol as I waited for some fried seafood. 
Another 12-spot flew by here too, and I found a single disembodied wing of a 
Halloween Pennant (Celithemis eponina) blowing around the asphalt. And, just 
for the same of completeness, had a nice male Widow Skimmer (L. luctuosa) 
patrolling my front yard in Amherst as I was setting out. 

>
> Cheers,
>
> Josh
>
>
> Joshua S. Rose, Ph.D.
> Amherst, MA
> http://bugguide.net/user/view/2399
> http://www.facebook.com/opihi
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------
>
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>
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>
> Yahoo Groups Links
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>
>
Subject: Ashburnham odes
From: "Joshua Rose opihi AT mindspring.com [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 8 Jul 2014 23:46:27 -0400
Howdy folks,

Was awarded with a few free hours for my 45th birthday, river/creek/stream 
prospects seemed dim after last nights torrential downpour, so elected to 
spend them in a bog in Ashburnham. Tom Murray had shown me this spot back in 
May, with butterflies in mind, but it looked like great Somatochlora habitat, 
so I wanted to check it out when the right time of year arrived. 


I started seeing green-eyed beauties almost as soon as I entered the bog 
proper. However, the only ones I could net, or see clearly enough to ID, were 
Dorocordulia libera, Racket-tailed Emeralds. Im fairly certain that I saw at 
least two Somatochlora species on the wing (one much bigger and straighter than 
the other), but could not net either. Also some sort of small-ish green-marked 
darner which similarly eluded species confirmation. Need to bring some company 
next time, extra pairs of eyes and extra nets, maybe a group of us could corral 
some Somatochloras where I couldnt do it on my own. 


A list: 

Sphagnum Sprite (Nehelennia gracilis) 3+, solo male and tandem pair
Bluet (Enallagma sp.) 1 male, civile/ebrium/etc.-type coloration, could not get 
close enough to examine appendages 

no forktails nor spreadwings of any sort, though I stayed on the road and 
didnt wade out onto the Sphagnum mat, as I was alone, nobody knew where I was, 
and my cell phone signal was vanishingly weak. Also no clubtails of any 
species, and surprisingly not one pondhawk nor Blue Dasher. 


Darner sp. - smelled like A. umbrosa to me, between habitat, behavior, flight 
style, etc. Or possibly a Gomphaeshna but a tad late 

Racket-tailed Emerald (Dorocordulia libera) a pair in the wheel plus at least 
3-4 males patrolling 

Somatochlora sp. (I think)
Skimmer (Libellula sp.) one lone female, I think a Slaty (L. incesta) but did 
not dwell on it for too long. 

12-spotted Skimmer (L. pulchella) 3+ males patrolling over the pools of water 
that interrupted the road in several places 

Common Whitetail (Plathemis lydia) a dozen or more on the same pools as L. 
pulchella; apparently patrolling much smaller territories 

White Corporal (Ladona exusta) 2 males which I think were this species; managed 
poor photos of one. Late? 


Also had a very different-smelling darner (more A. junius-ish) over the parking 
lot of the Route 202 Grill in Athol as I waited for some fried seafood. Another 
12-spot flew by here too, and I found a single disembodied wing of a Halloween 
Pennant (Celithemis eponina) blowing around the asphalt. And, just for the same 
of completeness, had a nice male Widow Skimmer (L. luctuosa) patrolling my 
front yard in Amherst as I was setting out. 


Cheers,

Josh


Joshua S. Rose, Ph.D.
Amherst, MA
http://bugguide.net/user/view/2399
http://www.facebook.com/opihi




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Subject: Re: Returning to important habitats
From: "Hal White halwhite AT udel.edu [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 08 Jul 2014 09:33:00 -0400
Chris,

I agree with your assessment that sites change and we need to adjust our 
expectations. I was cautious to describe the cause of the habitat change 
to a speculation. There are other factors at work in addition to the 
quite evident construction of a surrounding golf course--ground water 
removal for irrigation, a drought last year, development that has 
generated impervious surfaces, and possibly poor timing of our survey.  
I should add that last year we did a similar search for/Nannothemis 
bella/ (Elfin Skimmer) and /Argia bipunctulata/ (Seepage Dancer) at 
other sites including a sea level fen not too far away from the site we 
visited on Sunday. The fen site had not been surveyed for Odonates in a 
couple of decades and its character had changed also. In this case, sea 
level rise or Hurricane Sandy are likely culprits with the incursion of 
salt water.  These could also be factors at Guinea Creek. Another 
productive site for the two species two decades ago is completely gone 
due to construction. Seepage sites and boggy habitats are few and small 
in southern Delaware, and with the rapid development near the beaches 
here, I must say my hopes of finding new sites are dimming.

Hal


On 7/7/2014 9:27 PM, Christopher Hill chill AT coastal.edu [NEodes] wrote:
> I also enjoyed Hal White's account and agree it's great to revisit sites 
after a long time to see how they're doing. 

>
> I think that we should be careful about how we interpret the results, though. 
If you visited a random assortment of sites in 1980 and then revisited all of 
them in 2015, that would be one thing. But human nature says you're going to 
revisit the ones you remember as the *best* sites in 1980. Individual sites 
could change, some getting better, some getting worse, and by revisiting only 
those that were best in the past, you would miss those that had improved. 
Essentially, you'd be buying into a market almost guaranteed to decline. 

>
> When I was pretty new to odonates, I helped set up a regional meeting in 
Cheraw, SC, and Dennis Paulson, who had done a lot of ode-searching in that 
area 40 years earlier, shared with me his detailed field notes - what he found 
where. I thought we could revisit those same sites and compare 1969 with 2008, 
but as it turned out, that was naive. Some of the little corner-of-the-road wet 
spots he had records from had changed or disappeared, but that didn't reflect a 
regional degradation - there were just other, different little pockets of 
wetlands to explore. 

>
> I guess I'm saying, pessimist though I am, that you could see decline in all 
your old best spots and habitat overall in a county could still be doing OK. 

>
> Chris Hill
> Conway, SC
> ________________________________________
> From: NEodes AT yahoogroups.com [NEodes AT yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Earle 
Baldwin earlebaldwin AT gmail.com [NEodes] [NEodes-noreply AT yahoogroups.com] 

> Sent: Monday, July 07, 2014 9:08 PM
> To: NE Odes
> Subject: [NEodes] Returning to important habitats
>
> The venerable Hal White posted elsewhere a splendid record of returning to a 
site in Delaware in search of specific species. 

> This site had been productive long ago. Construction in the vicinity had 
addressed issues. Now, years later,, no bugs. 

> I believe it is again time to begin slogging about checking on the relative 
success or failures of our earlier efforts. I was encouraged recently when a 
friend went searching for Red Damsel in a sensitive spot and was rewarded with 
excellent results. Whether a species maintains in an area suggests the habitat 
is doing okay. 

> So,,, slog about and let us know
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> ------------------------------------
>
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> Yahoo Groups Links
>
>
>
Subject: RE: Returning to important habitats
From: "Christopher Hill chill AT coastal.edu [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 7 Jul 2014 21:27:07 -0400
I also enjoyed Hal White's account and agree it's great to revisit sites after 
a long time to see how they're doing. 


I think that we should be careful about how we interpret the results, though. 
If you visited a random assortment of sites in 1980 and then revisited all of 
them in 2015, that would be one thing. But human nature says you're going to 
revisit the ones you remember as the *best* sites in 1980. Individual sites 
could change, some getting better, some getting worse, and by revisiting only 
those that were best in the past, you would miss those that had improved. 
Essentially, you'd be buying into a market almost guaranteed to decline. 


When I was pretty new to odonates, I helped set up a regional meeting in 
Cheraw, SC, and Dennis Paulson, who had done a lot of ode-searching in that 
area 40 years earlier, shared with me his detailed field notes - what he found 
where. I thought we could revisit those same sites and compare 1969 with 2008, 
but as it turned out, that was naive. Some of the little corner-of-the-road wet 
spots he had records from had changed or disappeared, but that didn't reflect a 
regional degradation - there were just other, different little pockets of 
wetlands to explore. 


I guess I'm saying, pessimist though I am, that you could see decline in all 
your old best spots and habitat overall in a county could still be doing OK. 


Chris Hill
Conway, SC
________________________________________
From: NEodes AT yahoogroups.com [NEodes AT yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Earle 
Baldwin earlebaldwin AT gmail.com [NEodes] [NEodes-noreply AT yahoogroups.com] 

Sent: Monday, July 07, 2014 9:08 PM
To: NE Odes
Subject: [NEodes] Returning to important habitats

The venerable Hal White posted elsewhere a splendid record of returning to a 
site in Delaware in search of specific species. 

This site had been productive long ago. Construction in the vicinity had 
addressed issues. Now, years later,, no bugs. 

I believe it is again time to begin slogging about checking on the relative 
success or failures of our earlier efforts. I was encouraged recently when a 
friend went searching for Red Damsel in a sensitive spot and was rewarded with 
excellent results. Whether a species maintains in an area suggests the habitat 
is doing okay. 

So,,, slog about and let us know

Sent from my iPad




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Subject: Returning to important habitats
From: "Earle Baldwin earlebaldwin AT gmail.com [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 7 Jul 2014 21:08:53 -0400
The venerable Hal White posted elsewhere a splendid record of returning to a 
site in Delaware in search of specific species. 

 This site had been productive long ago. Construction in the vicinity had 
addressed issues. Now, years later,, no bugs. 

 I believe it is again time to begin slogging about checking on the relative 
success or failures of our earlier efforts. I was encouraged recently when a 
friend went searching for Red Damsel in a sensitive spot and was rewarded with 
excellent results. Whether a species maintains in an area suggests the habitat 
is doing okay. 

 So,,, slog about and let us know    

Sent from my iPad

------------------------------------
Posted by: Earle Baldwin 
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

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Subject: Re: Carlisle Cranberry Bog Odes
From: "'John and Sue Gregoire' khmo AT empacc.net [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 6 Jul 2014 21:57:18 -0400
Nice list! No doubt the newcomers were impressed and, hopefully, hooked. Jason 
is 

good, and Sohlei takes some very nice photos!

Sue
-- 
John and Sue Gregoire
Field Ornithologists
Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
5373 Fitzgerald Road
Burdett,NY 14818-9626
 Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
"Conserve and Create Habitat"

On Sun, July 6, 2014 20:44, 'Alan & Lisa Ankers' alankers AT comcast.net [NEodes] 
wrote: 

> Susan Emmons and myself led a Carlisle Conservation Foundation dragonfly
> walk this morning at the Cranberry Bog in Carlisle (Middlesex Co), MA, with
> much-appreciated ID help supplied by Jason Forbes. Over 25 people joined the
> walk, many of them newcomers to odes. We ended up with 30 species in three
> hours. The highlight, even though it was only seen by the hardcore group
> remaining at the end, was a Golden-winged Skimmer, a lifer for many of us.
>
>
>
> Soheil Zendeh has some photos, including the Golden-winged Skimmer, at
>
> https://picasaweb.google.com/102611087159208870022/CarlisleCranberryBogs?aut
> huser=0
>  thuser=0&feat=directlink> &feat=directlink
>
> the first 15 of those are from today's walk (others are from last year).
>
>
>
> I returned this afternoon to try to photograph the Golden-winged and
> although I was unsuccessful, I did add Familiar Bluet and Four-spotted
> Skimmer to the list for the day.
>
>
>
> Ebony Jewelwing
>
> Elegant Spreadwing
>
> Familiar Bluet
>
> Skimming Bluet
>
> Eastern Forktail
>
> Lilypad Forktail
>
> Sedge Sprite
>
> Variable Dancer
>
> Cyrano Darner
>
> Black-tipped Darner
>
> Common Green Darner
>
> Unicorn Clubtail
>
> Prince Baskettail
>
> Racket-tailed Emerald
>
> Eastern Amberwing
>
> Blue Dasher
>
> Eastern Pondhawk
>
> Spangled Skimmer
>
> Slaty Skimmer
>
> Common Whitetail
>
> Twelve-spotted Skimmer
>
> Widow Skimmer
>
> Golden-winged Skimmer
>
> Painted Skimmer
>
> Four-spotted Skimmer
>
> Halloween Pennant
>
> (Ruby or similar) Meadowhawk
>
> Band-winged Meadowhawk
>
> Dot-tailed Whiteface
>
> Frosted Whiteface
>
> Spot-winged Glider
>
> Black Saddlebags
>
>
>
> Alan Ankers
>
> Carlisle, Ma
>
>




------------------------------------
Posted by: "John and Sue Gregoire" 
------------------------------------


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Subject: Carlisle Cranberry Bog Odes
From: "'Alan & Lisa Ankers' alankers AT comcast.net [NEodes]" <NEodes-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 6 Jul 2014 20:44:42 -0400
Susan Emmons and myself led a Carlisle Conservation Foundation dragonfly
walk this morning at the Cranberry Bog in Carlisle (Middlesex Co), MA, with
much-appreciated ID help supplied by Jason Forbes. Over 25 people joined the
walk, many of them newcomers to odes. We ended up with 30 species in three
hours. The highlight, even though it was only seen by the hardcore group
remaining at the end, was a Golden-winged Skimmer, a lifer for many of us.

 

Soheil Zendeh has some photos, including the Golden-winged Skimmer, at 

https://picasaweb.google.com/102611087159208870022/CarlisleCranberryBogs?aut
huser=0
 &feat=directlink

the first 15 of those are from today's walk (others are from last year).

 

I returned this afternoon to try to photograph the Golden-winged and
although I was unsuccessful, I did add Familiar Bluet and Four-spotted
Skimmer to the list for the day.

 

Ebony Jewelwing

Elegant Spreadwing

Familiar Bluet

Skimming Bluet

Eastern Forktail

Lilypad Forktail

Sedge Sprite

Variable Dancer

Cyrano Darner

Black-tipped Darner

Common Green Darner

Unicorn Clubtail

Prince Baskettail

Racket-tailed Emerald

Eastern Amberwing

Blue Dasher

Eastern Pondhawk

Spangled Skimmer

Slaty Skimmer

Common Whitetail

Twelve-spotted Skimmer

Widow Skimmer

Golden-winged Skimmer

Painted Skimmer

Four-spotted Skimmer

Halloween Pennant

(Ruby or similar) Meadowhawk

Band-winged Meadowhawk

Dot-tailed Whiteface

Frosted Whiteface

Spot-winged Glider

Black Saddlebags

 

Alan Ankers

Carlisle, Ma