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Updated on Wednesday, February 22 at 08:37 AM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Booted Eagles,©Tony Disley

22 Feb Moth gift: Winner of an eBay auction thanks his mother by naming a new species after her []
21 Feb Lepidoptera Expedition- Peru, Summer 2017 ["Gallice,Geoffrey R" ]
13 Feb Lepidoptera Expedition- Peru, Summer 201 ["Gallice,Geoffrey R" ]
9 Feb Lepidoptera Expedition- Peru, Summer 2017 ["Gallice,Geoffrey R" ]
2 Feb Lepidoptera Expedition- Peru, Summer 2017 ["Gallice,Geoffrey R" ]
26 Jan Job - Resident Naturalist, ASA Peru ["Gallice,Geoffrey R" ]
24 Jan Internships in Tropical Conservation - Peru 2017 ["Gallice,Geoffrey R" ]
24 Jan Lepidoptera Expedition Peru - Summer 2017 ["Gallice,Geoffrey R" ]
23 Jan Journal of Research on the Lepidoptera [Michael Rotter ]
11 Jan Lepidoptera Expedition in the Peruvian Amazon, Summer 2017 ["Gallice,Geoffrey R" ]
8 Dec Re: New Regional Monarch Nectar Plant Guides Now Available [Dale McClung ]
8 Dec Re: New Regional Monarch Nectar Plant Guides Now Available [Dale McClung ]
8 Dec Re: New Regional Monarch Nectar Plant Guides Now Available ["Dana, Robert (DNR)" ]
8 Dec Re: New Regional Monarch Nectar Plant Guides Now Available [Paul Cherubini ]
8 Dec Re: New Regional Monarch Nectar Plant Guides Now Available [Candace Fallon ]
7 Dec Re: New Regional Monarch Nectar Plant Guides Now Available [Bill Cornelius ]
7 Dec Re: New Regional Monarch Nectar Plant Guides Now Available [Roger Kuhlman ]
7 Dec Re: New Regional Monarch Nectar Plant Guides Now Available [Paul Cherubini ]
7 Dec New Regional Monarch Nectar Plant Guides Now Available [Candace Fallon ]
29 Nov Intro to new funding opportunities for your work [Katharine Corriveau ]
1 Nov Ragwort Briefing [Neil Jones ]
7 Sep New LepSoc website ["John V. Calhoun" ]
30 Aug LepSoc webpage ["John V. Calhoun" ]
26 Aug Re: Request for information on the taxonomic status and evolution of Papilio appalachiensis [Neil Jones ]
26 Aug Request for information on the taxonomic status and evolution of Papilio appalachiensis [Dick Vane-Wright ]
23 Aug Re: What is the Evidence that Spring and Summer Azures are separate ... [Roger Kuhlman ]
22 Aug What is the Evidence that Spring and Summer Azures are separate species [Roger Kuhlman ]
20 Aug Expert Identification of a Possible Zabulon Skipper needed [Roger Kuhlman ]
21 Jun Re: Eastern Tiger Swallowtail intermediate morphs [Tony Thomas ]
21 Jun Eastern Tiger Swallowtail intermediate morphs []
29 Apr Fwd: ID Pterophoridae [Eduardo Nadal ]
9 Apr Finding taxonomic descriptions [Neil Jones ]
30 Mar Re: The Xerces Society Announces the 2016 Joan Mosenthal DeWind Award Winners ["Dana, Robert (DNR)" ]
29 Mar Re: The Xerces Society Announces the 2016 Joan Mosenthal DeWind Award Winners [Roger Kuhlman ]
28 Mar Re: The Xerces Society Announces the 2016 Joan Mosenthal DeWind Award Winners [Paul Cherubini ]
28 Mar The Xerces Society Announces the 2016 Joan Mosenthal DeWind Award Winners [Candace Fallon ]
3 Feb butterfly-like fossil lacewing [Bill Cornelius ]
3 Feb Re: 2016 Lepidopterists' Society Meeting details ["Rick" ]
3 Feb Re: 2016 Lepidopterists' Society Meeting details ["Rick" ]
25 Jan Re: ID and explanation requested, female micro [Richard Worth ]
25 Jan ID and explanation requested, female micro [Tony Thomas ]
15 Dec 2016 Lepidopterists' Society Meeting details [Todd Gilligan ]
15 Dec Bills to Help Protect the Monarch Butterfly Population Clears Assembly Panel [Neil Jones ]
15 Dec The decline in British butterflies could be caused by climate change [Neil Jones ]
3 Dec Re: The Crystal Skipper: North Carolina's Newest Butterfly Species ["Walsh, James Bruce - (jbwalsh)" ]
3 Dec Re: The Crystal Skipper: North Carolina's Newest Butterfly Species [Neil Jones ]
3 Dec The Crystal Skipper: North Carolina's Newest Butterfly Species [Matthew Shepherd ]
2 Dec $1, 500 in Grants for Genomics Research - Submission Deadline December 11th [Katharine Corriveau ]
10 Nov Re: Marpesia zerynthia - Waiter Daggerwing - nr. Tucson, AZ - Sept 1986 ["Walsh, James Bruce - (jbwalsh)" ]
10 Nov Marpesia zerynthia - Waiter Daggerwing - nr. Tucson, AZ - Sept 1986 [Mike Quinn ]
4 Nov Re: New Hairstreak Record For The US [Mike Quinn ]
15 Oct Re: Wildlife-friendly farming increases crop yield: evidence for ecological intensification ["Walsh, James Bruce - (jbwalsh)" ]
15 Oct Wildlife-friendly farming increases crop yield: evidence for ecological intensification [Neil Jones ]
22 Jul 2015 Lepidopterists' Society Annual Meeting next week [Todd Gilligan ]
22 Jun The molecules behind mimicry [Neil Jones ]
20 Jun Aberrant Canadian Tiger Swallowtail [Tony Thomas ]
1 Jun Lepidopterists' Society 2015 Meeting, West Lafayette, IN, July 28 - August 2 [Todd Gilligan ]
4 May Body mass [Jeremy Cohen ]
27 Feb Re: MJV's Monarchs on Native Nectar Plants photo contest! [Paul Cherubini ]
27 Feb MJV's Monarchs on Native Nectar Plants photo contest! [Candace Fallon ]
22 Feb Re: Caterpillar ID request (Virginia) []
22 Feb Caterpillar ID request (Virginia) []
31 Jan Location of Dr Arnold Schultze Collection? [Hugo Rocha ]
20 Jan Re: moth sampling [John Shuey ]
20 Jan Re: moth sampling ["Walsh, James Bruce - (jbwalsh)" ]
20 Jan Re: moth sampling [John Shuey ]
20 Jan Re: moth sampling [Christopher Hamm ]
20 Jan Re: moth sampling ["Walsh, James Bruce - (jbwalsh)" ]
20 Jan moth sampling []
20 Jan Re: moth sampling [John Shuey ]
19 Jan moth sampling [Tony Thomas ]
19 Jan Re: books and liteerature []
19 Jan Re: books and liteerature [Dale McClung ]
17 Jan books and liteerature []
17 Jan Please help Critically endangered invertebrate [Neil Jones ]
28 Dec Northernmost Early Black Witch moth record [Adrian Arleo ]

Subject: Moth gift: Winner of an eBay auction thanks his mother by naming a new species after her
From: metzlere AT msu.edu
Date: Wed, 22 Feb 2017 08:27:24 -0500

The loving son presented the name to his mother on St. Valentine's Day 

Pensoft Publishers

Winner of an eBay auction Steve Mix received the opportunity to pick the name 
for a new species of satiny-white winged moth collected from the white gypsum 
dunes of the White Sands National Monument, New Mexico. A fan of butterflies 
and moths himself, he chose to honor his supportive and encouraging mother 
Delinda Mix, so the moth is now formally listed under the species name 
delindae. It is described in the open access journal /ZooKeys/. 


Having spent 10 years studying the moth fauna at the White Sands National 
Monument, Eric H. Metzler, curator at the Michigan State University, but also 
research collaborator at the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian 
Institution, and research associate at the University of New Mexico and the 
University of Florida, discovered the moth during the first year of the study, 
in 2007. Back then, he spotted a curious small white moth with a satiny 
appearance, which immediately drew his attention. 


Already assigned to the genus Givira to the family commonly known as carpenter 
millers, the moth was yet to be identified as a species. While most of its 
North American 'relatives' are either dark-colored, or have substantial dark 
smudges on the forewings, there are only four of them, including the new 
species, which are substantially white with few or no dark markings. 


Further hindrance occurred when the researcher tried to study the specimens, as 
pinned moths turned out greased due to their abdomens being full of fatty 
tissue. However, the specialist managed to degrease them by carefully brushing 
their scales, and, having compared them to related species, confirmed them as 
representatives of a species new to science. 


Then, Eric joined the fundraising event, organized by the Western National 
Parks Association (WNPA), a non-profit education partner of the US National 
Park Service. The highest bidder in the eBay auction would receive the chance 
to pick the scientific name for the satiny-looking moth, and thus, become part 
of history. Having won the opportunity, Steve Mix, who himself had once been 
interested in studying butterflies and moths, and has been maintaining his 
fondness of them ever since, decided to name the species after his mother 
Delinda Mix, in gratitude for "the support and encouragement she gave to her 
son". 


"Steve Mix submitted the winning bid, and he chose to have the moth named after 
his mother because of the lasting nature of this naming opportunity", shares 
Eric. "I received no remuneration in this fundraising venture, and by 
volunteering my personal money, time, expertise, and experience I was able to 
help WNPA gain world-wide positive publicity while raising some much needed 
cash. The rewards to me were being able to help WNPA and Steve Mix honor his 
mother, which is just so very sentimental". 


"WNPA is so pleased that we were able to work with Eric and we are grateful to 
Steve. This project is a shining example of working together towards the common 
good of our parks with the added value of providing a priceless experience for 
everyone involved", says Amy Reichgott, Development Manager at the Western 
National Parks Association. 


 _______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
Subject: Lepidoptera Expedition- Peru, Summer 2017
From: "Gallice,Geoffrey R" <ggallice AT ufl.edu>
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 01:05:07 +0000
The Alliance for a Sustainable Amazon (ASA), a non-profit organization working 
in the southeastern Peruvian Amazon, is pleased to announce openings on a 
Lepidoptera research expedition during summer 2017. 



The expedition is part of a long-term research project sponsored by the ASA to 
investigate the basic biology, distribution, ecology, and conservation status 
of Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths) in the southeastern Peruvian Amazon. 



Expedition members will receive hands-on instruction in field methods that 
facilitate biological research in the tropics, applying our new skills to 
conducting biological research at the field sites. Expedition members will gain 
knowledge and skills in the following areas: 



  *   Field methods in the study of tropical Lepidoptera

  *   Tropical ecology and biology of key Amazonian plant and animal groups

  *   Amazonian plant and animal identification

  *   Off-trail and backcountry navigation

  *   Canopy access (tree climbing) and sampling techniques (canopy trapping)

 * Major conservation challenges facing the study region and the broader 
Amazonian ecosystem 


  *   Issues facing the survival of indigenous Amazonian cultures


DATES: May 23 – June 5, 2017

LOCATION: Madre de Dios, Peru

REGISTRATION: Open until April 30, 2017. Space is limited, so we recommend to 
apply early. 


FEE: $2,500

WEBSITE: 
www.sustainableamazon.org/lepexp2017 




HOW TO REGISTER

Fill out the application form at 
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.sustainableamazon.org_lepexp17-2Dregister&d=DwIF-g&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=8_XgjPlICDaLKrD_p7hx4JZ60TFZq4oCZSTPCoTgwxE&s=--BxPcr-d-jeNeLDz97zUYq_UYwm64YKIz_LOm0MnKI&e= 



For general inquiries please contact us at 
info AT sustainableamazon.org 



We hope to see you in the Peruvian Amazon!


Geoff Gallice, Ph.D.

President, Alliance for a Sustainable Amazon

Research Associate in Lepidoptera, Florida Museum of Natural History

_______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
Subject: Lepidoptera Expedition- Peru, Summer 201
From: "Gallice,Geoffrey R" <ggallice AT ufl.edu>
Date: Mon, 13 Feb 2017 18:02:20 +0000
The Alliance for a Sustainable Amazon (ASA), a non-profit organization working 
in the southeastern Peruvian Amazon, is pleased to announce openings on a 
Lepidoptera research expedition during summer 2017. 



The expedition is part of a long-term research project sponsored by the ASA to 
investigate the basic biology, distribution, ecology, and conservation status 
of Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths) in the southeastern Peruvian Amazon. 



Expedition members will receive hands-on instruction in field methods that 
facilitate biological research in the tropics, applying our new skills to 
conducting biological research at the field sites. Expedition members will gain 
knowledge and skills in the following areas: 



  *   Field methods in the study of tropical Lepidoptera

  *   Tropical ecology and biology of key Amazonian plant and animal groups

  *   Amazonian plant and animal identification

  *   Off-trail and backcountry navigation

  *   Canopy access (tree climbing) and sampling techniques (canopy trapping)

 * Major conservation challenges facing the study region and the broader 
Amazonian ecosystem 


  *   Issues facing the survival of indigenous Amazonian cultures


DATES: May 23 – June 5, 2017

LOCATION: Madre de Dios, Peru

REGISTRATION: Open until April 30, 2017. Space is limited, so we recommend to 
apply early. 


FEE: $2,500

WEBSITE: 
www.sustainableamazon.org/lepexp2017 




HOW TO REGISTER

Fill out the application form at 
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.sustainableamazon.org_lepexp17-2Dregister&d=CwIF-g&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=qhxr5nSUl8BtWscieT1zjI711PUzmVL-7FjfQYf8Was&s=9bNXjKitGvnrMCnC-juO_5DfiAVuXY-_g223s8eJMp8&e= 



For general inquiries please contact us at 
info AT sustainableamazon.org 



We hope to see you in the Peruvian Amazon!


Geoff Gallice, Ph.D.

President, Alliance for a Sustainable Amazon

Research Associate in Lepidoptera, Florida Museum of Natural History

_______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
Subject: Lepidoptera Expedition- Peru, Summer 2017
From: "Gallice,Geoffrey R" <ggallice AT ufl.edu>
Date: Thu, 9 Feb 2017 01:38:13 +0000
The Alliance for a Sustainable Amazon (ASA), a non-profit organization working 
in the southeastern Peruvian Amazon, is pleased to announce openings on a 
Lepidoptera research expedition during summer 2017. 



The expedition is part of a long-term research project sponsored by the ASA to 
investigate the basic biology, distribution, ecology, and conservation status 
of Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths) in the southeastern Peruvian Amazon. 



Expedition members will receive hands-on instruction in field methods that 
facilitate biological research in the tropics, applying our new skills to 
conducting biological research at the field sites. Expedition members will gain 
knowledge and skills in the following areas: 



  *   Field methods in the study of tropical Lepidoptera

  *   Tropical ecology and biology of key Amazonian plant and animal groups

  *   Amazonian plant and animal identification

  *   Off-trail and backcountry navigation

  *   Canopy access (tree climbing) and sampling techniques (canopy trapping)

 * Major conservation challenges facing the study region and the broader 
Amazonian ecosystem 


  *   Issues facing the survival of indigenous Amazonian cultures


DATES: May 23 – June 5, 2017


LOCATION: Las Piedras River basin, Madre de Dios, Peru


REGISTRATION: Open until April 30, 2017. Space is limited, so we recommend to 
apply early. 



FEE: $2,500


WEBSITE: 
www.sustainableamazon.org/lepexp2017 




HOW TO REGISTER

Fill out the application form at 
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.sustainableamazon.org_lepexp17-2Dregister&d=CwIF-g&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=8jRBtqXPZ5AyQYlNBAcgn9wVfmOp_zF8YWn4cIS2L-o&s=27Y5SY8cIRN4tcHumwICMDXBmXQHqliSTe74FDTWHXw&e= 



For general inquiries please contact us at 
info AT sustainableamazon.org 



We hope to see you in the Peruvian Amazon!


Geoff Gallice, Ph.D.

President, Alliance for a Sustainable Amazon

Research Associate in Lepidoptera, Florida Museum of Natural History

_______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
Subject: Lepidoptera Expedition- Peru, Summer 2017
From: "Gallice,Geoffrey R" <ggallice AT ufl.edu>
Date: Thu, 2 Feb 2017 00:14:42 +0000
The Alliance for a Sustainable Amazon (ASA), a non-profit organization working 
in the southeastern Peruvian Amazon, is pleased to announce openings on a 
Lepidoptera research expedition during summer 2017. 



The expedition is part of a long-term research project sponsored by the ASA to 
investigate the basic biology, distribution, ecology, and conservation status 
of Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths) in the southeastern Peruvian Amazon. 



Expedition members will receive hands-on instruction in field methods that 
facilitate biological research in the tropics, applying our new skills to 
conducting biological research at the field sites. Expedition members will gain 
knowledge and skills in the following areas: 



  *   Field methods in the study of tropical Lepidoptera

  *   Tropical ecology and biology of key Amazonian plant and animal groups

  *   Amazonian plant and animal identification

  *   Off-trail and backcountry navigation

  *   Canopy access (tree climbing) and sampling techniques (canopy trapping)

 * Major conservation challenges facing the study region and the broader 
Amazonian ecosystem 


  *   Issues facing the survival of indigenous Amazonian cultures


DATES: May 23 - June 5, 2017


LOCATION: Las Piedras River basin, Madre de Dios, Peru


REGISTRATION: Open until April 30, 2017. Space is limited, so we recommend to 
apply early. 



FEE: $2,500


WEBSITE: 
www.sustainableamazon.org/lepexp2017 



HOW TO REGISTER

Fill out the application form at 
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.sustainableamazon.org_lepexp17-2Dregister&d=CwIFAw&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=QnmLGNwiEGSxfPK0g2bywN09H8neoVjpfOIuJvx9X64&s=tweiSgtSJwj0cxhRubxw88iRW5blnty-8hxVNrrnXm4&e= 



For general inquiries please contact us at 
info AT sustainableamazon.org 



We hope to see you in the Peruvian Amazon!


Geoff Gallice, Ph.D.

President, Alliance for a Sustainable Amazon

Research Associate in Lepidoptera, Florida Museum of Natural History



_______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
Subject: Job - Resident Naturalist, ASA Peru
From: "Gallice,Geoffrey R" <ggallice AT ufl.edu>
Date: Thu, 26 Jan 2017 00:53:33 +0000
The Alliance for a Sustainable Amazon (ASA), a non-profit organization working 
in the southeastern Peruvian Amazon, is pleased to announce the position of 
Resident Naturalist beginning in June, 2017. The successful applicant will be 
based at the ASA’s field site in Peru’s Madre de Dios Department. 



POSITION: Resident Naturalist

LOCATION: Madre de Dios, Peru

POSITION DURATION: Minimum 6 months

START DATE: June 8, 2017

APPLICATION DEADLINE: April 8

WEBSITE: 
www.sustainableamazon.org 




JOB DESCRIPTION

Resident Naturalists (RNs) work closely with ASA academic faculty and staff to 
facilitate ongoing biological research and monitoring, sustainable tropical 
agriculture, and community engagement and education programs at Finca Las 
Piedras, in Peru’s Madre de Dios Department. RNs are part of the public face of 
the ASA’s programs in Peru, and are part of a dynamic team of researchers, 
conservation and development professionals, and students from around the world. 
In addition to assigned tasks, naturalists are encouraged to develop individual 
projects within their areas of interest, which may include anything from 
community service activities to biological or agricultural research. 



DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES


Biological Research and Monitoring

The ASA maintains a number of research and monitoring projects aimed at 
biodiversity conservation in the southeastern Peruvian Amazon. These include 
mammal, bird, and insect inventories and population monitoring, plant 
phenology, and rain forest dynamics plots, among others. RNs assist project 
leaders in data collection and entry, experimental design and setup, etc., as 
needed. Naturalists will also have the opportunity to assist visiting 
researchers when required. 



Sustainable Tropical Agriculture

Activities at Finca Las Piedras include a variety of experiments in organic 
agriculture, the use of compost and biochar, and research into the sustainable 
harvest of Brazil nuts, among others. RNs will assist in these as needed. 



Community Engagement and Education

Naturalists will also assist ASA faculty and staff in a number of ongoing 
programs both at Finca Las Piedras and in Monterrey and Planchon, the nearest 
local communities to the field site. Activities at Finca Las Piedras include 
volunteer and internship programs; in the communities RNs will assist in 
educational visits to schools, as well as a variety of outreach programs. 



Social Media

Resident Naturalists contribute to outreach efforts on social media. 
Naturalists are required to create material for distribution across a variety 
of platforms, including Facebook, Instagram, and regular blog posts. 



General Duties

In addition to the duties mentioned above, Naturalists will contribute to 
day-to-day operations and basic facilities maintenance. General duties may 
include, but are not limited to: Daily weather station readings, 
Guide/interpret/translate guided natural history hikes, lead visits to local 
farms, group check-in and orientation, logistical support for academic 
programs. 



REQUIREMENTS

  *   Minimum 6 month commitment required

 * Minimum bachelor’s degree in natural or environmental sciences or related 
field 


  *   Fluency in English (required)

  *   At least basic Spanish (preferred)

  *   Experience working/living abroad, especially in the tropics (preferred)

  *   Teaching experience (preferred)

  *   Enthusiasm and strong work ethic

  *   Flexibility in schedule and work environment

  *   Maturity/must live with and work well with others in close setting

  *   Excellent physical condition

  *   Traveler’s insurance (proof required upon acceptance)

  *   CPR/first aid certification (proof required upon acceptance)


TRAINING

Upon arrival at Finca Las Piedras, Resident Naturalists undergo an intensive, 
one-week training period. Naturalists are given an overview of current projects 
spanning the ASA’s three interrelated focal areas: biological research and 
monitoring, sustainable tropical agriculture, and community engagement and 
education, as well as the methodologies used for research and outreach work in 
these areas. Naturalists will also be trained informally throughout the 
duration of their term at Finca Las Piedras. 



COMPENSATION

This is an unpaid position. However, all room and board is provided on-site at 
Finca Las Piedras, 7 days per week, for the duration of the appointment 
(although work is only required M-F; approximate value $1,000/month). 
Work-related local transportation, including pickup from the Puerto Maldonado 
airport (PEM) or bus terminal, is covered. Resident Naturalists are responsible 
for their international flight to Peru, including airfare, taxes, airport fees, 
flight insurance, etc.), and domestic air or land travel to Puerto Maldonado 
(bus or air). 



HOW TO APPLY

The following are required to apply for this position:


  1.  A cover letter of interest, including end date (position begins June 8)

  2.  Current CV/resume with contact information for two references

  3.  Most recent unofficial university transcript


Completed applications should include each of the three required items, and 
should be submitted as a single PDF document, in the order listed above, by the 
application deadline (April 8). Document title should read: “last name”_”RN 
application”.pdf 



Send completed applications to: 
info AT sustainableamazon.org with “Resident 
Naturalist application in the subject line. 



Geoff Gallice, Ph.D.

President

Alliance for a Sustainable Amazon

A U.S. 501(c)3 charity_______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
Subject: Internships in Tropical Conservation - Peru 2017
From: "Gallice,Geoffrey R" <ggallice AT ufl.edu>
Date: Tue, 24 Jan 2017 22:46:10 +0000
The Alliance for a Sustainable Amazon (ASA), a non-profit organization working 
in the southeastern Peruvian Amazon, is seeking interns to assist its 
international team of biologists and conservationists with various projects 
spanning biological research and monitoring and sustainable tropical 
agriculture. Interns are based at Finca Las Piedras, the ASA's field site in 
Peru's Madre de Dios Department. 



LENGTH OF STAY: 4, 8 or 12 weeks

DATES: Starting June 19, 2017

FEES: Starting at $1,300

WEBSITE: 
www.sustainableamazon.org 
 



THREE OPPORTUNITIES:

1. INTRODUCTION TO SUSTAINABILITY INTERNSHIP (4 weeks - $1,300)

This 4-week program offers participants a broad introduction to biological 
research and conservation in the tropics. Our teaching and learning approach is 
both academic and hands-on. Interns will participate directly in scientific 
research and applied conservation projects that span the Alliance for a 
Sustainable Amazon's two focal areas: biological research and monitoring and 
sustainable tropical agriculture. With the help of academic faculty, interns 
will also navigate tropical biology and conservation science through lectures 
and weekly reading discussions covering articles drawn from the primary 
scientific literature. This is an excellent opportunity to explore an exciting 
variety of potential career paths in biology and conservation under the 
guidance of experts in those fields. 



2. ADVANCED SUSTAINABILITY INTERNSHIP (8 weeks - $2,200)

This 8-week program offers participants a more in-depth survey of biological 
research and conservation in the tropics. Interns will learn by participating 
directly in scientific research and applied conservation projects that span the 
Alliance for a Sustainable Amazon's two focal areas: biological research and 
monitoring and sustainable tropical agriculture. With the guidance of academic 
faculty, interns will also navigate tropical biology and conservation science 
through lectures and weekly reading discussions covering articles drawn from 
the primary scientific literature. 


Independent Research Project: As well as the activities listed above, 
participants in the Advanced Sustainability Internship Program will have the 
added opportunity to develop an Independent Research Project on a topic of 
their choosing, under the supervision of our academic faculty. 



3. ACADEMIC QUARTER INTERNSHIP (12 weeks - $3,000)

This 12-week program offers participants the most thorough exploration of 
biological research and conservation in the tropics. Interns will learn by 
participating directly in scientific research and applied conservation projects 
that span our two focal areas: biological research and monitoring and 
sustainable tropical agriculture. Under the guidance of our academic faculty, 
interns will also explore topics tropical biology and conservation science 
through lectures and weekly reading discussions covering articles drawn from 
the primary scientific literature. All interns maintain a field journal, 
including daily entries that aim to synthesize their learning experiences and 
sharpen their observational skills. 


Independent Research Project: As well as the activities listed above, 
participants in the Academic Quarter Internship Program will have the added 
opportunity to develop an Independent Research Project on a topic of their 
choosing, under the supervision of our academic faculty. This will allow 
interns to build upon what they have learned at the beginning of the program 
and apply it to a project in an area that is novel or interesting to them. 



MORE INFORMATION & HOW TO APPLY:

For more details about our Internship Programs in the Peruvian Amazon please 
visit our website 
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.sustainableamazon.org&d=CwIFAw&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=ILnwQTfzdubq1DmvWeuhU77BB4FR3bVywDgPMClnRvQ&s=Nil1leuXzNoIXYhsAReHh7rxPf3gfjiOBGt5DC1FdSk&e= 
. For general inquiries please contact us at info AT sustainableamazon.org. 



We look forward to meeting you in Peru!



Geoff Gallice, Ph.D.

President

Alliance for a Sustainable Amazon

A U.S. 501(c)3 charity_______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
Subject: Lepidoptera Expedition Peru - Summer 2017
From: "Gallice,Geoffrey R" <ggallice AT ufl.edu>
Date: Tue, 24 Jan 2017 03:36:26 +0000
The Alliance for a Sustainable Amazon (ASA), a non-profit organization working 
in the southeastern Peruvian Amazon, is pleased to announce openings on a 
Lepidoptera research expedition during summer 2017. 



The expedition is part of a long-term research project sponsored by the ASA to 
investigate the basic biology, distribution, ecology, and conservation status 
of Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths) in the southeastern Peruvian Amazon. 



Expedition members will receive hands-on instruction in field methods that 
facilitate biological research in the tropics, applying our new skills to 
conducting biological research at the field sites. Expedition members will gain 
knowledge and skills in the following areas: 



  *   Field methods in the study of tropical Lepidoptera

  *   Tropical ecology and biology of key Amazonian plant and animal groups

  *   Amazonian plant and animal identification

  *   Off-trail and backcountry navigation

  *   Canopy access (tree climbing) and sampling techniques (canopy trapping)

 * Major conservation challenges facing the study region and the broader 
Amazonian ecosystem 


  *   Issues facing the survival of indigenous Amazonian cultures


DATES: May 23 - June 5, 2017


LOCATION: Las Piedras River basin, Madre de Dios, Peru


REGISTRATION: Open until April 30, 2017. Space is limited, so we recommend to 
apply early. 



FEE: $2,500


WEBSITE: 
 
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.sustainableamazon.org_lepexp2017&d=CwIFAw&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=BhMNhfchJa-oRd_fTY96JOB6qrAJWKTAaWov2L2x0aA&s=Jojvu7YOyLIx8WwxqSF5GR-ADJQjC54Tynrg9A4cLwk&e= 



HOW TO REGISTER

Fill out the application form at 
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.sustainableamazon.org_lepexp17-2Dregister&d=CwIFAw&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=BhMNhfchJa-oRd_fTY96JOB6qrAJWKTAaWov2L2x0aA&s=1ZVFv3swrRYwvlC7dKjkgffp8SOhnKXkwWJ5rWRuh88&e= 


For general inquiries please contact us at 
info AT sustainableamazon.org 



We hope to see you in the Peruvian Amazon!


Geoff Gallice, Ph.D.

President, Alliance for a Sustainable Amazon

Research Associate in Lepidoptera, Florida Museum of Natural History



_______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
Subject: Journal of Research on the Lepidoptera
From: Michael Rotter <mjrotter AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 23 Jan 2017 17:31:56 -0700
Hello all,

I was wondering if anyone knew of any contact for the Journal of Research
on the Lepidoptera. I have been emailing at jrl_lepidoptera AT yahoo.com and
have not been given a reply in a while. Thanks.

Michael Rotter_______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
Subject: Lepidoptera Expedition in the Peruvian Amazon, Summer 2017
From: "Gallice,Geoffrey R" <ggallice AT ufl.edu>
Date: Wed, 11 Jan 2017 15:32:21 +0000
The Alliance for a Sustainable Amazon (ASA), a non-profit organization working 
in the southeastern Peruvian Amazon, is pleased to announce openings on a 
Lepidoptera research expedition during summer 2017. 



The expedition is part of a long-term research project sponsored by the Florida 
Museum of Natural History and the Alliance for a Sustainable Amazon to 
investigate the basic biology, distribution, ecology, and conservation status 
of Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths) in the southeastern Peruvian Amazon. 



Expedition members will receive hands-on instruction in field methods that 
facilitate biological research in the tropics, applying our new skills to 
conducting biological research at the field sites. Expedition members will gain 
knowledge and skills in the following areas: 



  *   Field methods in the study of tropical Lepidoptera

  *   Tropical ecology and biology of key Amazonian plant and animal groups

  *   Amazonian plant and animal identification

  *   Off-trail and backcountry navigation

  *   Canopy access (tree climbing) and sampling techniques (canopy trapping)

 * Major conservation challenges facing the study region and the broader 
Amazonian ecosystem 


  *   Issues facing the survival of indigenous Amazonian cultures


DATES: May 23 - June 6, 2017


LOCATION: Las Piedras River basin, Madre de Dios, Peru


REGISTRATION: Open until April 30, 2017. Space is limited, so we recommend to 
apply early. 



FEE: $2,500


WEBSITE: 
www.sustainableamazon.org/lepexp2017 



HOW TO REGISTER

Fill out the application form at 
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.sustainableamazon.org_lepexp17-2Dregister&d=CwIFAw&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=bNajw6CwCuq57bEbjWdnyRkQJgZv-hFmnESKr0TGMV8&s=TEevQyr6PfwVibXdDzpvtn10rporiPI-xfKo14YbYfw&e= 


For general inquiries please contact us at 
info AT sustainableamazon.org 



We hope to see you in the Peruvian Amazon!


Geoff Gallice, Ph.D.

President, Alliance for a Sustainable Amazon

Research Associate in Lepidoptera, Florida Museum of Natural History



_______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
Subject: Re: New Regional Monarch Nectar Plant Guides Now Available
From: Dale McClung <adverweb AT adver-net.com>
Date: Thu, 8 Dec 2016 17:13:21 -0500
Bill,

Unfortunately not agricultural development but urban development 
provides ideal paper habitat especially for paper wasps. The sheltered 
eaves of houses, sheds, etc, are ideal nesting locations. In the wild 
and in landscapes they utilize broad leafed plants. To check a planting 
just take a stick, ruffle the foliage and see if any wasps fly out. Most 
butterfly gardeners have good success the first few seasons until the 
predator population in response to the availability of prey establishes 
itself.

The only control I know of with paper wasps is to locate their nests, 
wait until after dark when they are all on the nest, and hit it with 
wasp spray then. Wasp spray is the only insecticidal product I ever use 
on my property with the exception if necessary of granular products for 
fire ants, but fortunately they have not returned in years now.

Dale McClung

On 12/7/16 7:47 PM, Bill Cornelius wrote:
> My brother in NZ raises monarchs just to release at his house, he says it's 
been harder the last few years because wasps have become too numerous. This 
includes hornets and yellow jackets which he can trap, but paper wasps ignore 
the traps. I'm wondering if there's something about global warming or 
agricultural development (such as wasp habitat or commercial tachinid flies) 
that's favorable to monarch predators. 

>
> Bill
> _______________________________________________
> Leps-l mailing list
> Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
> http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l


_______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
Subject: Re: New Regional Monarch Nectar Plant Guides Now Available
From: Dale McClung <adverweb AT adver-net.com>
Date: Thu, 8 Dec 2016 17:29:14 -0500
paper habitat

Should have been just habitat. Copy and paste edit error.

Dale

On 12/8/16 5:13 PM, Dale McClung wrote:
> Bill,
>
> Unfortunately not agricultural development but urban development
> provides ideal paper habitat especially for paper wasps. The sheltered
> eaves of houses, sheds, etc, are ideal nesting locations. In the wild
> and in landscapes they utilize broad leafed plants. To check a planting
> just take a stick, ruffle the foliage and see if any wasps fly out. Most
> butterfly gardeners have good success the first few seasons until the
> predator population in response to the availability of prey establishes
> itself.
>
> The only control I know of with paper wasps is to locate their nests,
> wait until after dark when they are all on the nest, and hit it with
> wasp spray then. Wasp spray is the only insecticidal product I ever use
> on my property with the exception if necessary of granular products for
> fire ants, but fortunately they have not returned in years now.
>
> Dale McClung
>
> On 12/7/16 7:47 PM, Bill Cornelius wrote:
>> My brother in NZ raises monarchs just to release at his house, he says it's 
been harder the last few years because wasps have become too numerous. This 
includes hornets and yellow jackets which he can trap, but paper wasps ignore 
the traps. I'm wondering if there's something about global warming or 
agricultural development (such as wasp habitat or commercial tachinid flies) 
that's favorable to monarch predators. 

>>
>> Bill
>> _______________________________________________
>> Leps-l mailing list
>> Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
>> http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
>
> _______________________________________________
> Leps-l mailing list
> Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
> http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l


_______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
Subject: Re: New Regional Monarch Nectar Plant Guides Now Available
From: "Dana, Robert (DNR)" <robert.dana AT state.mn.us>
Date: Thu, 8 Dec 2016 16:31:22 +0000
For many years here in the "urban core" of Minneapolis, I have not seen a 
monarch larva get beyond first instar on the milkweed I let grow in my yard. 
The gleaners I see on the plants are principally Polites spp. This past summer 
I had to remove a Polistes nest in order to do some house painting, and for the 
first time actually took note of the species--the introduced P. dominula. So I 
took a walk up and down my alley--MANY nests under the garage eaves, all P. 
dominula. If this little sample is representative, this wasp must be extremely 
abundant in the Twin Cities metro area, and probably in smaller cities in the 
state. But I have no idea whether this would shed any light on what's happening 
in NZ. 


Robert

-----Original Message-----
From: leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu [mailto:leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu] 
On Behalf Of Bill Cornelius 

Sent: Wednesday, December 07, 2016 6:48 PM
To: leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
Subject: Re: [Leps-l] New Regional Monarch Nectar Plant Guides Now Available

My brother in NZ raises monarchs just to release at his house, he says it's 
been harder the last few years because wasps have become too numerous. This 
includes hornets and yellow jackets which he can trap, but paper wasps ignore 
the traps. I'm wondering if there's something about global warming or 
agricultural development (such as wasp habitat or commercial tachinid flies) 
that's favorable to monarch predators. 


Bill
_______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
_______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
Subject: Re: New Regional Monarch Nectar Plant Guides Now Available
From: Paul Cherubini <monarch AT saber.net>
Date: Thu, 8 Dec 2016 08:33:52 -0800
> Candace Fallon  wrote:
> Thank you, Roger. I hope the migrant population survives as well! 

We already know the seasonal North American monarch migration is 
not a fragile phenomenon that is vulnerable to extinction if the population
drops below a certain size due to reductions in native milkweed abundance
or from changes in climate or from increased plantings of non-native 
evergreen tropical milkweeds. We know this because in the mid-1800’s
when mere handfuls of North American monarchs, preadapted to North 
American climates and deciduous North American milkweeds, were
inadvertently transported to  Australia and New Zealand on ships, the 
seasonal migration and overwintering phenomenon quickly arose from 
scratch in multiple areas of those countries and the phenomenon was
supported entirely by evergreen tropical milkweeds of African origin. 

Example of migratory monarchs in reproductive diapause overwintering 
in Christchurch, New Zealand: 

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.christchurchdailyphoto.com_wp-2Dcontent_uploads_2013_05_DSC04328.jpg&d=CwIFaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=nLvdW4rba8H5I-L-ysIJRoDOy3AWvwJqLlqDfkiXEnk&s=WIbSoVG1EfEHJMr0jEvDvSCcVC4sOdpg5ij76_fRx2Q&e= 


And in southeastern Australia: 

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.fluidr.com_photos_ausee_sets_72157631269381288&d=CwIFaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=nLvdW4rba8H5I-L-ysIJRoDOy3AWvwJqLlqDfkiXEnk&s=YN-gCRqu1PmVhXNvTjrgLtAXu8e69H5pYBzx3CxBUik&e= 
 


Paul Cherubini
El Dorado, Calif._______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
Subject: Re: New Regional Monarch Nectar Plant Guides Now Available
From: Candace Fallon <candace.fallon AT xerces.org>
Date: Thu, 8 Dec 2016 08:03:35 -0800
Thank you, Roger. I hope the migrant population survives as well! We have a
lot of good folks working on monarch conservation across the country, so
I'm hopeful.

All the best,
Candace

On Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 3:46 PM, Roger Kuhlman  wrote:

> Sounds to me like Candace that your organization is doing a good job. I
> hope the migrant Monarch population in the East is going to survive the
> next 50 years. There is a very significant chance they will not due to
> Human interference and that saddens me greatly.
>
>
> Roger Kuhlman
>
> Ann Arbor, Michigan
>
>
> 2016 was not a great Monarch year in southeast Michigan.
>
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu 
> on behalf of Candace Fallon 
> *Sent:* Wednesday, December 7, 2016 3:29 PM
> *To:* leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
> *Subject:* [Leps-l] New Regional Monarch Nectar Plant Guides Now Available
>
> Monarchs are in decline across North America. With milkweed loss in the
> east identified as a major contributing factor to this decline, the
> national call to action has understandably focused primarily on planting
> milkweeds, which are the required host plants for monarch caterpillars. Yet
> while restoring the millions of milkweed plants that have been lost is
> certainly an important strategy, monarchs need more than milkweed to
> support them throughout the year. Adult monarchs need nectar to fuel them
> during spring migration and breeding and to build up stores of fat which
> sustain them during fall migration and winter.
>
> There are many sources of information about which species of native
> milkweeds are best for your region, but information on which nectar plants
> are best for monarchs has not been available for large areas of the
> U.S. Working with the Monarch Joint Venture and the National Wildlife
> Federation, the Xerces Society has created a series of nectar plant lists
> for the continental U.S. based on a database of nearly 24,000 monarch
> nectaring observations. Each of the 15 regional guides highlights species
> that are commercially available, are native to and widely found in the
> region, and are known to be hardy or relatively easy to grow in a garden
> setting.
>
> Read more about this project on our blog
> 
, 

> or find a nectar plant guide for your region here
> 
. 

> These plant lists are works-in-progress and benefit from your help. You can
> submit additional monarch nectaring observations via our online survey
> 
. 

> We are grateful to the many different researchers and monarch enthusiasts
> across the country who have already contributed to our database - thank you!
>
> --
>
> *Candace Fallon*
>
> Senior Conservation Biologist
>
> Endangered Species Program
>
>
>
>
>
> *Protecting the Life that Sustains Us*
>
>
> 628 NE Broadway, Suite 200, Portland, OR, 97232 USA
>
> Tel: (503) 232-6639 ext. 118 |  Fax: (503) 233-6794
>
>
>
> *xerces.org*
> 
 

>      *Facebook*
> 
 

>      *Instagram*
> 
 

>      *Twitter
> 
* 

>      *Blog
> 
* 

>



-- 

*Candace Fallon*

Senior Conservation Biologist

Endangered Species Program





*Protecting the Life that Sustains Us*


628 NE Broadway, Suite 200, Portland, OR, 97232 USA

Tel: (503) 232-6639 ext. 118 |  Fax: (503) 233-6794



*xerces.org* 
 *Facebook* 


 

*Instagram* 
 *Twitter 


* *Blog 


* 
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Subject: Re: New Regional Monarch Nectar Plant Guides Now Available
From: Bill Cornelius <billcor AT mcn.org>
Date: Wed, 7 Dec 2016 16:47:59 -0800
My brother in NZ raises monarchs just to release at his house, he says it's 
been harder the last few years because wasps have become too numerous. This 
includes hornets and yellow jackets which he can trap, but paper wasps ignore 
the traps. I'm wondering if there's something about global warming or 
agricultural development (such as wasp habitat or commercial tachinid flies) 
that's favorable to monarch predators. 


Bill
_______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
Subject: Re: New Regional Monarch Nectar Plant Guides Now Available
From: Roger Kuhlman <rkuhlman AT hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 7 Dec 2016 23:46:26 +0000
Sounds to me like Candace that your organization is doing a good job. I hope 
the migrant Monarch population in the East is going to survive the next 50 
years. There is a very significant chance they will not due to Human 
interference and that saddens me greatly. 



Roger Kuhlman

Ann Arbor, Michigan


2016 was not a great Monarch year in southeast Michigan.


________________________________
From: leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu  on 
behalf of Candace Fallon  

Sent: Wednesday, December 7, 2016 3:29 PM
To: leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
Subject: [Leps-l] New Regional Monarch Nectar Plant Guides Now Available

Monarchs are in decline across North America. With milkweed loss in the east 
identified as a major contributing factor to this decline, the national call to 
action has understandably focused primarily on planting milkweeds, which are 
the required host plants for monarch caterpillars. Yet while restoring the 
millions of milkweed plants that have been lost is certainly an important 
strategy, monarchs need more than milkweed to support them throughout the year. 
Adult monarchs need nectar to fuel them during spring migration and breeding 
and to build up stores of fat which sustain them during fall migration and 
winter. 


There are many sources of information about which species of native milkweeds 
are best for your region, but information on which nectar plants are best for 
monarchs has not been available for large areas of the U.S. Working with the 
Monarch Joint Venture and the National Wildlife Federation, the Xerces Society 
has created a series of nectar plant lists for the continental U.S. based on a 
database of nearly 24,000 monarch nectaring observations. Each of the 15 
regional guides highlights species that are commercially available, are native 
to and widely found in the region, and are known to be hardy or relatively easy 
to grow in a garden setting. 


Read more about this project on our 
blog, 
or find a nectar plant guide for your region 
here. 
These plant lists are works-in-progress and benefit from your help. You can 
submit additional monarch nectaring observations via our online 
survey. 
We are grateful to the many different researchers and monarch enthusiasts 
across the country who have already contributed to our database - thank you! 


--

Candace Fallon

Senior Conservation Biologist

Endangered Species Program



[https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__docs.google.com_a_xerces.org_uc-3Fid-3D0Bx1WNNjAOrmNRHFRbF9EZFZaSnROY1k1ZGE3WUtnN1VRVFo4-26export-3Ddownload&d=CwIFAw&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=jpS2maSERTRWeUJwBRWZXrmH6QGP7XGt2OzbKhUGyW0&s=DPNq0UBnax4gFRvbCGwqu4zay7in7eAS7er62xy8U4c&e= 
] 




Protecting the Life that Sustains Us


628 NE Broadway, Suite 200, Portland, OR, 97232 USA

Tel: (503) 232-6639 ext. 118 |  Fax: (503) 233-6794




xerces.org 
Facebook 
Instagram 
Twitter 
Blog 
_______________________________________________
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http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
Subject: Re: New Regional Monarch Nectar Plant Guides Now Available
From: Paul Cherubini <monarch AT saber.net>
Date: Wed, 7 Dec 2016 13:57:09 -0800
> Candace Fallon wrote:
> 
> Monarchs are in decline across North America. With milkweed
> loss in the east identified as a major contributing factor to this
> decline, Yet while restoring the millions of milkweed plants that
> have been lost is certainly an important strategy, monarchs 
> need nectar to fuel them during spring migration and breeding and to
> build up stores of fat which sustain them during fall migration and winter.

Important strategy to accomplish what?  Stabilize the milkweed plant &
monarch population decline? Reverse the decline?   Xerces doesn’t 
specify, but instead talks in vague quantitative generalities like the 
effort will “help save the monarch migration”. 

An inconvenient truth is it's not ever going to be logistically feasible 
for monarch enthusiasts or scientists to conduct “annual milkweed 
and nectar plant patch/stem counts" on even a County, let alone 
Statewide, scale to obtain baseline plant stem abundance data.  
So because baseline abundance data will never be obtainable 
it will likewise never be possible for Xerces to tell us whether
the number of milkweed & nectar plant patches/stems is actually 
increasing over time.  

Paul Cherubini
El Dorado, Calif._______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
Subject: New Regional Monarch Nectar Plant Guides Now Available
From: Candace Fallon <candace.fallon AT xerces.org>
Date: Wed, 7 Dec 2016 12:29:43 -0800
Monarchs are in decline across North America. With milkweed loss in the
east identified as a major contributing factor to this decline, the
national call to action has understandably focused primarily on planting
milkweeds, which are the required host plants for monarch caterpillars. Yet
while restoring the millions of milkweed plants that have been lost is
certainly an important strategy, monarchs need more than milkweed to
support them throughout the year. Adult monarchs need nectar to fuel them
during spring migration and breeding and to build up stores of fat which
sustain them during fall migration and winter.

There are many sources of information about which species of native
milkweeds are best for your region, but information on which nectar plants
are best for monarchs has not been available for large areas of the
U.S. Working with the Monarch Joint Venture and the National Wildlife
Federation, the Xerces Society has created a series of nectar plant lists
for the continental U.S. based on a database of nearly 24,000 monarch
nectaring observations. Each of the 15 regional guides highlights species
that are commercially available, are native to and widely found in the
region, and are known to be hardy or relatively easy to grow in a garden
setting.

Read more about this project on our blog

, 

or find a nectar plant guide for your region here

. These plant lists are 

works-in-progress and benefit from your help. You can submit additional
monarch nectaring observations via our online survey

. 

We are grateful to the many different researchers and monarch enthusiasts
across the country who have already contributed to our database - thank you!

-- 

*Candace Fallon*

Senior Conservation Biologist

Endangered Species Program





*Protecting the Life that Sustains Us*


628 NE Broadway, Suite 200, Portland, OR, 97232 USA

Tel: (503) 232-6639 ext. 118 |  Fax: (503) 233-6794



*xerces.org* 
 *Facebook* 


 

*Instagram* 
 *Twitter 


* *Blog 


* 
_______________________________________________
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http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
Subject: Intro to new funding opportunities for your work
From: Katharine Corriveau <katharine AT instrumentl.com>
Date: Tue, 29 Nov 2016 08:00:51 -0800
Hi Leps-l-ers,

Instrumentl is the place to find grants if you're in the fields of biology,
ecology, evolution, and natural resources. And we just launched a new plan
you can use entirely for free.

Try it out yourself at: www.instrumentl.com

 


Best,

Katharine

PS - Questions? please email: katharine AT instrumentl.com

-- 
Katharine Corriveau
Co-founder
Instrumentl
(510) 684-4978

Follow us on Facebook 
 and Twitter 


 

Visit us at: www 
.instrumentl.com 

ᐧ
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Subject: Ragwort Briefing
From: Neil Jones <neil AT aurinia.co.uk>
Date: Tue, 1 Nov 2016 18:26:39 +0000
Respected environmental organisation, Friends of the Earth has issued a 
Briefing  on Ragwort a plant that is native to the UK
and which is subject to a hysterical campaign of misinformation,Ragwort: 
Problem plant or scapegoat? 

 


It is one of the most valuable plants for insect biodiversity.

There is also a blog entry which is associated with this document.Is 
ragwort poisonous? A ragwort mythbuster 

 


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Subject: New LepSoc website
From: "John V. Calhoun" <bretcal1 AT verizon.net>
Date: Wed, 7 Sep 2016 15:42:01 -0400

It is my great pleasure to announce the launch of the new Lepidopterists' 
Society website! Todd Gilligan and his wife have spent a great deal of time 
working on this project, which is now a reality. You can visit the new website 
at www.lepsoc.org. 



Its attributes include:    


- New design, scales automatically to all screen resolutions and devices, 
including tablets and phones 

- New logo and graphics, branding consistent with new brochures and meeting 
displays 

- Improved membership join/renew forms with automatic shipping options, late 
fee options, with a seamless Paypal back-end for payment 

- Membership login allows access to new Journal content on BioOne
- Older Journal articles and News articles continue to be hosted at Yale
- Resource pages on conservation, education, the Season Summary, etc.
- Information on the Society including history, officers, committees, etc.


Most significant changes are behind the scenes, such as:


- New membership database is online and updated in real time as new accounts 
are created/activated 

- Membership database can be easily exported into Excel for creating the 
directory, archiving, etc. 

- New membership or renewal transactions are automatically coordinated with the 
database and Paypal 

- The Assistant Secretary has the ability to validate new membership 
information before activating their accounts 

- Users have the ability to edit/update their own account information directly 
on the website 

- Purchases from the website automatically calculate the correct shipping 
amounts 

- Member logins that provide access to protected pages allow for future posting 
of members-only web content 

- The entire site is based on a Drupal content management system that allows 
for different levels of administration 

- Up-to-date coding assures compatibility with future web browsers and devices


NOTE: Everything on the new website is currently accessible to the general 
public EXCEPT the last 5 years of Journal articles, which are hosted on the 
BioOne website. These issues are only available to LepSoc members, who may 
access them via a user login. This user login can also be used to update member 
account information on the new LepSoc website. All other content on the LepSoc 
website is accessible without logging on. We will soon be sending login 
information to all current members for whom we have a valid email address. If 
you have questions about the new website please contact info AT lepsoc.org. 



The Lepidopterists' Society is indebted to the Gilligans for bringing this 
wonderful new website to life! 



Happy surfing!
John


----------------
John V. Calhoun
Research Associate
McGuire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity
Florida Museum of Natural History
University of Florida 
Gainesville, Florida USA
President, The Lepidopterists' Society


"Of all the offspring of Time, Error is the most ancient, and is so old and 
familiar an acquaintance, that Truth, when discovered, comes upon most of us 
like an intruder, and meets the intruder's welcome." --C. Mackay, 1841 








_______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
Subject: LepSoc webpage
From: "John V. Calhoun" <bretcal1 AT verizon.net>
Date: Tue, 30 Aug 2016 15:09:39 -0400
As many of you may know, Todd Gilligan has been hard at work on a new and 
improved website for LepSoc. It is nearly ready to go live. During the final 
stages, the current webpage (www.lepsoc.org) will be taken down (or at least 
password protected) for a couple of days. It should be up again by September 
1st, if not before. We will send out another announcement when the new site is 
live. 



Thank you for your patience--it will be worth the wait!
John



----------------
John V. Calhoun
Research Associate
McGuire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity
Florida Museum of Natural History
University of Florida 
Gainesville, Florida USA
President, The Lepidopterists' Society


"Of all the offspring of Time, Error is the most ancient, and is so old and 
familiar an acquaintance, that Truth, when discovered, comes upon most of us 
like an intruder, and meets the intruder's welcome." --C. Mackay, 1841 








_______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
Subject: Re: Request for information on the taxonomic status and evolution of Papilio appalachiensis
From: Neil Jones <neil AT aurinia.co.uk>
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2016 22:17:25 +0100
Being British I don't profess to have any special knowledge on this taxon
but I am good at ferreting out internet information.

This paper makes a brief reference

http://images.peabody.yale.edu/lepsoc/jls/2000s/2008/2008-62-1-018.pdf

This is one of the references given  in it and it isn't on your list.
MERCADER , R. & J.M. SCRIBER. 2007. Diversification of host use in two
polyphagous butterflies: differences in oviposition specificity or
host rank hierarchy? Entomol. Exp. et Appl. 129:89

This might be worth a glance too.

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__personal.kent.edu_-7Emlehner1_willow.pdf&d=CwID-g&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=ZVRqYtST4vu96g22H0TkBtAV8ayL_iZfTSQcX5GMIaI&s=4gRLjsDYPmLfhIOXKJscnOSk1OdKBGMq20Naz-AXWQE&e= 


I don't know if any of this is of any use to you but
it may help.

Neil Jones
neil AT aurinia.co.uk




On 26/08/16 21:22, Dick Vane-Wright wrote:
> *Published papers and open data sources regarding the taxonomic status 
> of /Papilio appalachiensis/ (Pavulaan & Wright, 2002) (Papilionidae) *
> *– a request for information*
> Input is kindly requested regarding publications not included in the 
> list below, and/or any database or other information available in the 
> public domain, relevant to making an assessment of the taxonomic 
> status of /Papilio appalachiensis /(Pavulaan & Wright, 2002). This 
> information is desired by the North American Butterfly Association 
> Scientific Names Committee prior to adding this taxon as a distinct 
> species, or not as the case may be, to the NABA checklist 
> 
(https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.naba.org_pubs_enames2-5F3.html&d=CwID-g&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=ZVRqYtST4vu96g22H0TkBtAV8ayL_iZfTSQcX5GMIaI&s=nHuXHugyy09XXkUqq2ibzq6wNi9ZH1gdBO-zyg7yHho&e= 

> 
). 

> Any such action by NABA carries no special weight or significance for 
> other groups, individuals, checklists, scientific institutions or 
> purposes. However, the information presented in each case is typically 
> extensive, and the full results and argumentation are made openly 
> available. The procedure of the committee, with an example of a recent 
> report covering several decisions, can be seen by accessing and freely 
> downloading the following two papers from the NABA website:
> Vane-Wright, [R.I.] & Glassberg, J.**2012. The new NABA names 
> committee: members and procedures. /American Butterflies/ 19(2/4): 
> 50–65. 
(https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.naba.org_pubs_ab192_ab192NABA-5FNames-5FCommittee.pdf&d=CwID-g&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=ZVRqYtST4vu96g22H0TkBtAV8ayL_iZfTSQcX5GMIaI&s=_P3X085k2WYCRyCwjRzHCIjnYDnyGSsJDoe56X-PfTo&e= 

> 
) 

> NABA Names Committee. 2016. Second Interim Report of the NABA Names 
> Committee. /American Butterflies /23(3/4): 26–45. 
> 
(https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.naba.org_ftp_2016-5FInterim-5FReport-5FNABA-5FNames-5FCommittee.pdf&d=CwID-g&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=ZVRqYtST4vu96g22H0TkBtAV8ayL_iZfTSQcX5GMIaI&s=IHM10wGFvVZBrsqtTZcB02KYnYBsvzZMuy9pKYcZg-Q&e= 

> 
) 

> Material assistance with this process will be acknowledged in the 
> eventual report. With thanks in advance, on behalf of the NABA 
> Scientific Names Committee and myself, for the receipt of any relevant 
> information. Please also copy anything posted direct to 
> dickvanewright AT btinternet.com
> Dick Vane-Wright
> Canterbury, Kent, UK
> Chair, NABA Scientific Names Committee
> dickvanewright AT btinternet.com
> *Current working list of published papers relevant to the status of 
> /Papilio appalachiensis/*
> Cong, C., Borek, D., Otwinowski, Z. & Grishin, N.V. 2015. Tiger 
> swallowtail genome reveals mechanisms for speciation and caterpillar 
> chemical defense. /Cell Reports/ *10*: 910–919. 
> doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2015.01.026 
> 
 

> Hagen, R.H., Lederhouse, R.C., Bossart, J.L. & Scriber, J.M. 1991. 
> /Papilio canadensis/ and /P. glaucus/ (Papilionidae) are distinct 
> species. /Journal of the Lepidopterists’ Society/ *45*(4): 245–258. 
> 
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www2.southeastern.edu_Academics_Faculty_jbossart_reprint_Hagen-5Fetal.pdf&d=CwID-g&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=ZVRqYtST4vu96g22H0TkBtAV8ayL_iZfTSQcX5GMIaI&s=2iq_KJWhts0L9fk3S1o1HZcbOpGCTu7kMHcy7ytaKPM&e= 

> 
 

> Kunte, K., Shea, C., Aardema, M.L., Scriber, J.M., Juenger, T.E., 
> Gilbert, L.E. & Kronforst, M.R. 2011. Sex chromosome mosaicism and 
> hybrid speciation among tiger swallowtail butterflies. /PLoS Genetics/ 
> *7*(9): e1002274 [14 pp.]. doi: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1002274
> LeGrand, H.E. Jr. 2016. /Butterflies of North Carolina – twenty-third 
> Approximation/. 
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__nature123.net_pdf_23rd.pdf&d=CwID-g&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=ZVRqYtST4vu96g22H0TkBtAV8ayL_iZfTSQcX5GMIaI&s=7tUgZehOwcmnErtzcQ28q4fdwYT06GvEbttkL0fwlZo&e= 

> 
(accessed 

> 24th August 2016; see page 6)
> Ording, G.J., Mercader, R.J., Aardema, M.L. & Scriber, J.M. 2010. 
> Allochronic isolation and incipient hybrid speciation in tiger 
> swallowtail butterflies. /Oecologia/ *162*: 523–531. doi: 
> 10.1007/s00442-009-1493-8 
> 
 

> Pavulaan, H. & Wright, D.M. 2002. /Pterous appalachiensis/ 
> (Papilionidae: Papilioninae), a new swallowtail butterfly from the 
> Appalachian region of the United States. /The Taxonomic Report of the 
> International Lepidoptera Survey /*3*(7): 1–20. 
> 
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__lepsurvey.carolinanature.com_ttr_ttr-2D3-2D7.pdf&d=CwID-g&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=ZVRqYtST4vu96g22H0TkBtAV8ayL_iZfTSQcX5GMIaI&s=DieCYYE-DJkn95sqaMi1bDV-T_njysmm70-Hnt8Tq8k&e= 

> 
 

> Pavulaan, H. & Wright, D.M. 2004. Discovery of a black female form of 
> /Pterourus appalachiensis/ (Papilionidae: Papilioninae) and additional 
> observations of the species in West Virginia. /Taxonomic Report of the 
> International Lepidoptera Survey /*6*(1): 1–10. 
> 
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.carolinanature.com_butterflies_ttr-2D6-2D1.pdf&d=CwID-g&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=ZVRqYtST4vu96g22H0TkBtAV8ayL_iZfTSQcX5GMIaI&s=PIdadx6qbO5t5Y8VZKJ-XZa2IteN3ySdKg7EQvTBPgA&e= 

> 
 

> Scriber, J.M. 2011. Impacts of climate warming on hybrid zone 
> movement: Geographically diffuse and biologically porous ‘‘species 
> borders’’. /Insect Science/ *18*: 121–159. doi: 
> 10.1111/j.1744-7917.2010.01367.x
> Scriber, J.M. 2014. Climate-driven reshuffling of species and genes: 
> potential conservation roles for species translocations and 
> recombinant hybrid genotypes. /Insects/ *5*: 1–61. 
> doi:10.3390/insects5010001
> Scriber, J.M. & Ording, G.J. 2005. Ecological speciation without host 
> plant specialization; possible origins of a recently described cryptic 
> /Papilio/ species. /Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata/ *115*: 
> 247–263. doi: 10.1111/j.1570-7458.2005.00285.x
> Scriber, J.M., Ording, G.J. & Mercader, R.J. 2008. Introgression and 
> parapatric speciation in a hybrid zone. /In/: Tilmon, K.J. (ed.) 
> /Specialization, speciation, and radiation: the evolutionary biology 
> of herbivorous insects/. Berkeley, California: University of 
> California Press. pp 69–87.
> Scriber, J.M., Romack, H. & Deering, M.D. 2009. Aberrant color 
> patterns in the /Papilio/ and an update on the semi-melanic 
> “fletcheri” variants, including females (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae). 
> /Journal of the Lepidopterists’ Society/ *63*(2): 118–126. 
> http://images.peabody.yale.edu/lepsoc/jls/2000s/2009/2009-63-2-118.pdf
> Zhang, W., Kunte, K. & Kronforst, M.R. 2013. Genome-wide 
> characterization of adaptation and speciation in tiger swallowtail 
> butterflies using de novo transcriptome assemblies. /Genome Biology 
> and Evolution/ *5*(6): 1233–1245. doi:10.1093/gbe/evt090
> August 2016
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Leps-l mailing list
> Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
> http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
_______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
Subject: Request for information on the taxonomic status and evolution of Papilio appalachiensis
From: Dick Vane-Wright <dickvanewright AT btinternet.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Aug 2016 20:22:02 +0000 (UTC)
Publishedpapers and open data sources regarding the taxonomic status of Papilio 
appalachiensis (Pavulaan &Wright, 2002) (Papilionidae) 


–a request for information


 
Input is kindly requested regarding publications notincluded in the list below, 
and/or any database or other information availablein the public domain, 
relevant to making an assessment of the taxonomic statusof Papilio 
appalachiensis (Pavulaan& Wright, 2002). This information is desired by the 
North American ButterflyAssociation Scientific Names Committee prior to adding 
this taxon as a distinctspecies, or not as the case may be, to the NABA 
checklist 
(https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.naba.org_pubs_enames2-5F3.html&d=CwIFaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=X7aUPHKQiYVMawt9bilDxfNSxMQdGV8flLZuUsBhYI8&s=SMSYVD3K4Y87odCx5F0qjucHM_Ldn66nMERDXfE8pnI&e= 
). 


Any such action by NABA carries no special weight orsignificance for other 
groups, individuals, checklists, scientific institutionsor purposes. However, 
the information presented in each case is typically extensive,and the full 
results and argumentation are made openly available. The procedureof the 
committee, with an example of a recent report covering several decisions,can be 
seen by accessing and freely downloading the following two papers fromthe NABA 
website: 


Vane-Wright, [R.I.]& Glassberg, J. 2012. The newNABA names committee: members 
and procedures. American Butterflies 19(2/4): 50–65. 
(https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.naba.org_pubs_ab192_ab192NABA-5FNames-5FCommittee.pdf&d=CwIFaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=X7aUPHKQiYVMawt9bilDxfNSxMQdGV8flLZuUsBhYI8&s=CWMJEwZjV6T__8Pquj9-dTJl6CEYwKpl8WcKHr4viss&e= 
) 


NABA Names Committee. 2016. Second InterimReport of the NABA Names Committee. 
AmericanButterflies 23(3/4): 
26–45.(https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.naba.org_ftp_2016-5FInterim-5FReport-5FNABA-5FNames-5FCommittee.pdf&d=CwIFaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=X7aUPHKQiYVMawt9bilDxfNSxMQdGV8flLZuUsBhYI8&s=HDUNiRj4cMAD-Jdpw7ttvw-DHgo4Q1TxnWjls5RijLg&e= 
) 



 
Materialassistance with this process will be acknowledged in the eventual 
report. Withthanks in advance, on behalf of the NABA Scientific Names Committee 
and myself,for the receipt of any relevant information. Please also copy 
anything posted direct to dickvanewright AT btinternet.com 



 
Dick Vane-Wright

Canterbury, Kent, UK

Chair, NABA Scientific Names Committee

dickvanewright AT btinternet.com


 
Current workinglist of published papers relevant to the status of Papilio 
appalachiensis 


Cong, C., Borek, D., Otwinowski, Z. &Grishin, N.V. 2015. Tiger swallowtail 
genome reveals mechanisms for speciationand caterpillar chemical defense. 
CellReports 10: 910–919. doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2015.01.026 


Hagen, R.H., Lederhouse, R.C., Bossart, J.L.& Scriber, J.M. 1991. 
Papiliocanadensis and P. glaucus(Papilionidae) are distinct species. Journalof 
the Lepidopterists’ Society 45(4):245–258.  



https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www2.southeastern.edu_Academics_Faculty_jbossart_reprint_Hagen-5Fetal.pdfKunte&d=CwIFaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=X7aUPHKQiYVMawt9bilDxfNSxMQdGV8flLZuUsBhYI8&s=nVjZNFZsvMkLF5ELDr8Np3X-dPKC6CHmlbLamRtR2Zs&e= 
, K., Shea, C., Aardema, M.L., Scriber, J.M., Juenger, T.E.,Gilbert, L.E. & 
Kronforst, M.R. 2011. Sex chromosome mosaicism and hybridspeciation among tiger 
swallowtail butterflies. PLoS Genetics 7(9):e1002274 [14 pp.]. doi: 
10.1371/journal.pgen.1002274 


LeGrand, H.E. Jr. 2016. Butterfliesof North Carolina– twenty-third 
Approximation. https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__nature123.net_pdf_23rd.pdf-28accessed&d=CwIFaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=X7aUPHKQiYVMawt9bilDxfNSxMQdGV8flLZuUsBhYI8&s=9sJZKA4cwfbz_svuYwCHSmAAJ54ajbVzJ0t3vaGdOtc&e= 
24th August 2016; see page 6) 


Ording, G.J., Mercader, R.J., Aardema, M.L. & Scriber, J.M.2010. Allochronic 
isolation and incipient hybrid speciation in tigerswallowtail butterflies. 
Oecologia 162: 523–531. doi: 10.1007/s00442-009-1493-8 


Pavulaan,H. & Wright, D.M. 2002. Pterousappalachiensis (Papilionidae: 
Papilioninae), a new swallowtail butterflyfrom the Appalachian region of the 
United States. The Taxonomic Report of theInternational Lepidoptera Survey 
3(7): 1–20.  



https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__lepsurvey.carolinanature.com_ttr_ttr-2D3-2D7.pdfPavulaan&d=CwIFaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=X7aUPHKQiYVMawt9bilDxfNSxMQdGV8flLZuUsBhYI8&s=4pmuC91sg-vadzd8IlKrEgbpUTB2L3TsNGgORi6TvUw&e= 
, H. & Wright, D.M. 2004. Discovery of a black femaleform of Pterourus 
appalachiensis(Papilionidae: Papilioninae) and additional observations of the 
species in West Virginia. TaxonomicReport of the International Lepidoptera 
Survey 6(1): 1–10.  



https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.carolinanature.com_butterflies_ttr-2D6-2D1.pdfScriber&d=CwIFaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=X7aUPHKQiYVMawt9bilDxfNSxMQdGV8flLZuUsBhYI8&s=RfVzDnX_p8Hp1B8xpb6Sw6R6mB8QhMFbM5YU0OIUYcI&e= 
, J.M. 2011. Impacts of climate warming on hybrid zonemovement: Geographically 
diffuse and biologically porous ‘‘species borders’’. Insect Science 18: 
121–159. doi:10.1111/j.1744-7917.2010.01367.x 


Scriber, J.M.2014. Climate-driven reshuffling of species and genes: potential 
conservationroles for species translocations and recombinant hybrid genotypes. 
Insects 5: 1–61. doi:10.3390/insects5010001 


Scriber, J.M. & Ording, G.J. 2005. Ecological speciationwithout host plant 
specialization; possible origins of a recently describedcryptic Papilio 
species. Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata 115: 247–263. 
doi:10.1111/j.1570-7458.2005.00285.x 


Scriber, J.M., Ording, G.J. & Mercader, R.J. 2008.Introgression and parapatric 
speciation in a hybrid zone. In: Tilmon, K.J. (ed.) Specialization,speciation, 
and radiation: the evolutionary biology of herbivorous insects.Berkeley, 
California:University of California Press. pp 69–87. 


Scriber, J.M., Romack, H. & Deering, M.D. 2009. Aberrant colorpatterns in the 
Papilio and an updateon the semi-melanic “fletcheri” variants, including 
females (Lepidoptera:Papilionidae). Journal of theLepidopterists’ Society 
63(2):118–126.  


http://images.peabody.yale.edu/lepsoc/jls/2000s/2009/2009-63-2-118.pdfZhang, 
W., Kunte,K. & Kronforst, M.R. 2013. Genome-wide characterization of adaptation 
andspeciation in tiger swallowtail butterflies using de novo 
transcriptomeassemblies. Genome Biology and Evolution5(6): 
1233–1245.doi:10.1093/gbe/evt090 



 
August 2016
_______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
Subject: Re: What is the Evidence that Spring and Summer Azures are separate ...
From: Roger Kuhlman <rkuhlman AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 10:10:32 -0400
So does that mean there are clear and consistent generic DNA sequencing 
differences between C. ladon and C. neglecta? Or is it the case differences may 
exist but those differences may be due to sampling error. Has it been 
established C. neglecta are not and can not be second and third brood seasonal 
variants of ladon? Could you raise ladon larva to become adult neglecta 
lookalikes under certain environmental conditions? Have not people in the past 
claimed that to be true? I do not know what to think on any of these questions. 


Roger Kuhlman
Ann Arbor, Michigan

From: BPatter789 AT aol.com
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2016 15:16:53 -0400
Subject: Re: [Leps-l] What is the Evidence that Spring and Summer Azures are 
separate ... 

To: rkuhlman AT hotmail.com






Dear Roger,
 
See the recent research article at ZooKeys that treats of this genus:
 

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__zookeys.pensoft.net_articles.php-3Fid-3D7882&d=CwIFAw&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=CiWJztWI9CpBhNRc22cp0m3w8j6pbvFI7AP8fWxWrKM&s=kuoaHNu5pqyOOMzzKGzcV3Xtq5gdnOSkLhxynLQgkek&e= 

 
What Azure blues occur in Canada? A re-assessment of Celastrina Tutt species 
(Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae)B. 

Christian Schmidt, Ross A. Layberry
 
Spring Azure (Celastrina ladon) 
and Summer Azure (Celastrina neglecta) are good 
species.
 

Bob Patterson
Bowie, Maryland, USA
(301) 262-2459 p.m. hours 
only
Moth Photographers 
Group
 
=======================================
 

In a message dated 8/22/2016 11:53:03 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time, 
rkuhlman AT hotmail.com writes:

  I would like to know if there is good evidence that Spring Azure 
 (Celastrina ladon) and Summer Azure (Celastrina neglecta) are separate species 

  or only just seasonal variants of the same species. Sure they look different 
  but they appear in exactly the same habitats at least that is true in 
 southeast Michigan. I think they may also use the same larval host-plants here 

  although I can not substantiate that claim. 

Roger Kuhlman
Ann 
  Arbor, 
  Michigan
=

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Subject: What is the Evidence that Spring and Summer Azures are separate species
From: Roger Kuhlman <rkuhlman AT hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 22 Aug 2016 11:51:38 -0400
I would like to know if there is good evidence that Spring Azure (Celastrina 
ladon) and Summer Azure (Celastrina neglecta) are separate species or only just 
seasonal variants of the same species. Sure they look different but they appear 
in exactly the same habitats at least that is true in southeast Michigan. I 
think they may also use the same larval host-plants here although I can not 
substantiate that claim. 


Roger Kuhlman
Ann Arbor, Michigan
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Subject: Expert Identification of a Possible Zabulon Skipper needed
From: Roger Kuhlman <rkuhlman AT hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 20 Aug 2016 20:52:12 -0400
We have a photo of a possible Zabulon Skipper from Washtenaw County in 
southeast Michigan that we need to be confirmed by an expert on the species. 
This butterfly is very rare in southeast Michigan and there have been no recent 
confirmed sightings of the species. It may no longer be resident in our area on 
a permanent basis. I and other local butterfliers do not have the requisite 
skills and experience to make a positive identification but we sure like this 
butterfly to be a Zabulon if it is one. If the butterfly is a Zabulon Skipper 
it would be a very noteworthy butterfly find for our region. 


Seeking help please.

Roger Kuhlman
Ann Arbor, Michigan
8/20/2016
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Subject: Re: Eastern Tiger Swallowtail intermediate morphs
From: Tony Thomas <mothman AT nbnet.nb.ca>
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 17:16:48 -0300
A Canadian Tiger Swallowtail was photographed recently in New Brunswick, 
Canada that had white forewings:


https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdingnewbrunswick.ca_group_bnbbutterflygroup_forum_topics_tiger-2Dswallowtail&d=CwIC-g&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=BiInUTkPysBFHBJWvNomShhrGhWkmEBSlvvlMJQPZRI&s=CF88rrdWbyOVKwr2jyQU14PiGux7tTj3JtRoFRNenFk&e= 


On 21/06/2016 4:38 PM, David Hamilton Cox wrote:
> In the May 2016 issue of the "Potomac Appalachian Newsletter", available 
here: 

>
> 
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.patc.net_PATC_Library_Newsletter-5FArchives.aspx&d=CwICAg&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=nrCHxoOnUXnPVsa6s8KQTU8N2CkpZ_0Jd6Vrln758rs&s=KXFWodLt7AXdJeLkv7rvmlicJ3RBvmQn5uo-pX_u2wE&e= 

>
>   an articled entitled "HIKER'S NOTEBOOK: EASTERN TIGER SWALLOWTAIL BUTTERFLY
> THE LADY AND THE TIGER" by William Needham, starting on page 7, states on
> page 9 that:
>
> "Recent genomic research of this phenomenon has revealed that it is a very
> simple process; melanism is controlled by a single gene that converts the
> yellow background to black."
>
>   I occasionally see female Tiger Swallowtails that appear to be intermediate
> between the yellow and black morph, such as this one I photographed in 
Madison 

> County, Virginia on April 15 of this year: 
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.nyx.net_-7Edhcox_tiger.jpg&d=CwICAg&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=nrCHxoOnUXnPVsa6s8KQTU8N2CkpZ_0Jd6Vrln758rs&s=K5pLHggxDhG64gUBuYLKyQz7tMzOXQ15jArX_28pcvM&e= 

>
>   How can this partial change occur if only one gene is involved? I realize
> I am probably displaying a rather complete lack of how genes work but
> thought I would at least ask.
>
> -David Cox
> _______________________________________________
> Leps-l mailing list
> Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
> http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
>

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Subject: Eastern Tiger Swallowtail intermediate morphs
From: dhcox AT nyx.net (David Hamilton Cox)
Date: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 13:38:55 -0600 (MDT)
 In the May 2016 issue of the "Potomac Appalachian Newsletter", available here:


https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.patc.net_PATC_Library_Newsletter-5FArchives.aspx&d=CwICAg&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=nrCHxoOnUXnPVsa6s8KQTU8N2CkpZ_0Jd6Vrln758rs&s=KXFWodLt7AXdJeLkv7rvmlicJ3RBvmQn5uo-pX_u2wE&e= 


 an articled entitled "HIKER'S NOTEBOOK: EASTERN TIGER SWALLOWTAIL BUTTERFLY 
THE LADY AND THE TIGER" by William Needham, starting on page 7, states on
page 9 that:

"Recent genomic research of this phenomenon has revealed that it is a very 
simple process; melanism is controlled by a single gene that converts the 
yellow background to black."

 I occasionally see female Tiger Swallowtails that appear to be intermediate
between the yellow and black morph, such as this one I photographed in Madison 
County, Virginia on April 15 of this year: 
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.nyx.net_-7Edhcox_tiger.jpg&d=CwICAg&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=nrCHxoOnUXnPVsa6s8KQTU8N2CkpZ_0Jd6Vrln758rs&s=K5pLHggxDhG64gUBuYLKyQz7tMzOXQ15jArX_28pcvM&e= 


 How can this partial change occur if only one gene is involved? I realize
I am probably displaying a rather complete lack of how genes work but 
thought I would at least ask.

-David Cox
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Subject: Fwd: ID Pterophoridae
From: Eduardo Nadal <ejnadal AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2016 14:49:06 -0300
Hi Mr. Cees Gielis,
I am a nature photographer from Argentina. I found many articles about this
family written by you, and I wonder if you could help me to identify the
species of the two pictures attached. Both of them were taken in Buenos
Aires, Argentina.
Thanks a lot for your help.
Sincerely

Eduardo Nadal
www.ecoregistros.org/EduardoNadal_______________________________________________
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Subject: Finding taxonomic descriptions
From: Neil Jones <neil AT aurinia.co.uk>
Date: Sat, 9 Apr 2016 19:48:43 +0100
Where would one look to find the original taxonomic descriptions of a 
species or subspecies?

For example, and it is only an example. Papilio machaon hispanicus Eller 
1936

Neil Jones
neil AT aurinia.co.uk
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Subject: Re: The Xerces Society Announces the 2016 Joan Mosenthal DeWind Award Winners
From: "Dana, Robert (DNR)" <robert.dana AT state.mn.us>
Date: Wed, 30 Mar 2016 06:02:19 +0000
Not sure what the teeming monarchs in these videos are evidence for. The dates 
show that the monarch migration was underway when they were recorded. We have 
large numbers of monarchs moving through MN at this time-but where are they 
coming from? Not necessarily from the roadsides and hayfields in the corn-beans 
carpet. 


Robert Dana
Minneapolis

From: leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu [mailto:leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu] 
On Behalf Of Roger Kuhlman 

Sent: Tuesday, March 29, 2016 3:22 PM
To: Leps List
Subject: Re: [Leps-l] The Xerces Society Announces the 2016 Joan Mosenthal 
DeWind Award Winners 


Anecdotal. I would rather not hear about pesticide salesmanship. Thanks.

Roger Kuhlman
Ann Arbor, Michigan
________________________________
From: monarch AT saber.net
Date: Mon, 28 Mar 2016 15:54:43 -0700
To: leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
Subject: Re: [Leps-l] The Xerces Society Announces the 2016 Joan Mosenthal 
DeWind Award Winners 


Monarch butterflies are undergoing a long-term population decline.
Although different factors are hypothesized to cause this decline,
one potential factor is the exposure of their milkweed host plants
to neonicotinoid insecticides when growing in close proximity to
agricultural fields.

The wildflowers and syriaca milkweed plants that are growing next to
the vast corn and soybean fields in the upper Midwest are teaming
with monarch butterflies, other butterflies and bumblebees like this
despite the fact that those crops are grown from neonicotinoid coated
seeds:


https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.youtube.com_watch-3Fv-3DOoPdnTepKok&d=AwIFAg&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=TFRu0npvUt58LKWrw9ByykClWkObx6Jiwjr8EC8kcB8&s=-lnZQs56B8oLtb7P2hnlSMKZCfVXskox9rUgNX6i798&e= 
 



https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.youtube.com_watch-3Fv-3DqeC8-2DrnxenI&d=AwIFAg&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=TFRu0npvUt58LKWrw9ByykClWkObx6Jiwjr8EC8kcB8&s=yQiS1u0koEHvNKh2ezhPL0ROtA9Bhsbbg7ZvdDoD94g&e= 
 


So it would be a real stretch look a midwestern farmer in the eye with a
straight face and say: "mind if we use your property to try and determine
if the neonicotinoid insecticides you use might be a significant cause of
the midwestern monarch population decline?"

Paul Cherubini
El Dorado, Calif.


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Subject: Re: The Xerces Society Announces the 2016 Joan Mosenthal DeWind Award Winners
From: Roger Kuhlman <rkuhlman AT hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 29 Mar 2016 16:21:32 -0400
Anecdotal. I would rather not hear about pesticide salesmanship. Thanks.

Roger Kuhlman
Ann Arbor, Michigan

From: monarch AT saber.net
Date: Mon, 28 Mar 2016 15:54:43 -0700
To: leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
Subject: Re: [Leps-l] The Xerces Society Announces the 2016 Joan Mosenthal 
DeWind Award Winners 



Monarch butterflies
are undergoing a long-term population decline.Although different factors are
hypothesized to cause this decline,one potential factor is the exposure of
their milkweed host plantsto neonicotinoid insecticides when growing in close
proximity toagricultural fields. 
The wildflowers and syriaca milkweed plants that are growing next to the vast 
corn and soybean fields in the upper Midwest are teaming with monarch 
butterflies, other butterflies and bumblebees like thisdespite the fact that 
those crops are grown from neonicotinoid coatedseeds: 


https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.youtube.com_watch-3Fv-3DOoPdnTepKok&d=AwIF-g&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=iGNguAoVI1IeMKlQsJk-G7klHel8n1bEAiv-DyLOJuM&s=TEzu7-3qb0rfTdP8_BsyY8YLMhtFLRIQ0XXTk_BbZlw&e= 


https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.youtube.com_watch-3Fv-3DqeC8-2DrnxenI&d=AwIF-g&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=iGNguAoVI1IeMKlQsJk-G7klHel8n1bEAiv-DyLOJuM&s=2bLItHFkxC-A9BZqvPtr4TTRojPWMAf5FB0MYdxKSPU&e= 

So it would be a real stretch look a midwestern farmer in the eye with a 
straight face and say: “mind if we use your property to try and determineif the 
neonicotinoid insecticides you use might be a significant cause of the 
midwestern monarch population decline?” 

Paul CherubiniEl Dorado, Calif.

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Subject: Re: The Xerces Society Announces the 2016 Joan Mosenthal DeWind Award Winners
From: Paul Cherubini <monarch AT saber.net>
Date: Mon, 28 Mar 2016 15:54:43 -0700
> Monarch butterflies are undergoing a long-term population decline.
> Although different factors are hypothesized to cause this decline,
> one potential factor is the exposure of their milkweed host plants
> to neonicotinoid insecticides when growing in close proximity to
> agricultural fields.

The wildflowers and syriaca milkweed plants that are growing next to 
the vast corn and soybean fields in the upper Midwest are teaming 
with monarch butterflies, other butterflies and bumblebees like this
despite the fact that those crops are grown from neonicotinoid coated
seeds:


https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.youtube.com_watch-3Fv-3DOoPdnTepKok&d=AwIFaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=IR1Eur62NF465yg8v4j0Y7W4Gf7I10i1AMCgOr3hn3Q&s=5F1ShoDKKCj5OLh0dPg4X2NYdp4j0gfKj6s_U6Ou1cg&e= 



https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.youtube.com_watch-3Fv-3DqeC8-2DrnxenI&d=AwIFaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=IR1Eur62NF465yg8v4j0Y7W4Gf7I10i1AMCgOr3hn3Q&s=zGk8LyF_DKu8FxVLtFIoPKdDTb9ekspRaxM5maTOOds&e= 


So it would be a real stretch look a midwestern farmer in the eye with a 
straight face and say: “mind if we use your property to try and determine
if the neonicotinoid insecticides you use might be a significant cause of 
the midwestern monarch population decline?”

Paul Cherubini
El Dorado, Calif.
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Subject: The Xerces Society Announces the 2016 Joan Mosenthal DeWind Award Winners
From: Candace Fallon <candace AT xerces.org>
Date: Mon, 28 Mar 2016 12:12:33 -0700
The Xerces Society is thrilled to announce the two winners of the 2016 Joan
Mosenthal DeWind Awards. From among the exceptional applications we
received, the following two students were selected:



*Paola Olaya-Arenas – Purdue University*

*Non-target effects of neonicotinoid insecticides on monarch butterflies*



Monarch butterflies are undergoing a long-term population decline. Although
different factors are hypothesized to cause this decline, one potential
factor is the exposure of their milkweed host plants to neonicotinoid
insecticides when growing in close proximity to agricultural fields.
Neonicotinoids are a relatively new class of pesticides that were recently
associated with the decline of widespread butterflies inhabiting farmland
in England and result in lethal and sublethal effects on insects feeding on
nectar, pollen, and leaves. Evaluating the effect of neonicotinoids in the
monarch–milkweed system will help guide restoration efforts that aim to
protect monarchs and other Lepidoptera specialized on milkweed.



*Cameron Thomas – Washington State University Vancouver, School of
Biological Sciences*

*Factors associated with ant tending in Fender’s blue butterfly (Plebejus
icarioides fenderi): assessing an understudied and potentially significant
mutualistic relationship*



Fender’s blue butterfly, *Plebejus icarioides fenderi *(Macy), survives in
remnant prairie habitat in Oregon’s Willamette Valley. Research involving
habitat restoration has focused primarily on how invasive vegetation
affects the adult stage, but recent work suggests ant tending of
caterpillars may significantly increase population growth rate. In this
project, we will systematically document ant tending and associated biotic
and abiotic factors in Fender's blue larvae by its ant mutualists with a
specific focus on the vegetation gradient among nine sites. Results aim to
inform restoration efforts relative to vegetation structure during the
larval phase, a stage that may be more significant for conservation of this
butterfly than previously documented.



The DeWind committee and the board and staff of the Society congratulate
Paola and Cameron and thank all the applicants for their outstanding
efforts in invertebrate conservation.



The DeWind Awards are given to individuals engaged in studies or research
leading to a university degree related to Lepidoptera research and
conservation, and working or intending to work in that field. Joan
Mosenthal DeWind was a pioneering member of the Xerces Society. A
psychiatric social worker by profession, she was also an avid butterfly
gardener and an accomplished amateur lepidopterist. Her contributions of
time, organizational expertise, and financial support were essential to the
growth and success of the Xerces Society over the past 40 years. Joan also
had a keen interest in young people, supporting what became the Young
Entomologists’ Society. In Joan’s memory, Bill DeWind established a student
research endowment fund in her name.



For more information on the DeWind Award, visit

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.xerces.org_joan-2Ddewind-2Daward_&d=AwIFaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=s-PqBMWMiULwtRb9uGzpi7I3eOBlY6YRs7eQFy4d2WQ&s=SqhxJ5n6RKQgWPV3rapWcKgkxtbnEg1NMVuC3tn6Rlk&e= 
and read our blog post on this 

year’s winners here

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.xerces.org_blog_investing-2Din-2Dthe-2Dfuture-2Dof-2Dlepidoptera-2Dconservation_&d=AwIFaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=s-PqBMWMiULwtRb9uGzpi7I3eOBlY6YRs7eQFy4d2WQ&s=k4tgzKgoosDN5Mdtfx3zITB20YLJwgvsnCGQ7yDm-h4&e= 

.



*Candace Fallon*

Conservation Biologist

Endangered Species Program


*The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation *

*Protecting the Life that Sustains Us*


628 NE Broadway, Suite 200, Portland, OR, 97232 USA

Tel: (503) 232-6639 ext. 118 |  Fax: (503) 233-6794



*xerces.org* 
 *Facebook* 


 

*E-newsletter* 
 *Twitter 


* 
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Subject: butterfly-like fossil lacewing
From: Bill Cornelius <billcor AT mcn.org>
Date: Wed, 3 Feb 2016 22:18:42 -0800
this is kinda cool: 
Smithsonian scientists discover butterfly-like fossil insect in the deep 
Mesozoic 
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.eurekalert.org_pub-5Freleases_2016-2D02_s-2Dssd020316.php&d=AwIFAg&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=C4o9pxorf1famNBZPdr_tXAUXSIHyglpCF5yYxMFqus&s=m_bh6Q-0aaEaKWPwXvgM51nQU_SAAHEIIy1kEwTMglo&e= 


Bill :)
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Subject: Re: 2016 Lepidopterists' Society Meeting details
From: "Rick" <rcech AT nyc.rr.com>
Date: Wed, 3 Feb 2016 20:19:44 -0500
Sorry, private message went viral


 

From: leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu [mailto:leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu] 
On Behalf Of Rick 

Sent: Wednesday, February 03, 2016 8:06 PM
To: 'Todd Gilligan' ; LEPS-L AT mailman.yale.edu
Subject: Re: [Leps-l] 2016 Lepidopterists' Society Meeting details

 

We need to sign up for this, let’s discuss


 

From: leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu  
[mailto:leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu] On Behalf Of Todd Gilligan 

Sent: Tuesday, December 15, 2015 4:29 PM
To: LEPS-L AT mailman.yale.edu  
Subject: [Leps-l] 2016 Lepidopterists' Society Meeting details

 

Hi Everyone,

Please see the following page regarding details for the 2016 Lepidopterists' 
Society Meeting to be held near Florissant, Colorado, July 6-10. Please let me 
know if you have any questions. Thank you! 



https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.lepsoc.org_2016-5Fmeeting.php&d=AwIFaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=kHPZ_lfHLgiyiRmr4inqL8_r_1B_Ccjea0qjHOqHOyw&s=g42QkC9I1YEngacXfFmnC7ogXfh9YqiM05NSNI8QJZA&e= 
 

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Subject: Re: 2016 Lepidopterists' Society Meeting details
From: "Rick" <rcech AT nyc.rr.com>
Date: Wed, 3 Feb 2016 20:05:40 -0500
We need to sign up for this, let’s discuss


 

From: leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu [mailto:leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu] 
On Behalf Of Todd Gilligan 

Sent: Tuesday, December 15, 2015 4:29 PM
To: LEPS-L AT mailman.yale.edu
Subject: [Leps-l] 2016 Lepidopterists' Society Meeting details

 

Hi Everyone,

Please see the following page regarding details for the 2016 Lepidopterists' 
Society Meeting to be held near Florissant, Colorado, July 6-10. Please let me 
know if you have any questions. Thank you! 



https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.lepsoc.org_2016-5Fmeeting.php&d=AwIFaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=ExV44MY0_5lUi4HlE5uI6n5npGY18M9dREzr4WcOhFw&s=-NHqsSLc7B-5OB_uFD-MgVB5WOz_Nq0Rvy24vOkzzrg&e= 
 

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Subject: Re: ID and explanation requested, female micro
From: Richard Worth <rworth AT oda.state.or.us>
Date: Mon, 25 Jan 2016 15:31:34 -0800
Hi Tony,
Your critter looks to be possibly Swammerdamia caesiella. The UK Dissection 
Group appears to be shut down for now but their images are on MPG. The answer 
to your other question is the aedeagus is very long! but still not as long as 
the ductus bursae. 


https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__mothphotographersgroup.msstate.edu_species.php-3Fhodges-3D2413&d=AwIFAg&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=8nRoD3gYoBUl6OkMXGPbOWT0nDmTuH1O9KqYSoVLL_g&s=j_n6aZwtKotbor1IUAt06lL5h7j6TfuqhHFgq1rCn2A&e= 


Best regards,  Rich
--------------------------------------------
Richard Worth
Entomologist / Lepidopterist
Plant Program
Oregon Dept. of Agriculture
635 Capitol St. NE
Salem, OR  97301
503-986-6461
rworth AT oda.state.or.us

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.oregon.gov_ODA_index.shtml&d=AwIFAg&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=8nRoD3gYoBUl6OkMXGPbOWT0nDmTuH1O9KqYSoVLL_g&s=o7xH_fZ36AYg1G5MhpwkpB2_JNrwgaxkWG5eDc2DhwQ&e= 



On Jan 25, 2016, at 1:28 PM, Tony Thomas  wrote:

> Please see here:
> 
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdingnewbrunswick.ca_group_moths-2Dof-2Dnew-2Dbrunswick_forum_topics_weird-2Dmicro&d=AwICaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=04H8JOjC7rBgySlbZkbNfdOxKG0DeSGYexNu6MhYpDw&s=rn6_CuDO2E-5jPd4tVOo-z6V35GxKrWFLCbwahhlxtU&e= 

> 
> _______________________________________________
> Leps-l mailing list
> Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
> http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
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Subject: ID and explanation requested, female micro
From: Tony Thomas <mothman AT nbnet.nb.ca>
Date: Mon, 25 Jan 2016 17:28:03 -0400
Please see here:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdingnewbrunswick.ca_group_moths-2Dof-2Dnew-2Dbrunswick_forum_topics_weird-2Dmicro&d=AwICaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=04H8JOjC7rBgySlbZkbNfdOxKG0DeSGYexNu6MhYpDw&s=rn6_CuDO2E-5jPd4tVOo-z6V35GxKrWFLCbwahhlxtU&e= 


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Subject: 2016 Lepidopterists' Society Meeting details
From: Todd Gilligan <tgilliga AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Dec 2015 14:28:59 -0700
Hi Everyone,

Please see the following page regarding details for the 2016
Lepidopterists' Society Meeting to be held near Florissant, Colorado, July
6-10. Please let me know if you have any questions. Thank you!


https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.lepsoc.org_2016-5Fmeeting.php&d=AwIBaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=6OX_GHMHKDTiq8UKua7BGWLTgHzdqZGTUXt5jqktiQQ&s=51RYL9f1sLXusvEKc792lNgd214wunMu-Q_M98dHBWo&e= 
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Subject: Bills to Help Protect the Monarch Butterfly Population Clears Assembly Panel
From: Neil Jones <neil AT aurinia.co.uk>
Date: Tue, 15 Dec 2015 00:12:28 +0000
Bills to Help Protect the Monarch Butterfly Population Clears Assembly Panel
By evaloayza | 12/14/15 2:30pm

Eustace Bills to Help Protect & Preserve the Monarch Butterfly 
Population Clears Assembly Panel



(TRENTON) – An Assembly panel on Monday released a legislative package 
sponsored by Assemblyman Tim Eustace to help protect the monarch 
butterfly population, which......

See



https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__politickernj.com_2015_12_bills-2Dto-2Dhelp-2Dprotect-2Dthe-2Dmonarch-2Dbutterfly-2Dpopulation-2Dclears-2Dassembly-2Dpanel_&d=AwIDaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=RvAMKHKWXbh2SCoKQt1hqY3CzqnTohtlpdT41Op2QGA&s=Z0oNdIF2KVPt5Z9RSt6qAxZhfYntBmgJC9rGYauDNDY&e= 


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Subject: The decline in British butterflies could be caused by climate change
From: Neil Jones <neil AT aurinia.co.uk>
Date: Tue, 15 Dec 2015 00:08:05 +0000
  Climate change could be behind the decline of more than three-quarters 
of the UK's butterflies, a study has found.

Some 76% of the UK's resident and regular migrant butterflies have 
fallen in number over the last 40 years, according to a joint report by 
the charity Butterfly Conservation and the Centre for Ecology & 
Hydrology (CEH).

While numbers are in decline across Europe, the UK has been hit the 
worst, with Southern Britain most affected.

Reasons behind the drop are not fully understood, but..........

See:-


https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.telegraph.co.uk_news_earth_wildlife_nature-2Dnotes_12050448_The-2Ddecline-2Din-2DBritish-2Dbutterflies-2Dcould-2Dbe-2Dcaused-2Dby-2Dclimate-2Dchange.html&d=AwICaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=BOueCiHgCjDru4hb69uYliZLPVwjIsTKsWOckL4xi7Q&s=j1CEUBrvYDkJ_OCclztQ9a8htWlw9Si1uU1Vk7ABXHI&e= 

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Subject: Re: The Crystal Skipper: North Carolina's Newest Butterfly Species
From: "Walsh, James Bruce - (jbwalsh)" <jbwalsh AT email.arizona.edu>
Date: Thu, 3 Dec 2015 20:03:02 +0000
This is very nice work. Congrats to Allison and an excellent funding choice by 
Xerces 


Bruce Walsh
Professor, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Professor, Public Health
Professor, BIO5 Institute
Professor, Plant Sciences
Adjunct Professor, Animal and Comparative Biomedical Sciences
Adjunct Professor, Molecular and Cellular Biology
University of Arizona
________________________________________
From: leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu [leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu] on 
behalf of Matthew Shepherd [mdshepherd AT xerces.org] 

Sent: Thursday, December 3, 2015 10:47 AM
To: Leps-L list
Subject: [Leps-l] The Crystal Skipper: North Carolina's Newest Butterfly 
Species 


We’re really happy to publish a blog by Allison Leidner about the crystal 
skipper, a butterfly that lives on barrier islands lining North Carolina’s 
coast. The skipper had no official name until last week, when it was published 
as a new species, Atrytonopsis quinteri, in the scientific literature. 




Allison spent five years studying the crystal skipper—and how it was coping 
with development-driven habitat fragmentation—for her PhD at North Carolina 
State University. It’s especially nice to publish this blog because Allison 
received a DeWind Award from the Xerces Society to support her studies. We give 
two DeWind Awards each year to support research into conservation of 
butterflies and moths. 




The Crystal Skipper: North Carolina's Newest Butterfly Species

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.xerces.org_blog_the-2Dcrystal-2Dskipper-2Dnorth-2Dcarolinas-2Dnewest-2Dbutterfly-2Dspecies_&d=AwIF-g&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=ftpE9z9QyjJvVAXZemKfeNSxdCGjrh1F3Gf1dmmLEKs&s=R7YEfJIS08Jvbceb5KMsFhUUnBMwGgMqjHKI9npyV7g&e= 
 


Enjoy!

Matthew

________

Matthew Shepherd, Communications Director

The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation Protecting the Life that 
Sustains Us 


Stay in touch: 
xerces.org 
Xerces 
blog 
E-newsletter 
Facebook 
Twitter 


628 NE Broadway, Ste 200, Portland, OR 97232-1324, USA
Tel: (503) 232-6639 ext. 110; Toll free: 1-855-232 6639 ext. 110; Cell: (503) 
807-1577 

mdshepherd AT xerces.org

The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation is an international nonprofit 
organization that protects wildlife through the conservation of invertebrates 
and their habitat. To join the Society, make a donation, or read about our 
work, please visit 
www.xerces.org. 



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Subject: Re: The Crystal Skipper: North Carolina's Newest Butterfly Species
From: Neil Jones <neil AT aurinia.co.uk>
Date: Thu, 3 Dec 2015 18:09:25 +0000

On 03/12/15 17:47, Matthew Shepherd wrote:
>
> We’re really happy to publish a blog by Allison Leidner about the 
> crystal skipper, a butterfly that lives on barrier islands lining 
> North Carolina’s coast. The skipper had no official name until last 
> week, when it was published as a new species,/Atrytonopsis quinteri/, 
> in the scientific literature.
>
> Allison spent five years studying the crystal skipper—and how it was 
> coping with development-driven habitat fragmentation—for her PhD at 
> North Carolina State University. It’s especially nice to publish this 
> blog because Allison received a DeWind Award from the Xerces Society 
> to support her studies. We give two DeWind Awards each year to support 
> research into conservation of butterflies and moths.
>
> The Crystal Skipper: North Carolina's Newest Butterfly Species
>
> 
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.xerces.org_blog_the-2Dcrystal-2Dskipper-2Dnorth-2Dcarolinas-2Dnewest-2Dbutterfly-2Dspecies_&d=AwID-g&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=fxkXyWQPOmX-n378o2H26crDs59Hk9NNra4RLRMYBLU&s=8iL_zhGO0d-y2kDPk3f363NjKBw7aSPt8FShuh1hokg&e= 

> 
 

>
> Enjoy!
>
> Matthew
>
>
Thank you very much for that information on this fascinating new butterfly.
The paper which describes it is, for those interested, available here.

http://images.peabody.yale.edu/lepsoc/jls/2010s/2015/2015-69-4-275.pdf

Neil Jones
neil AT aurinia.co.uk
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Subject: The Crystal Skipper: North Carolina's Newest Butterfly Species
From: Matthew Shepherd <mdshepherd AT xerces.org>
Date: Thu, 3 Dec 2015 09:47:23 -0800
We’re really happy to publish a blog by Allison Leidner about the crystal
skipper, a butterfly that lives on barrier islands lining North Carolina’s
coast. The skipper had no official name until last week, when it was
published as a new species,* Atrytonopsis quinteri*, in the scientific
literature.



Allison spent five years studying the crystal skipper—and how it was coping
with development-driven habitat fragmentation—for her PhD at North Carolina
State University. It’s especially nice to publish this blog because Allison
received a DeWind Award from the Xerces Society to support her studies. We
give two DeWind Awards each year to support research into conservation of
butterflies and moths.



The Crystal Skipper: North Carolina's Newest Butterfly Species


https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.xerces.org_blog_the-2Dcrystal-2Dskipper-2Dnorth-2Dcarolinas-2Dnewest-2Dbutterfly-2Dspecies_&d=AwIFaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=1BNYVat9AQIRprTrYbZksQKkfL_nnMUcighwv6f6eqw&s=3OoxnwHL8V1rcVgdq76ELBejU12NykOPBUEqnuYGFT0&e= 




Enjoy!



Matthew



________



*Matthew Shepherd*, Communications Director



*The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation     *Protecting the Life
that Sustains Us



Stay in touch: *xerces.org 
* *Xerces blog 


* *E-newsletter 


* *Facebook 


* 

  *Twitter

* 




628 NE Broadway, Ste 200, Portland, OR 97232-1324, USA

Tel: (503) 232-6639 ext. 110; Toll free: 1-855-232 6639 ext. 110; Cell:
(503) 807-1577

mdshepherd AT xerces.org



The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation is an international
nonprofit organization that protects wildlife through the conservation of
invertebrates and their habitat. To join the Society, make a donation, or
read about our work, please visit www.xerces.org._______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
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Subject: $1, 500 in Grants for Genomics Research - Submission Deadline December 11th
From: Katharine Corriveau <katharine AT instrumentl.com>
Date: Wed, 2 Dec 2015 10:05:02 -0800
Hi All,


Are you working on a research project that involves genomes (human, plant
or animal) or genetic analysis of any kind? If you need more funding to
fuel your work, consider joining Instrumentl

*'s Genomics Challenge*! Instrumentl 

is pleased to announce that DNAnexus 
has 

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Read more about our partnership with DNAnexus here

 

.

Have questions? Read more about our Grant Challenges

 or send me an email. I'm 

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Good luck!

Katharine


-- 
Katharine Corriveau
Co-founder/COO  AT  Instrumentl



Follow us on Facebook 
 and Twitter 


 

Visit us at www.Instrumentl.com 
 
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Subject: Re: Marpesia zerynthia - Waiter Daggerwing - nr. Tucson, AZ - Sept 1986
From: "Walsh, James Bruce - (jbwalsh)" <jbwalsh AT email.arizona.edu>
Date: Tue, 10 Nov 2015 19:29:30 +0000
Assume! Have not seen this recorded from here. I'll have to look more carefully 
in my back yard! 


Bruce Walsh
Professor, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Professor, Public Health
Professor, BIO5 Institute
Professor, Plant Sciences
Adjunct Professor, Animal and Comparative Biomedical Sciences
Adjunct Professor, Molecular and Cellular Biology
University of Arizona
________________________________________
From: leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu [leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu] on 
behalf of Mike Quinn [entomike AT gmail.com] 

Sent: Tuesday, November 10, 2015 11:33 AM
To: Leps-L; kyaustin AT davidson.edu; Bob Patterson; Kelly Lotts; Ken Davenport
Subject: [Leps-l] Marpesia zerynthia - Waiter Daggerwing - nr. Tucson, AZ - 
Sept 1986 


Not sure if this is a new AZ state record or not. This record is not in the 
LepSoc Season Summary database nor is AZ mentioned on the BOA site for Marpesia 
zerynthia... 


It's not listed on any other website or any AZ lep book/publication that I have 
access to. 


Marpesia zerynthia Hübner
Tucson, Pima County, Arizona
September 1, 1986

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__bugguide.net_node_view_1047243&d=AwIF-g&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=E6Sxg1KpI1E4PBvU5OgA60om7Bxzpgjb_6mC08G6u1s&s=F84uk5HmjoNMMtYzGMjHLqSYPIEXitBsqJzqqUUwHqg&e= 
 


"Collected by Harry Roegner in September 1986, just east of Tucson, AZ. Donated 
to Davidson College's Entomology Lab" 


Record posted to BugGuide by Kyhl Austin 
> on 16 March, 2015. 


adding a photo of the data label to the above link would help to validate this 
record... 


Harry Roegner spent over 40 yrs traveling the world collecting butterflies:

Adventures with Butterflies
By Harry R. Roegne

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__bit.ly_1MJiN7D&d=AwIF-g&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=E6Sxg1KpI1E4PBvU5OgA60om7Bxzpgjb_6mC08G6u1s&s=G4Cgo7pVrjvUwz2VtTNTtJHnp8vs_OBQbfbql976ieQ&e= 
 


Butterfly Trails
By Harry R. Roegner

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__bit.ly_1HFFBUv&d=AwIF-g&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=E6Sxg1KpI1E4PBvU5OgA60om7Bxzpgjb_6mC08G6u1s&s=kara3oCmSs0TFNbVJwDLX3DQIrZmtj1Xy_zzr31KwXY&e= 
 


Davidson College is in Davidson, N.C. 
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.davidson.edu_&d=AwIF-g&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=E6Sxg1KpI1E4PBvU5OgA60om7Bxzpgjb_6mC08G6u1s&s=jyZzdzQlRxjZjB6sy34QKnwJ3CKmHZCQOZvrOkeI15o&e= 
 

DAVIDSON INSECT DIGITIZATION PROJECT

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__omeka.davidson.edu_insects_&d=AwIF-g&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=E6Sxg1KpI1E4PBvU5OgA60om7Bxzpgjb_6mC08G6u1s&s=F9kzokwVU9Y1DzwHLOOSXt43XR3Gz2YgdUlYRye5aYU&e= 
 


“Marpesia zerynthia,” Davidson Insect Digitization Project, accessed November 
10, 2015, 
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__omeka.davidson.edu_insects_items_show_8222&d=AwIF-g&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=E6Sxg1KpI1E4PBvU5OgA60om7Bxzpgjb_6mC08G6u1s&s=1vlM0craq6kYBQYaCAbxUowpBaKH54B8H6XZ1y3yqWo&e= 
. 


Thanks, Mike

Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__texasento.net&d=AwIF-g&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=E6Sxg1KpI1E4PBvU5OgA60om7Bxzpgjb_6mC08G6u1s&s=sBdWdwqtxPKSqjP2uWM2LJRE-srlnRAljLG3FsQZL60&e= 
 


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Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
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Subject: Marpesia zerynthia - Waiter Daggerwing - nr. Tucson, AZ - Sept 1986
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 10 Nov 2015 12:33:24 -0600
Not sure if this is a new AZ state record or not. This record is not in the
LepSoc Season Summary database nor is AZ mentioned on the BOA site for
Marpesia zerynthia...

It's not listed on any other website or any AZ lep book/publication that I
have access to.

Marpesia zerynthia HĂŒbner
Tucson, Pima County, Arizona
September 1, 1986

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__bugguide.net_node_view_1047243&d=AwIFaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=-tl5U1Pfk5NW_Q9VmC15BSCr7fbyRDwWOJvoawrYB-g&s=vK3MLGkPu9b1BH2TbHYz6APIO8kUtCcNVD29mgpV_NY&e= 


"Collected by Harry Roegner in September 1986, just east of Tucson, AZ.
Donated to Davidson College's Entomology Lab"

Record posted to BugGuide by Kyhl Austin <
http://bugguide.net/user/view/94444> on 16 March, 2015.

adding a photo of the data label to the above link would help to validate
this record...

Harry Roegner spent over 40 yrs traveling the world collecting butterflies:

Adventures with Butterflies
By Harry R. Roegne

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__bit.ly_1MJiN7D&d=AwIFaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=-tl5U1Pfk5NW_Q9VmC15BSCr7fbyRDwWOJvoawrYB-g&s=Bih3xToF2RbdC4BDMKSzcYQVuu2rhESUSBlFj9FyGVE&e= 


Butterfly Trails
By Harry R. Roegner

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__bit.ly_1HFFBUv&d=AwIFaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=-tl5U1Pfk5NW_Q9VmC15BSCr7fbyRDwWOJvoawrYB-g&s=9SPxF2L2cCBSvFqN00CkGKgYJMvvw2eoyNyEksqt81c&e= 


Davidson College is in Davidson, N.C. 
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.davidson.edu_&d=AwIFaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=-tl5U1Pfk5NW_Q9VmC15BSCr7fbyRDwWOJvoawrYB-g&s=DvWe-wyTGYjXlsxSn6i4TBphAAvc-jhMe9vL1GIRj-U&e= 

DAVIDSON INSECT DIGITIZATION PROJECT

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__omeka.davidson.edu_insects_&d=AwIFaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=-tl5U1Pfk5NW_Q9VmC15BSCr7fbyRDwWOJvoawrYB-g&s=P24Yn9vsy4H8QwmC6kTOA9yVtT1U9GF_t6OY0WkgxHM&e= 


“Marpesia zerynthia,” Davidson Insect Digitization Project, accessed
November 10, 2015, 
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__omeka.davidson.edu_insects_items_show_8222&d=AwIFaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=-tl5U1Pfk5NW_Q9VmC15BSCr7fbyRDwWOJvoawrYB-g&s=u3Ar-gEVls9P-3WwqUZC6qvE-GDbJZVrbBzPSTGfVfE&e= 
. 


Thanks, Mike

Mike Quinn, Austin
________________
Texas Entomology

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__texasento.net&d=AwIFaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=-tl5U1Pfk5NW_Q9VmC15BSCr7fbyRDwWOJvoawrYB-g&s=R_SwHs-iboR8z0JxKBN1mePK1E_f-f5liFgczU3CJ28&e= 
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Subject: Re: New Hairstreak Record For The US
From: Mike Quinn <entomike AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Nov 2015 10:06:06 -0600
Great bug!

BOA info:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__butterfliesofamerica.com_michaelus-5Fira.htm&d=AwIBaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=eDfoHp8SA6ovNQtFa4fj57qOxQz4F9Gei_20ZfSRvxw&s=xQP_a7-I43uKS-d_34cnt026BW-bZoUB0gDdGSrbp7k&e= 


apparently, not much known about it except that it ranges s. to S.
America...

Mike Quinn, Austin

On Mon, Nov 2, 2015 at 8:19 AM, Mike Rickard  wrote:

> While leading a Texas Butterfly Festival field trip in Harlingen's Hugh
> Ramsey Park yesterday (11/01/15), I photographed a hairstreak I tentatively
> identified as a Shadowed Hairstreak (Michaelus ira).  It was visiting
> Crucita blossoms on the Indigo Trail, and observed by all trip
> participants.  This is the first record of this species for the US.  ID has
> been confirmed by Andy Warren of the McGuire Center.
>
> Mike Rickard
> Mission TX
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Subject: Re: Wildlife-friendly farming increases crop yield: evidence for ecological intensification
From: "Walsh, James Bruce - (jbwalsh)" <jbwalsh AT email.arizona.edu>
Date: Thu, 15 Oct 2015 19:06:26 +0000
Neil:

Very interesting article, thanks for posting!

Bruce Walsh
University of Arizona
________________________________________
From: leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu [leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu] on 
behalf of Neil Jones [neil AT aurinia.co.uk] 

Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2015 11:56 AM
Cc: dplex-l AT listproc.cc.ku.edu; FoE Cymru local groups list; 
leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu; envlist AT yahoogroups.com; FoE Nature Network; 
uk-leps AT yahoogroups.com 

Subject: [Leps-l] Wildlife-friendly farming increases crop yield: evidence for 
ecological intensification 


Ecological intensification has been promoted as a means to achieve
environmentally sustainable increases in crop yields by enhancing
ecosystem functions that regulate and support production. There is,
however, little direct evidence of yield benefits from ecological
intensification on commercial farms growing globally important
foodstuffs (grains, oilseeds and pulses). We replicated two treatments
removing 3 or 8% of land at the field edge from production to create
wildlife habitat in 50–60 ha patches over a 900 ha commercial arable
farm in central England, and..................................


https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org_content_282_1816_20151740&d=AwIDaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=Er9j9WAYoy-eFjmw_7lQp7O_sNmslR0veNkTvW1ZKoE&s=rku3KqHA1a9EtJymIYWW6ELg4N-EB4wRYvoExoi8l3Q&e= 

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Subject: Wildlife-friendly farming increases crop yield: evidence for ecological intensification
From: Neil Jones <neil AT aurinia.co.uk>
Date: Thu, 15 Oct 2015 19:56:54 +0100
Ecological intensification has been promoted as a means to achieve 
environmentally sustainable increases in crop yields by enhancing 
ecosystem functions that regulate and support production. There is, 
however, little direct evidence of yield benefits from ecological 
intensification on commercial farms growing globally important 
foodstuffs (grains, oilseeds and pulses). We replicated two treatments 
removing 3 or 8% of land at the field edge from production to create 
wildlife habitat in 50–60 ha patches over a 900 ha commercial arable 
farm in central England, and..................................


https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org_content_282_1816_20151740&d=AwIDaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=Er9j9WAYoy-eFjmw_7lQp7O_sNmslR0veNkTvW1ZKoE&s=rku3KqHA1a9EtJymIYWW6ELg4N-EB4wRYvoExoi8l3Q&e= 

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Subject: 2015 Lepidopterists' Society Annual Meeting next week
From: Todd Gilligan <tgilliga AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Jul 2015 16:53:46 -0600
Hello everyone,

Just a reminder that the 2015 Annual Meeting of the Lepidopterists' Society
is next week at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana.

A preliminary program and other details have been posted on the meeting's
website:


https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.entm.purdue.edu_perc_lepsoc2015_&d=AwIBaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=AU9EOS7ajkbLRBkC1bk2x4Y03FfCYK5sCqxzYMhJPG4&s=3eoljSiAUSnulW-sqfNw6qA329dla8_DeYaz1E1PtgU&e= 


*Please note that West Lafayette is on Eastern Standard Time (EST).* This
is NOT the same time zone as Chicago and the surrounding area, which is on
Central Time. Please plan accordingly, especially if you are flying into
Chicago.

Thanks and looking forward to seeing you next week at Purdue!

TG_______________________________________________
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Subject: The molecules behind mimicry
From: Neil Jones <neil AT aurinia.co.uk>
Date: Mon, 22 Jun 2015 10:10:32 +0100
The vibrant passion-vine butterfly species /Heliconius erato/ doesn’t 
taste as good as it looks. The flesh of this South and Central American 
species accumulates toxic compounds to discourage would-be predators, 
who quickly learn to associate the butterflies’ unpleasant taste with 
their bold red warning colors and patterns.

But /H. erato...................................../



https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__genestogenomes.org_the-2Dmolecules-2Dbehind-2Dmimicry&d=AwIDaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=GNgXwW4aguKdyIp_K7TntSBpqRYbSSp4VSm1zj0vQTE&s=pKMYgT4Cg3ZOlStK7okCqJ8wOJpfSWvU5PIbf2UStNo&e= 


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Subject: Aberrant Canadian Tiger Swallowtail
From: Tony Thomas <mothman AT nbnet.nb.ca>
Date: Sat, 20 Jun 2015 21:32:02 -0300
Specimen in New Brunswick, Canada


https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__birdingnewbrunswick.ca_group_bnbbutterflygroup_forum_topics_variant-2Dswallowtail&d=AwIBAg&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=5EOdGkprAz5OCWQNgWUyYzeBO3WS_aZ7GjrqS9Ediq0&s=Tw045t5unsReqSeDWSMbxhQHjLlAImTnCqGs4QX9RAo&e= 



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Subject: Lepidopterists' Society 2015 Meeting, West Lafayette, IN, July 28 - August 2
From: Todd Gilligan <tgilliga AT gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 1 Jun 2015 10:12:30 -0600
Everyone,

The Department of Entomology, Purdue Entomological Research Collection
(PERC) and Conferences at Purdue University invite you to attend the *64th
Annual Meeting of the Lepidopterists' Society*. Please mark your calendars
for this meeting, which will be held at Purdue University in the Stewart
Center in West Lafayette, Indiana, *July 28 - August 2, 2015*.

This promises to be an excellent meeting, with numerous field trips, access
to important collections (PERC and INHS), a robust scientific program, and
plenty of opportunities to reunite with old friends and make new ones!
Please visit the 2015 LepSoc website for more information and to register
for the meeting: 
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.entm.purdue.edu_perc_lepsoc2015&d=AwIBaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=90Gdgq1SRzMTnsM-IGZW8x9tzO9FaLNTSnSbu_j59JA&s=0rOBVEwrlX0tw3cua7Lb2Qmijifm04kQI2QfZCMjHEw&e= 


*NOTE: Today (June 1, 2015) is the last day to register for the meeting at
the discounted rate! Also, the deadline for submitting abstracts for
presentations and posters has been extended until July 1. Please register
and submit your abstract soon for inclusion in the program!*

Please contact Dr. Jennifer Zaspel (jzaspel AT purdue.edu) for any questions
about the 2015 LepSoc Meeting.

I hope to see you at Purdue in July!

Todd Gilligan
President
The Lepidopterists' Society_______________________________________________
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Subject: Body mass
From: Jeremy Cohen <jcohen9 AT mail.usf.edu>
Date: Mon, 4 May 2015 11:12:51 -0400
Hello all,

I'm trying to track down average body masses for a large number of
Lepidoptera species. Please let me know if you know of any body mass
databases or papers containing equations that can translate body or wing
length to mass (at any taxonomic level). Thanks!

-- 
Jeremy Cohen, B.S.
PhD Candidate
Dept. of Integrative Biology
University of South Florida
4202 E Fowler Ave, SCA 137
Tampa, FL 33620
Wildlife photography 
 
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Subject: Re: MJV's Monarchs on Native Nectar Plants photo contest!
From: Paul Cherubini <monarch AT saber.net>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 11:07:25 -0800
Candace Fallon wrote:

> The Xerces Society is partnering with the Monarch Joint Venture
> on a photo contest to gather information on important nectar plants
> for monarchs throughout the continental U.S. Please help us gather
> information about monarchs on native nectar plants in your region!

Monarchs actually adore numerous non-native nectar plants.  The City
of Pacific Grove, California, courageously planted the following non-natives
at its world famous Monarch Grove Sanctuary overwintering site because
real world testing revealed the monarchs favor them over California natives.

Pride of Madiera (Echium spp.)

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__s-2Dmedia-2Dcache-2Dak0.pinimg.com_236x_08_44_56_08445631096f251e7302e58eb0352f5c.jpg&d=AwIFAg&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=JEglJy6sf1Bi1GiGTW0pwe5GK-fH7JlYVlasGvO346g&s=okSWwNZZ9Uw0f-93Y-yqLtD8wdkh3NUEjDIku_Zc_x8&e= 


Bottlebrush:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__i.istockimg.com_file-5Fthumbview-5Fapprove_54341622_3_stock-2Dphoto-2D54341622-2Dthree-2Dmonarch-2Dbutterflies-2Don-2Da-2Dbottlebrush-2Dtree.jpg&d=AwIFAg&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=JEglJy6sf1Bi1GiGTW0pwe5GK-fH7JlYVlasGvO346g&s=uj98HtATkcyYBBtEkl85YIxlR-7YJoM6BSnmmOhzlwo&e= 


Yellow flowered Buddleia bushes:

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__static.flickr.com_79_258217706-5Fc0b0af103e.jpg&d=AwIFAg&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=JEglJy6sf1Bi1GiGTW0pwe5GK-fH7JlYVlasGvO346g&s=mOLcIzHOytdH3s6y4WO144CI4Xk7gEbkYWiNxAiXKnA&e= 


Daisytree: (Montanoa grandiflora)

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__blogs.kqed.org_science_files_2014_11_monarchsfeatured1-2De1416367400609.jpg&d=AwIFAg&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=JEglJy6sf1Bi1GiGTW0pwe5GK-fH7JlYVlasGvO346g&s=kxkJyYOH6h8f5THXmhheIwlqEVLcspfDCf-CC5Kbqx4&e= 


English Ivy: (Helix hedera)

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__1.bp.blogspot.com_-2DGhI934qo79o_UGNnd0mxbkI_AAAAAAAAAWs_EZ4NTGDC9P0_s1600_DSCN9618.JPG&d=AwIFAg&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=JEglJy6sf1Bi1GiGTW0pwe5GK-fH7JlYVlasGvO346g&s=Af3LAnago13HY5s8jPYAEvfigsjdvSlsHf0mktvW9rc&e= 


Paul Cherubini
El Dorado, Calif.




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Subject: MJV's Monarchs on Native Nectar Plants photo contest!
From: Candace Fallon <candace AT xerces.org>
Date: Fri, 27 Feb 2015 10:22:29 -0800
The Xerces Society is partnering with the Monarch Joint Venture on a photo
contest to gather information on important nectar plants for monarchs
throughout the continental U.S. Please help us gather information about
monarchs on native nectar plants in your region!


The contest is only available to Facebook users, and it ends April 21,
2015. More details can be found on the contest page: 
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__goo.gl_p2cRWb&d=AwIFaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=sxIGk28eYr9C-RL4Wm_PWuG3UnD21lqsSYHIshhSwNs&s=FVs2s412d8GSVLy-JG4O0oBloghC_ACXb4KPrR-g5LY&e= 


. 

Please note that the emphasis is on native plants. If you are unsure of
whether a plant is native, check using the USDA-PLANTS database,

https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__plants.usda.gov_java_&d=AwIFaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=sxIGk28eYr9C-RL4Wm_PWuG3UnD21lqsSYHIshhSwNs&s=Fj27TUl3C_m3Lt4RfxgVcxPXtsoBS6p-ddmHiC6IUqw&e= 


 

.


If you have observations of monarchs using native nectar plants in your
area that you would prefer to share directly, please send them to
Candace AT xerces.org. These entries will not be part of the contest. Please
include the plant species name, location, and time of year that monarchs
use this plant. All of the information we collect will be used to develop
regional recommendations regarding optimal nectar plants for monarchs in
all parts of their life cycle, including spring and fall migration, summer
breeding, and the overwintering period.


Thanks!

Candace
-- 

*Candace Fallon*

Conservation Biologist

Endangered Species Program



*The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation*

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Subject: Re: Caterpillar ID request (Virginia)
From: dhcox AT nyx.net (David Hamilton Cox)
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 12:14:44 -0700 (MST)
 Thanks! As always I am grateful for the expertise available in this forum.

-David

> Euspilia devia, me thinks.
> 
> 
> 
> Nice....goof record.   New record!
> 
> 
> 
> d
> 
> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu 
[mailto:leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu] On Behalf Of David Hamilton Cox 

> Sent: Sunday, February 22, 2015 10:51 AM
> To: leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
> Subject: [Leps-l] Caterpillar ID request (Virginia)
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> I've been editing my 2014 photos and have not been able to identify this
> 
> caterpillar:
> 
> 
> 
> 
https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.nyx.net_-7Edhcox_caterpillar1.jpg&d=AwICAg&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=hKA6HAtK1oEPDDiFQPLqvP33unmSyHjSNiV3XRz62D0&s=u6YtfQQhWrUB2Bl1XswgYIWxSWvDBuezBuOOajKTRDU&e= 

> 
> 
> 
> Taken June 6, 2014, Madison County, Virginia, on fleabane (Erigeron). I 
perhaps went through Wagner's guide too quickly, the closest match I saw was 
the Ruby Quaker, though that did not have the wide black stripe down the side. 
I would appreciate any help identifying this. Thanks! 

> 
> 
> 
> -David Cox
> 
> _______________________________________________
> 
> Leps-l mailing list
> 
> Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
> 
> http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
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Subject: Caterpillar ID request (Virginia)
From: dhcox AT nyx.net (David Hamilton Cox)
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 08:51:05 -0700 (MST)
 I've been editing my 2014 photos and have not been able to identify this
caterpillar:


https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.nyx.net_-7Edhcox_caterpillar1.jpg&d=AwICAg&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=hKA6HAtK1oEPDDiFQPLqvP33unmSyHjSNiV3XRz62D0&s=u6YtfQQhWrUB2Bl1XswgYIWxSWvDBuezBuOOajKTRDU&e= 


 Taken June 6, 2014, Madison County, Virginia, on fleabane (Erigeron). I
perhaps went through Wagner's guide too quickly, the closest match I saw
was the Ruby Quaker, though that did not have the wide black stripe down
the side. I would appreciate any help identifying this. Thanks!

-David Cox
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Subject: Location of Dr Arnold Schultze Collection?
From: Hugo Rocha <hhrocha AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2015 14:59:26 -0600
Does anyone know where the Agrias aedon magdalenae from the Dr. Arnold
Schultze (German) Collection (captured in Colombia in 1927) might be housed
today? I captured a similar specimen while conducting a permitted study in
Costa Rica in march of this year, and this aberration of Agrias aedon
(extensive blue) is most unusual for Agrias aedon, which is thought to be
the least variable of all Agrias. I suspect the specimen is a hybrid from
Agrias aedon rodriguezi and Agrias aedon aedon or a transitional form
between the two.

Sincerely,

Jim Hanlon

I think you can ask at The History Natural Museum of berlin, they have the
butterfly suitcase of Schultze and they are working with this specimens.

Dr. Wolfram Mey


Address
Museum fĂŒr Naturkunde
Leibniz Institute for Evolution and Biodiversity Science
Invalidenstraße 43
10115 Berlin
Germany

Phone +49 (0)30 2093 8500
Fax +49 (0)30 2093 8868
E-Mail wolfram.mey(at)mfn-berlin.de


-- 
Psic. Hugo Rocha PĂ©rez
52-7773646073 fijo ---52-17772118867 celular
SKYPE hugoro7007
Cuernavaca, Morelos, MĂ©xico

NO ME INCLUYAS EN REENVIOS O CADENAS, PUES TU CORREO SERA BLOQUEADO
AUTOMATICAMENTE... PREFERIRIA UNA NOTA TUYA, PERSONAL._______________________________________________
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Subject: Re: moth sampling
From: John Shuey <jshuey AT TNC.ORG>
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015 17:57:36 +0000
I think that this also has to do with how such indicators are misused (myself 
included). If I recall, Chao2 was designed to tell you how many species of 
zooplankton/phytoplankton were present in a body of water on a given sampling 
event. So - a finite species pool, in one habitat on one day. Compare this to 
what I'm doing, sampling across years (high species turnover by season) and 
habitat types in a small-ish country - and you have a mess. But what else do we 
have? 



I think these types of estimators might work fairly well for moth sampling 
where traps are located in the same place every sample event, and a year's 
worth of sampling is "a sample" (analogous to a set of plankton net pulls from 
a lake). 



j


  Please consider the environment before printing this email 

John A Shuey
Director of Conservation Science

jshuey AT tnc.org
317.829.3898 - direct
317.951.8818 - front desk 
317.917.2478 - Fax 

nature.org 
    
The Nature Conservancy
Indiana Field Office 
620 E. Ohio St.
Indianapolis, IN 46202
     




-----Original Message-----
From: Walsh, James Bruce - (jbwalsh) [mailto:jbwalsh AT email.arizona.edu] 
Sent: Tuesday, January 20, 2015 12:32 PM
To: John Shuey; Tony Thomas; leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
Subject: RE: [Leps-l] moth sampling

"Perhaps this is a solid indication that we are no-where close to having a 
decent inventory?" 

Bingo!
________________________________________
From: John Shuey [jshuey AT TNC.ORG]
Sent: Tuesday, January 20, 2015 9:12 AM
To: Walsh, James Bruce - (jbwalsh); Tony Thomas; leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
Subject: RE: [Leps-l] moth sampling

Hi Bruce, In some way, this is like the Chao estimators. The problem with these 
(at least relative to this particular data base) is that no matter how you cut 
them (sampling effort-wise), the estimates always keep going up. Every new 
field effort knocks 20 or so species of the "single record list" but adds 20 or 
so new species to that list. In the ideal world, at some point, the number of 
unique records has to start leveling off - which for Belize butterflies - we 
can't get it to do that. In other words, for every unique collection record 
species we knock off the list, we replace it with a new unique single 
record-species. I want an indicator that points to a fairly consistent 
"predicted total # of species" - a stable predicted asymptote that I can 
approach as sampling effort increases. Perhaps this is a solid indication that 
we are no-where close to having a decent inventory? 


It's frustrating, because I want Belize to be over, so that we can move onto 
something new and exciting. 


j

  Please consider the environment before printing this email

John A Shuey
Director of Conservation Science

jshuey AT tnc.org
317.829.3898 - direct
317.951.8818 - front desk
317.917.2478 - Fax

nature.org

The Nature Conservancy
Indiana Field Office
620 E. Ohio St.
Indianapolis, IN 46202





-----Original Message-----
From: Walsh, James Bruce - (jbwalsh) [mailto:jbwalsh AT email.arizona.edu]
Sent: Tuesday, January 20, 2015 9:52 AM
To: John Shuey; Tony Thomas; leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
Subject: RE: [Leps-l] moth sampling

By the way, a quick "adjustment" (a delete-one jackknife estimator) for the 
total number of species is total number seem PLUS the number of species seen in 
only one sampling event (not singletons, but rather seen on only one day, could 
be hundreds that day). For this data, add 145 and that gives you a better 
estimate of the actual number of species 


cheers

bruce
________________________________________
From: leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu [leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu] on 
behalf of John Shuey [jshuey AT TNC.ORG] 

Sent: Tuesday, January 20, 2015 6:35 AM
To: Tony Thomas; leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
Subject: Re: [Leps-l] moth sampling

Hi Tony, I think your data are interesting and reflect a somewhat "mature" 
survey end point. - you are at the 39 records/species point. Here is what I 
have at the 29 records/species mark for Belize butterflies at the (27,954 
record for 958 species - hence a 25% less mature survey in my mind). 


406 species known from 5 or fewer records (note that in this accounting, a 
record may a more than one specimen - it's a measure of a collection of a 
species at a place on a unique date, irrespective of how many individuals were 
recorded): 


145 species known from single capture events
91 species known from 2 events:
61 species known from 3 records:
44 from 4 records;
65 from 5 records
One species has 459 records

The similarities are striking - no?

Our data set is probably about 4,000 records behind, and the change in the 
shape of the graph should be interesting once we decide to pull the plug and 
claim that we are "done". But I hope to see the number of rarely encountered 
species decline as a function of "time" (as measured by # of records) 


j


  Please consider the environment before printing this email

John A Shuey
Director of Conservation Science

jshuey AT tnc.org
317.829.3898 - direct
317.951.8818 - front desk
317.917.2478 - Fax

nature.org

The Nature Conservancy
Indiana Field Office
620 E. Ohio St.
Indianapolis, IN 46202





-----Original Message-----
From: leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu [mailto:leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu] 
On Behalf Of Tony Thomas 

Sent: Monday, January 19, 2015 4:46 PM
To: leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
Subject: [Leps-l] moth sampling

Hi All,

Tidying up my computer's hard drive I came across a graph from my moth 
diversity work in Fundy National Park in New Brunswick, Canada; many years ago. 

Out of 401 species of macros with 15,851 specimens, about half (approx. 190 
species) had 5 or less individual moths The number of species with 1, 2, 3, 4, 
5 moths was 75, 40, 35, 20, 20 respectively. At the other extreme one species 
had 1,253 individuals. 

I believe this demonstrates that for the best inventory of species one should 
collect every night if one wishes to collect the very rare species (i.e., those 
with only 1 individual that comes to a trap). 

Of course my data doesn't rule out the possibility that if traps are operated 
just once every 5 days the singleton that would have been caught on day 2, when 
traps are operated nightly, may be caught on day 5. 



_______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
_______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
_______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
Subject: Re: moth sampling
From: "Walsh, James Bruce - (jbwalsh)" <jbwalsh AT email.arizona.edu>
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015 17:31:59 +0000
"Perhaps this is a solid indication that we are no-where close to having a 
decent inventory?" 

Bingo!
________________________________________
From: John Shuey [jshuey AT TNC.ORG]
Sent: Tuesday, January 20, 2015 9:12 AM
To: Walsh, James Bruce - (jbwalsh); Tony Thomas; leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
Subject: RE: [Leps-l] moth sampling

Hi Bruce, In some way, this is like the Chao estimators. The problem with these 
(at least relative to this particular data base) is that no matter how you cut 
them (sampling effort-wise), the estimates always keep going up. Every new 
field effort knocks 20 or so species of the "single record list" but adds 20 or 
so new species to that list. In the ideal world, at some point, the number of 
unique records has to start leveling off - which for Belize butterflies - we 
can't get it to do that. In other words, for every unique collection record 
species we knock off the list, we replace it with a new unique single 
record-species. I want an indicator that points to a fairly consistent 
"predicted total # of species" - a stable predicted asymptote that I can 
approach as sampling effort increases. Perhaps this is a solid indication that 
we are no-where close to having a decent inventory? 


It's frustrating, because I want Belize to be over, so that we can move onto 
something new and exciting. 


j

  Please consider the environment before printing this email

John A Shuey
Director of Conservation Science

jshuey AT tnc.org
317.829.3898 - direct
317.951.8818 - front desk
317.917.2478 - Fax

nature.org

The Nature Conservancy
Indiana Field Office
620 E. Ohio St.
Indianapolis, IN 46202





-----Original Message-----
From: Walsh, James Bruce - (jbwalsh) [mailto:jbwalsh AT email.arizona.edu]
Sent: Tuesday, January 20, 2015 9:52 AM
To: John Shuey; Tony Thomas; leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
Subject: RE: [Leps-l] moth sampling

By the way, a quick "adjustment" (a delete-one jackknife estimator) for the 
total number of species is total number seem PLUS the number of species seen in 
only one sampling event (not singletons, but rather seen on only one day, could 
be hundreds that day). For this data, add 145 and that gives you a better 
estimate of the actual number of species 


cheers

bruce
________________________________________
From: leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu [leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu] on 
behalf of John Shuey [jshuey AT TNC.ORG] 

Sent: Tuesday, January 20, 2015 6:35 AM
To: Tony Thomas; leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
Subject: Re: [Leps-l] moth sampling

Hi Tony, I think your data are interesting and reflect a somewhat "mature" 
survey end point. - you are at the 39 records/species point. Here is what I 
have at the 29 records/species mark for Belize butterflies at the (27,954 
record for 958 species - hence a 25% less mature survey in my mind). 


406 species known from 5 or fewer records (note that in this accounting, a 
record may a more than one specimen - it's a measure of a collection of a 
species at a place on a unique date, irrespective of how many individuals were 
recorded): 


145 species known from single capture events
91 species known from 2 events:
61 species known from 3 records:
44 from 4 records;
65 from 5 records
One species has 459 records

The similarities are striking - no?

Our data set is probably about 4,000 records behind, and the change in the 
shape of the graph should be interesting once we decide to pull the plug and 
claim that we are "done". But I hope to see the number of rarely encountered 
species decline as a function of "time" (as measured by # of records) 


j


  Please consider the environment before printing this email

John A Shuey
Director of Conservation Science

jshuey AT tnc.org
317.829.3898 - direct
317.951.8818 - front desk
317.917.2478 - Fax

nature.org

The Nature Conservancy
Indiana Field Office
620 E. Ohio St.
Indianapolis, IN 46202





-----Original Message-----
From: leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu [mailto:leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu] 
On Behalf Of Tony Thomas 

Sent: Monday, January 19, 2015 4:46 PM
To: leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
Subject: [Leps-l] moth sampling

Hi All,

Tidying up my computer's hard drive I came across a graph from my moth 
diversity work in Fundy National Park in New Brunswick, Canada; many years ago. 

Out of 401 species of macros with 15,851 specimens, about half (approx. 190 
species) had 5 or less individual moths The number of species with 1, 2, 3, 4, 
5 moths was 75, 40, 35, 20, 20 respectively. At the other extreme one species 
had 1,253 individuals. 

I believe this demonstrates that for the best inventory of species one should 
collect every night if one wishes to collect the very rare species (i.e., those 
with only 1 individual that comes to a trap). 

Of course my data doesn't rule out the possibility that if traps are operated 
just once every 5 days the singleton that would have been caught on day 2, when 
traps are operated nightly, may be caught on day 5. 



_______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
_______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
_______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
Subject: Re: moth sampling
From: John Shuey <jshuey AT TNC.ORG>
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015 16:12:42 +0000
Hi Bruce, In some way, this is like the Chao estimators. The problem with these 
(at least relative to this particular data base) is that no matter how you cut 
them (sampling effort-wise), the estimates always keep going up. Every new 
field effort knocks 20 or so species of the "single record list" but adds 20 or 
so new species to that list. In the ideal world, at some point, the number of 
unique records has to start leveling off - which for Belize butterflies - we 
can't get it to do that. In other words, for every unique collection record 
species we knock off the list, we replace it with a new unique single 
record-species. I want an indicator that points to a fairly consistent 
"predicted total # of species" - a stable predicted asymptote that I can 
approach as sampling effort increases. Perhaps this is a solid indication that 
we are no-where close to having a decent inventory? 


It's frustrating, because I want Belize to be over, so that we can move onto 
something new and exciting. 


j

  Please consider the environment before printing this email 

John A Shuey
Director of Conservation Science

jshuey AT tnc.org
317.829.3898 - direct
317.951.8818 - front desk 
317.917.2478 - Fax 

nature.org 
    
The Nature Conservancy
Indiana Field Office 
620 E. Ohio St.
Indianapolis, IN 46202
     




-----Original Message-----
From: Walsh, James Bruce - (jbwalsh) [mailto:jbwalsh AT email.arizona.edu] 
Sent: Tuesday, January 20, 2015 9:52 AM
To: John Shuey; Tony Thomas; leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
Subject: RE: [Leps-l] moth sampling

By the way, a quick "adjustment" (a delete-one jackknife estimator) for the 
total number of species is total number seem PLUS the number of species seen in 
only one sampling event (not singletons, but rather seen on only one day, could 
be hundreds that day). For this data, add 145 and that gives you a better 
estimate of the actual number of species 


cheers

bruce
________________________________________
From: leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu [leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu] on 
behalf of John Shuey [jshuey AT TNC.ORG] 

Sent: Tuesday, January 20, 2015 6:35 AM
To: Tony Thomas; leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
Subject: Re: [Leps-l] moth sampling

Hi Tony, I think your data are interesting and reflect a somewhat "mature" 
survey end point. - you are at the 39 records/species point. Here is what I 
have at the 29 records/species mark for Belize butterflies at the (27,954 
record for 958 species - hence a 25% less mature survey in my mind). 


406 species known from 5 or fewer records (note that in this accounting, a 
record may a more than one specimen - it's a measure of a collection of a 
species at a place on a unique date, irrespective of how many individuals were 
recorded): 


145 species known from single capture events
91 species known from 2 events:
61 species known from 3 records:
44 from 4 records;
65 from 5 records
One species has 459 records

The similarities are striking - no?

Our data set is probably about 4,000 records behind, and the change in the 
shape of the graph should be interesting once we decide to pull the plug and 
claim that we are "done". But I hope to see the number of rarely encountered 
species decline as a function of "time" (as measured by # of records) 


j


  Please consider the environment before printing this email

John A Shuey
Director of Conservation Science

jshuey AT tnc.org
317.829.3898 - direct
317.951.8818 - front desk
317.917.2478 - Fax

nature.org

The Nature Conservancy
Indiana Field Office
620 E. Ohio St.
Indianapolis, IN 46202





-----Original Message-----
From: leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu [mailto:leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu] 
On Behalf Of Tony Thomas 

Sent: Monday, January 19, 2015 4:46 PM
To: leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
Subject: [Leps-l] moth sampling

Hi All,

Tidying up my computer's hard drive I came across a graph from my moth 
diversity work in Fundy National Park in New Brunswick, Canada; many years ago. 

Out of 401 species of macros with 15,851 specimens, about half (approx. 190 
species) had 5 or less individual moths The number of species with 1, 2, 3, 4, 
5 moths was 75, 40, 35, 20, 20 respectively. At the other extreme one species 
had 1,253 individuals. 

I believe this demonstrates that for the best inventory of species one should 
collect every night if one wishes to collect the very rare species (i.e., those 
with only 1 individual that comes to a trap). 

Of course my data doesn't rule out the possibility that if traps are operated 
just once every 5 days the singleton that would have been caught on day 2, when 
traps are operated nightly, may be caught on day 5. 



_______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
_______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
_______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
Subject: Re: moth sampling
From: Christopher Hamm <topher.hamm AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015 09:06:11 -0600
The caveat is that it is the standard curve seen on most temperate studies. In 
the tropics you need ~10 years of consistent sampling to see the curve level 
off. Not to mention that the canopy and understory communities are almost 
completely different.  


Chris

-- 
Christopher Hamm
Postdoctoral Researcher
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of Kansas
5032 Haworth Hall
1200 Sunnyside Avenue
Lawrence, Kansas 66045-7566
USA

email: chamm AT ku.edu
phone: (785) 864-3848
butterflyology.net
pizzabeerandscience.blogspot.com
 AT butterflyology

On January 20, 2015 at 08:38:43, metzlere AT msu.edu (metzlere AT msu.edu) wrote:

It is my impression that Tony's data look like a lot of data sets I've seen, 
e.g. a series of 6 papers published by Teraguchi and Lublin, 1999. in 
Kirtlandia, Vol 51, pages 3 thru 86.  The data were based on almost 10 years 
of monthly light trapping of moths at 6 sites in NE Ohio.  I was involved in 
the project as a pro bono consultant helping them with identifications.  I 
think I've seen a term for the kind of curve Tony suggests, and if I remember 
correctly, it is a standard curve seen in most long term studies. 


Cheers from sunny, and a comfortable 70F southern NM.

Eric,

_______________________________________________  
Leps-l mailing list  
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu  
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l  _______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
Subject: Re: moth sampling
From: "Walsh, James Bruce - (jbwalsh)" <jbwalsh AT email.arizona.edu>
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015 14:52:00 +0000
By the way, a quick "adjustment" (a delete-one jackknife estimator) for the 
total number of species is total number seem PLUS the number of species seen in 
only one sampling event (not singletons, but rather seen on only one day, could 
be hundreds that day). For this data, add 145 and that gives you a better 
estimate of the actual number of species 


cheers

bruce
________________________________________
From: leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu [leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu] on 
behalf of John Shuey [jshuey AT TNC.ORG] 

Sent: Tuesday, January 20, 2015 6:35 AM
To: Tony Thomas; leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
Subject: Re: [Leps-l] moth sampling

Hi Tony, I think your data are interesting and reflect a somewhat "mature" 
survey end point. - you are at the 39 records/species point. Here is what I 
have at the 29 records/species mark for Belize butterflies at the (27,954 
record for 958 species - hence a 25% less mature survey in my mind). 


406 species known from 5 or fewer records (note that in this accounting, a 
record may a more than one specimen - it's a measure of a collection of a 
species at a place on a unique date, irrespective of how many individuals were 
recorded): 


145 species known from single capture events
91 species known from 2 events:
61 species known from 3 records:
44 from 4 records;
65 from 5 records
One species has 459 records

The similarities are striking - no?

Our data set is probably about 4,000 records behind, and the change in the 
shape of the graph should be interesting once we decide to pull the plug and 
claim that we are "done". But I hope to see the number of rarely encountered 
species decline as a function of "time" (as measured by # of records) 


j


  Please consider the environment before printing this email

John A Shuey
Director of Conservation Science

jshuey AT tnc.org
317.829.3898 - direct
317.951.8818 - front desk
317.917.2478 - Fax

nature.org

The Nature Conservancy
Indiana Field Office
620 E. Ohio St.
Indianapolis, IN 46202





-----Original Message-----
From: leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu [mailto:leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu] 
On Behalf Of Tony Thomas 

Sent: Monday, January 19, 2015 4:46 PM
To: leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
Subject: [Leps-l] moth sampling

Hi All,

Tidying up my computer's hard drive I came across a graph from my moth 
diversity work in Fundy National Park in New Brunswick, Canada; many years ago. 

Out of 401 species of macros with 15,851 specimens, about half (approx. 190 
species) had 5 or less individual moths The number of species with 1, 2, 3, 4, 
5 moths was 75, 40, 35, 20, 20 respectively. At the other extreme one species 
had 1,253 individuals. 

I believe this demonstrates that for the best inventory of species one should 
collect every night if one wishes to collect the very rare species (i.e., those 
with only 1 individual that comes to a trap). 

Of course my data doesn't rule out the possibility that if traps are operated 
just once every 5 days the singleton that would have been caught on day 2, when 
traps are operated nightly, may be caught on day 5. 



_______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
_______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
_______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
Subject: moth sampling
From: metzlere AT msu.edu
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015 09:35:04 -0500

It is my impression that Tony's data look like a lot of data sets I've seen, 
e.g. a series of 6 papers published by Teraguchi and Lublin, 1999. in 
Kirtlandia, Vol 51, pages 3 thru 86.  The data were based on almost 10 years of 
monthly light trapping of moths at 6 sites in NE Ohio.  I was involved in the 
project as a pro bono consultant helping them with identifications.  I think 
I've seen a term for the kind of curve Tony suggests, and if I remember 
correctly, it is a standard curve seen in most long term studies. 


Cheers from sunny, and a comfortable 70F southern NM.

Eric,_______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
Subject: Re: moth sampling
From: John Shuey <jshuey AT TNC.ORG>
Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2015 13:35:17 +0000
Hi Tony, I think your data are interesting and reflect a somewhat "mature" 
survey end point. - you are at the 39 records/species point. Here is what I 
have at the 29 records/species mark for Belize butterflies at the (27,954 
record for 958 species - hence a 25% less mature survey in my mind). 


406 species known from 5 or fewer records (note that in this accounting, a 
record may a more than one specimen - it's a measure of a collection of a 
species at a place on a unique date, irrespective of how many individuals were 
recorded): 


145 species known from single capture events 
91 species known from 2 events: 
61 species known from 3 records:
44 from 4 records;
65 from 5 records
One species has 459 records

The similarities are striking - no?

Our data set is probably about 4,000 records behind, and the change in the 
shape of the graph should be interesting once we decide to pull the plug and 
claim that we are "done". But I hope to see the number of rarely encountered 
species decline as a function of "time" (as measured by # of records) 


j


  Please consider the environment before printing this email 

John A Shuey
Director of Conservation Science

jshuey AT tnc.org
317.829.3898 - direct
317.951.8818 - front desk 
317.917.2478 - Fax 

nature.org 
    
The Nature Conservancy
Indiana Field Office 
620 E. Ohio St.
Indianapolis, IN 46202
     




-----Original Message-----
From: leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu [mailto:leps-l-bounces AT mailman.yale.edu] 
On Behalf Of Tony Thomas 

Sent: Monday, January 19, 2015 4:46 PM
To: leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
Subject: [Leps-l] moth sampling

Hi All,

Tidying up my computer's hard drive I came across a graph from my moth 
diversity work in Fundy National Park in New Brunswick, Canada; many years ago. 

Out of 401 species of macros with 15,851 specimens, about half (approx. 190 
species) had 5 or less individual moths The number of species with 1, 2, 3, 4, 
5 moths was 75, 40, 35, 20, 20 respectively. At the other extreme one species 
had 1,253 individuals. 

I believe this demonstrates that for the best inventory of species one should 
collect every night if one wishes to collect the very rare species (i.e., those 
with only 1 individual that comes to a trap). 

Of course my data doesn't rule out the possibility that if traps are operated 
just once every 5 days the singleton that would have been caught on day 2, when 
traps are operated nightly, may be caught on day 5. 



_______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
_______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
Subject: moth sampling
From: Tony Thomas <mothman AT nbnet.nb.ca>
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2015 17:46:19 -0400
Hi All,

Tidying up my computer's hard drive I came across a graph from 
my  moth diversity work in Fundy National Park in New Brunswick, 
Canada; many years ago.
Out of 401 species of macros with 15,851 specimens, about half 
(approx. 190 species) had 5 or less individual moths
The number of species with 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 moths was 75, 40, 35, 20, 20 
respectively. At the other extreme one species had 1,253 individuals.
I believe this demonstrates that for the best inventory of species 
one should collect every night if one wishes to collect the very rare 
species (i.e., those with only 1 individual that comes to a trap).
Of course my data doesn't rule out the possibility that if  traps are 
operated just once every 5 days the singleton that would have been 
caught on day 2, when traps are operated nightly,  may be caught on day 5.


_______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
Subject: Re: books and liteerature
From: monarchrst AT aol.com
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2015 10:27:37 -0500
Saw the first spring Monarch yesterday, migrating back into Arizona from the 
roosting sites NW of here. It was feeding on shoe-string acacia flowers along 
with two or three Queens. Little earlier than in most years. 


Ian Watkinson, Yuma, Arizona
 

 _______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
Subject: Re: books and liteerature
From: Dale McClung <adverweb AT adver-net.com>
Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2015 11:12:00 -0500
There are noticeable overwintering sites in AZ? Could this be from a 
winter generation.

Dale McClung

On 1/19/15 10:27 AM, monarchrst AT aol.com wrote:
> Saw the first spring Monarch yesterday, migrating back into Arizona 
> from the roosting sites NW of here.  It was feeding on shoe-string 
> acacia flowers along with two or three Queens. Little earlier than in 
> most years.
> Ian Watkinson, Yuma, Arizona
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Leps-l mailing list
> Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
> http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
_______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
Subject: books and liteerature
From: metzlere AT msu.edu
Date: Sat, 17 Jan 2015 14:28:56 -0500
I am offering duplicate books and literature, mostly lepidoptera, from my 
library. 


If you want to see the lists email me at metzlere AT msu.edu

No obligations.

This is not an auction.  No wagering please.

Thank you.

Eric

Eric Metzler_______________________________________________
Leps-l mailing list
Leps-l AT mailman.yale.edu
http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/leps-l
Subject: Please help Critically endangered invertebrate
From: Neil Jones <neil AT aurinia.co.uk>
Date: Sat, 17 Jan 2015 17:15:54 +0000
Hello everybody,

Please pass this on to your friends and colleagues. I am aware that this 
is slightly off topic for the list but it is a matter of international 
concern and we need your help urgently.

This is about a critically endangered animal. It is found in the UK and 
as far as we know it is found in just two places on earth, both in 
Plymouth , UK. It isn't a Tiger, or  a Panda, or a Condor. It is 
something much rarer than those.
It is a tiny spider that is being threatened by a proposed housing 
development in a quarry in Plymouth UK.

It is going to a planning inspector in just a few days time.
The link below provides extra information and tells you what you can do 
to help.

The American naturalist William Beebe had something relevant to say 
about this situation.
"The beauty and genius of a work of art may be reconceived, though its 
first material expression be destroyed; a vanished harmony may yet again 
inspire the composer; but when the last individual of a race of living 
beings breathes no more, another heaven and another earth must pass 
before such a one can be again."


https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.butterflyguy.com_critically-2Dendangered.html-3Fll&d=AwICaQ&c=-dg2m7zWuuDZ0MUcV7Sdqw&r=tVAKMFPe3UCcsMWUFXo0FeX0xe1JUAj77B74DAI3DKI&m=mNClGlFihzYVu0smawKVEc0QZ-aEQVMHMiA24C4R2FU&s=vwqlVWbc9E4KJj9ttJ5U8RU03DU0EnAKEE0Dnzbolc8&e= 


It really doesn't matter where in the world you are. Indeed responses 
from people outside the UK will only emphasise the importance of the case.
Remember, extinction is forever!

Neil Jones
neil AT aurinia.co.uk
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Subject: Northernmost Early Black Witch moth record
From: Adrian Arleo <aarleo AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Dec 2014 14:27:42 -0700
Hi John, 
Thought you might like to know that we had a large male black witch moth in our 
barn this summer (2014), here in Lolo, MT! 

It was in pretty good shape, almost as intact as the one below-- my daughter 
just encountered this one yesterday on the island of Utila, Honduras. I wish 
I'd taken a picture of the one we had here. Next time.... 

Thanks,
Adrian Arleo
Lolo, MT
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