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Updated on Sunday, February 15 at 11:59 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


Snowy Owls,©BirdQuest

15 Feb raptors near Pozo ["'steve schubert' s_schub1 AT msn.com [Hi_MountainCondor]" ]
08 Jan Good news! Happy New year! ["SteppingStones marcelle AT bags4you.com [Hi_MountainCondor]" ]
17 Dec Sad news ["SteppingStones marcelle AT bags4you.com [Hi_MountainCondor]" ]
09 Dec New UC Davis Study - Condors at most risk ["SteppingStones marcelle AT bags4you.com [Hi_MountainCondor]" ]
5 Dec Re: Condor Article ["'Francis X. Villablanca' fvillabl AT calpoly.edu [Hi_MountainCondor]" ]
05 Dec Condor Article ["SteppingStones marcelle AT bags4you.com [Hi_MountainCondor]" ]
25 Nov Hi Mountain Rd. ["'steve schubert' s_schub1 AT msn.com [Hi_MountainCondor]" ]
20 Nov Hi Mountain weather station off-line ["chris AT tbo.net [Hi_MountainCondor]" ]
9 Nov donations ["'steve schubert' s_schub1 AT msn.com [Hi_MountainCondor]" ]
13 Oct open house event ["'steve schubert' s_schub1 AT msn.com [Hi_MountainCondor]" ]
20 Sep Hi Mountain one of the Trib's 10 secret spots to visit in SLO County ["'steve schubert' s_schub1 AT msn.com [Hi_MountainCondor]" ]
17 Sep Sad news ["SteppingStones marcelle AT bags4you.com [Hi_MountainCondor]" ]
16 Sep Could be "good news" ["SteppingStones marcelle AT bags4you.com [Hi_MountainCondor]" ]
09 Sep Well-written ["SteppingStones marcelle AT bags4you.com [Hi_MountainCondor]" ]
8 Sep summer interns/condor talk ["'steve schubert' s_schub1 AT msn.com [Hi_MountainCondor]" ]
18 Aug Hi Mountain one of the Trib's 10 secret spots to visit in SLO County ["chris AT tbo.net [Hi_MountainCondor]" ]
16 Aug workday at the lookout ["'steve schubert' s_schub1 AT msn.com [Hi_MountainCondor]" ]
10 Jul 73 condors in Boise ["SteppingStones marcelle AT bags4you.com [Hi_MountainCondor]" ]
14 Jun Nice to hear! ["SteppingStones marcelle AT bags4you.com [Hi_MountainCondor]" ]
29 Apr Weather at Hi Mtn. ["steve schubert" ]
25 Apr Yurok Tribe to release condors in Northern California [SteppingStones ]
21 Apr Interesting article that could affect Condors [SteppingStones ]
20 Apr Well-written article [SteppingStones ]
16 Apr Citizens helping ID Condors for research [SteppingStones ]
10 Apr Re: Good News! [Jeannie Keeffe ]
10 Apr Good News! [SteppingStones ]
03 Apr Two cool things! [SteppingStones ]
25 Feb Good news: condor eggs in the wild [SteppingStones ]
19 Feb Hi Mountain weather ["steve schubert" ]
16 Feb donations ["steve schubert" ]
8 Feb Condor Cam ["steve schubert" ]
31 Jan Re: Article on the break-in [bob & jeannie keeffe ]
31 Jan Article on the break-in [SteppingStones ]
23 Jan Good News!!! [SteppingStones ]
5 Jan correspondence ["steve schubert" ]
31 Dec Hi Mountain bird checklist ["steve schubert" ]
24 Nov lookout workday 11/23/13 ["steve schubert" ]
22 Oct Hi Mtn. Lookout weather news ["steve schubert" ]
22 Oct VWS Condor Cam [Paul Andreano ]
21 Oct How Cool! [SteppingStones ]
17 Oct Hi Mountain bird list ["steve schubert" ]
13 Oct Hi Mtn. Lookout Project donations ["steve schubert" ]
11 Oct Fwd: [MCAS Alert!] We Did It! Gov. Jerry Brown just signed Assembly Bill 711 [Paul Andreano ]
9 Oct Re: Hi Mtn. open house event [Carolina Van Stone ]
7 Oct Hi Mtn. open house event ["steve schubert" ]
07 Oct Tell Gov. Brown to get the lead out! ONE WEEK left [SteppingStones ]
6 Oct The sad legacy of toxic lead in the wild continues, by Jesse Grantham [Paul Andreano ]
1 Oct Laptop for Open House [Paul Andreano ]
30 Sep 12th Annual Hi Mountain Condor Lookout Open House (All Day Oct 5th) [Michaela Koenig ]
11 Sep Help Fund Anthony Prieto's Non-Lead Hunter Kickstarter Campaign! [Paul Andreano ]
31 Aug Interns of Hi Mountain []
26 Aug Very, interesting! (maybe alarming too!) [SteppingStones ]
21 Jul Re: Hi Mountain Intern Update [bob & jeannie keeffe ]
22 Jul Hi Mountain Intern Update ["shanejohnson541" ]
16 Jul interesting re: condors [SteppingStones ]
17 Jun Re: Condors getting into trouble! [Carolina Van Stone ]
13 Jun Condors getting into trouble! [SteppingStones ]
5 May work day projects ["steve schubert" ]
30 Apr Hi Mtn. workday ["steve schubert" ]
16 Apr Happy Birthday Condors! [SteppingStones ]
9 Apr donations ["steve schubert" ]
29 Mar 1st condor chick of 2013 at SDZoo [SteppingStones ]
13 Mar weather at Hi Mtn. ["steve schubert" ]
11 Mar Good News! [SteppingStones ]
2 Mar condor documentary film ["steve schubert" ]
16 Feb Re: Marcelle featured in Audubon newsletter [bob & jeannie keeffe ]
12 Feb Marcelle featured in Audubon newsletter ["steve schubert" ]
21 Dec Re: Congratulations Marcelle! [Kathleen Kent ]
20 Dec Congratulations Marcelle! ["steve schubert" ]
21 Dec RE: Congratulations Marcelle! ["Cooper, Kevin C -FS" ]
20 Dec Congratulations Marcelle! [Paul Andreano ]
25 Nov Wellness Pet Food Recall BEEF RECALLS, Egg Recall, Salmonella, USA Food Recalls ["a.deena AT ymail.com" ]
13 Nov Hi Mountain weather [steve schubert ]
30 Oct Condors in the vicinity of Hi Mt. ["Cooper, Kevin C -FS" ]
28 Oct donations ["steve schubert" ]
27 Oct Hi Mtn. open house event ["steve schubert" ]

Subject: raptors near Pozo
From: "'steve schubert' s_schub1 AT msn.com [Hi_MountainCondor]" <Hi_MountainCondor-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 15 Feb 2015 20:29:16 -0800
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From: 'steve schubert' s_schub1 AT msn.com 
[slocobirding] 


To: slocobirding 

Sent: Sunday, February 15, 2015 7:17 PM

Subject: [slocobirding] raptors field trip




Hello all,

I gave a 'Birds of Prey' classroom lecture and then led a van field trip today 
for Cuesta College Community Programs. Highlights were the southside pair of 
PEREGRINE FALCONS at Morro Rock, a pair of mating and nest building 
RED-SHOULDERED HAWKS in a eucalyptus tree on San Jacinto St. at the Cloister's, 
an adult GOLDEN EAGLE in flight along Pozo Rd., and an adult BALD EAGLE perched 
in a blue oak along Pozo Rd. 1/2 mile west of the town of Pozo. While we 
watched the perched bald eagle, a PEREGRINE FALCON swept by in flight. A flock 
of more than 50 WILD TURKEYS slowly crossed Pozo Rd. near the Santa Margarita 
Lake Rd. intersection, stopping traffic (all 2 vehicles) on the road for 
several minutes. 


 

Steve Schubert

Los Osos
Subject: Good news! Happy New year!
From: "SteppingStones marcelle AT bags4you.com [Hi_MountainCondor]" <Hi_MountainCondor-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 08 Jan 2015 15:26:56 -0800
from: http://www.edhat.com/site/tidbit.cfm?nid=146182

*Mystery Condor Discovered*
updated: Jan 08, 2015, 2:14 PM

/By Ventana Wildlife Society/

Over the holidays, Ventana Wildlife Society biologists discovered a 
mystery condor at its wildlife sanctuary in Big Sur, California. This 
juvenile condor was seen with adult condors, #209, aka "Shadow" and 
#231, aka "Wild 1", which are a breeding pair. This pair of condors is 
suspected of nesting in a remote portion of the Ventana Wilderness in 
the Arroyo Seco drainage and are the most likely parents for the mystery 
bird. Biologists have never entered the nest because of the area's 
inaccessibility.

This would be the third chick for #209, the suspected father, and is 
perhaps the best Christmas present we could ask for, said "Kelly 
Sorenson, VWS executive director. "This is truly exciting to witness as 
it offers another example of condors surviving on their own."

The total condor population now stands at 425 individuals (captive and 
wild) of which 116 are living in the wilds of California. Condor 
populations are also found in Baja California, Mexico, Arizona and Utah.


-- 

*Marcelle *
SteppingStones -*EcoSac Reusable Shopping Bag System *
Toll Free:*(800) 926-1017 *
Local:*(805) 927-1017 *
Fax:*(805) 927-3275
*www.bags4you.com 
service AT bags4you.com 
/Saving on paper & plastic since 1989, providing the highest quality 
reusable cotton and organic cotton bags & the BEST customer service! 
//*EcoSacs*//are truly "green": renewable (sustainable), reusable, 
(washable) and, recyclable! /
Subject: Sad news
From: "SteppingStones marcelle AT bags4you.com [Hi_MountainCondor]" <Hi_MountainCondor-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Dec 2014 15:08:19 -0800
Sad news from the Salt Lake Tribune:


  First documented condor chick hatched in Utah considered dead

 
http://www.sltrib.com/news/1960479-155/first-documented-condor-chick-hatched-in 


*Marcelle *
SteppingStones -*EcoSac Reusable Shopping Bag System *
Toll Free:*(800) 926-1017 *
Local:*(805) 927-1017 *
Fax:*(805) 927-3275
*www.bags4you.com 
service AT bags4you.com 
/Saving on paper & plastic since 1989, providing the highest quality 
reusable cotton and organic cotton bags & the BEST customer service! 
//*EcoSacs*//are truly "green": renewable (sustainable), reusable, 
(washable) and, recyclable! /
Subject: New UC Davis Study - Condors at most risk
From: "SteppingStones marcelle AT bags4you.com [Hi_MountainCondor]" <Hi_MountainCondor-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 09 Dec 2014 00:06:37 -0800
From: 

http://goldrushcam.com/sierrasuntimes/index.php/news/local-news/1684-uc-davis-study-finds-condors-with-greater-independence-have-higher-lead-levels 


Sierra Sun Times


    UC Davis Study Finds Condors With Greater Independence Have Higher
    Lead Levels
 
 


  *


  *



    Last Updated: Monday, 08 December 2014 05:08


Lead poisoning remains a major threat that is preventing recovery of 
naturally sustaining populations of condors in the wild, according to UC 
Davis researcher Terra Kelly. ( Terra Kelly/UC Davis photo)

December 4, 2014 - As California condors return from the brink of 
extinction, the threat of lead poisoning persists, particularly for 
older, more independent condors, according to a study led by the 
University of California, Davis.

Researchers evaluated blood lead levels in wild condors over the past 15 
years where the condor, the largest flying bird in North America, has 
been re-introduced to its previous range from Southern California to the 
Central Coast.

The study, published this month in the journal Conservation Biology, 
found that 62 to 91 percent of condors sampled in a given year in 
California between 1997 and 2011 had elevated levels of lead in their 
blood. This was despite the regular provision of food at release sites, 
given to help transition young birds to the wild. The supplemental food 
has reduced foraging by the population on natural food sources that may 
be contaminated with lead ammunition.

The investigators found that older condors are more likely to be exposed 
to higher levels of lead --- especially those birds that are gaining 
independence from food provision and flying farther from sites where the 
supplemental food is available to them.

"Condors benefit from carcasses left behind by hunters and ranchers," 
said principal investigator Christine Johnson, a professor at the UC 
Davis School of Veterinary Medicine. "However, these benefits are only 
realized if nonlead ammunition is used."

Researchers also compared patterns of blood lead levels before and after 
a 2008 ban on using lead ammunition for most hunting activities in the 
state's condor range. They found that while blood lead levels were lower 
at times in certain places, overall blood lead levels were not reduced 
in the population between 2009 and 2011. Condors exhibited greater 
independence during the post-ban period, which resulted in greater risk 
of lead exposure.

"Until we can ensure natural food sources are free from lead ammunition 
for the population, lead poisoning will threaten recovery of naturally 
sustaining populations of condors in the wild," said lead author Terra 
Kelly, an epidemiologist at the Wildlife Health Center in the UC Davis 
School of Veterinary Medicine.

California condors, perhaps best known for their nearly 10-foot 
wingspan, are an endangered species. In the 1980s, there were just 21 of 
them in the wild. Through captive breeding and reintroduction, there are 
now more than 100 California condors flying in the wild statewide.

"Hunters and ranchers have a long-standing tradition of taking a 
proactive role in wildlife conservation and management," said Johnson. 
"Hunters and ranchers who use nonlead ammunition have made an invaluable 
contribution to the health of scavenging wildlife by providing 
critically important food sources for scavengers."

The study was conducted in collaboration with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife 
Service, California Department of Fish and Wildlife, National Park 
Service, Ventana Wildlife Society, and U.S. Geological Survey.

Previous studies conducted over the past few decades have highlighted 
lead-based ammunition as the main source of lead poisoning in condors. 
Lead bullets shatter upon impact into an animal. Condors that feed on 
remains from that carcass ingest the tiny lead fragments and become 
poisoned. Because condors scavenge communally, a single contaminated 
carcass can poison several condors.

In 2013, California Gov. Jerry Brown signed more comprehensive 
legislation that expands the previous ban statewide. The expanded law, 
to be phased in by 2019, requires nonlead ammunition for the take of any 
wildlife for any purpose. More information about the regulations and 
nonlead ammunition can be found at the following websites:

  * California Department of Fish and Wildlife: Fishing and Hunting
    Regulations 
  * California Department of Fish and Wildlife: Nonlead Ammunition
    
  * Hunting with Non-lead 

The study was funded by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Endangered 
Species Cooperative Conservation Fund Grant program and Morris Animal 
Foundation.
------------------------------------------------------------------------


      About UC Davis

UC Davis is a global community of individuals united to better humanity 
and our natural world while seeking solutions to some of our most 
pressing challenges. Located near the California state capital, UC Davis 
has more than 34,000 students, and the full-time equivalent of 4,100 
faculty and other academics and 17,400 staff. The campus has an annual 
research budget of over $750 million, a comprehensive health system and 
about two dozen specialized research centers. The university offers 
interdisciplinary graduate study and 99 undergraduate majors in four 
colleges and six professional schools.


      Additional information:

  * Read the study.
    
  * Related: Two new studies link hunting to lead in scavenger birds
    (2011) 

-- 

*Marcelle *
SteppingStones -*EcoSac Reusable Shopping Bag System *
Toll Free:*(800) 926-1017 *
Local:*(805) 927-1017 *
Fax:*(805) 927-3275
*www.bags4you.com 
service AT bags4you.com 
/Saving on paper & plastic since 1989, providing the highest quality 
reusable cotton and organic cotton bags & the BEST customer service! 
//*EcoSacs*//are truly "green": renewable (sustainable), reusable, 
(washable) and, recyclable! /
Subject: Re: Condor Article
From: "'Francis X. Villablanca' fvillabl AT calpoly.edu [Hi_MountainCondor]" <Hi_MountainCondor-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 5 Dec 2014 09:46:15 -0800 (PST)
Hi all, 

The original article is available through the USFWS at 
https://www.fws.gov/cno/es/CalCondor/PDF_files/2014-9-Kelly-Risk%20factors-lead%20exposure-in-condors.pdf 


Proud to be an extremist - FXV 

____________________________________________________________________ 
Francis Villablanca, Professor 
Associate Department Chair 
Biological Sciences Department 
Cal Poly State University 
San Luis Obispo, CA 
93407 


----- Original Message -----

From: "SteppingStones marcelle AT bags4you.com [Hi_MountainCondor]" 
 

To: "Hi Mtn Lookout Listserv"  
Sent: Friday, December 5, 2014 8:41:39 AM 
Subject: [CondorLookoutProject] Condor Article 



from: The Californian 


http://www.thecalifornian.com/story/news/local/2014/12/04/threat-local-condors-pervasive-study-says/19927761/ 


Threat to local condors pervasive, study says 




For those who care about the Central Coast’s population of California 
condors, the battle to keep them from being poisoned by spent lead ammunition 
has become an insidious, pervasive problem, according to a new study led by the 
University of California, Davis. 


Area advocates for Condor survival, such as the Ventana Wildlife Society and 
Pinnacles National Park, are continuing their work persuading hunters and 
ranchers to stop using lead ammunition and instead convert to alternatives, 
such as brass or copper. 


California condors, perhaps best known for their nearly 10-foot wingspan, are 
an endangered species. In the 1980s, there were just 21 of them in the wild. 
Through captive breeding and reintroduction, there are now about 100 California 
condors flying in the wild statewide. 


Researchers in the UC Davis study evaluated blood lead levels in wild condors 
over the past 15 years where the condor, the largest flying bird in North 
America, has been re-introduced to its previous range from Southern California 
to the Central Coast. 


The study, published this month in the journal Conservation Biology, found that 
up to 91 percent of condors sampled in a given year in California between 1997 
and 2011 had elevated levels of lead in their blood. The researchers found that 
older condors are more likely to be exposed to higher levels of lead – 
especially those birds that are gaining independence from provided food 
provisions and flying farther from sites where the supplemental food is 
available to them. 


Condors feed on large dead animals, and food, such as still-born calves, are 
left for them at key points in their Central Coast range by Ventana Wildlife 
Society and Pinnacles National Park. But as they get older, they become less 
dependent on these provisions, and venture out to private lands where carcasses 
of game and predator animals like coyotes are left, along with shattered pieces 
of lead bullets in their entrails. 


“Condors benefit from carcasses left behind by hunters and ranchers,” said 
Karen Beppler-Dorn, superintendent of Pinnacles, which co-manages the central 
California condor flock with the Ventana Wildlife Society. “However, these 
benefits are only realized if non-lead ammunition is used. Hunters and ranchers 
have a long-standing tradition of taking a proactive role in wildlife 
conservation and management. Sport hunting, euthanasia of farm animals, and 
depredation of various wildlife pests all play an important role by providing 
critically important food sources for wildlife scavengers.” 


If a poisoned condor isn’t treated, the lead salts produced by stomach acids 
coming into contact with the lead will block receptors in the brain, 
essentially shutting down the bird’s digestive system. They starve to death. 


But the National Rifle Association calls groups seeking a ban on lead 
“extremists,” making it an uphill battle convincing NRA members to give up 
lead. 


“These extremist groups are trying to ban bullets under a federal law that 
specifically doesn’t apply to ammunition,” said Chris Cox, an executive 
with the NRA, wrote in an undated blog on the NRA’s website when the lead ban 
was first proposed. “In addition, they are using false data and emotion 
instead of sound science to further their political agenda.” 


Apparently in the eyes of the NRA, the extremist groups include UC Davis, 
Pinnacles National Park, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, California Department 
of Fish and Wildlife, National Park Service, Ventana Wildlife Society and the 
U.S. Geological Survey – all of which participated in the new study. 


“The NRA says [the lead] must be from a different source,” said Kelly 
Sorenson, executive director of the Ventana Wildlife Society, which gives away 
non-lead ammunition to hunters and ranchers. “That’s a smoke screen – 70 
percent of the known exposures is from lead ammo. There is no doubt about the 
source. 


“It’s like I want to tell these guys, ‘I’m not trying to take away your 
guns; I’m trying to give you ammo,’ ” Sorrenson said. 


The study points out that a 2008 state ban on lead ammunition in condor ranges 
has done little to reduce the number of poisonings. Much of the poisoned 
carrion is on private lands, and there are not enough game wardens to enforce 
the ban on public lands. But a significant portion of the problem is the lack 
of availability of non-lead ammunition. 


“It’s no surprise that condor exposure to lead is unchanged after the onset 
of the lead ammunition ban,” Sorenson said. “The poor availability of 
non-lead ammunition for some calibers makes it difficult for many hunters to 
comply with the ban.” 


He noted, in particular, the dearth of non-lead .22-caliber bullets, a favorite 
for shooting varmints on ranchland. It creates a quandary for both shooters and 
condor advocates. How do you enforce a ban on lead when there are not enough 
non-lead replacements to go around? 


Until that loggerhead is broken, the poisoning of endangered species will 
likely continue, experts say. 


“Until we can ensure natural food sources are free from lead ammunition for 
the population, lead poisoning will threaten recovery of naturally sustaining 
populations of condors in the wild,” said lead author Terra Kelly, an 
epidemiologist at the Wildlife Health Center in the UC Davis School of 
Veterinary Medicine. 


Dennis L. Taylor covers environmental issues for TheCalifornian.com. Follow him 
on Twitter  AT taylor_salnews. 

-- 


Marcelle 
SteppingStones - EcoSac Reusable Shopping Bag System 
Toll Free: (800) 926-1017 
Local: (805) 927-1017 
Fax: (805) 927-3275 
www.bags4you.com 
service AT bags4you.com 
Saving on paper & plastic since 1989, providing the highest quality reusable 
cotton and organic cotton bags & the BEST customer service! EcoSacs are truly 
"green": renewable (sustainable), reusable, (washable) and, recyclable! 



 
Subject: Condor Article
From: "SteppingStones marcelle AT bags4you.com [Hi_MountainCondor]" <Hi_MountainCondor-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 05 Dec 2014 08:41:39 -0800
from: The Californian

 
http://www.thecalifornian.com/story/news/local/2014/12/04/threat-local-condors-pervasive-study-says/19927761/ 



  Threat to local condors pervasive, study says



For those who care about the Central Coast's population of California 
condors, the battle to keep them from being poisoned by spent lead 
ammunition has become an insidious, pervasive problem, according to a 
new study led by the University of California, Davis.

Area advocates for Condor survival, such as the Ventana Wildlife Society 
and Pinnacles National Park, are continuing their work persuading 
hunters and ranchers to stop using lead ammunition and instead convert 
to alternatives, such as brass or copper.

California condors, perhaps best known for their nearly 10-foot 
wingspan, are an endangered species. In the 1980s, there were just 21 of 
them in the wild. Through captive breeding and reintroduction, there are 
now about 100 California condors flying in the wild statewide.

Researchers in the UC Davis study evaluated blood lead levels in wild 
condors over the past 15 years where the condor, the largest flying bird 
in North America, has been re-introduced to its previous range from 
Southern California to the Central Coast.

The study, published this month in the journal Conservation Biology, 
found that up to 91 percent of condors sampled in a given year in 
California between 1997 and 2011 had elevated levels of lead in their 
blood. The researchers found that older condors are more likely to be 
exposed to higher levels of lead -- especially those birds that are 
gaining independence from provided food provisions and flying farther 
from sites where the supplemental food is available to them.

Condors feed on large dead animals, and food, such as still-born calves, 
are left for them at key points in their Central Coast range by Ventana 
Wildlife Society and Pinnacles National Park. But as they get older, 
they become less dependent on these provisions, and venture out to 
private lands where carcasses of game and predator animals like coyotes 
are left, along with shattered pieces of lead bullets in their entrails.

"Condors benefit from carcasses left behind by hunters and ranchers," 
said Karen Beppler-Dorn, superintendent of Pinnacles, which co-manages 
the central California condor flock with the Ventana Wildlife Society. 
"However, these benefits are only realized if non-lead ammunition is 
used. Hunters and ranchers have a long-standing tradition of taking a 
proactive role in wildlife conservation and management. Sport hunting, 
euthanasia of farm animals, and depredation of various wildlife pests 
all play an important role by providing critically important food 
sources for wildlife scavengers."

If a poisoned condor isn't treated, the lead salts produced by stomach 
acids coming into contact with the lead will block receptors in the 
brain, essentially shutting down the bird's digestive system. They 
starve to death.

But the National Rifle Association calls groups seeking a ban on lead 
"extremists," making it an uphill battle convincing NRA members to give 
up lead.

"These extremist groups are trying to ban bullets under a federal law 
that specifically doesn't apply to ammunition," said Chris Cox, an 
executive with the NRA, wrote in an undated blog on the NRA's website 
when the lead ban was first proposed. "In addition, they are using false 
data and emotion instead of sound science to further their political 
agenda."

Apparently in the eyes of the NRA, the extremist groups include UC 
Davis, Pinnacles National Park, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 
California Department of Fish and Wildlife, National Park Service, 
Ventana Wildlife Society and the U.S. Geological Survey -- all of which 
participated in the new study.

"The NRA says [the lead] must be from a different source," said Kelly 
Sorenson, executive director of the Ventana Wildlife Society, which 
gives away non-lead ammunition to hunters and ranchers. "That's a smoke 
screen -- 70 percent of the known exposures is from lead ammo. There is 
no doubt about the source.

"It's like I want to tell these guys, 'I'm not trying to take away your 
guns; I'm trying to give you ammo,'" Sorrenson said.

The study points out that a 2008 state ban on lead ammunition in condor 
ranges has done little to reduce the number of poisonings. Much of the 
poisoned carrion is on private lands, and there are not enough game 
wardens to enforce the ban on public lands. But a significant portion of 
the problem is the lack of availability of non-lead ammunition.

"It's no surprise that condor exposure to lead is unchanged after the 
onset of the lead ammunition ban," Sorenson said. "The poor availability 
of non-lead ammunition for some calibers makes it difficult for many 
hunters to comply with the ban."

He noted, in particular, the dearth of non-lead .22-caliber bullets, a 
favorite for shooting varmints on ranchland. It creates a quandary for 
both shooters and condor advocates. How do you enforce a ban on lead 
when there are not enough non-lead replacements to go around?

Until that loggerhead is broken, the poisoning of endangered species 
will likely continue, experts say.

"Until we can ensure natural food sources are free from lead ammunition 
for the population, lead poisoning will threaten recovery of naturally 
sustaining populations of condors in the wild," said lead author Terra 
Kelly, an epidemiologist at the Wildlife Health Center in the UC Davis 
School of Veterinary Medicine.

Dennis L. Taylor covers environmental issues for TheCalifornian.com. 
Follow him on Twitter  AT taylor_salnews.


-- 

*Marcelle *
SteppingStones -*EcoSac Reusable Shopping Bag System *
Toll Free:*(800) 926-1017 *
Local:*(805) 927-1017 *
Fax:*(805) 927-3275
*www.bags4you.com 
service AT bags4you.com 
/Saving on paper & plastic since 1989, providing the highest quality 
reusable cotton and organic cotton bags & the BEST customer service! 
//*EcoSacs*//are truly "green": renewable (sustainable), reusable, 
(washable) and, recyclable! /
Subject: Hi Mountain Rd.
From: "'steve schubert' s_schub1 AT msn.com [Hi_MountainCondor]" <Hi_MountainCondor-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Nov 2014 20:56:05 -0800
   Hello all,

Today Kevin Cooper, Dave Berry, and I birded from Pozo to Hi Mountain Lookout, 
where we put in a workday at the lookout. Below is the checklist for the 6 mile 
drive. At the Salinas River crossing on Hi Mountain Rd. 


- a one mile drive from the Pozo Ranger Station - there were two VARIED 
THRUSHES moving among the willows and oaks near the dry streambed. This is a 
'new' species addition for the Hi Mountain eBird checklist, now at a total of 
106 species for bird observations within a 3-mile radius of Hi Mountain 
Lookout. 


 

On the drive this morning a juv. GOLDEN EAGLE flushed from the roadside along 
Pozo Rd., within a mile east of the intersection with Santa Margarita Lake Rd. 


 

Steve Schubert

http://www.facebook.com/condorlookout



Hi Mountain-- Hi Mountain Rd. to Hi Mountain Lookout, west of Salinas River 
crossing, San Luis Obispo, US-CA 

Nov 25, 2014 9:30 AM - 3:00 PM
Protocol: Traveling
6.0 mile(s)
Comments: Varied thrush (2) at Salinas River crossing flying among willows and 
oaks; new species addition to Hi Mtn. eBird list. Birding along Hi Mountain Rd. 
and workday at Hi Mountain Lookout. 

Observers: S. Schubert, K. Cooper, D. Berry
Clear, cloudless skies, light SW breeze (6-7mph), becoming NW mid-afternoon. 
Temp. mid-upper 60's 

17 species

California Quail  X
Turkey Vulture  X
Band-tailed Pigeon  X
White-throated Swift  X
Acorn Woodpecker  X
Steller's Jay  X     riparian woodland along Salinas River crossing
Western Scrub-Jay  X
Common Raven  2
Oak Titmouse  X
White-breasted Nuthatch  X
Wrentit  X
Varied Thrush 2 2, vocalizing and perched among oaks and willows near Salinas 
River crossing. 

California Thrasher  X
Spotted Towhee  X
Fox Sparrow X several in chaparral along Hi Mountain Lookout Rd.; summit Santa 
Lucia Mountains 

Golden-crowned Sparrow  X
Dark-eyed Junco  X

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S20673950 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 
(http://ebird.org) 
Subject: Hi Mountain weather station off-line
From: "chris AT tbo.net [Hi_MountainCondor]" <Hi_MountainCondor-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2014 12:02:12 -0700




Subject: donations
From: "'steve schubert' s_schub1 AT msn.com [Hi_MountainCondor]" <Hi_MountainCondor-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 9 Nov 2014 11:37:46 -0800
   
The following donations to the Hi Mountain Lookout Project have been received. 
Thank-you! 




 

Financial donations -

 -Bill Moore, Los Osos 

 -Kathleen and Tony Kent, Paso Robles

-Central Coast Bioneers Conference, Oct. '14, San Luis Obispo

  

Material donations -

-Doug Stinson, Wild Birds Unlimited, San Luis Obispo -- book "Raptors at a 
Distance" 


 

Donors of auction items for the annual Hi Mountain Lookout Project open house 
event, October, 2014- 


-U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, California Condor Recovery Program

-Friends of the California Condor Wild and Free, Ventura

-Santa Barbara Zoo

-Nancy and Bill Greenough, Saucelito Canyon Vineyards, San Luis Obispo

-Jan Hamber, Santa Barbara

-Marcelle Bakula, Cambria

-Phyllis Hischier, San Luis Obispo

-Morro Bay National Estuary Program

-Mountain Air Sports, San Luis Obispo

 

 

Auction and merchandise sales at the 2014 open house event raised $218 for the 
Memorial Internship Fund and $376 for the Lookout Project general 
fund...thank-you to all the participants. 


 

 
 
Donations can be made by writing a check to: 

"MCAS Hi Mountain Lookout Project"

and mailing to:  

Morro Coast Audubon Society 

Po Box 1507
Morro Bay, CA 93443-1507



Donate to the Mike Tyner Memorial Internship Fund:

Please make checks payable to: MCAS-Hi Mountain Lookout Project (write in 
'M.Tyner Fund' on the notes space) 


Donate by mail: Morro Coast Audubon, PO Box 1507, Morro Bay, CA 93443

Donate on-line: To donate online with a credit card, simply visit Morro Coast 
Audubon's donation page at www.morrocoastaudubon.org 


Choose: Dedication or Gift (To make a donation in memory of Mike, please enter 
Mike Tyner's name). 


 

Contributions are tax deductible under IRS Code 501(c)(3).

Morro Coast Audubon Society tax I.D. # 23-7165021

A 2014 tax receipt will be sent to you from MCAS if requested
Subject: open house event
From: "'steve schubert' s_schub1 AT msn.com [Hi_MountainCondor]" <Hi_MountainCondor-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 13 Oct 2014 21:27:35 -0700
   Hello all,

 

Thank-you to all who helped out with and attended the 13th annual Hi Mountain 
Lookout Project open house event on Oct. 11th. A team effort - publicity, field 
trip leaders, speakers, kids activities, donors and participants in the auction 
and merchandise sales, assistance opening and closing the lookout facilities, 
loading and unloading supplies, sharing in the cooking of the sunset potluck 
dinner, cleaning up afterwards, and being there to join in the fun! See you 
next year. 


 

Photos of the open house event are posted on the Hi Mountain Lookout facebook 
page, at 
https://www.facebook.com/condorlookout 


 

Steve Schubert
http://www.condorlookout.org/
Subject: Hi Mountain one of the Trib's 10 secret spots to visit in SLO County
From: "'steve schubert' s_schub1 AT msn.com [Hi_MountainCondor]" <Hi_MountainCondor-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 20 Sep 2014 11:10:14 -0700
 
Hello all,

Below is the link to the newspaper article. Hi Mountain Lookout is featured #7 
of 10 'secret spots' to visit in SLO County in this Tribune article. By the 
way, #4 at Wallace Creek on the San Andreas Fault is a photo of a field trip I 
am leading for my Cuesta College Community Programs course. The photographer 
David Middlecamp from the Tribune came along on the field trip. It was a long 
time ago, in 1993. I am 4th from the front of the line, wearing binoculars, of 
course. 


Steve Schubert



Subject: Hi Mountain one of the Trib's 10 secret spots to visit in SLO County



 

 

 


http://www.sanluisobispo.com/2014/08/14/3196118/10-secret-spots-to-visit-in-slo.html, 
published Thursday, August 14th. 



 




#7. HI MOUNTAIN LOOKOUT | San Luis Obispo County sits in the heart of the 
historic range of the California condor, a huge vulture that was pushed to the 
brink of extinction. In the Los Padres National Forest between Pozo and Lopez 
Lake sits Hi Mountain Lookout, an old fire 
lookout that has been transformed into a field research station and 
interpretive center for condor biologists. It’s the best place in the county 
to see a condor." 



Read more here: 
http://www.sanluisobispo.com/2014/08/14/3196118/10-secret-spots-to-visit-in-slo.html#storylink=cpy 



 

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Subject: Sad news
From: "SteppingStones marcelle AT bags4you.com [Hi_MountainCondor]" <Hi_MountainCondor-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 08:35:13 -0700
Sad...

http://www.kionrightnow.com/news/local-news/first-wildhatched-condor-in-big-sur-dies/28087490 



BIG SUR, Calif. -

The first wild-hatched condor in Big Sur has died.


  More from Central Coast News

  * California condor arrives at Oakland Zoo for lead...
 
 

  * Pinnacles National Park holding fundraising hikes for...
 
 

  * Four California condors to be released in Big Sur Tuesday
 
 


Ventana, or #444, was the oldest living first-generation condor born in 
the world after the California condor population reached near extinction 
in the 1980s.

The Ventana Wildlife Society, one of the main conservation groups to 
re-build the condor population in the country, confirmed that Ventana 
was being treated at the Los Angeles Zoo and died the first week in 
September.

Researchers are still looking into the possibility that her death was 
caused by another lead poisoning incident. The raptor was treated for 
lead poisoning at the Oakland Zoo in May.

Researchers from Ventana Wildlife Society say that the more efficient 
condors become at finding food, the more risk there is for them to be 
exposed several times a year to lead found in carcasses. That lead 
typically comes from spent ammunition.

"The Ventana Wildlife Society believes that using non-lead ammunition 
preserves the hunters and ranchers livelihood and tradition in a safer 
way for the condors," the organization said.

The state previously banned the use of lead ammunition for 
big-game/non-game hunting within range of the California condor, and is 
set to ban the use of lead ammunition for any hunting purposes anywhere 
in California by July 2019.

A series of guided hikes are being offered at Pinnacles National park to 
help raise funds for condor conservation efforts. More information about 
those hikes is here. 

 


-- 

*Marcelle *
SteppingStones -*EcoSac Reusable Shopping Bag System *
Toll Free:*(800) 926-1017 *
Local:*(805) 927-1017 *
Fax:*(805) 927-3275
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//*EcoSacs*//are truly "green": renewable (sustainable), reusable, 
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Subject: Could be "good news"
From: "SteppingStones marcelle AT bags4you.com [Hi_MountainCondor]" <Hi_MountainCondor-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 20:43:58 -0700
Let's hope the legislators in Oregon believe the good scientific data & 
will help protect "our" endangered species (and not listen to the 
Firearms guy who thinks "lead" is the "only" way to go and that ammo may 
not be the problem - didn't read Myra Finkelstein's study/findings,  I 
gather)


http://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/news/politics/2014/09/16/lawmakers-hear-testimony-lead-ammunition/15746191/ 



  Lawmakers hear testimony on lead ammunition

The Oregon Legislature took its first steps towards deciding how it 
wants to handle lead ammunition when one of the country's most 
endangered species, the California condor, arrives.

The House Interim Committee on Agriculture and Natural Resources heard 
testimony from nine people Tuesday about a lead ammunition survey being 
sent to Oregon hunters and about potential next steps.

"Science has clearly shown that condors are exposed to lead when feeding 
on animals shot with lead ammunition," said Roy Elicker, director of the 
Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.

And that exposure can prove fatal.

Over the past three years, 67 percent of known condor mortalities were 
caused by lead, according to Elicker's PowerPoint presentation.

Condors were once found all along America's Pacific Coast, but today 
there are about 230 wild condors living in California, Arizona, Utah and 
Nevada.

The Yurok Tribe of Northern California plans to release captive-bred 
condors into the redwood coast over the next two to five years. 
Researchers expect those birds will migrate to southwestern Oregon for 
at least part of the year.

The question ODFW faces is whether to institute a lead ammunition ban 
the way California has done or to institute a voluntary program like 
Arizona and Utah.

"A well-designed voluntary program should be sufficient," Elicker said.

Arizona's program has a compliance rate that ranges from 80 to 90 
percent. The state has partnered with various private entities to offer 
coupons for free boxes of lead-free ammunition and raffle drawings for 
hunters who comply.

Debra Scheafer, who works as a Wildlife Care Center Veterinarian, wants 
the Oregon legislature to consider a statewide lead ammunition ban.

She told committee members about what she's seen while treating bald 
eagles and gold eagles suffering from lead poisoning.

"It takes a very small amount of lead as mentioned today, just a 
fragment, to cause potentially deadly impacts," Scheafer said. "Lead 
poison cases are some of the saddest cases we see in our hospital. They 
are truly suffering animals."

But Kevin Starrett from the Oregon Firearms Federation asked lawmakers 
to proceed with caution.

He questioned the science referenced by the speakers who supported a 
lead ban and pointed to the fact that in California, the condors are 
still showing elevated lead levels. Starrett speculated that perhaps 
lead ammunition is not actually the problem.

"Bullets are made of lead for a reason," Starrett said. "The composition 
of lead is ideal ... To replace lead in bullets, for the most part, is 
really not practical at all."




-- 

*Marcelle *
SteppingStones -*EcoSac Reusable Shopping Bag System *
Toll Free:*(800) 926-1017 *
Local:*(805) 927-1017 *
Fax:*(805) 927-3275
*www.bags4you.com 
service AT bags4you.com 
/Saving on paper & plastic since 1989, providing the highest quality 
reusable cotton and organic cotton bags & the BEST customer service! 
//*EcoSacs*//are truly "green": renewable (sustainable), reusable, 
(washable) and, recyclable! /
Subject: Well-written
From: "SteppingStones marcelle AT bags4you.com [Hi_MountainCondor]" <Hi_MountainCondor-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tue, 09 Sep 2014 09:19:18 -0700
Personal experience of meeting an "educational" Calif. Condor:

http://www.thecalifornian.com/story/news/local/2014/09/09/lead-ammo-kills-monterey-county-condor/15313389/ 



  Lead ammo kills Monterey County condor

Dennis L. Taylor 12:01 a.m. PDT September 9, 2014

I spent the day Saturday fluctuating between anger and joy, all over a 
pair of injured California condors with two radically different 
outcomes. One died and one lived because of human intervention.

Several months ago, I wrote a series of stories about an important 
condor named "Ventana" after our neighboring wilderness area. She was 
poisoned in Pinnacles National Park after ingesting someone's lead 
bullet. She was an important bird in the condor recovery project, as the 
oldest living wild-raised chick in the Central California flock.

When hunters or ranchers kill predators or game, they often leave the 
carcasses where they fall. Condors feed on carrion and are increasingly 
poisoned by the lead bullets or fragments left in the dead animal.

"Lead has been removed from gasoline and paints, even on wheels on 
cars," said Kelly Sorenson, executive director of the Ventana Wildlife 
Society. "It's no secret this stuff is toxic."

The Ventana Wildlife Society has been working with shooters for several 
years now to try and persuade them to switch to non-lead ammunition. 
There has been some success but it's been an uphill battle. Non-lead -- 
copper or other metal alloy -- costs more than lead. Apparently, for 
many, it's not worth the cost of preventing deadly outcomes for a 
species pushed as close to extinction as possible yet still has a chance 
to recover.

That's the anger part.

When I last wrote about the lead-bullet issue, I had a conversation with 
Jessica Brooks, the daughter of Randy Brooks, who innovated the copper 
bullet in the mid-1980s. Brooks is director of project managment at 
Utah-based Barnes Bullets. She told me that the performance of copper is 
unquestionable, far more lethal than lead. But it's also more expensive, 
a cost that is passed down to ranchers and hunters.

But she also noted that hunters and ranchers aren't buying ammunition by 
the truckload, and so the premium price of copper has not deterred demand.

On Saturday I attended the Wildlife Society's annual fundraiser, 
"Feathers in Flight," in Big Sur. At the entrance I was introduced to 
Joe Burnett, senior wildlife biologist for the VWS.

I mentioned my series of articles on Ventana -- the bird, not the 
society -- and asked how she was doing. After her poisoning, she was 
taken to a new facility at the Oakland Zoo where she responded to 
chelation therapy to rid her body of the nervous-system destroying 
metal. Weeks later she was released back at the Pinnacles.

"You know she died this week," Joe said. "She was poisoned a second time."

I'm sure I flushed. Bad things happen in nature, but this had nothing to 
do with nature. It was man at his worst -- thoughtless, arrogant and 
lacking any semblance to empathy. My mind immediately jumped to a 
stereotype: "I'll give up my lead ammo when you pry it from my cold dead 
hand."

Later in the day I met Mike Clark, the Los Angeles Zoo's wildlife 
biologist who found Ventana dead. He's a man who enjoys looking people 
straight in the eye. But I noticed when he was recalling finding her, 
his eyes moved away from mine and his face hardened.

"She was the third death from lead poisoning this week," he said.

The next 15 minutes I went through the motions of meeting new people, 
but had to leave the human flock to go admire a falconer and his 
peregrines. I needed to relax. The incredible speed and grace of these 
birds calmed me a bit. I reflected on the fact that many hunters and 
ranchers in the Salinas Valley have willingly switched ammunition. They 
don't want to harm condors; in the case of ranchers, they just want to 
protect their livestock.

But the real mood changer came with meeting Dolly. The 2-year-old 
condor suffered a severely broken right wing, and even after superb care 
she was rendered flightless. Dolly was rehabbed at the Los Angeles Zoo's 
Condor Program; to my mind the finest in the United States. She is now 
distinguished as being the first educational condor.

On Saturday, Dolly was hamming it up for her human well-wishers with a 
look of curiosity and very little fear, which is fine for educational 
birds. In the wild, lacking fear of humans is obviously a deadly 
mistake. In our arrogance, we have divorced ourselves from nature.

Vital Currents pursues critical examinations of culture, medicine, 
economics and policy. Follow Senior Writer Dennis L. Taylor on Twitter 
 AT taylor_salnews.



-- 

*Marcelle *
SteppingStones -*EcoSac Reusable Shopping Bag System *
Toll Free:*(800) 926-1017 *
Local:*(805) 927-1017 *
Fax:*(805) 927-3275
*www.bags4you.com 
service AT bags4you.com 
/Saving on paper & plastic since 1989, providing the highest quality 
reusable cotton and organic cotton bags & the BEST customer service! 
//*EcoSacs*//are truly "green": renewable (sustainable), reusable, 
(washable) and, recyclable! /
Subject: summer interns/condor talk
From: "'steve schubert' s_schub1 AT msn.com [Hi_MountainCondor]" <Hi_MountainCondor-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 8 Sep 2014 08:22:14 -0700
   Hello all,

Come support and hear about the Cal Poly intern's field research projects and 
eperiences at Hi Mountain Lookout this past summer, followed by Joe Burnett's 
condor talk, Monday September 15th at the Morro Coast Audubon Society monthly 
meeting. 


 

MCAS will be hosting a program about the status of the endangered California 
Condor in Central California at 7:00 PM, Monday, September 15, at the SLO 
Botanical Garden's Oak Glen Pavilion. 



The program will begin with Cal Poly summer interns Elizabeth Saldo and Summer 
Schlagete sharing the research that they and four other Cal Poly students 
conducted regarding the small mammals of the area, during a ten-week period at 
Hi Mountain Lookout in the Los Padres National Forest. The students collected 
vegetation data with the small mammal data at each location that was studied 
and also used radio telemetry to track local condor movement. The research was 
conducted as part of a long-term monitoring project of local wildlife. 



The main speaker of the night, Joe Burnett, Lead Biologist for Ventana Wildlife 
Society's California Condor Recovery Program in Big Sur, CA, will present about 
the current status of the condor in Central California. The presentation will 
also feature an in- depth look at the bird's history, including the dif? 
culties of releases into the wild, foraging and nesting, the survival threats 
the condor has faced, and the outlook of a full recovery. 
Subject: Hi Mountain one of the Trib's 10 secret spots to visit in SLO County
From: "chris AT tbo.net [Hi_MountainCondor]" <Hi_MountainCondor-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2014 11:51:47 -0700




Subject: workday at the lookout
From: "'steve schubert' s_schub1 AT msn.com [Hi_MountainCondor]" <Hi_MountainCondor-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 16 Aug 2014 10:15:04 -0700
    
Hello all,

Yesterday, Aug. 15th, I joined Kevin Cooper and Patrick Lieske, U.S. Forest 
Service, putting in a 5 hour workday at the lookout. We enjoyed meeting with 
Cal Poly interns Graham and Nikki, on duty. 


 

Photos are posted at 
https://www.facebook.com/condorlookout 


 

eBird checklist:


Hi Mountain-- Hi Mountain Lookout, San Luis Obispo, US-CA
Aug 15, 2014 10:20 AM - 3:20 PM
Protocol: Stationary
Comments: Hi Mountain Lookout workday, with USFS biologists Kevin Cooper and 
Patrick Lieske. Temp. upper 70's*F, persistent SW winds - max. 15mph, clear 
skies, coastal fog bank at the coast. 

Checklist submitted by S. Schubert
11 species

Turkey Vulture  X
Golden Eagle  1     juv.
Band-tailed Pigeon  X
White-throated Swift  X
Anna's Hummingbird  X
Western Scrub-Jay  X
Wrentit  X
California Thrasher  X
Spotted Towhee  X
California Towhee  X
Lesser Goldfinch  X

Subject: 73 condors in Boise
From: "SteppingStones marcelle AT bags4you.com [Hi_MountainCondor]" <Hi_MountainCondor-noreply@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 10 Jul 2014 07:14:22 -0700
A nice "behind-the-scenes" story / video of the facility in Boise:


http://www.ktvb.com/news/Raising-California-Condors-a-rare-look-inside-the-effort-to-save-the-endangered-bird-266492361.html 

-- 

*Marcelle *
SteppingStones -*EcoSac Reusable Shopping Bag System *
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//*EcoSacs*//are truly "green": renewable (sustainable), reusable, 
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Subject: Nice to hear!
From: "SteppingStones marcelle AT bags4you.com [Hi_MountainCondor]" <Hi_MountainCondor@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sat, 14 Jun 2014 20:37:33 -0700
/(This made me feel a little better after listening to a contractor from 
Tehachapi today complaining about the damage the condors are doing to 
some of his client's properties..ripping out their screens, destroying 
seats on their tractors - teen//age mischief I think!)/


http://www.mercurynews.com/science/ci_25959192/first-california-condor-spotted-san-mateo-county-since 


 From the San Jose Mercury News:
*FIRST CONDOR SPOTTED IN SAN MATEO COUNTY SINCE 1904*

Sending a jolt of excitement through biologists who are trying to bring 
one of America's most endangered species back from the brink of 
extinction, a California condor has been spotted in San Mateo County, 
the first since 1904.

The bird, #597, also known as "Lupine," is a 3-year-old female that flew 
more than 100 miles north from Pinnacles National Park in San Benito 
County on May 30 and landed on a private, forested property near 
Pescadero, on the San Mateo County Coast.

It was photographed by an motion-activated wildlife camera. The property 
owner checked the camera several days later, made the discovery and 
reported the finding to biologists this week.

"It's very important," said Kelly Sorenson, executive director of the 
Ventana Wildlife Society, a nonprofit group in Salinas that works to 
restore condors to the wild.

"It shows that they really are spreading out in their range. It's very 
exciting. It shows that we're on the right track. The population is 
expanding. They are breeding on their own. They are finding food on 
their own."

Condors, whose wingspan can reach 9 feet, once ranged from British 
Columbia to Mexico. But because of habitat loss, hunting and lead 
poisoning, the majestic birds' population dwindled to just 22 nationwide 
by 1982.

In a desperate gamble to stave off extinction, federal biologists 
captured all remaining wild condors in 1987 and began breeding them in 
zoos. The birds' offspring have been gradually released back to the wild.

Today the California condor population has grown to 433. Of those, 238 
live in the wild at Big Sur, Pinnacles, Southern California, Arizona, 
Utah and Mexico. The other 195 condors live in captivity, at places such 
as the Los Angeles Zoo. At a new wildlife hospital, the Oakland Zoo 
began treating wild condors last month.

The last condor verified in San Mateo County was observed in 1904, one 
mile west of the Stanford University campus, by professor Harold Heath.

Since condors have been reintroduced to the wild in recent decades, they 
have spread along the California coast, and Central California area, and 
more recently have turned up in the southern Sierra Nevada and the 
Tehachapi Mountains in Kern County.

Sorenson said that it's likely that condor #597 flew through Santa Cruz 
County. The birds also have been observed in rural Santa Clara County, 
east of Mount Hamilton, and in southern Alameda County. Because there 
are large numbers of sea lions, elephant seals and other marine mammals 
on the Santa Cruz-San Mateo coastline, Sorenson said that it's possible 
in future years, condors could begin to nest in the Santa Cruz Mountains 
and feed on marine mammals that wash up on the beach.

The main threat to condors continues to be poisoning from ingesting lead 
while eating dead animals shot by hunters. Last year, Gov. Jerry Brown 
signed a law banning lead bullets in hunting statewide by 2019.

Paul Rogers covers resources and environmental issues. Contact him at 
408-920-5045. Follow him at Twitter.com/PaulRogersSJMN 


-- 

*Marcelle *
SteppingStones -*EcoSac Reusable Shopping Bag System *
Toll Free:*(800) 926-1017 *
Local:*(805) 927-1017 *
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//*EcoSacs*//are truly "green": renewable (sustainable), reusable, 
(washable) and, recyclable! /
Subject: Weather at Hi Mtn.
From: "steve schubert" <s_schub1 AT msn.com>
Date: Tue, 29 Apr 2014 21:41:24 -0700
   Excerpt from Meteorologist John Lindsey's daily weather forecast:

 

Weather Forecast  04/29/14 (warm)

 

 ATMOSPHERIC CONDITION:

    At 6 a.m. the temperature at the San Luis Obispo County
    Airport reached 68 degrees while the relative humidity
    dropped to 33 percent. At the same time, the Paso Robles
    Airport reported a temperature of 46 degrees with a
    relative humidity reading of 76 percent. 

    The large temperature and relative humidity differences
    between these two stations is a result of gusty Santa Lucia
    (offshore) winds. Condor Lookout on Hi Mountain at 3,200 feet
    of elevation reported sustained northeasterly winds of 23 mph
    with gusts to 38 mph this morning. As the air mass descends
    down the Santa Lucia mountains into the coastal valleys
    and beaches its being warmed and dried by compression. 

    This condition will result in the warmest weather of the
    season. Today's maximum temperatures will reach the low 90s
    in the Coastal valleys and will range between the high 70s
    and mid 80s along the beaches. The North County is
    expected to hit the high 80s today. 
Subject: Yurok Tribe to release condors in Northern California
From: SteppingStones <marcelle AT bags4you.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Apr 2014 12:38:22 -0700
http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory/yurok-tribe-release-condors-california-23464744 


Yurok tribal tradition holds the California condor as sacred, with 
ancient stories saying the giant birds fly closest to the sun and are 
the best messengers to carry prayers.

Now, after five years of research, the far northern California-based 
tribe has received permission to release captive-bred condors into the 
Redwood Coast, where the giant bird hasn't soared for more than a century.

Yurok officials signed a memorandum of understanding last month with 
state and federal agencies and a condor conservation group, allowing for 
test releases as a final assessment of whether the region can support 
the endangered birds.

The first releases could come in the next one to three years, tribal 
biologist Chris West said. Meetings will begin in July to work out 
protocols and select a release site.

Seven sites are under consideration on Redwood National and State Parks 
and private land within about 50 miles of each other, primarily south of 
the Klamath River.

With federal funding in short supply, the tribes will work to develop 
private funding to cover the estimated annual cost of about $400,000, 
West said.

The return of the condor is part of Yurok environmental work, along with 
efforts to restore salmon numbers and improve forest health.

Condor feathers are part of traditional regalia used in ceremonial 
dances, said tribal microbiologist Tiana Williams. With no condors 
flying over tribal lands, there are no new feathers to replace old 
plumes worn out from use.

"When a species like condor or eagle gives you material for your 
regalia, it is considered their spirit is in that, too. They are singing 
with you, and praying with you," she said. "We can get feathers from the 
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, but it's not the same thing as being 
able to go out there and collect the feathers we need from condors 
flying over our own skies."

For Fish and Wildlife, establishing another population of condors far 
from the five existing sites in Southern and central California, 
Arizona, and Mexico's Baja California would reduce the risks associated 
with the giant bird's recovery.

Condors once flew the Pacific Coast from Mexico to Canada. There are 
just over 400 California condors in the world now, and only about 230 in 
the wild, said John McCamman, condor coordinator for Fish and Wildlife 
in Sacramento, Calif. That's up from just 22 birds in 1982, he said.

Condors face threats to their recovery, the top danger being ingesting 
lead shot or bullet fragments in an animal carcass, McCamman said.

West would like to see a new format for releasing birds, starting with a 
pair of mature adults, and gradually adding younger birds for a total of 
six.

All the birds would be fitted with tiny radio transmitters on their 
wings and tails, allowing biologists in the field to track them, and 
some with GPS satellite trackers, which send a position to a biologist's 
desk computer. That makes monitoring for lead poisoning easier.

Using $600,000 in grants from Fish and Wildlife, the tribe has been 
assessing habitat, taking blood samples from turkey vultures to assess 
the threat of lead poisoning and testing dead sea lions that wash up on 
the beach for DDT.

The lead levels in the vultures were lower than anywhere else in the 
condor's range, West said.

DDT contamination has also been lower than elsewhere.

Like eagles, condors in the 1960s and 1970s became unable to hatch their 
eggs because DDT made the shells too thin.

To provide the greatest genetic diversity possible, birds would come 
from breeding programs in Oregon, Idaho and California, and all the 
release sites, McCamman said.

The Fish and Wildlife Service, the National Park Service, the California 
Department of Parks and Recreation, and the Ventana Wildlife Society all 
signed the memorandum.

-- 

*Marcelle *
SteppingStones -*EcoSac Reusable Shopping Bag System *
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reusable cotton and organic cotton bags & the BEST customer service! 
//*EcoSacs*//are truly "green": renewable (sustainable), reusable, 
(washable) and, recyclable! /
Subject: Interesting article that could affect Condors
From: SteppingStones <marcelle AT bags4you.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 19:09:01 -0700
We may need to comment upon the proposed wind farm in Condor's territroy 
(as it poses a threat to Condors!)
Article from KCET:


*http://www.kcet.org/news/rewire/wind/blm-evaluating-another-wind-project-in-condor-country.html* 

-- 

*Marcelle *
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Toll Free:*(800) 926-1017 *
Local:*(805) 927-1017 *
Fax:*(805) 927-3275
*www.bags4you.com 
service AT bags4you.com 
/Saving on paper & plastic since 1989, providing the highest quality 
reusable cotton and organic cotton bags & the BEST customer service! 
//*EcoSacs*//are truly "green": renewable (sustainable), reusable, 
(washable) and, recyclable! /
Subject: Well-written article
From: SteppingStones <marcelle AT bags4you.com>
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2014 09:51:58 -0700
http://aeon.co/magazine/nature-and-cosmos/condors-bred-in-captivity-need-our-tough-love/ 

-- 

*Marcelle *
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Toll Free:*(800) 926-1017 *
Local:*(805) 927-1017 *
Fax:*(805) 927-3275
*www.bags4you.com 
service AT bags4you.com 
/Saving on paper & plastic since 1989, providing the highest quality 
reusable cotton and organic cotton bags & the BEST customer service! 
//*EcoSacs*//are truly "green": renewable (sustainable), reusable, 
(washable) and, recyclable! /
Subject: Citizens helping ID Condors for research
From: SteppingStones <marcelle AT bags4you.com>
Date: Wed, 16 Apr 2014 17:27:44 -0700
http://phys.org/news/2014-04-condor-citizen-scientists-endangered-species.html
     WAY TOO COOL - "We" can help ID condors from photos at feeding sites:

  http://www.condorwatch.org/

You have to sign up & then you get a bunch of photos to do (tutorial first)
Fun!

-- 

*Marcelle *
SteppingStones -*EcoSac Reusable Shopping Bag System *
Toll Free:*(800) 926-1017 *
Local:*(805) 927-1017 *
Fax:*(805) 927-3275
*www.bags4you.com 
service AT bags4you.com 
/Saving on paper & plastic since 1989, providing the highest quality 
reusable cotton and organic cotton bags & the BEST customer service! 
//*EcoSacs*//are truly "green": renewable (sustainable), reusable, 
(washable) and, recyclable! /
Subject: Re: Good News!
From: Jeannie Keeffe <bkeeffe AT earthlink.net>
Date: Thu, 10 Apr 2014 20:16:14 -0700
?? maybe instead of being pulled for breeding hes being pulled FROM breeding 
?? Typo ?? 


Thanks for keeping everyone posted,
Jeannie Keeffe
Lopez Lake, Arroyo Grande, CA

On Apr 10, 2014, at 5:21 PM, SteppingStones  wrote:

> I've been wanting to go up to Oregon to visit friends who recently moved back 
from Costa Rica - so I'll have to be sure to visit the zoo! 

> (interesting print error I believe - see the bold copy - If I am reading this 
correctly: Tyrion is a poor candidate for breeding but in the next paragraph 
he's the most likely to be pulled for breeding?!) 

> site/ source:
> 
> 
http://www.oregonlive.com/environment/index.ssf/2014/04/oregon_zoos_california_condor.html 

> The Oregon Zoo next month will become only a handful of zoos worldwide to 
exhibit California condors but here's a tip: Two of the enormous, bald-headed 
birds already are there and if you know where to look, you can see them. 

> 
> Pssst: That would be from the boardwalk you traverse as you head down into 
the zoo from the entrance. 

> 
> Wednesday morning, Kaweah, 29, and Tyrion, 5, both males, were given access 
to their new exhibit, dubbed Condors of the Columbia. 

> 
> It is scheduled to open to the public May 24, the start of Memorial Day 
weekend. 

> 
> The exhibit is an extension of the zoo's involvement in the effort to bring 
California condors, a critically endangered species, back from extinction's 
brink through the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's California Condor Recovery 
Program. Since 2003 the zoo has operated a captive breeding program at its 
Jonsson Center for Wildlife Conservation in rural Clackamas County. The site is 
off-limits to the public. 

> 
> Construction of the approximately $2.3 million on-site exhibit began last 
June; it is the third of eight major projects funded by the zoo bond measure 
voters passed in 2008. 

> 
> With cantilevered poles tilting out, the mesh-wrapped aviary covers about 
4,900 square feet at ground level and 5,800 square feet up top. The birds have 
roughly 100 feet over which they can take short flights between three tree 
perches -- likely only a few flaps, given their 8- to 10-foot wingspan. They 
also have a 3-foot-deep pool in which the water loving condors can bathe. 

> 
> 
> When given access to the space Wednesday, according to the zoo, the two birds 
flapped straight up to the highest perches. 

> Neither of them, nor a third condor that will join them, are suitable for 
release to the wild. 

> 
> Kaweah had been part of the zoo's breeding population but had to be removed 
for behaving roughly with his mate and breaking their eggs. 

> 
> "He has been in captivity his entire life, and has no fear of people," says 
Kelli Walker, lead condor keeper. "In fact he finds them quite interesting. 
When the exhibit opens, he will probably come right up to the barrier to meet 
visitors." 

> 
> Tyrion faced extensive medical problems, including a severely curved spine, 
after he hatched at the Los Angeles Zoo. Because of the spinal deformity, he's 
a poor candidate for the breeding program. And because he's relatively 
imprinted on people, he likely wouldn't do well in the wild, Walker says. 

> 
> A condor known as No. 432, who has previously been on exhibit at California's 
Santa Barbara Zoo, will join Kaweah and Tyrion soon. Of the three zoo condors, 
Tyrion, 6, is the most likely to be pulled for breeding. 

> 
> The Condors of the Columbia exhibit is named for the "buzzards of the 
Columbia" referenced in Meriwether Lewis' journals during the Lewis and Clark 
expedition. 

> 
> The birds, native to the region and commonly seen here during Lewis' and 
Clark's era, haven been seen in the Northwest for more than a century. 

> 
> The zoo's is one of four California condor breeding operations and more than 
40 chicks have hatched there. More than 20 Oregon Zoo-reared birds have gone to 
field pens and most of those have been freed. In addition, several eggs laid by 
Oregon Zoo condors have been placed in wild nests to hatch. 

> 
> -- Katy Muldoon
> 
> -- 
> Marcelle 
> SteppingStones - EcoSac Reusable Shopping Bag System 
> Toll Free: (800) 926-1017 
> Local: (805) 927-1017 
> Fax: (805) 927-3275 
> www.bags4you.com
> service AT bags4you.com
> Saving on paper & plastic since 1989, providing the highest quality reusable 
cotton and organic cotton bags & the BEST customer service! EcoSacs are truly 
"green": renewable (sustainable), reusable, (washable) and, recyclable! 

> 
> 
> 
Subject: Good News!
From: SteppingStones <marcelle AT bags4you.com>
Date: Thu, 10 Apr 2014 17:21:41 -0700
I've been wanting to go up to Oregon to visit friends who recently moved 
back from Costa Rica - so I'll have to be sure to visit the zoo!
(interesting print error I believe - see the bold copy - If I am reading 
this correctly: Tyrion is a poor candidate for breeding but in the next 
paragraph he's the most likely to be pulled for breeding?!)
site/ source:

http://www.oregonlive.com/environment/index.ssf/2014/04/oregon_zoos_california_condor.html 


The Oregon Zoo  next month will become only a 
handful of zoos worldwide to exhibit California condors but here's a 
tip: Two of the enormous, bald-headed birds already are there and if you 
know where to look, you can see them.

Pssst: That would be from the boardwalk you traverse as you head down 
into the zoo from the entrance.

Wednesday morning, Kaweah, 29, and Tyrion, 5, both males, were given 
access to their new exhibit, dubbed Condors of the Columbia.

It is scheduled to open to the public May 24, the start of Memorial Day 
weekend.

The exhibit is an extension of the zoo's involvement in the effort 
 to 
bring California condors, a critically endangered species, back from 
extinction's brink through the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's 
California Condor Recovery Program 
. 

Since 2003 the zoo has operated a captive breeding program at its 
Jonsson Center for Wildlife Conservation in rural Clackamas County. The 
site is off-limits to the public.

Construction of the approximately $2.3 million on-site exhibit began 
last June; it is the third of eight major projects funded by the zoo 
bond measure voters passed in 2008.

With cantilevered poles tilting out, the mesh-wrapped aviary covers 
about 4,900 square feet at ground level and 5,800 square feet up top. 
The birds have roughly 100 feet over which they can take short flights 
between three tree perches -- likely only a few flaps, given their 8- to 
10-foot wingspan. They also have a 3-foot-deep pool in which the water 
loving condors can bathe.


When given access to the space Wednesday, according to the zoo, the two 
birds flapped straight up to the highest perches.

Neither of them, nor a third condor that will join them, are suitable 
for release to the wild.

Kaweah had been part of the zoo's breeding population but had to be 
removed for behaving roughly with his mate and breaking their eggs.

"He has been in captivity his entire life, and has no fear of people," 
says Kelli Walker, lead condor keeper. "In fact he finds them quite 
interesting. When the exhibit opens, he will probably come right up to 
the barrier to meet visitors."

*Tyrion faced extensive medical problems, including a severely curved 
spine, after he hatched at the **Los Angeles Zoo 
**. Because of the spinal deformity, he's a poor 
candidate for the breeding program. And because he's relatively 
imprinted on people, he likely wouldn't do well in the wild, Walker says.*

**

*A condor known as No. 432, who has previously been on exhibit at 
California's **Santa Barbara Zoo **, will join 
Kaweah and Tyrion soon. Of the three zoo condors, Tyrion, 6, is the most 
likely to be pulled for breeding.*

The Condors of the Columbia exhibit is named for the "buzzards of the 
Columbia" referenced in Meriwether Lewis' journals during the Lewis and 
Clark expedition.

The birds, native to the region and commonly seen here during Lewis' and 
Clark's era, haven been seen in the Northwest for more than a century.

The zoo's is one of four California condor breeding operations and more 
than 40 chicks have hatched there. More than 20 Oregon Zoo-reared birds 
have gone to field pens and most of those have been freed. In addition, 
several eggs laid by Oregon Zoo condors have been placed in wild nests 
to hatch.

-- Katy Muldoon

-- 

*Marcelle *
SteppingStones -*EcoSac Reusable Shopping Bag System *
Toll Free:*(800) 926-1017 *
Local:*(805) 927-1017 *
Fax:*(805) 927-3275
*www.bags4you.com 
service AT bags4you.com 
/Saving on paper & plastic since 1989, providing the highest quality 
reusable cotton and organic cotton bags & the BEST customer service! 
//*EcoSacs*//are truly "green": renewable (sustainable), reusable, 
(washable) and, recyclable! /
Subject: Two cool things!
From: SteppingStones <marcelle AT bags4you.com>
Date: Thu, 03 Apr 2014 12:44:43 -0700
First:  Jan Hamber is speaking Wed. April 16th in Santa Barbara if 
anyone can make it down there:
     Jan presents an illustrated lecture on the history of the 
California Condor on *Wed., April 16 at 7 PM* at the SBA Museum of 
Natural History.
RSVP to tsheridan AT sbnature2.org

Second,
     A Hi Mountain Lookout volunteer, Sara, wrote to tell me that 
today's SLO Co. NEW TIMES has Condors on the cover w/ a "nice article" -
     In case you can't pick one up, here is the article: (Jan is quoted, 
AC-9 mentioned, good lead poisoning info & Joseph Brandt & Steve 
Kirkland interviewed)
hee hee, I had to chuckle at the typo: "...their personality /wines/ you 
over."


http://www.newtimesslo.com/cover/10801/california-biologists-fight-to-help-condors-stay-aliveand-thrive/ 

California Condor Archives Manager Jan Hamber presents an illustrated 
lecture on the history of the California condor, Wednesday, April 16, 
7:00 PM, at the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History, RSVP to 
tsheridan AT sbnature2.org.


    California biologists fight to help condors stay alive--and thrive


      BY AMY ASMAN


*UP ON BITTER CREEK*
/The condors are assisted by refuge biologists, who often belay into 
mountainside nests to check on chicks and eggs./

*PHOTO COURTESY OF U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE*

Imagine, as you stand on a grassy plateau overlooking the thirsty San 
Joaquin Valley foothills, three school buses soaring through the air 
about 40 to 50 feet above your head.

Now replace the bright yellow paint and several tons of metal with the 
cream-and-charcoal feathers and naked pink flesh of a California condor.

Typically weighing in at 20 pounds, and with a wingspan of approximately 
9 1/2 to 10 feet, the California condor is the largest land bird in 
North America.

The species would have died out completely in the late 1980s, 
however---if not for the efforts of some dedicated biologists.

After decades of being hunted, as well as exposed to lead and the 
insecticide DDT, the California condor population dwindled to less than 
26 birds. Faced with the possibility of witnessing a species extinction, 
biologists and zoologists scrambled to launch captive breeding programs 
at the San Diego Wild Animal Park (now the San Diego Zoo Safari Park) 
and the Los Angeles Zoo, and started transporting the remaining birds, 
and their eggs, down south.

Biologists captured the last wild condor, AC9, on Easter morning in 1987.

"For the first time in tens of thousands of years, there were no 
California condors soaring in the sunny skies of Southern California," 
wrote Jan Hamber, a condor biologist at the Santa Barbara Museum of 
Natural History, and Bronwyn Davey, in an article on the Santa Barbara 
Zoo-associated website, sbcondors.com.

"At the time, it seemed that it was the end of the road for the wild 
population," the article said. "All those involved in the program felt a 
pervasive sadness. Would these majestic birds of the sky ever soar again?"

*From the brink and back*

*'Condor Zone' 4-1-1*
/For more information about the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Condor 
Recovery Program, visit fws.gov/refuge/hopper_mountain/. More 
information about non-lead ammunition can be found at 
dfg.ca.gov/wildlife/hunting/condor/./

**

The simple answer to that question is, "yes."

But the story of how California condors were able to once again take 
flight isn't as simple.

"It's pretty amazing---there are birds now that are breeding that I 
worked with about 15 to 17 years ago," said Steve Kirkland, a field 
coordinator for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's California Condor 
Recovery Program, which monitors and cares for protected condor 
populations in Tulare, Santa Barbara, Ventura, and Kern counties.

"I think it's amazing that any of them have been able to survive, 
honestly," Kirkland said.

The success of the zoos' captive breeding programs led biologists to 
start reintroducing condors to the wild as early as 1992. When last 
checked, the population had soared to 436 birds, with 123 flying free in 
Central and Southern California.

"We're continuing to see an increase in more natural reproduction," 
Kirkland said. "Hopefully, what we're seeing in the field will offset 
mortalities due to lead and other factors."

According to research done by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.C. 
Santa Cruz, the University of Colorado at Boulder, and others, the vast 
majority of California condor deaths are caused by lead poisoning---and, 
at least 75 percent of the time, the birds were exposed to lead by 
ingesting bullet fragments lodged in the carcasses of dead animals.


*NATURAL BEAUTY*
/Bordered by the Transverse mountain ranges, Bitter Creek Canyon is part 
of the roughly 23,000-acre Bitter Creek National Wildlife Refuge./

*PHOTO BY HENRY BRUINGTON*

Joseph Brandt---a biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and 
supervisor of the condor recovery program---explained the effects of 
lead poisoning while giving a tour of the Bitter Creek National Wildlife 
Refuge. Located off of California State Route 166, just past the Kern 
County line, the refuge is home to at least 70 condors.

"[Lead poisoning] is a pretty horrible way to die," Brandt said.

"Condors are opportunistic scavengers; they don't chew their food, they 
just swallow it in mouthfuls. Being on the ground is dangerous for them, 
so it's all about eating as much as they can, taking off, and finding a 
place to roost and digest," he explained.

Because of their eating habits, the birds can't tell when they've 
swallowed bullet fragments, which can stay inside their systems for long 
periods of time.

"The neurotoxin causes paralysis of their digestive system, so while 
they still might be able to eat, they're actually starving to death," 
Brandt said.

Condors store food in their crops---pink fleshy pouches on their 
chests---but when their digestive systems are paralyzed, the crop "fills 
up and festers with infection," he said.

Veterinarians at the Los Angeles Zoo saved one condor by flushing its 
crop and then repeatedly pushing small amounts of food into its 
digestive system by firmly running their hands up down the bird's neck.


*GET THE LEAD OUT*
/Brandt and his fellow biologists perform chelation therapy---leaching 
lead and other metals out of the blood---on a sick condor. Approximately 
30 percent of the refuges more than 100 birds require chelation at some 
point in their lives./

*PHOTO COURTESY OF U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE*

The bird lived---after losing more than half of its body weight.

To help the condors survive, biologists have devised a hands-on program 
that involves tagging birds with radio telemetry sensors, monitoring 
newly laid eggs, removing micro-trash from nests, and leaching lead and 
other metals from the birds' systems through a medical procedure called 
chelation.

According to data from the condor recovery program, approximately 30 
percent of the birds have to be treated for lead poisoning in their 
lifetime.

The biologists who work with the birds are incredibly dedicated to their 
wild charges. Brandt, for example, frequently belays down craggy rock 
formations to enter the nests of mating pairs to check on eggs or 
chicks. He and the other refuge staffers also trap each of the condors 
at least twice a year to check their blood for lead and, if necessary, 
perform chelation.

"It's like having 70 children," Brandt said as he drove us toward one of 
the condor traps on the plateau above Bitter Creek Canyon.

As we stood by the trap, a pair of condors took off from the feeding 
station across the canyon from us. Even at a distance, the birds---with 
their long dark wings fully extended---were impressive, as was the 
effortless way they floated above the countryside.

Watching the birds reminded me of something field coordinator Kirkland 
told me on the phone several days before our visit: "That's what they're 
designed for; to cruise and soar on the wind, to travel long distances 
and find that carrion."

*Get the lead out*


*WHO'S THERE?*
/"[Condors are] hilarious, the way they're always interacting with each 
other," condor recovery program supervisor Joseph Brandt said. "People 
say they're kind of ghoulish looking, but their personality wines you 
over."/

*PHOTO COURTESY OF U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE*

The goal of the condor recovery program is to get the birds to the point 
that they can be self-sustaining in the wild.

As Kirkland put it, "We want to get out of the business of actively 
managing [condors]."

The best way to do that, according biologists like Kirkland and Brandt, 
is to get rid of lead ammunition.

In 2008, the California Legislature passed the Ridley-Tree Condor 
Preservation Act, requiring hunters to use non-lead ammunition while 
hunting in the "Condor Zone." This zone encompasses much of the condor's 
historical breeding range; on a map of California, it forms a horseshoe 
shape from San Jose, down to Los Angeles, and back up to Madera.

The controversial bill received ample criticism from hunting enthusiasts 
of all levels and, to a lesser extent, ranchers. Their biggest 
complaints included the cost of non-lead ammo---copper bullets are the 
most common---and what some call the inconclusive nature of data linking 
lead ammo to condor deaths.

Brandt and many of his colleagues, however, feel that the law has some 
major loopholes. First, the sheer size of the zone makes the law 
difficult to enforce because there are only so many game wardens to go 
around. Second, the law doesn't account for "nuisance" animals, such as 
coyotes and pigs, which feed on crops and livestock, or the livestock 
themselves.

In fall of 2013, Gov. Jerry Brown signed into law a bill that bans the 
use of lead hunting ammunition in all of California. The non-lead ammo 
is to be phased in by 2019. The language of this law applies to "all 
wildlife, including game mammals," but, like its predecessor, doesn't 
include livestock.

Brandt explained that "putting down" sick or injured livestock falls 
under agricultural code, whereas hunting and other forms of depredation 
fall under fish and wildlife code.

After making close to a dozen calls to local hunting outfitters to get 
their perspective on the non-lead ammo laws, only one called back. 
Alfred Luis owns Central Coast Outfitters and guides hunting expeditions 
in Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo counties.

Luis said he switched to copper bullets before the Ridley-Tree Act 
passed in 2008 because he was "very pleased with their accuracy and 
performance."

Some hunters have argued that copper bullets don't work as well as lead 
and consider the lead ones more humane because they bag a "cleaner kill."


*FAMILIAL BOND*
/The California condor is known for its attentive parenting. Chicks 
usually stay with her parents for about two years before joining up with 
other juveniles./

*PHOTO COURTESY OF U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE*

However, Luis said he and the other hunters he knows haven't had any 
issues with copper bullets.

"In my experience, if the rifle is used with the right caliber and shot 
properly, there aren't going to be any problems," he said. "[Copper 
bullets] retain all their weight, they penetrate well, and they open up."

When asked what he thinks about the Condor Zone, Luis said he hasn't 
seen the data to prove that lead poisoning is what's harming the condors.

"I think Mother Nature selected them for extinction long before we got 
involved," he said. "I don't see them surviving without us helping them 
and feeding them."

He also feels that the law is difficult to enforce because of the sheer 
number of people who hunt and the fact that most other states don't ban 
the use of lead ammunition.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, along with several partners, is 
currently reaching out to California hunters and ranchers to educate 
them about the non-lead ammo laws and the effects of lead on not just 
condors, but all scavenging wildlife.

Advocates with the Ventana Wildlife Society in Monterey County have gone 
as far as to give hunters free copper ammo that has been paid for with 
grant money and donations.

The biologists at the Bitter Creek wildlife refuge and its parent 
refuge, Hopper Mountain in the Ventura wilderness, are in the process of 
acquiring ammo for distribution. Hunters and ranchers receive ammo based 
on where the birds feed or by raffle.

"Laws don't always make things easier. Usually it's harder to talk to 
someone if you're saying, 'you can't do this,' and wagging your finger," 
Brandt said, adding that free ammo helps get the conversation started.

"It can be frustrating because [condor biologists] tend to get labeled 
as anti-hunting. If anything, we want to see an increased number of 
hunters out there because it's beneficial to the birds. We just want 
them using different ammo."

This is news to outfitter Luis, who said, "If you know someone giving 
away free ammo, let me know."

/Amy Asman is Managing Editor of New Times' sister paper, The Sun. 
Contact her at aasman AT santamariasun.com ./

California Condor Archives Manager Jan Hamber presents an illustrated 
lecture on the history of the California condor, Wednesday, April 16, 
7:00 PM, at the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History, RSVP to 
tsheridan AT sbnature2.org.
-- 

*Marcelle *
SteppingStones -*EcoSac Reusable Shopping Bag System *
Toll Free:*(800) 926-1017 *
Local:*(805) 927-1017 *
Fax:*(805) 927-3275
*www.bags4you.com 
service AT bags4you.com 
/Saving on paper & plastic since 1989, providing the highest quality 
reusable cotton and organic cotton bags & the BEST customer service! 
//*EcoSacs*//are truly "green": renewable (sustainable), reusable, 
(washable) and, recyclable! /
Subject: Good news: condor eggs in the wild
From: SteppingStones <marcelle AT bags4you.com>
Date: Tue, 25 Feb 2014 19:10:53 -0800
This story from:

http://www.tucsonnewsnow.com/story/24822551/condor-comeback-first-eggs-spotted-in-breeding-season-for-endangered-bird 



      Condor comeback: First eggs spotted in breeding season for
      endangered bird

/Posted: Feb 25, 2014 4:50 PM PST / /Updated: Feb 25, 2014 4:52 PM PST /
By Christopher Francis - email 

 



            (Source: Arizona Game and Fish Department) (Source: Arizona
            Game and Fish Department)




TUCSON, AZ (Tucson News Now) -

Wildlife workers are seeing the first signs of what they hope will be a 
successful breeding season for an endangered bird that was once extinct 
in the wild.

Earlier this month, workers found eggs in a wild flock of California 
condors in both Arizona and Utah. Eggs also turned up in a captive flock 
in Idaho.

Last year, four young condors hatched in the Arizona-Utah wild 
population, the most ever in one season.

According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the California Condor 
is one of the rarest bird species in the world, with less than 250 
living in the wild as of last year.  Poaching, poisoning and destruction 
of their habitat nearly wiped the bird out in the 1980's until an 
aggressive effort began to save it.

The first egg in the wild Arizona-Utah flock was reported Feb. 11. The 
adults will incubate it for about two months in their nest at a remote 
location in Vermilion Cliffs National Monument. Biologists will continue 
to monitor the birds from afar to confirm when the eggs hatch and the 
nestlings take their first flight. They will continue to observe the 
young birds as they are raised by their parents for about a year.

Breeding is also under way in the captive flock at The Peregrine Fund's 
World Center for Birds of Prey in Boise, Idaho. The center expects the 
captive flock to produce up to 20 young birds this season.
The recovery effort is a cooperative program by federal, state, and 
private partners including the Arizona Game and Fish Department and the 
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

For more information on condors in Arizona-Utah, visit 
www.azgfd.gov/condor .

/Copyright 2014 //Tucson News Now/ /All 
rights reserved./

-- 

*Marcelle *
SteppingStones -*EcoSac Reusable Shopping Bag System *
Toll Free:*(800) 926-1017 *
Local:*(805) 927-1017 *
Fax:*(805) 927-3275
*www.bags4you.com 
service AT bags4you.com 
/Saving on paper & plastic since 1989, providing the highest quality 
reusable cotton and organic cotton bags & the BEST customer service! 
//*EcoSacs*//are truly "green": renewable (sustainable), reusable, 
(washable) and, recyclable! /
Subject: Hi Mountain weather
From: "steve schubert" <s_schub1 AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 19 Feb 2014 22:27:08 -0800
Here is an excerpt from the daily weather report by Meteorologist John Lindsey, 
highlighting the fierce offshore winds at the lookout being recorded by Chris 
Arndt's online 

WeatherElement weather station (go to 
http://www.weatherelement.com/condorlookout 
for live weather conditions at Hi Mountain): 


Weather Forecast  02/19/14  (Santa Lucia winds) 

ATMOSPHERIC CONDITION:

Condor Lookout on Hi Mountain at 3,200 feet of elevation
is reporting sustained north-northeasterly winds of 35 mph
with gust to 41 mph. These gusty Santa Lucia (offshore)
winds will produce clear and dry conditions today. 
Subject: donations
From: "steve schubert" <s_schub1 AT msn.com>
Date: Sun, 16 Feb 2014 11:47:53 -0800
The Hi Mountain Lookout Project has received the following donations. 
Thank-you! 




Financial donations - -



Phyllis Hischier, Arroyo Grande



Paul and Judith Burkhardt, Creston



Libbie Agran, Los Osos







Donations can be made by writing a check to 

MCAS Hi Mountain Lookout Project and mailing to: 

Morro Coast Audubon Society 

Po Box 1507
Morro Bay, CA 93443-1507



Contributions are tax deductible under IRS Code 501(c)(3).

Morro Coast Audubon Society tax I.D. # 23-7165021 

 

Donate to the Mike Tyner Memorial Internship Fund:

Please make checks payable to: MCAS-Hi Mountain Lookout Project (write in 
'M.Tyner Fund' on the notes space) 


Donate by mail: Morro Coast Audubon, PO Box 1507, Morro Bay, CA 93443

Donate on-line: To donate online with a credit card, simply visit Morro Coast 
Audubon's donation page at 
www.morrocoastaudubon.org 


Choose: Dedication or Gift (To make a donation in memory of Mike, please enter 
Mike Tyner's name). 


 

Donations are tax deductible (Tax ID # 23-7165021)
A 2014 tax receipt will be sent to you from MCAS
Subject: Condor Cam
From: "steve schubert" <s_schub1 AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 8 Feb 2014 09:46:50 -0800


Condor Cam Offers Rare Glimpse of California Condor Family Nest


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 


Originally published 3:59 p.m., February 6, 2014
Updated 3:59 p.m., February 6, 2014
By San Diego Zoo

For decades field biologists, researchers and animal care staff were the only 
people able to witness the development of a California condor family. Now 
viewers around the globe will be able to watch the growth of a condor, from 
caring for the egg to rearing the hatched chick, via the San Diego Zoo Wildlife 
Conservancys online Condor Cam. This rare glimpse has only recently been 
available for public viewing with the hatching of the Condor Cams very first 
star, Saticoy, in 2012. 


More than 600,000 visitors watched Saticoy on the websites Condor Cam, and 
many read blog updates as he was released into the wild in November of 2013. 
Since his release, Saticoy has been observed perching and roosting in trees 
with other condors and field biologists have confirmed that he is doing well 
and integrating seamlessly into the wild. 


Saticoys is a success story many years in the making. In the 1980s, there were 
only 22 condors left in the world. The San Diego Zoo Safari Park has now 
hatched 181 chicks and released more than 80 birds into the wild as part of the 
California Condor Recovery Program. Having cameras in the nests has certainly 
played a part in the recovery programs success. 


The cameras allow animal care staff to observe the natural behavior of the 
condor family and also keep a close eye on the newly laid eggs. As soon as the 
time is right, keepers replace the nest egg with an artificial one, placing the 
real egg in an incubator until fertility is confirmed. The egg is then placed 
back into the nest just before hatching without the condor parents ever knowing 
it was gone. 


Having these cameras in the nests has offered us invaluable insight into 
condor parenting behavior and it is from observing their activities that we 
know more about the best methods to prepare chicks for release into the wild, 
said Michael Mace, curator of birds at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park. As it 
turns out, the Condor Cam serves as a valuable research tool while also 
offering the public a view of one of the most endangered species on Earth. 


Animal care staff have confirmed that the first three eggs of the condor 
breeding season are fertile and the Condor Cam is now live 
here. 
http://www.sandiegozooglobal.org/video/condor_cam 


The San Diego Zoo Global Wildlife Conservancy is dedicated to bringing 
endangered species back from the brink of extinction. The Conservancy makes 
possible the wildlife conservation efforts(representing both plants and 
animals) of the San Diego Zoo, San Diego Zoo Safari Park, San Diego Zoo 
Institute for Conservation Research, and international field programs in more 
than 35 countries. The important conservation and science work of these 
entities is supported in part by The Foundation of the Zoological Society of 
San Diego. 

Subject: Re: Article on the break-in
From: bob & jeannie keeffe <bkeeffe AT earthlink.net>
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2014 21:49:52 -0800
Saw the news article this evening ..  what a shocker ! !
Hey, I'll help put in for a 'spy' camera,
Jeannie


"Courage is being scared to death,
but saddling up anyway"
Jeannie & Bob Keeffe
bkeeffe AT earthlink.net









On Jan 31, 2014, at 9:22 PM, SteppingStones wrote:

> See this link re: Hi Mtn. Lookout break-in
> 
http://www.sanluisobispo.com/2014/01/31/2902897/hi-mountain-lookout-break-in.html 

>
> --  
> Marcelle
>
>
>
> 
>
Subject: Article on the break-in
From: SteppingStones <marcelle AT bags4you.com>
Date: Fri, 31 Jan 2014 21:22:00 -0800
See this link re: Hi Mtn. Lookout break-in

http://www.sanluisobispo.com/2014/01/31/2902897/hi-mountain-lookout-break-in.html 

-- 

*Marcelle *

//
Subject: Good News!!!
From: SteppingStones <marcelle AT bags4you.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Jan 2014 18:40:04 -0800
(from: 

http://www.oregonlive.com/environment/index.ssf/2014/01/its_a_record_endangered_califo.html 

)


  It's a record: Endangered California condor lays earliest egg ever at
  Oregon Zoo's breeding operation

California condor egg laying season is off to its earliest start ever at 
the Oregon Zoo 's captive breeding operation.

A condor, who zookeepers call "Malibu," delivered an egg shortly before 
4 p.m. Tuesday. That's a full week ahead of the previous record of Jan. 
28, set in 2011 by a bird named "Ojai."

"We're off to a good start," said Kelli Walker, lead condor keeper. "I 
examined the egg briefly and it seemed to be in fine shape."

If all goes well, the chick -- one of as many as six expected this 
season -- will start to hatch after 54 to 58 days, or about the third 
week of March.

That same month, the zoo expects to open*Condors of the Columbia*, 
where, for the first time, it will exhibit three of the enormous, 
bald-headed birds, still a critically endangered species. Only a handful 
of zoos exhibit them and it's only possible to see them flying free in a 
few places, including the Grand Canyon, California's Big Sur and in 
Pinnacles National Park.

The $2.6 million Oregon Zoo exhibit, with its four-story aviary, mesh 
roof and tall trees for perching, is part of a massive zoo remodel paid 
for with a $125 million bond voters passed in 2008. The biggest of those 
projects, an expanded elephant enclosure, also is under construction.

California condors are native to the Northwest; the zoo's new exhibit is 
named after the "buzzards of the Columbia" referenced in Meriwether 
Lewis' journals during the Lewis and Clark Expedition. They haven't been 
spotted here, however, in more than a century.

By the 1980s, condors were nearly extinct, with only 22 birds remaining 
in the wild. Biologists determined that that the only way to keep the 
species going was by breeding them in captivity. 


The zoo joined that effort in 2003, constructing aviaries, flight pens 
and nest boxes in a remote corner of Clackamas County. It's off-limits 
to the public to reduce the birds' exposure to people, increasing the 
chances for captive-bred birds to survive once they're freed.

Such breeding programs have rebuilt the population to around 400; about 
half live in the wild.

The zoo has hatched 40 chicks; more than 25 have gone to field pens, 
with most of those released to the wild. Plus, several eggs laid by 
Oregon Zoo condors have been placed in wild nests to hatch.

"At this point," said Walker, "each egg that arrives and every chick 
that hatches is vitally important to the survival of this species."

Malibu and her mate, Maluk, experienced parents, seem to be doing a good 
job as they take turns incubating the season's first fist-sized, 
gray-green egg, Walker said.

She figures the early lay date might be due to Oregon's mild, dry 
winter. Other pairs are expected to produce eggs through March.

Last year, the first egg didn't arrive until Feb. 14.

/-- Katy Muldoon/


*Marcelle *
SteppingStones -*EcoSac Reusable Shopping Bag System *
Toll Free:*(800) 926-1017 *
Local:*(805) 927-1017 *
Fax:*(805) 927-3275
*www.bags4you.com 
service AT bags4you.com 
/Saving on paper & plastic since 1989, providing the highest quality 
reusable cotton and organic cotton bags & the BEST customer service! 
//*EcoSacs*//are truly "green": renewable (sustainable), reusable, 
(washable) and, recyclable! /
Subject: correspondence
From: "steve schubert" <s_schub1 AT msn.com>
Date: Sun, 5 Jan 2014 11:50:29 -0800
Hello all,
Here is a message connecting our Hi Mountain condor lookout project today to a 
traveler from New Mexico and his role in condor research in Peru. Nice how the 
word gets out. 

Steve 

From: Bruce Pearson 
To: s_schub1 AT msn.com 
Sent: Thursday, July 11, 2013 1:13 PM
Subject: Condor Sighting on 4 July 2013


Dear Mr. Schubert, 
On 4 July 2013, my wife and I were driving south on Highway One. About six 
miles north of Lucia, we stopped at an overlook to look at the ocean. The 
overlook has no name, but it is where an artist paints and has some of his 
paintings for sale. 

Around 10:30 a.m., we noticed a very large condor, several hundred feet below 
us. At first, we thought it was a turkey vulture, but it then flew directly 
toward us, swooped to about 20 feet straight above our heads -- and then 
circled us a couple of times. Wow! We got a clear view of the white feathers on 
the lower side of the wings and the enormous red head and wattles, so there's 
no doubt that it was a California condor. It then flew east over the highway 
and up the mountain, where it landed on a steep slope. It stayed on the rocks 
for several minutes, apparently just resting, and then caught an updraft and 
continued its flight over the ridge and disappeared from view. I'm still 
cussing myself because I didn't have my camera with me at the time. 

When we got to our next stop, at the elephant seal overlook, we reported our 
sighting to one of the docents there. Then when we reached Morro Bay, we found 
the Audubon exhibit, which was closed, but we saw some information in the 
window about your Condor Lookout organization. So we're reporting our sighting 
to you. 

There's also an interesting postscript to the foregoing. Back in 1980, I was an 
officer with the U.S. Department of State, assigned as the Science Attache at 
the American Embassy in Lima, Peru. In that capacity, I received an unusual 
request from two ornithologists in California. I think the last name of one of 
them was Enos or Amos -- or something like that. At any rate, they asked the 
Embassy to contact the appropriate Peruvian officials for permission for them 
to visit Peru and learn how to raise Andean condors in captivity. At that time, 
the Andean condor was not endangered, so the two guys wanted to make their 
mistakes with the Andean birds, learn from their experiences, and then return 
to the U.S. to capture all the remaining California condors (only about 20 at 
the time), breed them in captivity, build up the flock and then ultimately 
release the offspring into the wild. I wasn't a birder back then, and the idea 
seemed crazy to me, but I did get the required permits, and after a few 
bureaucratic and logistical foul-ups, the two guys came down to Peru and set up 
shop. You know the rest of the story -- they learned how to raise baby condors 
without having them imprint on humans and then successfully released them into 
the wild. The really weird thing about this experiment was that many 
self-styled "environmentalists" in the U.S. were strongly opposed to it, on the 
grounds that we should let the California condor "die with dignity" and become 
extinct (!!!), rather than becoming a tame "zoo bird" (their words). 
Fortunately, they didn't prevail. 

It was a real thrill to see that condor in the wild, and to know that I had 
played a small part in the project. Best of luck to you and your organization. 

Sincerely, 
Bruce L. Pearson
Mesilla Park, New Mexico 
Subject: Hi Mountain bird checklist
From: "steve schubert" <s_schub1 AT msn.com>
Date: Tue, 31 Dec 2013 12:16:40 -0800
Hello all,
During the 1978 Huff's Hole peregrine falcon nest watch - in the Santa Lucia 
Wilderness Area below Hi Mountain Lookout - I wrote in my field notes that John 
Schmitt and I speculated about the possibility of finding 100 bird species in 
the area. Thirty-five years later, after submitting eBird checklists for that 
time span, the Hi Mountain bird list is at 105 species (plus several additional 
undocumented species). The birds were recorded within a 2.5 mile radius of Hi 
Mountain Lookout. 


I submitted these eBird checklists from my personal observations and field 
notes, from the handwritten and manually typed field notes of Morro Coast 
Audubon Society volunteers staffing the lookout in the late 1970's for the 
falcon nest watch, and from field trip leader's reports conducting the birding 
field trips for the annual Hi Mountain Lookout open house events since 2002. 


The checklist can be viewed at the Hi Mountain Lookout website 
www.condorlookout.org by clicking on the Natural History tab, or 
going to the following link: 


https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B69ndBQ1iA78Um5Bd0JCWi1VeGM/edit?usp=drive_web&pli=1 


Steve Schubert
Volunteer Coordinator, Hi Mountain Lookout Project
http://www.condorlookout.org/
http://www.facebook.com/condorlookout
Subject: lookout workday 11/23/13
From: "steve schubert" <s_schub1 AT msn.com>
Date: Sun, 24 Nov 2013 10:53:07 -0800
Hi all,
Workday at the lookout photos posted at 
https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.151232084909533.22209.133314096701332&type=1&l=12c5c2fe37 


Steve Schubert
http://www.condorlookout.org/
http://www.facebook.com/condorlookout
photos at:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/12571965 AT N07/ 
Subject: Hi Mtn. Lookout weather news
From: "steve schubert" <s_schub1 AT msn.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Oct 2013 19:40:55 -0700
Excerpt from Meteorologist's John Lindsey's weather forecast:

======== PG&E DCPP Weather Forecast for Tuesday 10/22/13 ==========

ATMOSPHERIC CONDITIONS:

Today's surface charts resembles more of a summer type of
weather pattern then late fall. 

A strong temperature inversion layer has developed along 
coastal regions of San Luis Obispo County. Chris Arndt
of SLOweather.com reported it was 51 degrees at his weather
station and 68 degrees at Condor Lookout, a difference of
17 degrees last night.

This strong temperature inversion layer combined with gentle
northwesterly (onshore) winds will continue to allow the marine
low clouds and areas of dense fog to develop along the beaches
and in the coastal valleys during the night and morning.
Subject: VWS Condor Cam
From: Paul Andreano <himountainpaul AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 22 Oct 2013 16:25:05 -0700
Its up and running and has been amazing to watch today. Way to go VWS,
thanks!!!
http://www.ventanaws.org/condor_cam/
Subject: How Cool!
From: SteppingStones <marcelle AT bags4you.com>
Date: Mon, 21 Oct 2013 17:20:44 -0700
The on-line headline is:


  Oakland Zoo and Ventana Wildlife Society Install First Live Streaming
  California Condor Webcam in the Wild

http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/1536895


site for the webcam is: http://www.oaklandzoo.org/Condor_Cam.php?cam=Big_Sur
PS you can also click on some other great videos of condors in AZ and in 
care at the Peregrine Fund in Boise.
-- 

*Marcelle *
SteppingStones -*EcoSac Reusable Shopping Bag System *
Toll Free:*(800) 926-1017 *
Local:*(805) 927-1017 *
Fax:*(805) 927-3275
*www.bags4you.com 
service AT bags4you.com 
/Saving on paper & plastic since 1989, providing the highest quality 
reusable cotton and organic cotton bags & the BEST customer service! 
//*EcoSacs*//are truly "green": renewable (sustainable), reusable, 
(washable) and, recyclable! /
Subject: Hi Mountain bird list
From: "steve schubert" <s_schub1 AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Oct 2013 12:10:32 -0700
Hello all,
Here are two eBird checklists I submitted for Hi Mountain from observations on 
the day of the Oct. 5th open house event. The total number of birds on the Hi 
Mountain eBird checklist -for sightings within a 3-mile radius of Hi Mountain 
Lookout - is now at 105 bird species! On Oct. 5th the Wild Turkeys beyond the 
Salinas River crossing, and surprisingly, the Chestnut-backed Chickadees at Hi 
Mountain Campground were two new additions to the Hi Mountain bird checklist, 
which has been tallied from several dozen checklists I submitted to eBird 
dating back to the late 1970's. The Hi Mountain eBird list of 105 spp. can be 
viewed at the Hi Mountain Lookout Project website at : 
http://www.condorlookout.org/p/natural-history.html 


Steve Schubert, Volunteer Coordinator, Hi Mountain Lookout Project


Hi Mountain-- Hi Mountain Lookout, San Luis Obispo, US-CA
Oct 5, 2013 4:30 PM
Protocol: Incidental
Comments: Observers: Steve Schubert & Jay Carroll
Clear skies, afternoon high temp. 76*F. Sustained 15 to 20+ mph hour northerly 
(offshore) winds throughout the day. Max. wind gust 47mph, 7:16am. 

12th annual Hi Mountain Lookout open house event.
1 species

Vaux's Swift 3, in flight near the lookout

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S15341091 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 
(http://ebird.org) 



Hi Mountain-- Hi Mountain Rd., W-SW of Salinas River crossing, San Luis Obispo, 
US-CA 

Oct 5, 2013 9:00 AM - 11:30 AM
Protocol: Traveling
5.0 mile(s)
Comments: Birding field trip from Pozo Ranger Station to Hi Mt. lookout, 
stopping at various locations along Hi Mountain Rd. 

Field trip leader Mike Stiles, President, Morro Coast Audubon Society. 12th 
annual Hi Mountain Lookout Project Open House event. 


Clear skies, warming to 70's, persistent NE (offshore winds) throughout the 
day. 


note: additional species observed east of Salinas River crossing near Pozo 
Ranger Station: European starling, White-crowned sparrow, Golden-crowned 
sparrow 


23 species

Wild Turkey 2
Great Blue Heron 1 flushed from Salinas River crossing
Turkey Vulture 18
Golden Eagle 1 far look at immature bird, much white in upper tail, white 
patches on wings 

Sharp-shinned Hawk 1 adult
Red-tailed Hawk 8
Anna's Hummingbird 2
Acorn Woodpecker 8
Northern Flicker 4
Steller's Jay 1 heard only
Western Scrub-Jay 5
Common Raven 3 at the lookout
Chestnut-backed Chickadee 5 Hi Mountain Campground
Oak Titmouse 3
Bushtit 10
White-breasted Nuthatch 3
Bewick's Wren 1
Wrentit 2
Hermit Thrush 3
Spotted Towhee 1
California Towhee 1
Dark-eyed Junco 5
Lesser Goldfinch 35

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S15340959 


This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 
(http://ebird.org) 
Subject: Hi Mtn. Lookout Project donations
From: "steve schubert" <s_schub1 AT msn.com>
Date: Sun, 13 Oct 2013 11:30:07 -0700
The Hi Mountain Lookout Project has received the following donations. 
Thank-you! 


Materials and Supplies:

Nancy & Bill Greenough, owners, Saucelito Canyon Winery-- complimentary wine 
serving at 12th annual open house event 


Jan Hamber, Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History-- condor posters and John 
Schmitt condor feather prints 




Financial donations:  

Mike Tyner Memorial Internship Fund donations- 

Nancy Tyner, Paso Robles

Randell & Theresa Guire, Tehachapi

Timothy & Rose Skeens, Alta Loma

Sal & Ada Lucido, Carmel Valley


2013 Open House Silent Auction donors of items (for lookout project operating 
expenses) - 


11 auction items were donated by:

Nancy Greenough, Saucelito Canyon Winery

Friends of the CA Condor Wild & Free

Santa Barbara Zoo

Marcelle Bakula, Cambria

Jan Hamber, Santa Barbara



note: the 2013 open house event generated $310 income from auction proceeds and 
$234 from the sales of merchandise. 


Thank-you at all the donors, bidders, winners, and purchasers!



Donations can be made by writing a check to 

"MCAS Hi Mountain Lookout Project" and mailing to: 

Morro Coast Audubon Society 

Po Box 1507
Morro Bay, CA 93443-1507



Contributions are tax deductible under IRS Code 501(c)(3).

Morro Coast Audubon Society tax I.D. # 23-7165021 

 

Donate to the Mike Tyner Memorial Internship Fund:

Please make checks payable to: MCAS-Hi Mountain Lookout Project (write in 
'M.Tyner Fund' on the notes space) 


Donate by mail: Morro Coast Audubon, PO Box 1507, Morro Bay, CA 93443

Donate on-line: To donate online with a credit card, simply visit Morro Coast 
Audubon's donation page at 
www.morrocoastaudubon.org 


Choose: Dedication or Gift (To make a donation in memory of Mike, please enter 
Mike Tyner's name). 


 

Donations are tax deductible (Tax ID # 23-7165021)
A 2013 tax receipt will be sent to you from MCAS
Subject: Fwd: [MCAS Alert!] We Did It! Gov. Jerry Brown just signed Assembly Bill 711
From: Paul Andreano <himountainpaul AT gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 11 Oct 2013 13:02:19 -0700
I can't believe I'm actually sending this email, my hands are shaking a
little. Congratulations to everyone who has been behind this historic piece
of legislation. Some of us for years, others for decades. Wow.

[image: 
AuCApms-(1).gif] 

****

** **

[image: email_banner_golden_600.jpg]

We did it!

Gov. Jerry Brown just signed a historic bill that will save some of
Californias most majestic birds from senseless lead poisoning deaths.
Assembly Bill 711 will require nonlead ammunition for all hunting in
California beginning in 2019, removing the single greatest source of
unregulated lead from our environment.

*
This was an incredibly difficult fight for Audubon California and its
partners. You were there with us. Thank you.
*

Lead shot left behind on the ground, as well as fragments of lead bullets
left behind in hunted carcasses, have been a constant obstacle to bird
conservation in California for decades. You heard a lot about the
California Condor during this campaign, as the research has shown
definitively that this endangered species simply cannot recover with lead
in the environment. But the condor is just part of the story. Iconic birds
such as the Golden Eagle and Bald Eagle also suffer the threat of lead
poisoning, along with more than 130 other wildlife species. Moreover,
research also shows that people who eat meat hunted with lead ammunition
have higher levels of lead in their blood.

Previous efforts to address this have been limited in scope, leaving behind
loopholes that have put birds and people at risk of exposure to one of the
deadliest toxins known to man. Assembly Bill 711 is the light at the end of
the tunnel that will finally rid us of this threat.

Theres more to do. Now that the bill has been signed, the State Fish and
Game Commission has until 2019 to implement the law in its regulatory
capacity. Audubon California will be there every step of the way to ensure
that the new rules on lead are implemented quickly and properly.

Ridding our environment of lead ammunition is quite possibly one of the
greatest conservation victories in the last 20 years. I hope you are as
proud as I am to have been a part of it.

Sincerely,
[image: brigid-sig-JPG.jpg]
Brigid McCormack
Executive Director
Audubon California

*
P.S. Victories like these are only possible with your ongoing support. Help
us continue the fight for birds into the
future
.
**

**
(banner photo by LilySusie)
*

* *****
Subject: Re: Hi Mtn. open house event
From: Carolina Van Stone <carolina792 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Wed, 9 Oct 2013 13:52:15 -0700
Great photos Steve,
Thanks for another wonderful open house.
Glad we could make it up this year.
xo
Carolina and Tiko Van Stone

On Oct 7, 2013, at 10:32 PM, steve schubert wrote:

> Hello all,
> The 12th annual Hi Mountain Lookout open house event on Saturday,  
> Oct. 5th was attended by more than 80 people, coming and going  
> throughout the day,  including good turnouts for the morning birding  
> field trip along Hi Mountain Road, the afternoon geology and native  
> plant identification walks and the condor update talk held inside  
> the lookout. Those who stayed into the evening enjoyed wine tasting - 
> compliments of Saucelito Canyon Winery - and after dinner Jim Duff's  
> famous pineapple upside down cake for dessert!
>
> Birding highlights along Hi Mountain Rd. were one golden eagle and a  
> likely family group of five red-tailed hawks soaring together in the  
> wind. An juvenile peregrine falcon was spotted and  several Vaux's  
> swifts were swirling around the lookout in the late afternoon.
>
> The day was clear and sunny with sustained 15 to 20+ mph northerly  
> winds throughout the day (maximum 47 mph wind gust at 7:16am!) and  
> afternoon temperatures in the 70's. It was an overall pleasant day,  
> with a nice sunset, starry skies and planet Venus hanging in the  
> western sky after dark.
>
> Thank-you to all who attended the event and the volunteers, staff,  
> donors for the auction fundraiser, field trip leaders and guest  
> speakers for putting on another successful event. A photo album of  
> the open house event is posted at the Hi Mountain Lookout facebook  
> page at:
> 
https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.643941452305258.1073741826.133314096701332&type=1&l=b07c55d6fd 

>
> Steve Schubert
> http://www.condorlookout.org/
> http://www.facebook.com/condorlookout
>
> 
Subject: Hi Mtn. open house event
From: "steve schubert" <s_schub1 AT msn.com>
Date: Mon, 7 Oct 2013 22:32:34 -0700
Hello all,
The 12th annual Hi Mountain Lookout open house event on Saturday, Oct. 5th was 
attended by more than 80 people, coming and going throughout the day, including 
good turnouts for the morning birding field trip along Hi Mountain Road, the 
afternoon geology and native plant identification walks and the condor update 
talk held inside the lookout. Those who stayed into the evening enjoyed wine 
tasting -compliments of Saucelito Canyon Winery - and after dinner Jim Duff's 
famous pineapple upside down cake for dessert! 


Birding highlights along Hi Mountain Rd. were one golden eagle and a likely 
family group of five red-tailed hawks soaring together in the wind. An juvenile 
peregrine falcon was spotted and several Vaux's swifts were swirling around the 
lookout in the late afternoon. 


The day was clear and sunny with sustained 15 to 20+ mph northerly winds 
throughout the day (maximum 47 mph wind gust at 7:16am!) and afternoon 
temperatures in the 70's. It was an overall pleasant day, with a nice sunset, 
starry skies and planet Venus hanging in the western sky after dark. 


Thank-you to all who attended the event and the volunteers, staff, donors for 
the auction fundraiser, field trip leaders and guest speakers for putting on 
another successful event. A photo album of the open house event is posted at 
the Hi Mountain Lookout facebook page at: 


https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.643941452305258.1073741826.133314096701332&type=1&l=b07c55d6fd 


Steve Schubert
http://www.condorlookout.org/
http://www.facebook.com/condorlookout
Subject: Tell Gov. Brown to get the lead out! ONE WEEK left
From: SteppingStones <marcelle AT bags4you.com>
Date: Mon, 07 Oct 2013 15:20:36 -0700
There's just one more week to go. It all comes down to whether or not 
Governor Jerry Brown signs the environmental bills that made it to his desk.

You're courageously speaking up in support of bills that protect our 
environment and health, and it's working. *Just this past weekend, 
Governor Brown signed AB 127 into law *-- a bill that protects 
Californians, our families and our firefighters from toxic chemicals. 
This is an important victory, and it's thanks in large part to thousands 
of CLCV supporters like you.

Please see note below about an important bill sitting on the governor's 
desk. *AB 711 will stop the flow of what scientists call the largest 
unregulated source of poisonous lead into our environment-- lead 
ammunition.*Please take a moment to forward this email to your friends.

There's just one week left to make our voices heard. *Governor Brown is 
listening.*

Thanks for all you do,


Rebecca Saltzman
Government Affairs Manager
California League of Conservation Voters

*COPY & SHARE THIS LINK: **http://ecovote.org/lead* 

 


look at these baby bald eagles in the photo below, then take action to 
protect them from lead poisoning ecovote.org/lead 

 


Take action now: Click here! 

 


Eagles, like the ones pictured here, are among the many species 
threatened by lead-based ammunition. Lead ammo is likely the largest 
unregulated source of lead that is knowingly discharged into the 
environment in the United States. 

 


*Banning lead ammo will finally protect California wildlife from lead 
poisoning. Tell Governor Brown to sign AB 711 into law right away.* 

 


*_ecovote.org/lead _* 

 


Take action now: Click here! 

 


Lead is toxic. It poisons humans and wildlife alike. /So why is lead 
ammunition still allowed in California?/

*Governor Jerry Brown is currently deciding whether to add his signature 
to AB 711, which would finally enact a **ban on lead ammunition in our 
state.* *We're urging Governor Brown to sign AB 711 into law, and you 
can make a difference by adding your voice right now* 

*.* 


 


*_ecovote.org/lead _* 

 


*Lead is a known toxin that has already been removed from nearly 
everything including paint, gasoline -- even pencils.*But it persists in 
ammunition, threatening California condors, mountain lions, bald eagles 
and golden eagles among others.

*Lead poisoning in the endangered California condor is now of "epidemic 
proportions."*From a recent report published in the /San Francisco 
Chronicle/:

There are currently only 224 California condors in the wild, spread 
across Arizona and Mexico as well as California. (Almost half the 
population lives in California). The birds are North America's largest 
land birds, with wingspans reaching nine feet or more. Their 
much-celebrated comeback--they were down to 22 birds in 1982 before a 
captive-breeding program boosted their numbers--belies their tenuous status.

While hunting endangered species like the California condor is clearly 
illegal, non-targeted wildlife ingest spent lead ammunition which causes 
painful, deadly lead poisoning in 130 species of birds and animals. 
*Millions of non-target birds and other wildlife are poisoned each year 
in the U.S. from scavenging carcasses containing lead-bullet fragments,* 
eating lead-poisoned prey, or ingesting spent lead-shot pellets, 
mistaking them for food.

*Send your message to Governor Brown now. Tell him to sign AB 711 into 
law before more wild creatures become victims of lead poisoning in 
California* 

*.* 


 


Co-sponsored by Audubon California, the Humane Society of the United 
States, and Defenders of Wildlife, and authored by Assemblyman (and 
former interim Executive Director of CLCV) Anthony Rendon, AB 711 aims 
to protect wildlife and the environment. But importantly, /AB 711 will 
also protect hunters and those who eat hunted game in California from 
ingesting lead themselves./

*Dozens of hunters have signed on to a public letter in support of AB 
711.*The letter notes that using lead ammunition despite the risks to 
wildlife and public health "is at odds with the proud tradition of 
responsible hunting stewardship." Signers include Michael Sutton, 
president of the California Commission on Fish and Game, and vice 
president Richard Rogers.

*Scientists have also registered their support for AB 711.*A consensus 
statement signed by 30 scientists and published in /Environmental Health 
and Perspectives/ says "lead-based ammunition is likely the greatest 
largely unregulated source of lead that is knowingly discharged into the 
environment in the United States."

*Now add your voice. Click here to support AB 711 and protect wildlife 
from lead poisoning.* 

 


Thank you for speaking out to protect California's environment, 
wildlife, and people.

Sincerely,


Jenesse E. Miller
Communications Director
California League of Conservation Voters

Take Action Now! 

 


*Since 1972, the California League of Conservation Voters (CLCV) has 
protected our land, air, water, and public health as the non-partisan 
political arm of the environmental movement.*
CLCV's mission is to protect the environmental quality of the state by 
increasing public awareness of the environmental performance of all 
elected officials, working to elect environmentally responsible 
candidates, and holding them accountable to the environmental agenda 
once elected. 

 



/CLCV sends email to members, non-profit partners, and other California 
citizens who are interested in helping elect the best environmental 
lawmakers and maintain California's status as the nation's environmental 
leader./

-- 

*Marcelle *
SteppingStones -*EcoSac Reusable Shopping Bag System *
Toll Free:*(800) 926-1017 *
Local:*(805) 927-1017 *
Fax:*(805) 927-3275
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service AT bags4you.com 
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reusable cotton and organic cotton bags & the BEST customer service! 
//*EcoSacs*//are truly "green": renewable (sustainable), reusable, 
(washable) and, recyclable! /
Subject: The sad legacy of toxic lead in the wild continues, by Jesse Grantham
From: Paul Andreano <himountainpaul AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 6 Oct 2013 10:44:48 -0700
http://www.audublog.org/?p=11687
Subject: Laptop for Open House
From: Paul Andreano <himountainpaul AT gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 1 Oct 2013 21:00:53 -0700
Is there anyone who is planning on spending the night on Saturday that
could bring up their laptop to use for the evening presentation? I'm not
going to be able to spend the night and I don't want to leave my laptop up
there, but I will leave my projector and DVD player and all the necessary
cables. We just need a laptop for Powerpoint. Pretty sure there used to be
a laptop up at the lookout that could run Powerpoint, it is still there?

Paul
Subject: 12th Annual Hi Mountain Condor Lookout Open House (All Day Oct 5th)
From: Michaela Koenig <michaelamkoenig AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 30 Sep 2013 10:06:24 -0700 (PDT)
12th Annual Hi Mountain Condor Lookout Campout and Open House Event
Saturday, October 5, 2013 (all day event)
Hi Mountain Lookout, San Luis Obispo County, Los Padres National Forest
 
Come and discover one of the largest and most endangered flying birds of North 
America. California Condors are radio tracked from Hi Mountain Lookout , flying 
near release sites in Big Sur and Pinnacles National Monument in Central 
California and Bitter Creek National Wildlife Refuge, the Sespe Condor 
Sanctuary and Hopper Mountain National Wildlife Refuge in Southern California. 
This is an opportunity for you to learn more about condor biology and the 
reintroduction of these magnificent birds back to the wild.  The Hi Mountain 
Lookout Project is a collaboration between Morro Coast Audubon Society, U.S. 
Forest Service at Los Padres National Forest, U.S. Fish &Wildlife Service 
California Condor Recovery Program, Cal Poly Biological Sciences Department, 
Ventana Wildlife Society, and the National  Parks Service at Pinnacles 
National Monument. 

The open house event will feature condor radio tracking demonstrations, a bird 
watching field trip and a native plant identification stroll.  Activities for 
kids will be ongoing, including plaster of paris track making and a guided 
nature walk. 

Join us in the evening for complimentary serving of wine from Saucelito Canyon 
Winery and a potluck dinner while enjoying the sunset watch.  Overnight 
camping near the lookout is optional.  Popcorn and refreshments will be 
provided for the evening program presentations and showing of the documentary 
movie ‘The Condor’s Shadow’, with outdoor seating under the stars! 

For a schedule of events, driving directions, and other information go to 
www.condorlookout.org   

Visit the Hi Mountain Lookout Facebook page at 
https://www.facebook.com/events/373587909410349/?ref_dashboard_filter=calendar. 

To RSVP for the event please contact Steve Schubert at # (805) 528-6138 or 
e-mail at s_schub1 AT msn.com         

 
Please help spread the word!
 
Michaela M. Koenig
Senior Biologist
1065 Higuera Street, Suite 301
San Luis Obispo, CA 93401
805.434.2804 x 104  | cell 805.459.0333 | fax 805.980.5886 

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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Subject: Help Fund Anthony Prieto's Non-Lead Hunter Kickstarter Campaign!
From: Paul Andreano <himountainpaul AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 2013 21:26:51 -0700
You can help send our friend Anthony Prieto to Montana where he's been
invited to screen his documentary "The Non-Lead Hunter".

Anthony is a long time supporter of Hi Mt. Lookout and the California
Condor. Anthony painted the AC-9 mural that graces the west wall of the
Lookout. He has been working tirelessly as a volunteer to change hunters'
minds about lead ammunition for over a decade now. Anthony recently created
a documentary that explains the effects of lead ammunition on wildlife, and
demonstrates the effectiveness of copper rounds.

Anthony is simply trying to crowd-fund his travel expenses, all of his
time, as usual, will be unpaid. You can donate anything from $1 on up. Read
more about Anthony's project, watch his documentary, and learn how you can
help him spread the word here...

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/453737074/the-non-lead-hunter
Subject: Interns of Hi Mountain
From: <shanejohnson3139 AT yahoo.com>
Date: 31 Aug 2013 15:26:29 -0700
Dear Morro Coast Audubon Society,     Our point count data 
collection went smoothly; poison-oak proved to be the greatest hurdle as
 we climbed and crawled through it all summer to find our GPS 
coordinates. We saw some amazing birds this summer. Our most commonly 
recorded species were Mourning Doves, Acorn Woodpeckers, and Wrentits to
 name a few. We all had our favorite birds picked out when our bird data
 collection came to an end.     Then it was on to 
vegetation data collection. It was not as enthralling as the bird data 
collection but we got very familiar with the common native (and 
non-native) plants in the area. We hiked back to each GPS location and 
recorded information on the plants that
 existed 25 meters in four directions from the GPS location center, 
North, East, South, and West. This data allows us to understand the 
vegetation composition of each area where birds are detected. This 
valuable data will be used by the US Forest Service and by students at 
Cal Poly for senior and independent projects concerning which species 
occur in which habitat/ vegetation types.     Even for 
the vegetation work, we hiked early in the morning to beat the heat. 
After our morning of hiking, our downtime consisted of working together 
on some puzzles, reading, playing cards, sun bathing (if we could stand 
it), and telemetry for tagged condors. We got a few beeps on the 
telemetry receiver towards the Pinnacles National Monument which was 
exciting! With the fire danger in the area reported as "extreme", we 
also reported a couple fires!      We worked hard 
through the
 summer heat and  recently completed our work at the lookout, setting a 
record for the fastest intern group to finish the necessary data 
collection. We had so much fun working up at Hi Mountain this summer and
 are looking forward to more visits, especially the open house! We hope 
to see some or, even better, all of you there! Yours in birding, Summer 2013 Hi 
Mountain Interns Jackie, Shane, Desiree, EB, Sophie, and Adam 


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Subject: Very, interesting! (maybe alarming too!)
From: SteppingStones <marcelle AT bags4you.com>
Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2013 18:53:36 -0700
 From the Washington Times

http://communities.washingtontimes.com/neighborhood/world-our-backyard/2013/aug/26/california-condor-nra-lead-bullets-and-truth/ 



  The California condor, lead bullets, and the 'truth'

*WASHINGTON, *August 26, 2013 -- Supporters of California's AB 711 argue 
that hunters in the U.S. shoot over 3,000 pounds of lead into the 
environment yearly, resulting in nearly 20 million bird deaths due to 
lead poisoning every year. The birds are poisioned after eating 
discarded carcasses left by hunters.

The California condor eats animal carcasses and is one of the animals 
the new proposed state law seeks to protect.

The website "Hunt for Truth" (HFT) offers an opposing opinion to that of 
the scientific community and supporters of a proposed California law 
that would ban the use of lead bullets for hunting within the state.

As more studies reveal the dangers posed by lead bullets, several states 
have proposed similar bans on lead ammunition for hunting. The Center 
for Biological Diversity has previously urged the EPA to ban lead 
ammunition citing negative effects on birds protected under the Federal 
Migratory Bird Treaty Act including eagles, swans, and condors.

Passing Assembly and now making its way through the state Senate, AB 711 
would ban all lead bullets for hunting within the state. At the same 
time it would provide California hunters with replacement non-lead 
bullets free of charge or at low cost.

The NRA is calling AB 711 and similar laws calling for a ban on lead 
ammunition an "assault on traditional hunting."

"Anti-lead ammunition groups will not rest until all lead ammunition, 
and ultimately hunting, is banned," the NRA has said.

Hunt for Truth discusses several reasons for opposing the lead ammo ban.

The main arguments are that lead from bullets, citing a study Lead in 
Game Meat (Nuremberg, March 2013), is not dangerous for human 
consumption, a ban will create a shortage of alternative ammunition, the 
more lethal non-lead forms of ammo run the risk of being considered 
armor piercing, and the ban is just the first step in a left-wing 
conspiracy to end hunting altogether and ultimately obliterate the 
Second Amendment.

HTF divides lead into metallic and industrial lead. It then claims that 
the metallic lead used in bullets reacts to oxygen to form a protective 
layer that protects lead fragments from further oxidation.  For this 
reason, according to HTF, "the lead can remain on the ground in the 
environment for a very long period of time in an essentially inert state."

HFT provides no scientific evidence for this claim.

HTF also asserts that even if ingested by birds, lead from bullets is 
not broken down by the birds' digestive tract and usually passes through 
the system intact, without harming the animal.

This statement stands in contrast to a number of studies that state the 
opposite, including a 2010 study (PDF 

) 

performed by scientists at U.C. Santa Cruz, the National Park Service, 
and the U.S. Geological Service.

In contrast, Hunt for Truth (HTF) provides no scientific backing for its 
claims, other than a 10-year-old study that, when read closely, states 
that turkey vultures, because their digestive systems are more resistant 
to lead poisoning than most birds, would be poor models for assessing 
the risk of lead poisoning to California Condors.

There is nothing in this study to back HFT's claims that lead fragments 
pass through the system of most birds without causing any harm.

Also without citing any scientific evidence, HFT claims that the main 
culprits of lead poisoning in wild species like the California condor 
are the carcasses of industrial livestock, which contain lead from 
gasoline, paint, and pesticides---not bullets.

Hunt for Truth also blames "microtrash,"coins, bottle caps, and 
fishhooks discarded by humans as the reason for lead poisoning in most 
wild birds.

Aside from listing a number of studies (most of them over 10 years old 
and some dating back to the 1970s) proving that there are multiple 
avenues for lead poisoning in both humans and wildlife, HTF does not 
present a single piece of scientific, peer-reviewed evidence that 
specifically shows that lead fragments from bullets are not toxic to 
wildlife.

On the other side, conservationists in support of the lead bullet ban 
argue that the toxicity of lead is undisputed, both "metallic" and 
"industrial." There are an overwhelming number of older and more recent 
peer-reviewed studies proving specifically that lead bullet fragments 
cause lead poisoning and death in birds if ingested.

Recognizing the danger of lead ammunition, the U.S. government 
instituted a federal ban on lead bullets for hunting waterfowl in 1991.

Proponents of the ban argue that lead free bullets perform the same, if 
not better, than lead bullets and are so accurate that even the U.S. 
military is making the change to copper bullets.

Hunt for Truth explain sthe overwhelming scientific consensus on lead's 
toxicity and danger to wild birds as the result of a highly organized 
secret network of "activist scientists" with an environmental agenda.

Perhaps the most convincing argument set forth by HFT is that the ban 
could lead to an ammunition shortage. According to websites like 
AmmoLand.com, if AB 711 and similar laws pass, hunters face the specter 
of "empty shelves of ammunition when hunting season comes along."

While it is true that hunters may face an ammo shortage if the ban 
passes, there is already an ammunition shortage in the U.S. and it has 
nothing to do with the lead bullet ban. In any case, lead free bullets 
are in fact currently widely available from most major and some minor 
manufacturers.

Another reason to oppose AB 711 and similar laws, according to HTF, is 
that non-lead ammo runs the risk of being considered armor piercing 
ammunition, banned in the U.S. since by the Federal Gun Control Act of 
1968. However, the 1968 Act contains a specific exception for sporting 
purposes and would not affect hunters' ability to use such ammunition.

On its website, HFT lists organizations like The Ventana Wildlife 
Society, California Condor Recovery Team, Peregrine Fund, Natural 
Resources Defense Council, San Diego Zoo, Raptor Education Group, and 
Center for Biological Diversity, stating that it planned to "expose" 
them for misleading the public about the dangers of lead ammunition.

"Hunt for Truth will expose the researchers associated with 'faulty 
science' critical of lead ammunition," states the website. So far, 
however, HFT has failed to expose any faulty science.


Read more: 

http://communities.washingtontimes.com/neighborhood/world-our-backyard/2013/aug/26/california-condor-nra-lead-bullets-and-truth/#ixzz2d88UWlcg 


Follow us:  AT wtcommunities on Twitter 








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Subject: Re: Hi Mountain Intern Update
From: bob & jeannie keeffe <bkeeffe AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sun, 21 Jul 2013 20:26:42 -0700
I am wondering if the adult Bald Eagle and two juveniles were from the  
Lopez nest ...  I've seen then venturing around the lake and here on  
the ranch ...

Jeannie Keeffe
Upper Lopez Canyon Road


"Courage is being scared to death,
but saddling up anyway"
Jeannie & Bob Keeffe
bkeeffe AT earthlink.net









On Jul 21, 2013, at 8:17 PM, shanejohnson541 wrote:

> Hello fellow Bird Lovers,
> Here are some of the updates from the interns of Hi Mountain this  
> year. We have been seeing some very neat creature features this  
> summer that should be posted online at the Hi mountain Facebook page  
> soon. There was a tarantula hawk (a wasp) that was hanging out in  
> oak woodland. It was HUGE and very cool. The weekend of Sunday July  
> 5th we reported a fire that was spotted out over in Paso Robles.  
> This is the first of a few fires the interns have been reporting.  
> The first week of official research was very successful; the two  
> groups were able to achieve 40 avian point counts. We have been  
> using PRBO variable distance data sheets to perform the point  
> counts. There has been very good progress so far, and luckily the  
> interns from last year left a substantial about of flagging so we  
> have been able to use that to find the points. The point counts are  
> coming to a close and vegetation research has begun. The species  
> list of exciting sightings includes, a black bear along Pozo road, a  
> Phainopepla mated pair defending their nest from some Western Scrub- 
> Jays, an adult Bald Eagle and two juveniles, and a Golden Eagle that  
> landed on the cistern which gave us an amazing view of the beautiful  
> creature. More updates will be coming soon.
> Sincerely
> -	The Hi Mountain Interns
>
> 



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Subject: Hi Mountain Intern Update
From: "shanejohnson541" <shanejohnson541 AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 22 Jul 2013 03:17:52 -0000
Hello fellow Bird Lovers, 
Here are some of the updates from the interns of Hi Mountain this year. We have 
been seeing some very neat creature features this summer that should be posted 
online at the Hi mountain Facebook page soon. There was a tarantula hawk (a 
wasp) that was hanging out in oak woodland. It was HUGE and very cool. The 
weekend of Sunday July 5th we reported a fire that was spotted out over in Paso 
Robles. This is the first of a few fires the interns have been reporting. The 
first week of official research was very successful; the two groups were able 
to achieve 40 avian point counts. We have been using PRBO variable distance 
data sheets to perform the point counts. There has been very good progress so 
far, and luckily the interns from last year left a substantial about of 
flagging so we have been able to use that to find the points. The point counts 
are coming to a close and vegetation research has begun. The species list of 
exciting sightings includes, a black bear along Pozo road, a Phainopepla mated 
pair defending their nest from some Western Scrub-Jays, an adult Bald Eagle and 
two juveniles, and a Golden Eagle that landed on the cistern which gave us an 
amazing view of the beautiful creature. More updates will be coming soon. 

Sincerely
-	The Hi Mountain Interns 




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Subject: interesting re: condors
From: SteppingStones <marcelle AT bags4you.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Jul 2013 11:32:51 -0700
(not sure WHERE to fine the full study referred to at this site:  
Science Codex - NOTE: to the right of the "story" on the following page 
are some other Condor-related stories..

http://www.sciencecodex.com/novel_study_using_new_technologies_outlines_importance_of_california_condor_social_groups-115799 



    Novel study using new technologies outlines importance of California
    condor social groups

The intricate social hierarchy of the California condor, an endangered 
species, is something that could not be studied until recently due to 
the severe reduction of this population in the wild. The first formal 
study on this species, based on remote video observation of reintroduced 
populations, indicates that the species has a complex system of 
interactions based on dominance. The study further indicates that, with 
the effect of human disturbance and lead poisoning removed from the 
equation, an individual bird that does not successfully integrate into 
the structure will have reduced survivability.

"We were able to engage in this effort due to the use of new 
technologies that allow us to observe these newly reintroduced groups 
without disturbing them," said James Sheppard, a conservation biologist 
for the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research. "This ongoing 
study provides us information about these unique birds that was 
essentially lost when the populations disappeared in the wild and will 
help us with our ongoing efforts to recover this species."

The California condor was reduced to little more than a dozen 
individuals in the 1980s before a collaborative captive-breeding program 
raised the population to a status where this species could be 
reintroduced into the wild again. The study, which appeared in a recent 
issue of "/Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology/," outlines the fluidity 
of the bird's hierarchical social structure and the role dominance plays 
among the group.

Source: Zoological Society of San Diego 
-- 

*Marcelle *
SteppingStones -*EcoSac Reusable Shopping Bag System *
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Local:*(805) 927-1017 *
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Subject: Re: Condors getting into trouble!
From: Carolina Van Stone <carolina792 AT earthlink.net>
Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2013 01:48:47 -0700
Hi Marcelle,

How are you? I never congratulated you on your award. I bet it's been  
at least one year since. You are amazing!

I wonder why the Condors are so particular about this woman's property?

Thanks and best of everything, always.

Love to all,

Carolina


On Jun 13, 2013, at 5:21 PM, SteppingStones wrote:

> Condor vandals! Wish it was in MY town...
> 
http://www.foxnews.com/us/2013/06/13/intruder-endangered-bird-species-damages-california-community-homes/ 

> -- 
>
> *Marcelle *
> SteppingStones -*EcoSac Reusable Shopping Bag System *
> Toll Free:*(800) 926-1017 *
> Local:*(805) 927-1017 *
> Fax:*(805) 927-3275
> *www.bags4you.com 
> service AT bags4you.com 
> /Saving on paper & plastic since 1989, providing the highest quality
> reusable cotton and organic cotton bags & the BEST customer service!
> //*EcoSacs*//are truly "green": renewable (sustainable), reusable,
> (washable) and, recyclable! /
>
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
>
> 



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Subject: Condors getting into trouble!
From: SteppingStones <marcelle AT bags4you.com>
Date: Thu, 13 Jun 2013 17:21:22 -0700
Condor vandals!  Wish it was in MY town...

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2013/06/13/intruder-endangered-bird-species-damages-california-community-homes/ 

-- 

*Marcelle *
SteppingStones -*EcoSac Reusable Shopping Bag System *
Toll Free:*(800) 926-1017 *
Local:*(805) 927-1017 *
Fax:*(805) 927-3275
*www.bags4you.com 
service AT bags4you.com 
/Saving on paper & plastic since 1989, providing the highest quality 
reusable cotton and organic cotton bags & the BEST customer service! 
//*EcoSacs*//are truly "green": renewable (sustainable), reusable, 
(washable) and, recyclable! /



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Subject: work day projects
From: "steve schubert" <s_schub1 AT msn.com>
Date: Sun, 5 May 2013 19:10:24 -0700
Hello all,

Today - May 5th - Kevin Cooper, Dr. Francis Villablanca, and I spent 4 hours 
working at Hi Mountain Lookout. We completed a lot of spring cleaning projects 
including emptying out the mouse traps, disinfecting and cleaning surfaces, 
sweeping and mopping the floors, cleaning out the desk and removing clutter and 
other non-necessary stuff in storage that's been accumulating over the years. 
We discussed some other planned improvement and repair projects for the near 
future. The lookout is in good condition... looking forward to the Cal Poly 
college interns arriving for duty next month for the summer field season. 


We arrived at the lookout mid-morning enshrouded in a wind-driven gray mist as 
a late season low pressure system was approaching. The morning wind chill temp. 
was 40*F...only 2 days prior the temp. had reached a warm 82*F. The morning 
sustained southwesterly winds were more than 35 mph to over 40 mph, with wind 
gusts up to 48 mph. The weather station recorded a maximum wind gust of 56 mph 
at 5:50am! The wind was so strong we had difficulty opening the upstairs and 
downstairs doors from indoors without putting our full body weight against the 
doors and pushing outwards, trying to avoid getting slammed back into the door 
frames or getting our hands smashed while holding onto the door handles. 


A group of volunteers recently graded Hi Mountain Lookout Road, greatly 
improving the bad ruts in the road by the campground and continuing on past the 
gate up to the lookout. The grass along the edges of the entry road past the 
gate and all around the lookout slopes has also been cut down to stubble by 
extensive weedeating efforts -good to have this project done early to reduce 
fire fuels this low rainfall year. 


The already browning grassy roadcuts on Hi Mountain Road above Pozo are 
flowering profusely with Clarkia (Farewell-to-Spring) flowers and a few 
Mariposa lilies. Up higher along the Lookout Road flowering shrubs, trees and 
vines include golden yarrow, elderberry, Clematis (old man's beard), wooly blue 
curls, and pitcher sage. A mountain quail was frequently calling this morning 
below the lookout, heard on the leeward slopes where more wind protected. 


Another follow-up workday to complete some other projects is scheduled for 
Saturday, May 18th. Please contact me if you are available to help out that 
day. 


Today's work day photos are posted at 
https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.151232084909533.22209.133314096701332&type=1&l=f4a6ae8628 


Steve Schubert, Volunteer Coordinator, Hi Mountain Lookout Project
http://www.condorlookout.org/
http://www.facebook.com/condorlookout


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Subject: Hi Mtn. workday
From: "steve schubert" <s_schub1 AT msn.com>
Date: Tue, 30 Apr 2013 22:34:45 -0700
Hi all,
We are considering having a volunteer work day at the lookout this Sunday, May 
5th. Please let me know if you can attend and help out, thanks. Meeting time is 
8am at the Pozo Ranger Station. Bring a sack lunch. Spring cleaning and 
preparing for the summer field season and internship staffing will be the main 
emphasis. We can meet for a planning session before lunch. 

Steve

Steve Schubert
http://www.condorlookout.org/
http://www.facebook.com/condorlookout


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Subject: Happy Birthday Condors!
From: SteppingStones <marcelle AT bags4you.com>
Date: Tue, 16 Apr 2013 21:16:34 -0700
 
http://www.imperialvalleynews.com/index.php/news/california-news/3761-california-condors-from-the-wild-turn-30-at-san-diego-zoo-safari-park.html 

 
 



    California Condors from the Wild Turn 30 at San Diego Zoo Safari
    Park
 
 



Created on Tuesday, 16 April 2013 15:35

    Written by Imperial Valley News 

Escondido, California - Three of the four condors that were brought in 
as eggs from the wild and were the first to be hatched in a zoo are 
celebrating their 30^th birthday today. This birthday is reason to 
celebrate their age and the contributions these condors have made. The 
three condors,*Sespe*, *Sisquoc* and *Almiyi*, helped form the 
foundation for the condor recovery program at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park.

"It's a very significant event, because when these eggs were pulled from 
the wild there was a lot of controversy," said Don Sterner, an animal 
care manager at the Safari Park. "Once these birds became established 
and they adjusted well, they started breeding and it became known that 
we could save them."

To celebrate the condors' birthday, keepers made a special cake 
constructed of cardboard and filled with treats for the birds to tear 
open and enjoy: mice, rats, meatballs and beef spleen.

Of the three condors celebrating their 30^th birthday today, Sespe is 
the only one currently on exhibit and on view to the public. Sisquoc can 
be seen on the live Condor Cam taking care of his recent chick 
(www.sandiegozooglobal.org/video/condor_cam 
) . The other 
birthday condor, Almiyi, is currently in the condor breeding program 
making great contributions to the condor population.

In the 30 years these three condors have been with the Park, the 
recovery program has come a long way. Beginning in the 1980s, there were 
only 22 condors left in the world. The Safari Park has now hatched over 
170 chicks and released more than 80 birds in the wild. Currently there 
are now more than 400 condors, more than half of which are flying free 
in California, Arizona and Baja California, Mexico.

The California Condor Recovery Program is implemented by the U.S. Fish 
and Wildlife Service, zoos in the U.S. and Mexico, and U.S. and Mexican 
government agencies. Although listed by the federal government as an 
endangered species in 1967, the California condor population continued 
to decline, reaching a critical low of less than two dozen birds. In 
1982, the condor breeding program was successfully established at the 
San Diego Zoo Safari Park and Los Angeles Zoo. Today, two additional 
breeding centers are assisting with the recovery of the species at The 
Peregrine Fund's World Center for Birds of Prey and the Oregon Zoo. In 
addition, condors are part of an education program that allows guests at 
the San Diego Zoo, San Diego Zoo Safari Park, Santa Barbara Zoo and 
Mexico City's Chapultepec Zoo to see North America's largest bird up close.

The San Diego Zoo Global Wildlife Conservancy is dedicated to bringing 
endangered species back from the brink of extinction. The Conservancy 
makes possible the wildlife conservation efforts (representing both 
plants and animals) of the San Diego Zoo, San Diego Zoo Safari Park, San 
Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research, and international field 
programs in more than 35 countries. The important conservation and 
science work of these entities is supported in part by The Foundation of 
the Zoological Society of San Diego.

-- 

*Marcelle *
SteppingStones -*EcoSac Reusable Shopping Bag System *
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/Saving on paper & plastic since 1989, providing the highest quality 
reusable cotton and organic cotton bags & the BEST customer service! 
//*EcoSacs*//are truly "green": renewable (sustainable), reusable, 
(washable) and, recyclable! /



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Subject: donations
From: "steve schubert" <s_schub1 AT msn.com>
Date: Tue, 9 Apr 2013 21:17:37 -0700
The Hi Mountain Lookout Project has received financial donations from the 
following donors, designated for the Mike Tyner Memorial Internship Fund. 

Thank-you! 

--Arnold and Judy Bramlett, La Mirada, CA

--Lidia Rodriguez, Ontario, CA

--Morro Coast Audubon Society, Board of Directors


Donations can be made by writing a check to 

'MCAS Hi Mountain Lookout Project" and mailing to: 

Morro Coast Audubon Society 

Po Box 1507
Morro Bay, CA 93443-1507



Contributions are tax deductible under IRS Code 501(c)(3).

Morro Coast Audubon Society tax I.D. # 23-7165021 

 

Donate to the Mike Tyner Memorial Internship Fund:

Please make checks payable to: MCAS Hi Mountain Lookout Project (write in 
'M.Tyner Fund' on the notes space) 


Donate by mail: Morro Coast Audubon, PO Box 1507, Morro Bay, CA 93443

Donate on-line: To donate online with a credit card, simply visit Morro Coast 
Audubon's donation page at 
www.morrocoastaudubon.org 


Choose: Dedication or Gift (To make a donation in memory of Mike, please enter 
Mike Tyner's name). 


 

Donations are tax deductible (Tax ID # 23-7165021)
A 2013 tax receipt will be sent to you from MCAS

 


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Subject: 1st condor chick of 2013 at SDZoo
From: SteppingStones <marcelle AT bags4you.com>
Date: Fri, 29 Mar 2013 12:00:21 -0700
The hatching took place on March 26 -
You can watch the Condor Cam!
http://www.sandiegozooglobal.org/video/condor_cam
-- 

*Marcelle *
SteppingStones -*EcoSac Reusable Shopping Bag System *
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Local:*(805) 927-1017 *
Fax:*(805) 927-3275
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service AT bags4you.com 
/Saving on paper & plastic since 1989, providing the highest quality 
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//*EcoSacs*//are truly "green": renewable (sustainable), reusable, 
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Subject: weather at Hi Mtn.
From: "steve schubert" <s_schub1 AT msn.com>
Date: Wed, 13 Mar 2013 18:56:07 -0700
Here is an excerpt from today's 03-13-13 weather report from Meteorologist John 
Lindsey, mentioning Hi Mtn. Lookout and the temperature inversion across the 
central coast: 


This morning's strong temperature inversion layer along
the beaches and in the coastal valleys produced areas
of dense fog. 

At 8 a.m. this morning the temperature at SLOweather.com was 
was 43 degrees at 300 feet of elevation, while at the same time
and a short distance away the temperature at Tim's Home on top
of the Irish Hills was 66 degrees at 1,200-feet of elevation.
Higher-up at 3,200 feet, Condor Lookout reported 68 degrees.



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Subject: Good News!
From: SteppingStones <marcelle AT bags4you.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Mar 2013 23:18:09 -0700
First:  Congrats to Jan Hamber, Joseph Brandt, Devon Lang (I know I saw 
Joe Burnett briefly) and everyone who got to participate in the 
documentary film *"The Condor's Shadow" *(shown at the S.L.O. 
International Film Festival on Sunday) Well done!  Informative, 
emotional, educational and beautiful camera shots (yeah for helmet cams!)
     (Personally it was fun to see the faces of some I've never met & 
only have emailed, like Jesse Grantham, and,  to see Jan's sweet smiling 
face from the 80's and her sweet smiling face now, as she watches the 
next generation follow in her footsteps.. protecting the majestic birds.
See film's trailer at:
http://www.thecondorsshadow.com/
     Screening in SBA on March 28 (listed under "screenings" at site 
listed above.
I hope we can buy the dvd and hold a showing as a fundraiser for the Hi 
Mountain Lookout this year...
Second: (Too cute!)
From: 
http://www.sandiego6.com/news/local/California-Condor-Chick-Wesa-197241251.html


  California Condor Chick "Wesa" Debuts at Safari Park


      By Mike Wille

Story Published: Mar 11, 2013 at 6:30 PM PDT

SAN DIEGO (CNS) - The first California condor chick to be born at the 
San Diego Zoo Safari Park this year is about two weeks old, the zoo 
announced Monday.

      Wesa, which means "celebratory drink" in the Chumash language, 
is growing by leaps and bounds, according to the chick's handlers, who 
said the bird is gulping down as many as 15 mice a day. Wesa also sleeps 
a lot, but plays with a feather and other enrichment toys when awake.
        The sex of the bird is not known yet. Safari Park animal 
handlers will conduct a blood test in a few weeks to make a 
determination. Sometime later, the condor could be released to the wild, 
either here in California or Arizona, according to the zoo.
      The California Condor Recovery Program at the Safari Park has 
hatched 173 chicks and released more than 80 birds in the wild since 
starting up in the 1980s, when there were an estimated 22 condors left 
in the world. The number is now over 400, with about half in the wild.
-- 

*Marcelle *
SteppingStones -*EcoSac Reusable Shopping Bag System *
Toll Free:*(800) 926-1017 *
Local:*(805) 927-1017 *
Fax:*(805) 927-3275
*www.bags4you.com 
service AT bags4you.com 
/Saving on paper & plastic since 1989, providing the highest quality 
reusable cotton and organic cotton bags & the BEST customer service! 
//*EcoSacs*//are truly "green": renewable (sustainable), reusable, 
(washable) and, recyclable! /



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Subject: condor documentary film
From: "steve schubert" <s_schub1 AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 2 Mar 2013 12:05:12 -0800
SLO folks, mark your calendars. A new documentary about the California Condor 
will be showing at the SLO Film Festival on Sunday March 10, 10am  AT  Downtown 
Cinemas. 


film website at: thecondorsshadow.com


 

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Subject: Re: Marcelle featured in Audubon newsletter
From: bob & jeannie keeffe <bkeeffe AT earthlink.net>
Date: Sat, 16 Feb 2013 20:00:34 -0800
Although I am not a 'working' volunteer I oh so much appreciate all  
that our volunteers do and report.
Thank you,
Jeannie Keeffe
Lopez Lake BaldEagles

"Courage is being scared to death,
but saddling up anyway"
Jeannie & Bob Keeffe
bkeeffe AT earthlink.net









On Feb 12, 2013, at 9:24 AM, steve schubert wrote:

> Hello all,
> Hi Mountain Lookout Project volunteer Marcelle Bakula, recently  
> honored for her talents and community contributions as
> "Cambria Citizen of the Year", is featured in a front page article  
> for the February issue of the Pacific Flyway, the newsletter of  
> Morro Coast Audubon Society, at: 
http://www.morrocoastaudubon.org/pdf/feb13.pdfhttp://www.morrocoastaudubon.org/pdf/feb13.pdf 

> >
>
> Congratulations to Marcelle, who has given of her time, energy, and  
> talents as a Hi Mountain volunteer since 2005, a driving force for  
> the lookout project.
>
> Steve Schubert
> Volunteer Coordinator, Hi Mountain Lookout Project
>
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
>
> 
>



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Subject: Marcelle featured in Audubon newsletter
From: "steve schubert" <s_schub1 AT msn.com>
Date: Tue, 12 Feb 2013 09:24:32 -0800
Hello all,
Hi Mountain Lookout Project volunteer Marcelle Bakula, recently honored for her 
talents and community contributions as 

"Cambria Citizen of the Year", is featured in a front page article for the 
February issue of the Pacific Flyway, the newsletter of Morro Coast Audubon 
Society, at: 
http://www.morrocoastaudubon.org/pdf/feb13.pdf 


Congratulations to Marcelle, who has given of her time, energy, and talents as 
a Hi Mountain volunteer since 2005, a driving force for the lookout project. 


Steve Schubert
Volunteer Coordinator, Hi Mountain Lookout Project



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Subject: Re: Congratulations Marcelle!
From: Kathleen Kent <kikapoo AT charter.net>
Date: Fri, 21 Dec 2012 06:04:45 -0800
Your efforts at Hi Mountain Lookout have been outstanding, Marcelle. This award 
is well deserved and I'm so proud of you! 

Kathleen
On Dec 20, 2012, at 6:37 PM, steve schubert wrote:

> Congratulations, well deserved. 
> Steve
> 
> From: Cooper, Kevin C -FS 
> To: Paul Andreano ; Lookout 
Listserv 

> Sent: Thursday, December 20, 2012 4:25 PM
> Subject: RE: [CondorLookoutProject] Congratulations Marcelle!
> 
> Congratulations Marcelle! You are the best! Kevin
> 
> From: 
Hi_MountainCondor AT yahoogroups.com 
[mailto:Hi_MountainCondor AT yahoogroups.com] 
On Behalf Of Paul Andreano 

> Sent: Thursday, December 20, 2012 3:33 PM
> To: Lookout Listserv
> Subject: [CondorLookoutProject] Congratulations Marcelle!
> 
> 
http://www.condorlookout.org/2012/12/marcelle-bakula-named-cambria-citizen.html 

> 
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
> 
> 



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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Subject: Congratulations Marcelle!
From: "steve schubert" <s_schub1 AT msn.com>
Date: Thu, 20 Dec 2012 18:37:48 -0800
Congratulations, well deserved.  
Steve

  From: Cooper, Kevin C -FS 
 To: Paul Andreano ; Lookout 
Listserv 

  Sent: Thursday, December 20, 2012 4:25 PM
  Subject: RE: [CondorLookoutProject] Congratulations Marcelle!


  Congratulations Marcelle! You are the best! Kevin

 From: 
Hi_MountainCondor AT yahoogroups.com 
[mailto:Hi_MountainCondor AT yahoogroups.com] 
On Behalf Of Paul Andreano 

  Sent: Thursday, December 20, 2012 3:33 PM
  To: Lookout Listserv
  Subject: [CondorLookoutProject] Congratulations Marcelle!

 
http://www.condorlookout.org/2012/12/marcelle-bakula-named-cambria-citizen.html 


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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Subject: RE: Congratulations Marcelle!
From: "Cooper, Kevin C -FS" <kccooper AT fs.fed.us>
Date: Fri, 21 Dec 2012 00:25:24 +0000
Congratulations Marcelle!      You are the best!  Kevin

From: Hi_MountainCondor AT yahoogroups.com 
[mailto:Hi_MountainCondor AT yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Paul Andreano 

Sent: Thursday, December 20, 2012 3:33 PM
To: Lookout Listserv
Subject: [CondorLookoutProject] Congratulations Marcelle!



http://www.condorlookout.org/2012/12/marcelle-bakula-named-cambria-citizen.html

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for 
the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the 
use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and 
subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have 
received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email 
immediately. 



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Subject: Congratulations Marcelle!
From: Paul Andreano <himountainpaul AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 20 Dec 2012 15:33:00 -0800
http://www.condorlookout.org/2012/12/marcelle-bakula-named-cambria-citizen.html


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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Subject: Wellness Pet Food Recall BEEF RECALLS, Egg Recall, Salmonella, USA Food Recalls
From: "a.deena AT ymail.com" <a.deena@ymail.com>
Date: Sun, 25 Nov 2012 04:01:58 -0000
 Wellness Pet Food Recall
BEEF RECALLS, Egg Recall, Salmonella, USA Food Recalls,

http://petfoodrecalls-p.blogspot.com

Virtual Pet Breeding
http://petbreeding-p.blogspot.com




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Subject: Hi Mountain weather
From: steve schubert <s_schub1 AT msn.com>
Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2012 08:17:34 -0800
Excerpt from Meteorologist John Lindsey's Nov. 13th weather report:

ATMOSPHERIC CONDITIONS:

A 1,030 millibar high over the Great Basin will continue to 
produce an offshore flow during the night and morning hours.

The Condor Lookout weather reporting station on top of Hi
Mountain at 3,200 feet of elevation is reporting winds out 
of the east-northeast at 20 mph sustained with gust 25 mph. 

Tassajera Peak weather station along the Cuesta Ridge at 
2,800 feet of elevation is reporting northeasterly winds of
10 mph with gusts to 18 mph.

Due to these offshore winds, temperatures along the many of
the beaches this morning are quite mild with the Diablo
Canyon reporting 59 degrees. However, locations sheltered
from these winds in the North County could see one more
morning of below freezing temperatures.


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Subject: Condors in the vicinity of Hi Mt.
From: "Cooper, Kevin C -FS" <kccooper AT fs.fed.us>
Date: Tue, 30 Oct 2012 16:45:58 +0000
Hi All,
GPS transmitter info shows two condors flew over the lookout and Huff's Hole 
yesterday - condors 449 and 526, flew north along the Lopez ridge, and then 
returned to south to the upper Sisquoc area. Hopefully we see more of these 
forays into their old haunts! Kevin 









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the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the 
use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and 
subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have 
received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email 
immediately. 



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Subject: donations
From: "steve schubert" <s_schub1 AT msn.com>
Date: Sun, 28 Oct 2012 12:06:47 -0700
The following donations have been received. Thank-you!


Materials and Supplies- 



Marcelle Bakula, Cambria-- tri-fold brochure printing



Financial donations- 



Jerry and Judith Burkhardt, Creston



Phyllis and Michael Hischier, San Luis Obispo



Marjorie Smith, Arroyo Grande



Memorial fund donations-



Nancy Tyner, Paso Robles



Jane Fong, Network for Good





2012 Open House Silent Auction donors of items for lookout general fund -



Friends of the California Condor, Ventura

Central Coast Outdoors, Los Osos 

Girl Scout Troop 146, Templeton

Santa Barbara Zoo

Marcelle Bakula, Cambria

Phyllis Hischier, San Luis Obispo

Joel Weiss, San Luis Obispo





2012 Open House Silent Auction donors of items for Mike Tyner Memorial Fund - 




U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Ventura

Santa Barbara Zoo

California Dept. of Parks and Recreation, San Simeon

Novo Restaurant, San Luis Obispo

Joel Weiss, San Luis Obispo

Marcelle Bakula, Cambria



note: the 2012 open house event generated $303 from auction proceeds for 
general lookout operations and $360 from auction proceeds for the memorial fund 
supporting the summer internship program. 


Thank-you to all the donors, bidders, and winners!





Donations can be made by writing a check to 

'MCAS Hi Mountain Project" and mailing to: 

Morro Coast Audubon Society 

Po Box 1507
Morro Bay, CA 93443-1507



Contributions are tax deductible under IRS Code 501(c)(3).

Morro Coast Audubon Society tax I.D. # 23-7165021 

 

Donate to the Mike Tyner Memorial Internship Fund:

Please make checks payable to: MCAS-Hi Mountain Lookout 

(write in 'M.Tyner Fund' on the notes space)

Donate by mail: Morro Coast Audubon, PO Box 1507, Morro Bay, CA 93443

Donate on-line: To donate online with a credit card, simply visit Morro Coast 
Audubon's donation page at 
www.morrocoastaudubon.org 


Choose: Dedication or Gift (To make a donation in memory of Mike, please enter 
Mike Tyner's name). 


 

Donations are tax deductible (Tax ID # 23-7165021)
A 2012 Tax receipts will be sent to you from MCAS


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Subject: Hi Mtn. open house event
From: "steve schubert" <s_schub1 AT msn.com>
Date: Sat, 27 Oct 2012 14:57:09 -0700
Here is the text of a note card from the Templeton Girl Scouts, recently 
delivered to the MCAS mailbox: 


Dear Hi Mountain Lookout,
Thank you for a wonderful day at the Lookout at this year's open house. Our 
troop enjoyed re-visiting the Lookout and hearing all of the positive reports 
about the Condors growing numbers. Please pass on our thank you's to all of the 
volunteers who taught our troop as well as Junior Troop No. 40016. Their Leader 
reported that these younger scouts talked all the way home about their 
experience at Hi-Mountain and are looking forward to giving a report to their 
younger troop members at their next meeting. In addition they will be making an 
information board about the Condor and displaying it in some public buildings 
around Paso Robles. Thank you again for a memorable day and all of your 
volunteer efforts to save this important bird. 

Sincerely,
GS Cadette Troop No. 40146
(and eight scouts signed it)

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