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Updated on Thursday, June 5 at 11:13 PM EST
The most recently received Mail is at the top.


White-shouldered Ibis,©BirdQuest

5 Jun Re: Midland Clubtail (Gomphus fraternus) with marking on S9 ["'karlndot chorus.net' karlndot AT chorus.net [gl_odonata]" ]
5 Jun RE: Midland Clubtail (Gomphus fraternus) with marking on S9 ["Dan Jackson DanJackson AT LBWhite.com [gl_odonata]" ]
5 Jun Re: Midland Clubtail (Gomphus fraternus) with marking on S9 ["J Sommer jdsommer90 AT gmail.com [gl_odonata]" ]
4 Jun Re: Midland Clubtail (Gomphus fraternus) with marking on S9 ["curt powell curt.curt AT yahoo.com [gl_odonata]" ]
04 Jun Midland Clubtail (Gomphus fraternus) with marking on S9 [2 Attachments] ["davemarvin AT sbcglobal.net [gl_odonata]" ]
1 Jun Re: W. lintneri site ["curt powell curt.curt AT yahoo.com [gl_odonata]" ]
30 May RE: W. lintneri site ["David Marvin davemarvin AT sbcglobal.net [gl_odonata]" ]
30 May W. lintneri site ["Peter Burke psburke AT rogers.com [gl_odonata]" ]
29 May Boghaunter ["David Marvin davemarvin AT sbcglobal.net [gl_odonata]" ]
29 May lintier site en route to the Sault? ["Peter Burke psburke AT rogers.com [gl_odonata]" ]
29 May Re: Ringed Boghaunter at Rose Lake ["curt powell curt.curt AT yahoo.com [gl_odonata]" ]
28 May Re: Ringed Boghaunter at Rose Lake [5 Attachments] ["davemarvin AT sbcglobal.net [gl_odonata]" ]
28 May Re: Ringed Boghaunter at Rose Lake ["Mark OBrien argusmaniac AT yahoo.com [gl_odonata]" ]
28 May Ringed Boghaunter at Rose Lake [1 Attachment] ["argusmaniac AT yahoo.com [gl_odonata]" ]
24 Feb 2014 DSA Meeting [Mark OBrien ]
13 Feb request for help with odoate education in Michigan ["Celeste Mazzacano" ]
28 Jan 3 - Announcements from IORI ["IORI" ]
22 Jan Re: Southeast DSA Meeting - Gainesville FL 4-6 April 2014 [Ryan Chrouser ]
15 Jan latest Great lakes Odonata Bibliography [Mark OBrien ]
17 Dec Dragonflies of North America - discount extended becasue of later then expected delivery of ARGIA for DSA members ["IORI" ]
12 Dec final change for discount for Dragonflies of NA - 3rd eition- price goes up to $145 at midnight on Monday Dec 16 []
11 Dec RE: Final chance for discounted Dragonflies of NA 3rd edit ["IORI" ]
11 Dec Sorry bout that [Chris Hill ]
11 Dec Re: Final chance for discounted Dragonflies of NA 3rd edit [Chris Hill ]
4 Aug Re: Be on the lookout for Golden-winged skimmers [Steve Hummel ]
04 Aug Be on the lookout for Golden-winged skimmers ["argusmaniac" ]
1 Aug Dragonflies of NA update - bad news and good news! []
30 Jul change in email address [Steve Hummel ]
22 Jun Northwest Wisconsin trip, June 14-17 [Nicholas Block ]
17 Jun Re: recent Wisconsin Odeing trip 6/5-6/11 [curt powell ]
17 Jun RE: recent Wisconsin Odeing trip 6/5-6/11 [Dan Jackson ]
15 Jun recent Wisconsin Odeing trip 6/5-6/11 ["Troy" ]
31 May Re: bridge cameras [Tim Cashatt ]
30 May Re: [gl_odonata] bridge cameras [curt powell ]
30 May Re: bridge cameras [curt powell ]
26 Apr Anax junius [Mark OBrien ]
23 Apr RE: Anax junius ["Ethan Bright" ]
23 Apr RE: Cancel iNaturalist Project for now - clarification ["Celeste Mazzacano" ]
23 Apr Cancel iNaturalist Project for now ["Ray" ]
22 Apr Anax junius [Mark OBrien ]
19 Apr iNaturalist link ["Ray" ]
19 Apr Re: Migratory Dragonflies in Ohio ["Ray" ]
19 Apr Migratory Dragonflies in Ohio ["schoolhouse1885" ]
18 Apr Nymph Workshop at UM- Duluth ["Kurt" ]
17 Apr Common Green Darner in Ann Arbor, MI [Darrin O'Brien ]
10 Mar Re: more on the underwater dragonfly larva video [Thomas Schultz ]
9 Mar Re: Fwd: [Carolina Odonates] If you haven't seen this guy's underwater films,... [Margret Chriscinske ]
7 Jan (unknown) [curt powell ]
2 Dec Third edition of Dragonflies of North America - expected in a few months ["IORI" ]
21 Nov RE: [gl_odonata] Re: [CalOdes] The Xerces Society 2013 Dragonfly Calendar ["Bob Glotzhober" ]
14 Nov Re: camera question [Gord Gallant ]
22 Sep OFF-TOPIC - Post-Katrina research [chris kline ]
21 Sep Re: bridge cameras 3 [curt powell ]
12 Sep RE: camera question ["John Pogacnik" ]
12 Sep Re: camera question [Ryan Chrouser ]
12 Sep Re: [gl_odonata] camera question [Dave McShaffrey ]
12 Sep RE: camera question ["Dave McShaffrey" ]
12 Sep RE: camera question ["Arne" ]
12 Sep Re: camera question [curt powell ]
27 Aug FW: Ontario - Migratory Dragonfly Short Course at Point Pelee National Park, 9-8-12 ["Celeste Mazzacano" ]
17 Aug Re: Michigan ode spots [Greg Bauman ]
12 Aug Re: Digest Number 609 [chris kline ]
12 Aug Re: Digest Number 609 [Kurt Mead ]
11 Aug Re: Fw: [gl_odonata] 2013 [chris kline ]
5 Aug Michigan ode spots [chris kline ]
30 Jul Re: Female Striped Saddlebags - Tramea calverti - Wisconsin [Mike May ]
30 Jul Female Striped Saddlebags - Tramea calverti - Wisconsin [Dan Jackson ]
30 Jul Female Striped Saddlebags - Tramea calverti - Wisconsin [Dan Jackson ]
28 Jul Finally - Announcing the new edition of the Dragonflies of North America ["IORI" ]
25 Jul FW: [The Natural Treasures of Ohio] The Federally Endangered Michigan Monkeyflower ["Bob Glotzhober" ]
25 Jul new Michigan Odonata Atlas Post ["argusmaniac" ]
18 Jul latest MOA post ["argusmaniac" ]
12 Jul Re: Fw: [gl_odonata] 2013 [Dennis Paulson ]
12 Jul RE: Fw: [gl_odonata] 2013 ["Arne" ]
12 Jul Re: Fw: [gl_odonata] 2013 [chris kline ]
9 Jul Re: First Royal River Cruiser (Macromia taeniolata) Report for MN [Mark OBrien ]

Subject: Re: Midland Clubtail (Gomphus fraternus) with marking on S9
From: "'karlndot chorus.net' karlndot AT chorus.net [gl_odonata]" <gl_odonata@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Jun 2014 22:49:00 -0500
Yes, we have some Midlands with yellow on top of segment 9, in northern and
southern Wisconsin. In Common Dragonflies of Wisconsin (1998) I had both a
inset photo of this and mentioned it in identification. Unfortunately,
space constraints did not permit the photo to be carried over into
Dragonflies of Wisconsin (2003, 2007, 2013), but I at least retained the
mention of the identification caveat. I regret having to drop the photo of
the 9-spot!
Paulson has neither a photo of this phenomenon nor a mention of it in the
text. Dunkle mentions a "pale form of upper Midwest" with the 9-spot, but
does not illustrate it.
Cheers,
Karl Legler
Southern Wisconsin Butterfly Association
(608) 643-4926
Subject: RE: Midland Clubtail (Gomphus fraternus) with marking on S9
From: "Dan Jackson DanJackson AT LBWhite.com [gl_odonata]" <gl_odonata@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Jun 2014 13:21:22 +0000
I see them occasionally in western WI. Here is a link to a teneral male that I 
saw yesterday. The really big mark on S9 had me excited for a bit!! 


http://upload.pbase.com/image/155962009

Dan Jackson
Chaseburg, Vernon County, Wisconsin (Near La Crosse)
www.PBase.com/DEJackson

From: gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Thursday, June 5, 2014 5:27 AM
To: gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com
Subject: [SPAM-PHISHING] - Re: [gl_odonata] Midland Clubtail (Gomphus 
fraternus) with marking on S9 



I saw a similarly marked female last year and a male in 2012, both in Saginaw 
Co. 


​

On Wed, Jun 4, 2014 at 7:24 PM, curt powell 
curt.curt AT yahoo.com [gl_odonata] 
> wrote: 


Here is a link to a female we had on the Raisin Rive last June.
Midland Clubtail 
(Female) 




[image] 


Midland Clubtail 
(Female) 


View on 
www.flickr.com 


Preview by Yahoo





On Wednesday, June 4, 2014 6:13 PM, 
"davemarvin AT sbcglobal.net [gl_odonata]" 
> wrote: 




[Attachment(s) 
from davemarvin AT sbcglobal.net [gl_odonata] 
included below] 

Doug McWhirter and I have discussed the past few summers the large number of 
Midland Clubtails that we have found along the Grand River south of Lansing, 
Michigan that have an atypical mark on their S9. I have attached an email of a 
female from last year and a male from this year. Is this a common thing seen 
elsewhere or are we seeing something restricted to this area? Is anyone else 
seeing this trait in Midland Clubtails or are we just misidentifying what 
really looks like Midland Clubtails? 


Thanks,
David Marvin




--
Jeff Sommer
http://www.flickr.com/photos/j_sommer/

Subject: Re: Midland Clubtail (Gomphus fraternus) with marking on S9
From: "J Sommer jdsommer90 AT gmail.com [gl_odonata]" <gl_odonata@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 5 Jun 2014 06:26:57 -0400
I saw a similarly marked female last year and a male in 2012, both in
Saginaw Co.

​


On Wed, Jun 4, 2014 at 7:24 PM, curt powell curt.curt AT yahoo.com
[gl_odonata]  wrote:

>
>
> Here is a link to a female we had on the Raisin Rive last June.
> Midland Clubtail (Female)
> 
 

> [image: image]
> 
 

> Midland Clubtail (Female)
> 
 

> View on www.flickr.com
> 
 

> Preview by Yahoo
>
>
>
>   On Wednesday, June 4, 2014 6:13 PM, "davemarvin AT sbcglobal.net
> [gl_odonata]"  wrote:
>
>
>
>  [Attachment(s)
> 
> from davemarvin AT sbcglobal.net [gl_odonata] included below]
> Doug McWhirter and I have discussed the past few summers the large number
> of Midland Clubtails that we have found along the Grand River south of
> Lansing, Michigan that have an atypical mark on their S9.  I have attached
> an email of a female from last year and a male from this year.  Is this a
> common thing seen elsewhere or are we seeing something restricted to this
> area?  Is anyone else seeing this trait in Midland Clubtails or are we just
> misidentifying what really looks like Midland Clubtails?
>
> Thanks,
> David Marvin
>
>
>    
>



-- 
Jeff Sommer
http://www.flickr.com/photos/j_sommer/
Subject: Re: Midland Clubtail (Gomphus fraternus) with marking on S9
From: "curt powell curt.curt AT yahoo.com [gl_odonata]" <gl_odonata@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 4 Jun 2014 16:24:11 -0700 (PDT)
Here is a link to a female we had on the Raisin Rive last June.
Midland Clubtail (Female)
 
   Midland Clubtail (Female)  
View on www.flickr.com Preview by Yahoo  
  


On Wednesday, June 4, 2014 6:13 PM, "davemarvin AT sbcglobal.net [gl_odonata]" 
 wrote: 

  


  
[Attachment(s) from davemarvin AT sbcglobal.net [gl_odonata] included below] 
Doug McWhirter and I have discussed the past few summers the large number of 
Midland Clubtails that we have found along the Grand River south of Lansing, 
Michigan that have an atypical mark on their S9.  I have attached an email of 
a female from last year and a male from this year.  Is this a common thing 
seen elsewhere or are we seeing something restricted to this area?  Is anyone 
else seeing this trait in Midland Clubtails or are we just misidentifying what 
really looks like Midland Clubtails? 



Thanks,
David Marvin  
 
Subject: Midland Clubtail (Gomphus fraternus) with marking on S9 [2 Attachments]
From: "davemarvin AT sbcglobal.net [gl_odonata]" <gl_odonata@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 04 Jun 2014 15:13:26 -0700
Doug McWhirter and I have discussed the past few summers the large number of 
Midland Clubtails that we have found along the Grand River south of Lansing, 
Michigan that have an atypical mark on their S9. I have attached an email of a 
female from last year and a male from this year. Is this a common thing seen 
elsewhere or are we seeing something restricted to this area? Is anyone else 
seeing this trait in Midland Clubtails or are we just misidentifying what 
really looks like Midland Clubtails? 


 

 Thanks,
 David Marvin
Subject: Re: W. lintneri site
From: "curt powell curt.curt AT yahoo.com [gl_odonata]" <gl_odonata@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Sun, 1 Jun 2014 20:16:14 -0700 (PDT)
OK.  Rose Lake near Lansing Michigan was absolutely outstanding.  After 
spending an hour plus in the bog, very nearly dunking my camera, gave at least 
a quart of blood to the vampires, I was giving up.  I went trudging down the 
trail in the forest dejectedly looking down ... well down was the right place 
to look.  Ringed Boghaunters.  I saw 7 of the buggars.   I even saw one or 
two at the parking lot on the way out.  The place was also full of Ashy 
clubtails and Painted Skimmers.  Also got photos of Arrowhead Spiketail, 
Springtime Darner, Lancet Clubtail.  Too much fun.  Here's a flicke link to a 
few photos from today.  Curt 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/12965973 AT N06/sets/72157644971100065/ 


On Friday, May 30, 2014 11:47 AM, "David Marvin davemarvin AT sbcglobal.net 
[gl_odonata]"  wrote: 

  


  
Peter,

Rose Lake is a beautiful and diverse place that you should enjoy. It is a 
hidden gem in mid-Michigan. 


Enjoy!

-Dave

-------- Original message --------
From: "Peter Burke psburke AT rogers.com [gl_odonata]" 
Date:05/30/2014  11:31 AM  (GMT-05:00) 
To: "David Marvin davemarvin AT sbcglobal.net [gl_odonata]" 
Subject: [gl_odonata] W. lintneri site 

David

Thanks so much for this information- I really appreciate it!

I am getting an early start from London so I should be able to get to this site 
by 9 am or so; just in time for things to start flying. I may try and see if 
there are any Henslow’s Sparrows in the vicinity if I get there a little 
early! This should work into the trip quite well as I’ve got the day to get 
to the Soo. 


Wonderful photos and great discovery. Congrats! I’ll try to send word about 
my attempt. 


Peter






------------------------------------

------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links



 
 
Subject: RE: W. lintneri site
From: "David Marvin davemarvin AT sbcglobal.net [gl_odonata]" <gl_odonata@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 30 May 2014 11:46:45 -0400
Peter,

Rose Lake is a beautiful and diverse place that you should enjoy. It is a 
hidden gem in mid-Michigan. 


Enjoy!

-Dave

-------- Original message --------
From: "Peter Burke psburke AT rogers.com [gl_odonata]" 
 

Date:05/30/2014  11:31 AM  (GMT-05:00) 
To: "David Marvin davemarvin AT sbcglobal.net [gl_odonata]" 
 

Subject: [gl_odonata] W. lintneri site 

David

Thanks so much for this information- I really appreciate it!

I am getting an early start from London so I should be able to get to this site 
by 9 am or so; just in time for things to start flying. I may try and see if 
there are any Henslow’s Sparrows in the vicinity if I get there a little 
early! This should work into the trip quite well as I’ve got the day to get 
to the Soo. 


Wonderful photos and great discovery. Congrats! I’ll try to send word about 
my attempt. 


Peter






------------------------------------

------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links


Subject: W. lintneri site
From: "Peter Burke psburke AT rogers.com [gl_odonata]" <gl_odonata@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 30 May 2014 11:31:31 -0400
David

Thanks so much for this information- I really appreciate it!

I am getting an early start from London so I should be able to get to this site 
by 9 am or so; just in time for things to start flying. I may try and see if 
there are any Henslows Sparrows in the vicinity if I get there a little early! 
This should work into the trip quite well as Ive got the day to get to the 
Soo. 


Wonderful photos and great discovery. Congrats! Ill try to send word about my 
attempt. 


Peter






------------------------------------

------------------------------------

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Subject: Boghaunter
From: "David Marvin davemarvin AT sbcglobal.net [gl_odonata]" <gl_odonata@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 29 May 2014 12:01:31 -0700 (PDT)
Peter,

I'm the photographer that found the Boghaunters about which Mark O'Brien posted 
on the Yahoo Group.  If you do not mind adding an extra 75km or so to your 
overall journey, I can route you right to the spot where I found them.  If you 
are coming from London, most likely the route you would take would be I-69 West 
out of Port Huron to I-75 North in Flint.  If you go west of Flint about 
another 45 minutes, you will be on the outskirts of Lansing.  You will want to 
follow I-69 to Exit 98 - Woodbury Road.  When you get to the top of 

the exit ramp turn right (north) and then turn left (west) immediately 
onto Stoll Road.  Follow Stoll Road to the next intersection, which is 
Peacock Road.  Turn right (north) on Peacock and follow for about a 
half-a-mile.  You will come to a Department of Natural Resources shooting 
range on the west side of 

the road and just past that on the east side of the road there will be a 
parking area.  Follow the trail that leads east from the parking area 

about six-tenths of a mile east.  The trail is fairly straight, but 
there are intersecting trails.  You should pass a stand of pines and 
then come to a small open area of not much more than an acre.  Just past that 
is a trail that runs north and south.  This is the main area where I found the 
Boghaunters.  There is a bog around which the trail 

encircles, so you can walk all the way around it.  I saw most of them on the 
east side of the bog.  Otherwise, the rough 

coordinates for this spot are: 42°48'29.45”N /  84°21'38.59”W.

When you are finished, go back to I-69 and keep heading west until you get to 
Exit 89A.  This will get you onto US-127 North, which will eventually connect 
with I-75 North (about 2 hours later) and take you to Sault Ste. Marie. 



-David Marvin

 
------------
DAVID MARVIN
davemarvin AT sbcglobal.net
http://marvins-gardens.blogspot.net
Subject: lintier site en route to the Sault?
From: "Peter Burke psburke AT rogers.com [gl_odonata]" <gl_odonata@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 29 May 2014 14:45:11 -0400
Hi Michael
 I am heading through Michigan on Sunday en route to the Soo from London, ONT.. 
Colin Jones suggested I ask if there was a convenient site not too far from the 
interstate that I could check to see W. lintneri. I could probably spare an 
hour or two if it werent too far offColin has been looking and looking in 
Ontario for this thing- Ive joined him on a couple trips in the past. It would 
be good to at least see the habitat. 


Anyways, if you have a chance to respond, Id be grateful. I know its a 
sensitive species, so if that is information not generally shared, I 
understand. 


Many thanks,

Peter 

------------------------------------

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Subject: Re: Ringed Boghaunter at Rose Lake
From: "curt powell curt.curt AT yahoo.com [gl_odonata]" <gl_odonata@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thu, 29 May 2014 09:50:15 -0700 (PDT)
I will try this weekend.  Unfortunately I can't go before then. 


On Wednesday, May 28, 2014 10:13 AM, "argusmaniac AT yahoo.com [gl_odonata]" 
 wrote: 

  


  
[Attachment(s) from argusmaniac AT yahoo.com [gl_odonata] included below] 
David Marvin, a photographer, informed me that he photographed W. lintneri at 
Rose Lake Wildlife Res. Area - and that they were abundant a day or so ago. 
 Can anyone in the area get over there and snag a voucher, and add more 
information about the population?  Clinton County would be a nice new record, 
and a bit of a surprise.. and a welcome one. 


Thanks,

Mark
  
 
Subject: Re: Ringed Boghaunter at Rose Lake [5 Attachments]
From: "davemarvin AT sbcglobal.net [gl_odonata]" <gl_odonata@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 28 May 2014 07:33:43 -0700
Here are a few photos of the Ringed Boghaunters I saw at this location. This 
location is very close to the line that divides Clinton and Shiawassee 
Counties. The ones I photographed were on the Shiawassee side of the line on 
the east side of bog. I saw several more, including a mating pair on the west 
side of the bog along the trail there, which is closer to the county line. I 
photographed these Ringed Boghaunters on May 25 and 26. 


David Marvin
http://marvins-gardens.blogspot.com
Subject: Re: Ringed Boghaunter at Rose Lake
From: "Mark OBrien argusmaniac AT yahoo.com [gl_odonata]" <gl_odonata@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wed, 28 May 2014 07:15:37 -0700 (PDT)
Coordinates are:N 42.80819 W 84.36116

-----------------------------------------------
Mark O'Brien
Ann Arbor, MI
http://randomphoto.blogspot.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mfobrien/
-----------------------------------------------
Subject: Ringed Boghaunter at Rose Lake [1 Attachment]
From: "argusmaniac AT yahoo.com [gl_odonata]" <gl_odonata@yahoogroups.com>
Date: 28 May 2014 07:12:58 -0700
David Marvin, a photographer, informed me that he photographed W. lintneri at 
Rose Lake Wildlife Res. Area - and that they were abundant a day or so ago. Can 
anyone in the area get over there and snag a voucher, and add more information 
about the population? Clinton County would be a nice new record, and a bit of a 
surprise.. and a welcome one. 

 

 Thanks,
 

 Mark
 

Subject: 2014 DSA Meeting
From: Mark OBrien <argusmaniac AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 24 Feb 2014 06:09:17 -0800 (PST)
Hey folks, the 2014 DSA Meeting will be in N Wisconsin, June 13-15. I 
encourage you to attend! 

Find out more here:http://mamomi.net/dsa2014/DSA2014/Main_Meeting.html

Best wishes,
Mark

-----------------------------------------------
Mark O'Brien
Ann Arbor, MI
http://randomphoto.blogspot.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mfobrien/
-----------------------------------------------
Subject: request for help with odoate education in Michigan
From: "Celeste Mazzacano" <celeste AT xerces.org>
Date: Thu, 13 Feb 2014 12:50:02 -0800
I received a request from Jennifer Panek, a naturalist at Crosswinds Marsh
Wetland Interpretive Preserve in New Boston Michigan, about having someone
do a session/station on dragonflies at their annual Nature Fest on June 21.
I can't be there, but if anyone out there is interested or knows of someone
Jennifer could contact, you can send her a message directly at
jpanek AT waynecounty.com. 

 

Thanks!

 

Celeste

_________________________________________

Celeste A. S. Mazzacano, Ph. D.

Staff Scientist / Aquatic Conservation Director, Xerces Society

Project Coordinator, Migratory Dragonfly Partnership


The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation

628 NE Broadway, suite 200, Portland, OR 97232, USA

Tel: (503) 232-6639 x105 / Cell: (503) 490-0389 

Toll free: 1-855-232-6639 x105
  celeste AT xerces.org /  
www.xerces.org 
Follow MDP on Facebook & Twitter
 FB_icon_small
 twitter-bird-white-on-blue

Follow Xerces on Facebook

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The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation is an international
nonprofit organization that protects wildlife through the conservation of
invertebrates and their habitat.  Find more information on at-risk aquatic
invertebrates at  
www.xerces.org/aquatic-invertebrates/ .

 
Subject: 3 - Announcements from IORI
From: "IORI" <iodonata AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Tue, 28 Jan 2014 17:15:20 -0500
1.      Southeast Dragonfly Society of the Americas meeting info link (that
actually works now)
 
http://loving.corral.tacc.utexas.edu/odonata/OdonataCentral/index.php/PageAc
tion.get/name/SEDSA2014
 
Please RSVP is attending. There is a huge soccer tournament here  in the
Gainesville that weekend  which is tying up quite a few motel rooms. Rooms
are still available however.
 
2.    BACK ISSUES OF ODONATOLOGICA AVAILABLE FROM IORI: drastic reduction in
price due to needed shelf space: DISCOUNT for many full year sets 80%;
Discount for individual issues 70% [1986 and later] ; Discounts for earlier
[1972-1985] issues- 50%; Disocunts for orders placed by Mar 15, 2014. SEND
email request for list of available numbers.
 
3.      Update regarding 3rd edition of Dragonflies of North America: The
copy was finished in December, but due to a formatting incompatability with
the printer, the final draft had to be scanned by the publisher into the
correct final format. This will ship this week to the printer. The proof is
expected by Feb 10 and one the proof is checked, it will take 2-3 week for
the book to be printed and bound. SO now it looks like we are only 4-5 weeks
from getting the books.
 
If you have not ordered it yet please email me for the current rate. I was
able to secure 40 more copies at the $145 US delivery rate.
 
 
Bill Mauffray
International Odonata Research Institute
4525 NW 53RD LN
Gainesville FL 32653
352-219-3141 cell
  iodonata AT gmail.com
  http://www.iodonata.net
 
Subject: Re: Southeast DSA Meeting - Gainesville FL 4-6 April 2014
From: Ryan Chrouser <rjchrouser AT uwalumni.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Jan 2014 14:35:59 -0600
Bill,

I will be taking a family trip to Florida arriving just after your meeting
is concluded.  We will be staying in the Cedar Key area.  I really would
like to see and photograph the Seaside Dragonlet and Roseate Skimmer,
which I don't think I will have too much trouble finding.  Other than that
I just would love to see as many species as possible without taxing the
rest of the family too much.  Do you have any suggestions for good odonate
sites in the Cedar Key area that have relatively easy access?  Or is there
a website that may have some of this info?

Thanks,
Ryan Chrouser
Wisconsin Dragonfly Society


On Wed, Jan 22, 2014 at 2:16 PM,  wrote:

>
>
> Information about the SE DSA meeting:
>
>
>
> First link is word doc
>
> Second on is web doc
>
>
>
>
> 
https://www.dropbox.com/s/0rwaxd8no5kht7x/SOUTHEAST%20REGIONAL%20DRAGONFLY%20SOCIETY%20OF%20THE%20AMERICAS.docx 

>
>
>
>
> 
https://www.dropbox.com/s/vj432l7nta8146q/SOUTHEAST%20REGIONAL%20DRAGONFLY%20SOCIETY%20OF%20THE%20AMERICAS.htm 

>
>
>
> Please let me know if you are planning to attend OR maybe planning to
> attend so I can add you to the email announcement updates.
>
>
>
> *Bill Mauffray*
>
> *International Odonata Research Institute*
>
> *4525 NW 53RD LN*
>
> *Gainesville FL 32653*
>
> *352-219-3141 <352-219-3141> cell*
>
> *iodonata AT gmail.com *
>
> *http://www.iodonata.net *
>
>
>
>  
>
Subject: latest Great lakes Odonata Bibliography
From: Mark OBrien <argusmaniac AT yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 15 Jan 2014 08:24:33 -0800 (PST)
I have completed my bibliography of references pertaining to the Odonata of the 
Great lakes Region. You can find it on the MOS web site here: 

http://insects.ummz.lsa.umich.edu/MICHODO/mospubs/MOS_TN4.pdf


Cheers,

Mark

-----------------------------------------------
Mark O'Brien
Ann Arbor, MI
http://randomphoto.blogspot.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mfobrien/
-----------------------------------------------
Subject: Dragonflies of North America - discount extended becasue of later then expected delivery of ARGIA for DSA members
From: "IORI" <iodonata AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Tue, 17 Dec 2013 21:24:32 -0500
Since the final issue of ARGIA was only released today, I am extending the
discount deadline till Thursday Dec 19, 2013 for the IORI supplemented early
order discount:
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 
Final Update to: DRAGONFLIES OF NORTH AMERICA by James G. Needham, Minter J.
Westfall, Jr., & Michael L. May. 
The long-awaited 3rd Edition monographic revision of the classic "Manual of
the Dragonflies of North America", by Needham and Westfall (1955) is
revised, including numerous additions and corrections for all the currently
known species of North American dragonflies (Anisoptera), including all
(over 365 species) from Alaska to northern Mexico and the Greater Antilles.
keys to adults and known larvae allow identification these important aquatic
insects. The text is completely revised by Westfall and May, with over 200
added figures for all newly discovered species.  The book includes an
updated checklist to all species, a bibliography, glossary, distribution
table, and index.
The projected date for the Third edition is late January 2014. The list
price according to the publisher is estimated now to be $165.00. By special
arrangement with the publisher advance orders are still be taken now with
FREE S&H for $130 US deliveries, $165 Canada & Mexico, $170.00 elsewhere.
(includes S&H). This price is valid only for envelopes postmarked no later
than Dec 19, 2013 or Paypal payment received by midnight on the 19th.
Beginning Friday, Dec 17, the price will be $145.00 for U.S. delivery
orders,  $180 for Canada & Mexico, and $185.00 elsewhere in the world. On
Jan 1, 2014 there will be another price increase to $160-165 [all prices
included S&H, but not the 3% add on for using PayPal)
Florida residents must add 6.25% sales tax.
All funds are US and must be PAID IN ADVANCE by check or money order made
payable to "International Odonata Research Institute" or I.O.R.I. All
profits will go to the International Odonata Research Institute..

VISA/MC CARD ORDERS use PAYPAL to pay online: (with 3% CC surcharge )
[email your order to   iodonata AT gmail.com and you
will be reverse billed though your email - Paypal account is not necessary
using this method]
Or Send Check (US funds only) to: I.O.R.I. % 4525 NW 53RD LN  Gainesville,
Fl 32653 USA, Attn: Bill Mauffray. Envelope must be postmarked by Dec 16,
2013 to qualify for discount.
 Please note new email address.
Bill Mauffray
International Odonata Research Institute
4525 NW 53RD LN
Gainesville FL 32653
352-219-3141 cell
  iodonata AT gmail.com
  http://www.iodonata.net
Subject: final change for discount for Dragonflies of NA - 3rd eition- price goes up to $145 at midnight on Monday Dec 16
From: iodonata AT bellsouth.net
Date: Thu, 12 Dec 2013 11:53:14 -0500
Final Update to: DRAGONFLIES OF NORTH AMERICA by James G. Needham, Minter J.
Westfall, Jr., & Michael L. May. 
The long-awaited 3rd Edition monographic revision of the classic "Manual of
the Dragonflies of North America", by Needham and Westfall (1955) is
revised, including numerous additions and corrections for all the currently
known species of North American dragonflies (Anisoptera), including all
(over 365 species) from Alaska to northern Mexico and the Greater Antilles.
keys to adults and known larvae allow identification these important aquatic
insects. The text is completely revised by Westfall and May, with over 200
added figures for all newly discovered species.  The book includes an
updated checklist to all species, a bibliography, glossary, distribution
table, and index.
The projected date for the Third edition is late January 2014. The list
price according to the publisher is estimated now to be $165.00. By special
arrangement with the publisher advance orders are still be taken now with
FREE S&H for $130 US deliveries, $165 Canada & Mexico, $170.00 elsewhere.
(includes S&H). This price is valid only for envelopes postmarked no later
than Dec 16, 2013 or Paypal payment received by midnight on the 16th.
Beginning Tuesday, Dec 17, the price will be $145.00 for U.S. delivery
orders,  $180 for Canada & Mexico, and $185.00 elsewhere in the world. On
Jan 1, 2014 there will be another price increase to $160-165 [all prices
included S&H, but not the 3% add on for using PayPal)
Florida residents must add 6.25% sales tax.
All funds are US and must be PAID IN ADVANCE by check or money order made
payable to "International Odonata Research Institute" or I.O.R.I. All
profits will go to the International Odonata Research Institute..

VISA/MC CARD ORDERS use PAYPAL to pay online: (with 3% CC surcharge )
[email your order to   iodonata AT gmail.com and you
will be reverse billed though your email - Paypal account is not necessary
using this method]
Or Send Check (US funds only) to: I.O.R.I. % 4525 NW 53RD LN  Gainesville,
Fl 32653 USA, Attn: Bill Mauffray. Envelope must be postmarked by Dec 16,
2013 to qualify for discount.
 Please note new email address.
Bill Mauffray
International Odonata Research Institute
4525 NW 53RD LN
Gainesville FL 32653
352-219-3141 cell
  iodonata AT gmail.com
  http://www.iodonata.net
Subject: RE: Final chance for discounted Dragonflies of NA 3rd edit
From: "IORI" <iodonata AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Wed, 11 Dec 2013 12:41:20 -0500
Chris:

 

If you Library orders it, it will cost a lot more than $130.00 - The
publisher's price effective Jan 1 is $165.00 plus S&H

 

We are selling for $130. Flat price including S&H by special arrangement
with publisher - Scientific Publishers, Gainesville Fl. ISBN # for 3rd
edition is not finalized yet as far as I know..Expected deliver Feb 1, 2014

 

Library's always have to pay more when they go though these library service
companies.

 

The price though us will go up to $145 (flat price) next Monday through the
31st

 

Theses reduced prices are for prepaid orders only..no purchase orders ,
etc..I am a volunteer and do not have time for that paperwork. I will issue
an invoice receipt however. 

 

So I need a check with a postmark by the 16th  (*since the 15th is a Sunday)
or pay with a credit card at $134.02. by Sunday midnight to get this rate.

 

Bill Mauffray

International Odonata Research Institute

4525 NW 53RD LN

Gainesville FL 32653

352-219-3141 cell

  iodonata AT gmail.com

  http://www.iodonata.net

 

From: gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com] On
Behalf Of Chris Hill
Sent: Wednesday, December 11, 2013 11:48 AM
To: gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [gl_odonata] Final chance for discounted Dragonflies of NA 3rd
edit

 

  

Bill, who's the publisher?  And what's the ISBN number?  And is there a list
price yet?  I'm having my library order a copy.  If I can go ahead and let
them know details, I'll have them put in the order this year instead of
waiting for next year.

 

Chris Chris Hill [chill AT coastal.edu]

 

On Nov 26, 2013, at 8:43 AM, iodonata AT bellsouth.net wrote:





 

Final Update to: DRAGONFLIES OF NORTH AMERICA
by James G. Needham, Minter J. Westfall, Jr., & Michael L. May.

 

The long-awaited 3rd Edition monographic revision of the classic "Manual of
the Dragonflies of North America", by Needham and Westfall (1955) is
revised, including numerous additions and corrections for all the currently
known species of North American dragonflies (Anisoptera), including all
(over 365 species) from Alaska to northern Mexico and the Greater Antilles.
keys to adults and known larvae allow identification these important aquatic
insects. The text is completely revised by Westfall and May, with over 200
added figures for all newly discovered species.  The book includes an
updated checklist to all species, a bibliography, glossary, distribution
table, and index.

The projected date for the Third edition is late January 2014. The list
price according to the publisher is estimated now to be $165.00. By special
arrangement with the publisher advance orders are still be taken now with
FREE S&H for $130 US deliveries, $165 Canada & Mexico, $170.00 elsewhere.
(includes S&H). This price w ill be adjusted upward once the final draft
goes to the printer, which now is estimated to be around Dec 15, 2013..

Florida residents must add 6.25% sales tax.

All funds are US and must be PAID IN ADVANCE by check or money order made
payable to "International Odonata Research Institute" or I.O.R.I. All
profits will go to the International Odonata Research Institute..

VISA/MC CARD ORDERS use PAYPAL to pay online: (with 3% CC surcharge )
[email your order to   iodonata AT gmail.com and you
will be reverse billed though your email - Paypal account is not necessary
using this method]

Or Send Check (US funds only) to: I.O.R.I. % 4525 NW 53RD LN  Gainesville,
Fl 32653 USA, Attn: Bill Mauffray. Envelope must be postmarked by Dec 15,
2013 to qualify for discount.

 

Please note new email address.

 

Bill Mauffray

International Odonata Research Institute

4525 NW 53RD LN

Gainesville FL 32653

352-219-3141 cell

  iodonata AT gmail.com

  http://www.iodonata.net

 

 

 

************************************************************************

Christopher E. Hill

Biology Department

Coastal Carolina University

Conway, SC 29528-1954

843-349-2567

chill AT coastal.edu

http://ww2.coastal.edu/chill/chill.htm

 

 





 


Subject: Sorry bout that
From: Chris Hill <chill AT coastal.edu>
Date: Wed, 11 Dec 2013 12:00:09 -0500
Sorry about sending a note to the whole list that was meant to be directed to 
one person. 


I should watch that to line.

Chris

************************************************************************
Christopher E. Hill
Biology Department
Coastal Carolina University
Conway, SC 29528-1954
843-349-2567
chill AT coastal.edu
http://ww2.coastal.edu/chill/chill.htm







------------------------------------

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Subject: Re: Final chance for discounted Dragonflies of NA 3rd edit
From: Chris Hill <chill AT coastal.edu>
Date: Wed, 11 Dec 2013 11:48:15 -0500
Bill, whos the publisher? And whats the ISBN number? And is there a list 
price yet? Im having my library order a copy. If I can go ahead and let them 
know details, Ill have them put in the order this year instead of waiting for 
next year. 


Chris

On Nov 26, 2013, at 8:43 AM, iodonata AT bellsouth.net wrote:

> 
> Final Update to: DRAGONFLIES OF NORTH AMERICA
> by James G. Needham, Minter J. Westfall, Jr., & Michael L. May.
> 
>  
> 
> The long-awaited 3rd Edition monographic revision of the classic "Manual of 
the Dragonflies of North America", by Needham and Westfall (1955) is revised, 
including numerous additions and corrections for all the currently known 
species of North American dragonflies (Anisoptera), including all (over 365 
species) from Alaska to northern Mexico and the Greater Antilles. keys to 
adults and known larvae allow identification these important aquatic insects. 
The text is completely revised by Westfall and May, with over 200 added figures 
for all newly discovered species. The book includes an updated checklist to all 
species, a bibliography, glossary, distribution table, and index. 

> 
> The projected date for the Third edition is late January 2014. The list price 
according to the publisher is estimated now to be $165.00. By special 
arrangement with the publisher advance orders are still be taken now with FREE 
S&H for $130 US deliveries, $165 Canada & Mexico, $170.00 elsewhere. (includes 
S&H). This price w ill be adjusted upward once the final draft goes to the 
printer, which now is estimated to be around Dec 15, 2013.. 

> 
> Florida residents must add 6.25% sales tax.
> 
> All funds are US and must be PAID IN ADVANCE by check or money order made 
payable to "International Odonata Research Institute" or I.O.R.I. All profits 
will go to the International Odonata Research Institute.. 

> 
> VISA/MC CARD ORDERS use PAYPAL to pay online: (with 3% CC surcharge ) [email 
your order to iodonata AT gmail.com and you will be reverse billed though your 
email  Paypal account is not necessary using this method] 

> 
> Or Send Check (US funds only) to: I.O.R.I. % 4525 NW 53RD LN Gainesville, Fl 
32653 USA, Attn: Bill Mauffray. Envelope must be postmarked by Dec 15, 2013 to 
qualify for discount. 

> 
>  
> 
> Please note new email address.
> 
>  
> 
> Bill Mauffray
> 
> International Odonata Research Institute
> 
> 4525 NW 53RD LN
> 
> Gainesville FL 32653
> 
> 352-219-3141 cell
> 
> iodonata AT gmail.com
> 
> http://www.iodonata.net
> 
>  
> 
> 
> 

************************************************************************
Christopher E. Hill
Biology Department
Coastal Carolina University
Conway, SC 29528-1954
843-349-2567
chill AT coastal.edu
http://ww2.coastal.edu/chill/chill.htm




Subject: Re: Be on the lookout for Golden-winged skimmers
From: Steve Hummel <mshummel AT iowatelecom.net>
Date: Sun, 4 Aug 2013 09:32:47 -0500
Hi Mark,
Could you pass along that the 2nd find of L. auripennis should be  
submitted to OdonataCentral. We have the 1st occurrence vetted and  
mapped.
Steve

Steve Hummel
mshummel AT iowatelecom.net
Great Plains Administrator
OdonataCentral

On Aug 4, 2013, at 7:09 AM, argusmaniac wrote:

Write-up is here:
http://michodo.blogspot.com/2013/08/golden-winged-skimmer-incursion-into.html

Mark



Subject: Be on the lookout for Golden-winged skimmers
From: "argusmaniac" <argusmaniac AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 04 Aug 2013 12:09:50 -0000
Write-up is here:
http://michodo.blogspot.com/2013/08/golden-winged-skimmer-incursion-into.html

Mark



------------------------------------


Subject: Dragonflies of NA update - bad news and good news!
From: iodonata AT bellsouth.net
Date: Thu, 1 Aug 2013 09:36:50 -0400
Odonatists:
 
RE: Dragonflies of N.A. Third Edition
 
The latest from the editor, publisher and Mike May is that there is another
delay in getting the final draft to the printer for a late August delivery
as promised before. The book is finished, but still needs final proofing and
scanning to the printer. It will have 660 pages, using the new format as in
the last Damselfly edition, but will have many more figures. There will not
be a "color supplement" since there are many field guides out there to serve
that purpose. Due to prior commitment to field work with some of the parties
involved, it is expected that the book will not go to the printer until
November with a December delivery.
 
That is the BAD NEWS!!!
 
Now for the GOOD NEWS!! It is now estimated by the publisher that the price
of the book, once ordered for print, will go up to $165-170. So if you paid
the advance pre-publication price of 130 (includes S&H), then you got a
bargain. The pre-publication price will remain at $130 until the book
finally goes to printing. At that time the price will be increased. So if
you have not ordered  and paid for it yet, you got a few more months to do
it and save around $40.00. That is a great investment. Where else! can you
get about 30-35% return on your investment.
 
ALSO- If you have had an address change since you ordered, please let me
know now.
 
Original message with ordering instructions: Pre-Publication price still
valid!
 
Finally announcing the new edition of  DRAGONFLIES OF NORTH AMERICA by James
G. Needham, Minter J. Westfall, Jr., & Michael L. May, including numerous
additions and corrections for all the currently known species of North
American dragonflies (Anisoptera) from Alaska to northern Mexico and the
Greater Antilles. The text is completely revised, with keys, figures and
drawings for all the species (including larvae) known as of  now; as well
as, updated checklist to all species, a bibliography, glossary, distribution
table, and index.
 
Advance orders are be taken now with FREE S&H for $130 US deliveries, $165
Canada & Mexico, $170.00 elsewhere. (includes S&H).  Florida residents must
add 6.25% sales tax. 
 
All funds are US and must be PAID IN ADVANCE by check or money order made
payable to "International Odonata Research Institute" or I.O.R.I. All
profits will go to the International Odonata Research Institute.
VISA/MC CARD ORDERS use PAYPAL to pay online: Only 3% surcharge (use the
formula X/. 97) [email your order to iodonata AT bellsouth.net and you will be
reverse billed though your email - Paypal account is not necessary using
this method] Or Send Check (US funds only) to: I.O.R.I. % 4525 NW 53RD LN
Gainesville, Fl 32653 USA, Attn: Bill Mauffray
 
ALSO: I have back issues of some Odonatologica for sale. Goto the web site
below and look under books and supplies. e-mail me your needs list. Will
discount heavily to clear the storage area.
 
I have about 7 copies left of Sid Dunkle's "Dragonflies Though Binoculars"
for $12.00 each which includes S&H for US addresses..
 
Bill Mauffray
International Odonata Research Institute
4525 NW 53RD LN
Gainesville FL 32653
352-219-3141 cell
iodonata AT bellsouth.net  
http://www.iodonata.net  
 
Subject: change in email address
From: Steve Hummel <mshummel AT iowatelecom.net>
Date: Tue, 30 Jul 2013 09:35:18 -0500
Hi all,
Please change my email address to this as my shummel AT iowatelecom.net  
address is no longer working.
Thanks,
Steve

Steve Hummel
mshummel AT iowatelecom.net



_______________________________________________
Odonata-l mailing list
Odonata-l AT listhost.ups.edu
https://mailweb.pugetsound.edu/mailman/listinfo/odonata-l
Subject: Northwest Wisconsin trip, June 14-17
From: Nicholas Block <nlb.birder AT gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 22 Jun 2013 13:57:22 -0500
Hello all,

Sorry for the delay in reporting our sightings!  Nathan Goldberg, Matthew
Hale, Michael Retter, and I took a whirlwind trip to northwestern WI last
weekend with the primary purpose of finding snaketails.  Although sheer
numbers of odes were pretty low, we were pretty happy with the 34 species
found considering the cold spring (and that we weren't really looking for
damselflies much).  Below are species lists from various locations we
visited in chronological order (the standalone complete trip list,
including scientific names, is after my signature).  Lifers for me are
capitalized.  I threw in butterflies and tiger beetles, too.  Thank you to
all that helped with planning, particularly Matt Berg!

*June 14 - Sandhill WMA, Wood County*

Ebony Jewelwing - 1
Eastern Forktail - 3
Sedge Sprite - 6
Midland Clubtail - several
Dusky Clubtail - 1
Illinois (Swift) River Cruiser - 1
Boghaunters - ZERO! :-(
Racket-tailed Emerald - 40+
Common Baskettail - ~10
Calico Pennant - 1 female along Ball Road (apparently a new county record!?)
Chalk-fronted Corporal - 20+
Frosted Whiteface - 30+
Dot-tailed Whiteface - 8
Twelve-spotted Skimmer - 1
Four-spotted Skimmer - 6

Juvenal's Duskywing - 1
Arctic Skipper - 1
Canadian/Eastern Tiger Swallowtail - 2
Clouded Sulphur - 1
KARNER (Melissa) BLUE - 1
Monarch - 1
Pearl Crescent - 1
Mourning Cloak - 1
Little Wood-Satyr - 5

Six-spotted Tiger Beetle - 5

*June 14 - Big Falls County Park, Eau Claire River, Eau Claire County*

STYGIAN SHADOWDRAGON - several flying above the falls at dusk

*June 15 - Canoe trip down the St. Croix River from Nelsons Landing to
Highway 70, Burnett County (WI) and Pine County (MN)*

River Jewelwing - 40+
Eastern Forktail - 2
Springtime Darner - 15+
Midland Clubtail - 1
Ashy Clubtail - 1
Rapids Clubtail - 1
PYGMY SNAKETAIL - 1 teneral male that was stuck on the MN bank because of a
deformed hindwing (also 1 exuvia)
Rusty Snaketail - 2, both teneral (also tons of exuviae)
Stream Cruiser - ~10
American Emerald - 2
BEAVERPOND BASKETTAIL - 1+ (only caught one to confirm)
SPINY BASKETTAIL - 1+ (only caught one to confirm)
Chalk-fronted Corporal - 1
Frosted Whiteface - 1
Four-spotted Skimmer - 2

Among the many Rusty Snaketail exuviae found was one apparent Extra-striped
Snaketail (O. anomalus) exuvia!  We found no evidence of St. Croix
Snaketail, unfortunately (exuviae or adults).

Northern Crescent - 1

Bronzed Tiger Beetle - 5 on a river island sand bank

*June 16 - Memory Lake Park, Grantsburg, Burnett County*

Bluet sp. (presumably Familiar, but we didn't catch any) - 4
Eastern Forktail - ~10
Common Green Darner - 4
Baskettail sp. - 2
Chalk-fronted Corporal - 2
Four-spotted Skimmer - 4
Dot-tailed Whiteface - 2

No Arigomphus, unfortunately (excluding a Horned Clubtail exuvia)

Purplish Copper - 1

*June 16 - Soderbeck Landing (St. Croix River) and nearby powerline cut,
Burnett County*

Springtime Darner - 1
Midland Clubtail - 1
Rapids Clubtail - 1
SKILLET CLUBTAIL - 2
Stream Cruiser - 1
Four-spotted Skimmer - 1

Juvenal's Duskywing - 1
Silvery Blue - 1
Eastern Comma - 1

TWELVE-SPOTTED TIGER BEETLE - 2
Big Sand Tiger Beetle - 8
FESTIVE TIGER BEETLE - 4

*June 16 - Nelsons Landing (St. Croix River), Burnett County*

Eastern Forktail - 2
Springtime Darner - 3
ARROWHEAD SPIKETAIL - 1
Illinois (Swift) River Cruiser - 3
Spiny Baskettail - 1
Chalk-fronted Corporal - 1
Four-spotted Skimmer - 2

Dreamy Duskywing - 4

*June 16 - Norway Point Landing (St. Croix River), Burnett County*

Eastern Forktail - 1
SPLENDID CLUBTAIL - 1
Illinois (Swift) River Cruiser - 4
Four-spotted Skimmer - 1

Arctic Skipper - 1
Common Roadside-Skipper - 1
Meadow Fritillary - 1

*June 16 - McKenzie Creek at County Highway W, Polk County*

River Jewelwing - ~15
Eastern Forktail - 2
Ashy Clubtail - 2
SIOUX SNAKETAIL - 3
TWIN-SPOTTED SPIKETAIL - 2
American Emerald - 15+
Racket-tailed Emerald - 5+
Common Baskettail - 50+
Spiny/Beaverpond Baskettail - 30+
Calico Pennant - 1
Chalk-fronted Corporal - 2
Dot-tailed Whiteface - 3
Twelve-spotted Skimmer - 1
Four-spotted Skimmer - 4

Juvenal's Duskywing - 1
Hobomok Skipper - 1
Eastern/Canadian Tiger Swallowtail - 3

*June 16 - Northern Wisconsin Veteran's Memorial Cemetery Pond, Washburn
County*

Bluet sp. (probably Familiar) - 30
Common Green Darner - 3
Common Baskettail - 1
Spiny/Beaverpond Baskettail - 1
Chalk-fronted Corporal - 1
Dot-tailed Whiteface - 1
Twelve-spotted Skimmer - 3

*June 16 - Namekagon River at County Highway K, Washburn County*

River Jewelwing - 5
Springtime Darner - 6
Splendid Clubtail - 1
Ashy Clubtail - 2
Twin-spotted Spiketail - 2
Illinois (Swift) River Cruiser - 4
Racket-tailed Emerald - 5
Common Baskettail - 20+
Spiny/Beaverpond Baskettail - 20+
Chalk-fronted Corporal - 1
Four-spotted Skimmer - 1

*June 17 - Totagatic River at Seeley Fire Lane, Sawyer County*

Dusky/Ashy Clubtail - 2
Common Baskettail - 2
Chalk-fronted Corporal - 2
Four-spotted Skimmer - 1

*June 17 - Namekagon River at Peterson Road, Sawyer County*

Ebony Jewelwing - 2
Dusky/Ashy Clubtail - 2
Common Baskettail - 20+
Spiny/Beaverpond Baskettail - 10+
Chalk-fronted Corporal - 2

*June 17 - Namekagon River at Larsen Road, Sawyer County*

River Jewelwing - 1
Springtime Darner - 1
Dusky Clubtail - 4
BOREAL SNAKETAIL - 1
Rusty Snaketail - 2
Spiketail sp. - 1
American Emerald - 2
Common Baskettail - 20+
Spiny Baskettail - 1
Common Whitetail - 1

Arctic Skipper - 2
Meadow Fritillary - 1
Mourning Cloak - 1

*June 17 - Chippewa River at Ojibwa, Sawyer County*

River Jewelwing - 5
Familiar Bluet - 1
Eastern Forktail - 3
Dusky/Ashy Clubtail - 2
Common Baskettail - 4
Spiny/Beaverpond Baskettail - 2
Dot-tailed Whiteface - 2

*June 17 - Beaver Dam Landing (Flambeau River), Rusk County*

Springtime Darner - 2
Stream Cruiser - 2
Illinois (Swift) River Cruiser - 10+
Spiny/Beaverpond Baskettail - 2

Also found exuviae of 2 Pygmy Snaketails and a Stygian Shadowdragon!

Hobomok Skipper - 10
Eastern/Canadian Tiger Swallowtail - 1
Azure sp. - 1
Mourning Cloak - 1

Cheers,
Nick Block
Villa Park, IL
nlb.birder AT gmail.com

FULL TRIP LIST - 34 species

River Jewelwing, Calopteryx aequabilis
Ebony Jewelwing, Calopteryx maculata
Familiar Bluet, Enallagma civile
Eastern Forktail, Ischnura verticalis
Sedge Sprite, Nehalennia irene
Common Green Darner, Anax junius
Springtime Darner, Basiaeschna janata
Midland Clubtail, Gomphus fraternus
Splendid Clubtail, Gomphus lineatifrons
Ashy Clubtail, Gomphus lividus
Rapids Clubtail, Gomphus quadricolor
Dusky Clubtail, Gomphus spicatus
Skillet Clubtail, Gomphus ventricosus
Boreal Snaketail, Ophiogomphus colubrinus
Pygmy Snaketail, Ophiogomphus howei
Rusty Snaketail, Ophiogomphus rupinsulensis
Sioux Snaketail, Ophiogomphus smithi
Twin-spotted Spiketail, Cordulegaster maculata
Arrowhead Spiketail, Cordulegaster obliqua
Stream Cruiser, Didymops transversa
Illinois River Cruiser, Macromia illinoiensis illinoiensis
American Emerald, Cordulia shurtleffii
Racket-tailed Emerald, Dorocordulia libera
Beaverpond Baskettail, Epitheca canis
Common Baskettail, Epitheca cynosura
Spiny Baskettail, Epitheca spinigera
Stygian Shadowdragon, Neurocordulia yamaskanensis
Calico Pennant, Celithemis elisa
Chalk-fronted Corporal, Ladona julia
Frosted Whiteface, Leucorrhinia frigida
Dot-tailed Whiteface, Leucorrhinia intacta
Twelve-spotted Skimmer, Libellula pulchella
Four-spotted Skimmer, Libellula quadrimaculata
Common Whitetail, Plathemis lydia
Subject: Re: recent Wisconsin Odeing trip 6/5-6/11
From: curt powell <curt.curt AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2013 07:14:40 -0700 (PDT)
We were just discussing the clubtail situation here in SE Mich.  I stumbled on 
a big emergence (I'll have to review the date), but in mid-may - quite late, 
with Skillet, Cobra, Rusty Snaketail, and Rapids all teneral.  But adults are 
tough to find now.  We were contemplating that there may have been an earlier, 
more timely emergence and many were possible killed off by the cold/cloudy 
weather.  All armchair blah blah blah, no science here! 

 
On the other hand, Midland, Unicorn, Rapids and Lancet seem typically numerous.
 
Curt Powell
 
Ann Arbor, MI
 
PS Dan, Do you suspect your hotspot will still have these species in a couple 
of weeks?  Taking the family to South Dakota and plan to pass thru Lacross and 
sleep over - maybe take them on a river tour. 

If the place you refer to is close, I might be able to stop in without creating 
too much resentment :) 

 

________________________________
 From: Dan Jackson 
To: "gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com"  
Sent: Monday, June 17, 2013 9:26 AM
Subject: RE: [gl_odonata] recent Wisconsin Odeing trip 6/5-6/11
  
   
 
If you head this way for Horned and Lilypad Clubtails, let me know.  I have a 
spot in Vernon County about 30 miles south of La Crosse that is very good for 
them. 

  
I had 20+ Horned, 10+Lilypad, 20+Dusky, and a couple Midland Clubtails there on 
Saturday. 

  
The clubtails are definitely late this year around here.  They really just 
started to emerge last week.  

  
Good Chasing, 
  
Dan Jackson 
Chaseburg, Vernon County, WI  (near La Crosse) 
www.pbase.com/dejackson  
  
From:gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com] On Behalf 
Of Troy 

Sent: Saturday, June 15, 2013 9:48 AM
To: gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com
Subject: [gl_odonata] recent Wisconsin Odeing trip 6/5-6/11   
  
   
my family and I recently made a trip up from SW Texas to western Wisconsin 
primarily to target Boghaunters and Clubtails . . . did well on the first, 
rather below expectations on the second - most of the Gomphids had apparently 
not emerged, and the ones that we did see were all rather fresh or tenerals. 
I've list all my "lifers" in CAPS 


6/5 - Iowa, Madison Co - Pammel State Park - arrived after a day's worth of 
rain, river rather high and murky . . . sun just breaking out of the clouds . . 
. only Odes seen were 


Argia moesta (Powdered Dancer) 4-5 
Plathemis lydia (Common Whitetail) 4-5 - none showed mature colors

6/6 - travel day, mostly in the rain

6/7 - overcast in early morning, partly cloudy all day, high around 68F

Wisconsin, Jackson Co - Black River State Forest, Pigeon Creek Campground - 
early morning, overcast . . . 1 Ladona julia (Chalk-fronted Corporal) - teneral 


Wisconsin, Wood Co - Sandhill Wildlife Area - 1130-1600 hrs, drove roads mostly 
looking for Boghaunters and clubtails 


Enallagma sp (Northern/Vernal Bluet) lots 
Ischnura verticalis (Eastern Forktail) 4-5 
Anax junius (Common Green Darner) 10+ 
Gomphus exilis (Lancet Clubtail) 3 including 1 pr in cop
Gomphus spicatus (Dusky Clubtail) 2 tenerals
Didymops transversus (Stream Cruiser) 2
Cordulia shurtleffi (American Emerald) 20+
Dorocodulia libera (Racket-tailed Emerald) 1
Epitheca canis (Beaverpond Baskettail) 10+ most that I could ID were this 
species 

Epitheca spinigera (Spiny Baskettail) 1
WILLIAMSONIA FLETCHERI (EBONY BOGHAUNTER) 20+ less than half mature, many 
teneral 

WILLIAMSONIA LINTNERI (RINGED BOGHAUNTER) 10+ 
Ladona julia (Chalf-fronted Corporal) lots - maybe 1/5th mature
Leucorrhinia frigida (Frosted Whiteface) lots, hundreds of emerging tenerals - 
there may have been some glacialis and proxima mixed in with all the tenerals, 
but all the maturing ones were frigida 

Leucorrhinia hudsonica (Hudsonian Whiteface) 10+
Leucorrhinia intacta (Dot-tailed Whiteface) 10+
Libellula quadrimaculata (Four-spotted Skimmer) 10+

Wisconsin, Jackson Co - Goodyear Rd at County HH

Anax junius (Common Green Darner) 1
Epitheca sp (Baskettail species, probably Beaverpond) 1
Williamsonia fletcheri (Ebony Boghaunter) 1
Leucorrhinia sp (Whiteface, immature female) 1

6/8 - Overcast all day, scattered rain showers, little odonate activity

Wisconsin, Jackson Co - Robinson Creek at WI 27

Calopteryx aequabilis (River Jewelwing) 2 teneral
Calopteryx maculata (Ebony Jewelwing) 5-6 teneral and immature

Wisconsin, Eau Claire Co - Horse Creek Rd at CR H

Gomphus spicatus (Dusky Clubtail) 1 immature
Tramea lacerata (Black Saddlebags) 1
+ two other dragons flushed from trees, likely Didymops and Anax

Wisconsin, Eau Claire Co - Eau Claire River at CR H

Calopteryx maculata (Ebony Jewelwing) 2-3 tenerals
Gomphus spicatus (Dusky Clubtail) 1

Wisconsin, Rusk Co - Chippewa River at WI 8 (Bruce)

Lestes sp (Spreadwing sp) 4-5 tenerals
Leucorhinnia sp (Whiteface sp, immature female) 1

Wisconsin, Rusk Co - Perch Lake Recreation Area, Rusk Co Forest

Cordulia shurtleffi (American Emerald) 1 teneral - came into blacklight I had 
set up for moths after dark 


6/9 - rained all day - no Odes seen

6/10 - partly cloudy all day, increasing sun as day went on - high around 74F

Wisconsin, Rusk Co - from Perch Lake to CR O

Chromagrion conditum (Aurora Damsel) 3 tenerals
Enallagma sp (Bluet sp - likely Marsh/Hagens) 10+
Anax junius (Common Green Darner) 3-4
Gomphus spicatus (Dusky Clubtail) 5-6
Cordulia shurtleffi (American Emerald) 10+
Epitheca canis (Beaverpond Baskettail) 10+
Epitheca cynosura (Common Baskettail) 10+
Ladona julia (Chalk-fronted Corporal) lots, almost all immature
Leucorrhinia sp (Whiteface sp, immature) 5-6
Libellula quadrimaculata (Four-spotted Skimmer) 1 teneral
Plathemis lydia (Common Whitetail) 1 immature male

Wisconsin, Rusk Co - Chippewa River at WI 8 (Bruce) - except for a few 
Basiaeschna, no activity over water - everything up along powerline road cut 


Calopteryx aequabilis (River Jewelwing) 1 teneral
Calopteryx maculata (Ebony Jewelwing) 3-4 teneral/immature
Lestes sp (Spreadwing sp, teneral) 3-4
Anax junius (Common Green Darner) 1
Basiaeschna janata (Sprintime Darner) lots
Gomphus spicatus (Dusky Clubtail) lots
Didymops transversa (Stream Cruiser) 2-3
Epitheca sp (Baskettail sp) 1

Wisconsin, Eau Claire Co - Eau Claire River at CR H

Basiaeschna janata (Springtime Darner) 2

Wisconsin, Eau Claire Co - Horse Creek Rd at Horse Creek - all on road or in 
roadside brush 


Gomphus spicatus (Dusky Clubtail) 10
OPHIOGOMPHUS SMITHI (SOUIX SNAKETAIL) 10 - tenerals/immature - most were well 
colored but with gray eyes 

Epitheca sp (Baskettail sp, likely Beaverpond) 10

6/11 - travel day, leaving Wisconsin heading back to Iowa and then home to 
Texas 


Wisconsin, Monroe Co - Espe Pond on WI 27

Enallagma civile (Familiar Bluet) 5-6
Enallagama signatum (Orange Bluet) 1
Ischnura verticalis (Eastern Forktail) lots
Anax junius (Common Green Darner) 10
Gomphus exilis (Lancet Clubtail) 2
Epitheca cynosura (Common Baskettail) lots
Leucorhinnia intacta (Dot-tailed Whiteface) 10
Libellula pulchella (Twelve-spotted Skimmer) 10

Wisconsin, Crawford Co - Upper Mississippi NWR, Cold Spring Landing

Enallagma geminatum (Skimming Bluet) 4-5
Ischnura verticalis (Eastern Forktail) lots
Anax junius (Common Green Darner) 4-5
Epitheca cynosura (Common Baskettail) 10+

Iowa, Butler Co - Shell Rock River at Shell Rock Park

Ischnura verticalis (Eastern Forktail) lots
Anax junius (Common Green Darner) 4-5
Gomphus externus (Plains Clubtail) 1 teneral/immature
GOMPHUS FRATERNUS (MIDLAND CLUBTAIL) 10+ immatures and tenerals
Epitheca cynosura (Common Baskettail) 10+
Plathemis lydia (Common Whitetail) 7-8 none with mature colors
Tramea lacerata (Black Saddlebags) 4-5

Summary - I missed out on several things I had hoped to see, including St. 
Croix and Pygmy Snaketails; Horned, Lilypad, and Skillet Clubtails . . . for 
this year, I'm thinking I was just a bit too early for most of those species at 
the localities I looked for 

 them at.

Troy Hibbitts
Brackettville, Texas        
         
Subject: RE: recent Wisconsin Odeing trip 6/5-6/11
From: Dan Jackson <DanJackson AT LBWhite.com>
Date: Mon, 17 Jun 2013 13:26:41 +0000
If you head this way for Horned and Lilypad Clubtails, let me know. I have a 
spot in Vernon County about 30 miles south of La Crosse that is very good for 
them. 


I had 20+ Horned, 10+Lilypad, 20+Dusky, and a couple Midland Clubtails there on 
Saturday. 


The clubtails are definitely late this year around here. They really just 
started to emerge last week. 


Good Chasing,

Dan Jackson
Chaseburg, Vernon County, WI  (near La Crosse)
www.pbase.com/dejackson

From: gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com] On Behalf 
Of Troy 

Sent: Saturday, June 15, 2013 9:48 AM
To: gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com
Subject: [gl_odonata] recent Wisconsin Odeing trip 6/5-6/11



my family and I recently made a trip up from SW Texas to western Wisconsin 
primarily to target Boghaunters and Clubtails . . . did well on the first, 
rather below expectations on the second - most of the Gomphids had apparently 
not emerged, and the ones that we did see were all rather fresh or tenerals. 
I've list all my "lifers" in CAPS 


6/5 - Iowa, Madison Co - Pammel State Park - arrived after a day's worth of 
rain, river rather high and murky . . . sun just breaking out of the clouds . . 
. only Odes seen were 


Argia moesta (Powdered Dancer) 4-5
Plathemis lydia (Common Whitetail) 4-5 - none showed mature colors

6/6 - travel day, mostly in the rain

6/7 - overcast in early morning, partly cloudy all day, high around 68F

Wisconsin, Jackson Co - Black River State Forest, Pigeon Creek Campground - 
early morning, overcast . . . 1 Ladona julia (Chalk-fronted Corporal) - teneral 


Wisconsin, Wood Co - Sandhill Wildlife Area - 1130-1600 hrs, drove roads mostly 
looking for Boghaunters and clubtails 


Enallagma sp (Northern/Vernal Bluet) lots
Ischnura verticalis (Eastern Forktail) 4-5
Anax junius (Common Green Darner) 10+
Gomphus exilis (Lancet Clubtail) 3 including 1 pr in cop
Gomphus spicatus (Dusky Clubtail) 2 tenerals
Didymops transversus (Stream Cruiser) 2
Cordulia shurtleffi (American Emerald) 20+
Dorocodulia libera (Racket-tailed Emerald) 1
Epitheca canis (Beaverpond Baskettail) 10+ most that I could ID were this 
species 

Epitheca spinigera (Spiny Baskettail) 1
WILLIAMSONIA FLETCHERI (EBONY BOGHAUNTER) 20+ less than half mature, many 
teneral 

WILLIAMSONIA LINTNERI (RINGED BOGHAUNTER) 10+
Ladona julia (Chalf-fronted Corporal) lots - maybe 1/5th mature
Leucorrhinia frigida (Frosted Whiteface) lots, hundreds of emerging tenerals - 
there may have been some glacialis and proxima mixed in with all the tenerals, 
but all the maturing ones were frigida 

Leucorrhinia hudsonica (Hudsonian Whiteface) 10+
Leucorrhinia intacta (Dot-tailed Whiteface) 10+
Libellula quadrimaculata (Four-spotted Skimmer) 10+

Wisconsin, Jackson Co - Goodyear Rd at County HH

Anax junius (Common Green Darner) 1
Epitheca sp (Baskettail species, probably Beaverpond) 1
Williamsonia fletcheri (Ebony Boghaunter) 1
Leucorrhinia sp (Whiteface, immature female) 1

6/8 - Overcast all day, scattered rain showers, little odonate activity

Wisconsin, Jackson Co - Robinson Creek at WI 27

Calopteryx aequabilis (River Jewelwing) 2 teneral
Calopteryx maculata (Ebony Jewelwing) 5-6 teneral and immature

Wisconsin, Eau Claire Co - Horse Creek Rd at CR H

Gomphus spicatus (Dusky Clubtail) 1 immature
Tramea lacerata (Black Saddlebags) 1
+ two other dragons flushed from trees, likely Didymops and Anax

Wisconsin, Eau Claire Co - Eau Claire River at CR H

Calopteryx maculata (Ebony Jewelwing) 2-3 tenerals
Gomphus spicatus (Dusky Clubtail) 1

Wisconsin, Rusk Co - Chippewa River at WI 8 (Bruce)

Lestes sp (Spreadwing sp) 4-5 tenerals
Leucorhinnia sp (Whiteface sp, immature female) 1

Wisconsin, Rusk Co - Perch Lake Recreation Area, Rusk Co Forest

Cordulia shurtleffi (American Emerald) 1 teneral - came into blacklight I had 
set up for moths after dark 


6/9 - rained all day - no Odes seen

6/10 - partly cloudy all day, increasing sun as day went on - high around 74F

Wisconsin, Rusk Co - from Perch Lake to CR O

Chromagrion conditum (Aurora Damsel) 3 tenerals
Enallagma sp (Bluet sp - likely Marsh/Hagens) 10+
Anax junius (Common Green Darner) 3-4
Gomphus spicatus (Dusky Clubtail) 5-6
Cordulia shurtleffi (American Emerald) 10+
Epitheca canis (Beaverpond Baskettail) 10+
Epitheca cynosura (Common Baskettail) 10+
Ladona julia (Chalk-fronted Corporal) lots, almost all immature
Leucorrhinia sp (Whiteface sp, immature) 5-6
Libellula quadrimaculata (Four-spotted Skimmer) 1 teneral
Plathemis lydia (Common Whitetail) 1 immature male

Wisconsin, Rusk Co - Chippewa River at WI 8 (Bruce) - except for a few 
Basiaeschna, no activity over water - everything up along powerline road cut 


Calopteryx aequabilis (River Jewelwing) 1 teneral
Calopteryx maculata (Ebony Jewelwing) 3-4 teneral/immature
Lestes sp (Spreadwing sp, teneral) 3-4
Anax junius (Common Green Darner) 1
Basiaeschna janata (Sprintime Darner) lots
Gomphus spicatus (Dusky Clubtail) lots
Didymops transversa (Stream Cruiser) 2-3
Epitheca sp (Baskettail sp) 1

Wisconsin, Eau Claire Co - Eau Claire River at CR H

Basiaeschna janata (Springtime Darner) 2

Wisconsin, Eau Claire Co - Horse Creek Rd at Horse Creek - all on road or in 
roadside brush 


Gomphus spicatus (Dusky Clubtail) 10
OPHIOGOMPHUS SMITHI (SOUIX SNAKETAIL) 10 - tenerals/immature - most were well 
colored but with gray eyes 

Epitheca sp (Baskettail sp, likely Beaverpond) 10

6/11 - travel day, leaving Wisconsin heading back to Iowa and then home to 
Texas 


Wisconsin, Monroe Co - Espe Pond on WI 27

Enallagma civile (Familiar Bluet) 5-6
Enallagama signatum (Orange Bluet) 1
Ischnura verticalis (Eastern Forktail) lots
Anax junius (Common Green Darner) 10
Gomphus exilis (Lancet Clubtail) 2
Epitheca cynosura (Common Baskettail) lots
Leucorhinnia intacta (Dot-tailed Whiteface) 10
Libellula pulchella (Twelve-spotted Skimmer) 10

Wisconsin, Crawford Co - Upper Mississippi NWR, Cold Spring Landing

Enallagma geminatum (Skimming Bluet) 4-5
Ischnura verticalis (Eastern Forktail) lots
Anax junius (Common Green Darner) 4-5
Epitheca cynosura (Common Baskettail) 10+

Iowa, Butler Co - Shell Rock River at Shell Rock Park

Ischnura verticalis (Eastern Forktail) lots
Anax junius (Common Green Darner) 4-5
Gomphus externus (Plains Clubtail) 1 teneral/immature
GOMPHUS FRATERNUS (MIDLAND CLUBTAIL) 10+ immatures and tenerals
Epitheca cynosura (Common Baskettail) 10+
Plathemis lydia (Common Whitetail) 7-8 none with mature colors
Tramea lacerata (Black Saddlebags) 4-5

Summary - I missed out on several things I had hoped to see, including St. 
Croix and Pygmy Snaketails; Horned, Lilypad, and Skillet Clubtails . . . for 
this year, I'm thinking I was just a bit too early for most of those species at 
the localities I looked for them at. 


Troy Hibbitts
Brackettville, Texas
Subject: recent Wisconsin Odeing trip 6/5-6/11
From: "Troy" <alterna2627 AT att.net>
Date: Sat, 15 Jun 2013 14:47:47 -0000
my family and I recently made a trip up from SW Texas to western Wisconsin 
primarily to target Boghaunters and Clubtails . . . did well on the first, 
rather below expectations on the second - most of the Gomphids had apparently 
not emerged, and the ones that we did see were all rather fresh or tenerals. 
I've list all my "lifers" in CAPS 


6/5 - Iowa, Madison Co - Pammel State Park - arrived after a day's worth of 
rain, river rather high and murky . . . sun just breaking out of the clouds . . 
. only Odes seen were 


Argia moesta (Powdered Dancer) 4-5 
Plathemis lydia (Common Whitetail) 4-5 - none showed mature colors

6/6 - travel day, mostly in the rain

6/7 - overcast in early morning, partly cloudy all day, high around 68F

Wisconsin, Jackson Co - Black River State Forest, Pigeon Creek Campground - 
early morning, overcast . . . 1 Ladona julia (Chalk-fronted Corporal) - teneral 


Wisconsin, Wood Co - Sandhill Wildlife Area - 1130-1600 hrs, drove roads mostly 
looking for Boghaunters and clubtails 


Enallagma sp (Northern/Vernal Bluet) lots 
Ischnura verticalis (Eastern Forktail) 4-5 
Anax junius (Common Green Darner) 10+ 
Gomphus exilis (Lancet Clubtail) 3 including 1 pr in cop
Gomphus spicatus (Dusky Clubtail) 2 tenerals
Didymops transversus (Stream Cruiser) 2
Cordulia shurtleffi (American Emerald) 20+
Dorocodulia libera (Racket-tailed Emerald) 1
Epitheca canis (Beaverpond Baskettail) 10+ most that I could ID were this 
species 

Epitheca spinigera (Spiny Baskettail) 1
WILLIAMSONIA FLETCHERI (EBONY BOGHAUNTER) 20+ less than half mature, many 
teneral 

WILLIAMSONIA LINTNERI (RINGED BOGHAUNTER) 10+ 
Ladona julia (Chalf-fronted Corporal) lots - maybe 1/5th mature
Leucorrhinia frigida (Frosted Whiteface) lots, hundreds of emerging tenerals - 
there may have been some glacialis and proxima mixed in with all the tenerals, 
but all the maturing ones were frigida 

Leucorrhinia hudsonica (Hudsonian Whiteface) 10+
Leucorrhinia intacta (Dot-tailed Whiteface) 10+
Libellula quadrimaculata (Four-spotted Skimmer) 10+

Wisconsin, Jackson Co - Goodyear Rd at County HH

Anax junius (Common Green Darner) 1
Epitheca sp (Baskettail species, probably Beaverpond) 1
Williamsonia fletcheri (Ebony Boghaunter) 1
Leucorrhinia sp (Whiteface, immature female) 1


6/8 - Overcast all day, scattered rain showers, little odonate activity

Wisconsin, Jackson Co - Robinson Creek at WI 27

Calopteryx aequabilis (River Jewelwing) 2 teneral
Calopteryx maculata (Ebony Jewelwing) 5-6 teneral and immature


Wisconsin, Eau Claire Co - Horse Creek Rd at CR H

Gomphus spicatus (Dusky Clubtail) 1 immature
Tramea lacerata (Black Saddlebags) 1
+ two other dragons flushed from trees, likely Didymops and Anax

Wisconsin, Eau Claire Co - Eau Claire River at CR H

Calopteryx maculata (Ebony Jewelwing) 2-3 tenerals
Gomphus spicatus (Dusky Clubtail) 1


Wisconsin, Rusk Co - Chippewa River at WI 8 (Bruce)

Lestes sp (Spreadwing sp) 4-5 tenerals
Leucorhinnia sp (Whiteface sp, immature female) 1


Wisconsin, Rusk Co - Perch Lake Recreation Area, Rusk Co Forest

Cordulia shurtleffi (American Emerald) 1 teneral - came into blacklight I had 
set up for moths after dark 



6/9 - rained all day - no Odes seen

6/10 - partly cloudy all day, increasing sun as day went on - high around 74F

Wisconsin, Rusk Co - from Perch Lake to CR O

Chromagrion conditum (Aurora Damsel) 3 tenerals
Enallagma sp (Bluet sp - likely Marsh/Hagens) 10+
Anax junius (Common Green Darner) 3-4
Gomphus spicatus (Dusky Clubtail) 5-6
Cordulia shurtleffi (American Emerald) 10+
Epitheca canis (Beaverpond Baskettail) 10+
Epitheca cynosura (Common Baskettail) 10+
Ladona julia (Chalk-fronted Corporal) lots, almost all immature
Leucorrhinia sp (Whiteface sp, immature) 5-6
Libellula quadrimaculata (Four-spotted Skimmer) 1 teneral
Plathemis lydia (Common Whitetail) 1 immature male


Wisconsin, Rusk Co - Chippewa River at WI 8 (Bruce) - except for a few 
Basiaeschna, no activity over water - everything up along powerline road cut 


Calopteryx aequabilis (River Jewelwing) 1 teneral
Calopteryx maculata (Ebony Jewelwing) 3-4 teneral/immature
Lestes sp (Spreadwing sp, teneral) 3-4
Anax junius (Common Green Darner) 1
Basiaeschna janata (Sprintime Darner) lots
Gomphus spicatus (Dusky Clubtail) lots
Didymops transversa (Stream Cruiser) 2-3
Epitheca sp (Baskettail sp) 1


Wisconsin, Eau Claire Co - Eau Claire River at CR H

Basiaeschna janata (Springtime Darner) 2


Wisconsin, Eau Claire Co - Horse Creek Rd at Horse Creek - all on road or in 
roadside brush 


Gomphus spicatus (Dusky Clubtail) 10
OPHIOGOMPHUS SMITHI (SOUIX SNAKETAIL) 10 - tenerals/immature - most were well 
colored but with gray eyes 

Epitheca sp (Baskettail sp, likely Beaverpond) 10


6/11 - travel day, leaving Wisconsin heading back to Iowa and then home to 
Texas 


Wisconsin, Monroe Co - Espe Pond on WI 27

Enallagma civile (Familiar Bluet) 5-6
Enallagama signatum (Orange Bluet) 1
Ischnura verticalis (Eastern Forktail) lots
Anax junius (Common Green Darner) 10
Gomphus exilis (Lancet Clubtail) 2
Epitheca cynosura (Common Baskettail) lots
Leucorhinnia intacta (Dot-tailed Whiteface) 10
Libellula pulchella (Twelve-spotted Skimmer) 10


Wisconsin, Crawford Co - Upper Mississippi NWR, Cold Spring Landing

Enallagma geminatum (Skimming Bluet) 4-5
Ischnura verticalis (Eastern Forktail) lots
Anax junius (Common Green Darner) 4-5
Epitheca cynosura (Common Baskettail) 10+


Iowa, Butler Co - Shell Rock River at Shell Rock Park

Ischnura verticalis (Eastern Forktail) lots
Anax junius (Common Green Darner) 4-5
Gomphus externus (Plains Clubtail) 1 teneral/immature
GOMPHUS FRATERNUS (MIDLAND CLUBTAIL) 10+ immatures and tenerals
Epitheca cynosura (Common Baskettail) 10+
Plathemis lydia (Common Whitetail) 7-8 none with mature colors
Tramea lacerata (Black Saddlebags) 4-5


Summary - I missed out on several things I had hoped to see, including St. 
Croix and Pygmy Snaketails; Horned, Lilypad, and Skillet Clubtails . . . for 
this year, I'm thinking I was just a bit too early for most of those species at 
the localities I looked for them at. 


Troy Hibbitts
Brackettville, Texas



------------------------------------


Subject: Re: bridge cameras
From: Tim Cashatt <cashatt AT museum.state.il.us>
Date: Fri, 31 May 2013 15:33:07 -0500
Hi Dennis,

Thanks for the update below.  I have continued to keep my Sony 
Cyber-shot DSC-HX200V, and for the most part, I am happy with the 
images.  I like the 18.2 Megapixels and the Zeiss 30X lens.  The manual, 
however, is practically non-existent (little more than an outline to the 
switches)!  It has taken me 2 or 3 several hour sessions to figure out 
the basics of bypassing the automatic settings (when needed).  It does 
come with an internal manual that is accessible through menus which I 
found to be of little help.

I am looking forward to taking it with me to Costa Rica next week when 
we go down for a family vacation and will probably leave my heavy Pentax 
equipment at home to lighten the luggage.

We are being hit with a lot of rain and flooding here in IL and MO.  We 
are planning on Hine's emerald mark/recapture studies  at Kay  Branch in 
MO the week after I return, weather permitting.

Happy hunting!

Tim


On 5/30/2013 9:44 AM, Dennis Paulson wrote:
>
> Hello, all.
>
>
> Many months ago I queried the listserves about bridge cameras, also 
> called superzooms. These are point and shoot cameras with zoom 
> capability that allows them to take photos equivalent to those taken 
> by long lenses on single lens reflexes but also to take everything 
> else, including macros. All in one fairly compact camera that won't 
> strain your shoulder, elbow, and wrist by carrying it around all day.
>
> I've been quiet on the subject for a long time as I didn't get going 
> on it until later last summer, then it was winter, with no odonates to 
> photograph until just a few weeks ago.
>
> I bought a Panasonic Lumix FZ200 in August, as I decided it was 
> probably the best all-around camera with its 24x zoom lens and the 
> lens at f2.8 at all apertures, an amazing feat. It seems like a fine 
> camera, but after I bought it I discovered it was incompatible with my 
> Mac computer. The photo software is made only for PCs, so the camera 
> can't upload onto the computer, and the manual (on a CD) can't be 
> loaded on a Mac. I took it out for an afternoon before I learned this, 
> and by putting the SD card in another camera I was able to upload the 
> photos. You could also do it, of course, with a card reader, just not 
> bother about the Canon software, and surely find a way to get the 
> manual on your Mac eventually. But I brought the camera back, in part 
> as a protest against a company (Panasonic) that wouldn't deal with the 
> reality of the thousands of Mac users who are photographers. Good 
> camera, bad karma. Turned out that Sony is exactly the same, but at 
> least they say on the camera box that it isn't for Macs. What's the 
> matter with these companies anyway?
>
> I went for several months without doing anything more, then a friend 
> purchased a Canon Powershot SX50, one of the cameras I had considered 
> but rejected because I felt I didn't really need a 50x zoom lens. 
> Well, he star ted sending me bird photos, then another friend told me 
> about his photo site with all his SX50 photos, then I read a 
> recommended review 
> (http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/cameras/canon_sx_50_review.shtml) 
> and immediately ordered the camera. I am a committed nature 
> photographer, and birds are what a nature photographer photographs in 
> the winter here. I teach bird classes and am always trying to get 
> better bird photos. The camera didn't disappoint me. I wish all of the 
> ode listserves allowed attachments to be sent, as I would send some 
> representative photos.
>
> The first thing I did was start taking photos of everything at 50x, 
> and I was very pleased with them. The camera has built-in image 
> stabilization, and it works quite well. If I was careful and the 
> subject didn't move, I could shoot photos at 1/100 sec at 50x, which 
> is the 35mm equivalent of 1200 mm. The autofocus focuses quickly on 
> subjects that are very well defined (more on this later). There is a 
> small time delay between photos, and you can tell the difference 
> between this and an SLR in that, but for the most part it hasn't 
> caused me grief (and the camera has a rapid burst mode). If you don't 
> display the photo after it is taken, the delay is quite short. The 
> camera has a digital zoom to 200x, believe it or not, and I took 
> photos of a Gyrfalcon high in a tree on a high bluff with that. I had 
> to use a tripod just to hold the camera on the bird, but the photos 
> came out surprisingly good. Keeping it at lower ISOs is always better, 
> but I have photos up to 1000 that are acceptable.
>
> The camera is just about useless for flying birds, too hard to find 
> and keep on them at high zoom levels. It would be similarly useless 
> for flying odonates.
>
> It takes great photos at all focal lengths, and it's a real kick to 
> switch from a broad habi tat photo to a distant object and back again.
>
> Those are all pros. How about the cons? Well, like all P&S cameras, it 
> can be frustrating to try to get something in focus that is in a messy 
> environment, lots of branches, leaves, etc. The camera often decides 
> to focus on something else, usually in the background. Sometimes it 
> refuses to focus on what I want it to, and I give up. Nevertheless, I 
> have now taken >4000 photos with it, so I must be getting some 
> satisfaction. I should add that the Panasonic did exactly the same thing.
>
> Another good thing is that it focuses down to about 4.5 feet at 50x, 
> so you can walk around and take fine photos of odonates down to 
> damselflies and other things of similar size from that distance. You 
> can also take macros, but it has to be at wide angle and you have to 
> be very very close to do so, so close at extreme wide (24 mm) that the 
> camera itself shades the subject and the on-camera fl ash is useless. 
> So it's not as good for macros as I would have liked, but if you zoom 
> in from that just slightly you can get photos from slightly farther 
> away. I'm still learning optimal distances, as insect photography 
> becomes more and more possible (the spring weather here is crappy 
> enough to make a grownup cry).
>
> The manual is huge, comes on a CD (I uploaded it onto my computer and 
> also printed it out) and lists more features than most of us would 
> ever use, but nevertheless shows the amazing versatility of the camera 
> (probably duplicated on most of the bridge cameras). Sadly, the manual 
> is totally oriented toward photos of your family and pretty much 
> ignores nature. Someone should write a nature-photographer's manual 
> for this camera.
>
> If anyone has any specific questions, I'll try to respond. I should 
> add that I taught a Master Birders class this winter to 24 people, and 
> now I believe 8 of them have bought this camera! I am still 
> recommending it highly for bird photography, and I think it works fine 
> for odonates, with some caveats.
> -----
> Dennis Paulson
> 1724 NE 98 St.
> Seattle, WA 98115
> 206-528-1382
> dennispaulson AT comcast.net 
>
>
>
> 


-- 
Everett D. (Tim) Cashatt, Ph.D.
Chair and Curator of Zoology
Illinois State Museum
Research and Collection Center
1011 E. Ash Street
Springfield, IL  62703
Tel. (217) 782-6689
FAX  (217) 785-2857
http://www.museum.state.il.us/research/entomology/index.html
Subject: Re: [gl_odonata] bridge cameras
From: curt powell <curt.curt AT yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 30 May 2013 08:11:23 -0700
Great commentary,
 
I was shooting the Canon SX 35 for a couple of years - my first camera.  I 
managed some wonderful dragonfly shots.  The zoom is incredible.  I have 
similar caveats to you.  I began looking for an upgrade and wound up with a 
Canon 7D (and the associated expense).  

 
The thing was that I often had to take many many shots to get a good one.  Not 
only was the autofocus confused at times, but the exposure also would go 
berserk sometimes due to bright backgrounds (like pale rocks) with dark Odes on 
them.  Overall, though, I was very satisfied for Odes.  Not so for birds, 
though.  As you said, the camera was useless for birds in flight (although I 
took some fun videos of Broad-winged hawk kettles).  I should caveat my 
comments to say I spent too much time in 'Auto' with this camera - so I might 
have done better in aperture priority. 

 
I also found the 'Macro' unsatisfactory, except for simple close-up 
documentation of in-hand Odes. 

 
Overall, my take is the 'super zooms' are an amazing value and can take 
beautiful pics in the right circumstances.  For quick documentation pics - 
fantastic.  

 
Once I started to get pickier about details and artsy kinds of things, I felt I 
needed a DSLR - and for birds in flight, a Canon 7D. 

 
I'm happy to share some SX 35 Ode photos if anyone is interested.  (Clubtails 
just started emerging last week, so I took my very first Ode photos with the 
7D.  Teneral dragonflies in the noon day sun are tough shots no matter what 
camera you are using!) 

 
Curt
 

________________________________
 From: Dennis Paulson 
To: Odonata-l ; NE Odonata 
; Southeast Odonata ; 
TexOdes Odes ; great lakes odes 
; dragonfly listserve ; 
CalOdes CalOdes  

Sent: Thursday, May 30, 2013 10:44 AM
Subject: [gl_odonata] bridge cameras
  
 
   
 
Hello, all.

Many months ago I queried the listserves about bridge cameras, also called 
superzooms. These are point and shoot cameras with zoom capability that allows 
them to take photos equivalent to those taken by long lenses on single lens 
reflexes but also to take everything else, including macros. All in one fairly 
compact camera that won't strain your shoulder, elbow, and wrist by carrying it 
around all day. 


I've been quiet on the subject for a long time as I didn't get going on it 
until later last summer, then it was winter, with no odonates to photograph 
until just a few weeks ago. 


I bought a Panasonic Lumix FZ200 in August, as I decided it was probably the 
best all-around camera with its 24x zoom lens and the lens at f2.8 at all 
apertures, an amazing feat. It seems like a fine camera, but after I bought it 
I discovered it was incompatible with my Mac computer. The photo software is 
made only for PCs, so the camera can't upload onto the computer, and the manual 
(on a CD) can't be loaded on a Mac. I took it out for an afternoon before I 
learned this, and by putting the SD card in another camera I was able to upload 
the photos. You could also do it, of course, with a card reader, just not 
bother about the Canon software, and surely find a way to get the manual on 
your Mac eventually. But I brought the camera back, in part as a protest 
against a company (Panasonic) that wouldn't deal with the reality of the 
thousands of Mac users who are photographers. Good camera, bad karma. Turned 
out that Sony is exactly the same, but at least they 

 say on the camera box that it isn't for Macs. What's the matter with these 
companies anyway? 


I went for several months without doing anything more, then a friend purchased 
a Canon Powershot SX50, one of the cameras I had considered but rejected 
because I felt I didn't really need a 50x zoom lens. Well, he started sending 
me bird photos, then another friend told me about his photo site with all his 
SX50 photos, then I read a recommended review 
(http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/cameras/canon_sx_50_review.shtml) 
and immediately ordered the camera. I am a committed nature photographer, and 
birds are what a nature photographer photographs in the winter here. I teach 
bird classes and am always trying to get better bird photos. The camera didn't 
disappoint me. I wish all of the ode listserves allowed attachments to be sent, 
as I would send some representative photos. 


The first thing I did was start taking photos of everything at 50x, and I was 
very pleased with them. The camera has built-in image stabilization, and it 
works quite well. If I was careful and the subject didn't move, I could shoot 
photos at 1/100 sec at 50x, which is the 35mm equivalent of 1200 mm. The 
autofocus focuses quickly on subjects that are very well defined (more on this 
later). There is a small time delay between photos, and you can tell the 
difference between this and an SLR in that, but for the most part it hasn't 
caused me grief (and the camera has a rapid burst mode). If you don't display 
the photo after it is taken, the delay is quite short. The camera has a digital 
zoom to 200x, believe it or not, and I took photos of a Gyrfalcon high in a 
tree on a high bluff with that. I had to use a tripod just to hold the camera 
on the bird, but the photos came out surprisingly good. Keeping it at lower 
ISOs is always better, but I have photos up to 

 1000 that are acceptable.

The camera is just about useless for flying birds, too hard to find and keep on 
them at high zoom levels. It would be similarly useless for flying odonates. 


It takes great photos at all focal lengths, and it's a real kick to switch from 
a broad habitat photo to a distant object and back again. 


Those are all pros. How about the cons? Well, like all P&S cameras, it can be 
frustrating to try to get something in focus that is in a messy environment, 
lots of branches, leaves, etc. The camera often decides to focus on something 
else, usually in the background. Sometimes it refuses to focus on what I want 
it to, and I give up. Nevertheless, I have now taken >4000 photos with it, so I 
must be getting some satisfaction. I should add that the Panasonic did exactly 
the same thing. 


Another good thing is that it focuses down to about 4.5 feet at 50x, so you can 
walk around and take fine photos of odonates down to damselflies and other 
things of similar size from that distance. You can also take macros, but it has 
to be at wide angle and you have to be very very close to do so, so close at 
extreme wide (24 mm) that the camera itself shades the subject and the 
on-camera flash is useless. So it's not as good for macros as I would have 
liked, but if you zoom in from that just slightly you can get photos from 
slightly farther away. I'm still learning optimal distances, as insect 
photography becomes more and more possible (the spring weather here is crappy 
enough to make a grownup cry). 


The manual is huge, comes on a CD (I uploaded it onto my computer and also 
printed it out) and lists more features than most of us would ever use, but 
nevertheless shows the amazing versatility of the camera (probably duplicated 
on most of the bridge cameras). Sadly, the manual is totally oriented toward 
photos of your family and pretty much ignores nature. Someone should write a 
nature-photographer's manual for this camera. 


If anyone has any specific questions, I'll try to respond. I should add that I 
taught a Master Birders class this winter to 24 people, and now I believe 8 of 
them have bought this camera! I am still recommending it highly for bird 
photography, and I think it works fine for odonates, with some caveats. 

-----
Dennis Paulson
1724 NE 98 St.
Seattle, WA 98115
206-528-1382
dennispaulson AT comcast.net

     
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Subject: Re: bridge cameras
From: curt powell <curt.curt AT yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 30 May 2013 08:11:23 -0700 (PDT)
Great commentary,
 
I was shooting the Canon SX 35 for a couple of years - my first camera.  I 
managed some wonderful dragonfly shots.  The zoom is incredible.  I have 
similar caveats to you.  I began looking for an upgrade and wound up with a 
Canon 7D (and the associated expense).  

 
The thing was that I often had to take many many shots to get a good one.  Not 
only was the autofocus confused at times, but the exposure also would go 
berserk sometimes due to bright backgrounds (like pale rocks) with dark Odes on 
them.  Overall, though, I was very satisfied for Odes.  Not so for birds, 
though.  As you said, the camera was useless for birds in flight (although I 
took some fun videos of Broad-winged hawk kettles).  I should caveat my 
comments to say I spent too much time in 'Auto' with this camera - so I might 
have done better in aperture priority. 

 
I also found the 'Macro' unsatisfactory, except for simple close-up 
documentation of in-hand Odes. 

 
Overall, my take is the 'super zooms' are an amazing value and can take 
beautiful pics in the right circumstances.  For quick documentation pics - 
fantastic.  

 
Once I started to get pickier about details and artsy kinds of things, I felt I 
needed a DSLR - and for birds in flight, a Canon 7D. 

 
I'm happy to share some SX 35 Ode photos if anyone is interested.  (Clubtails 
just started emerging last week, so I took my very first Ode photos with the 
7D.  Teneral dragonflies in the noon day sun are tough shots no matter what 
camera you are using!) 

 
Curt
 

________________________________
 From: Dennis Paulson 
To: Odonata-l ; NE Odonata 
; Southeast Odonata ; 
TexOdes Odes ; great lakes odes 
; dragonfly listserve ; 
CalOdes CalOdes  

Sent: Thursday, May 30, 2013 10:44 AM
Subject: [gl_odonata] bridge cameras
  
 
   
 
Hello, all.

Many months ago I queried the listserves about bridge cameras, also called 
superzooms. These are point and shoot cameras with zoom capability that allows 
them to take photos equivalent to those taken by long lenses on single lens 
reflexes but also to take everything else, including macros. All in one fairly 
compact camera that won't strain your shoulder, elbow, and wrist by carrying it 
around all day. 


I've been quiet on the subject for a long time as I didn't get going on it 
until later last summer, then it was winter, with no odonates to photograph 
until just a few weeks ago. 


I bought a Panasonic Lumix FZ200 in August, as I decided it was probably the 
best all-around camera with its 24x zoom lens and the lens at f2.8 at all 
apertures, an amazing feat. It seems like a fine camera, but after I bought it 
I discovered it was incompatible with my Mac computer. The photo software is 
made only for PCs, so the camera can't upload onto the computer, and the manual 
(on a CD) can't be loaded on a Mac. I took it out for an afternoon before I 
learned this, and by putting the SD card in another camera I was able to upload 
the photos. You could also do it, of course, with a card reader, just not 
bother about the Canon software, and surely find a way to get the manual on 
your Mac eventually. But I brought the camera back, in part as a protest 
against a company (Panasonic) that wouldn't deal with the reality of the 
thousands of Mac users who are photographers. Good camera, bad karma. Turned 
out that Sony is exactly the same, but at least they 

 say on the camera box that it isn't for Macs. What's the matter with these 
companies anyway? 


I went for several months without doing anything more, then a friend purchased 
a Canon Powershot SX50, one of the cameras I had considered but rejected 
because I felt I didn't really need a 50x zoom lens. Well, he started sending 
me bird photos, then another friend told me about his photo site with all his 
SX50 photos, then I read a recommended review 
(http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/cameras/canon_sx_50_review.shtml) 
and immediately ordered the camera. I am a committed nature photographer, and 
birds are what a nature photographer photographs in the winter here. I teach 
bird classes and am always trying to get better bird photos. The camera didn't 
disappoint me. I wish all of the ode listserves allowed attachments to be sent, 
as I would send some representative photos. 


The first thing I did was start taking photos of everything at 50x, and I was 
very pleased with them. The camera has built-in image stabilization, and it 
works quite well. If I was careful and the subject didn't move, I could shoot 
photos at 1/100 sec at 50x, which is the 35mm equivalent of 1200 mm. The 
autofocus focuses quickly on subjects that are very well defined (more on this 
later). There is a small time delay between photos, and you can tell the 
difference between this and an SLR in that, but for the most part it hasn't 
caused me grief (and the camera has a rapid burst mode). If you don't display 
the photo after it is taken, the delay is quite short. The camera has a digital 
zoom to 200x, believe it or not, and I took photos of a Gyrfalcon high in a 
tree on a high bluff with that. I had to use a tripod just to hold the camera 
on the bird, but the photos came out surprisingly good. Keeping it at lower 
ISOs is always better, but I have photos up to 

 1000 that are acceptable.

The camera is just about useless for flying birds, too hard to find and keep on 
them at high zoom levels. It would be similarly useless for flying odonates. 


It takes great photos at all focal lengths, and it's a real kick to switch from 
a broad habitat photo to a distant object and back again. 


Those are all pros. How about the cons? Well, like all P&S cameras, it can be 
frustrating to try to get something in focus that is in a messy environment, 
lots of branches, leaves, etc. The camera often decides to focus on something 
else, usually in the background. Sometimes it refuses to focus on what I want 
it to, and I give up. Nevertheless, I have now taken >4000 photos with it, so I 
must be getting some satisfaction. I should add that the Panasonic did exactly 
the same thing. 


Another good thing is that it focuses down to about 4.5 feet at 50x, so you can 
walk around and take fine photos of odonates down to damselflies and other 
things of similar size from that distance. You can also take macros, but it has 
to be at wide angle and you have to be very very close to do so, so close at 
extreme wide (24 mm) that the camera itself shades the subject and the 
on-camera flash is useless. So it's not as good for macros as I would have 
liked, but if you zoom in from that just slightly you can get photos from 
slightly farther away. I'm still learning optimal distances, as insect 
photography becomes more and more possible (the spring weather here is crappy 
enough to make a grownup cry). 


The manual is huge, comes on a CD (I uploaded it onto my computer and also 
printed it out) and lists more features than most of us would ever use, but 
nevertheless shows the amazing versatility of the camera (probably duplicated 
on most of the bridge cameras). Sadly, the manual is totally oriented toward 
photos of your family and pretty much ignores nature. Someone should write a 
nature-photographer's manual for this camera. 


If anyone has any specific questions, I'll try to respond. I should add that I 
taught a Master Birders class this winter to 24 people, and now I believe 8 of 
them have bought this camera! I am still recommending it highly for bird 
photography, and I think it works fine for odonates, with some caveats. 

-----
Dennis Paulson
1724 NE 98 St.
Seattle, WA 98115
206-528-1382
dennispaulson AT comcast.net

     
         
Subject: Anax junius
From: Mark OBrien <argusmaniac AT yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 26 Apr 2013 12:36:47 -0700 (PDT)

A beautiful day in Ann Arbor, temp. is about 60F, full sun and a light breeze. 
One Anax junius seen flying over the UM diag. 


Mark
-----------------------------------------------
Mark O'Brien
Ann Arbor, MI
http://randomphoto.blogspot.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mfobrien/
-----------------------------------------------
Subject: RE: Anax junius
From: "Ethan Bright" <ethanbr AT umich.edu>
Date: Tue, 23 Apr 2013 17:42:58 -0400
Actually, my 6-year old daughter spied one from our backyard deck
(42.27345N,-83.76076W) last week Monday (April 15). This was during a warm,
windy day before we got all that rain. She said she saw a dragonfly, and I
queried her to the shape, color, and size: undoubtedly A. junius. A lot
later than last year!

Cheers, Ethan

 

"In vino veritas, in aqua sanitas"

 

From: gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com] On
Behalf Of Mark OBrien
Sent: Monday, April 22, 2013 2:14 PM
To: gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com
Subject: [gl_odonata] Anax junius

 






 

 

Spotted a male Anax junius over the Varsity Drive parking lot at 2 pm today.
(MICHIGAN: Washtenaw Co., N 42.23591 W 83.72742) sunny, light breeze, ca.
57F.  





Mark

 

-----------------------------------------------
Mark O'Brien
Ann Arbor, MI
http://randomphoto.blogspot.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mfobrien/
-----------------------------------------------

 







Subject: RE: Cancel iNaturalist Project for now - clarification
From: "Celeste Mazzacano" <celeste AT xerces.org>
Date: Tue, 23 Apr 2013 07:18:08 -0700
Hello everyone-

 

Just to clarify, anyone who would like to participate in the migratory
dragonfly project can still do so.  Xerces coordinates this project, which
was initiated by US Forest Service International Programs and represents an
effort to better understand the mechanics and dynamics of  migration across
Canada, the US, and Mexico, and it involves a variety of different partners
and agencies around North America.  The MDP has a fully functioning web site
(www.migratorydragonflyproject.org) for collecting data on dragonfly
migration through both our Pond Watch and Migration Monitoring projects;
this page also has a variety of other resources to help volunteers
participate.  The MDP web site is a sister site to OdonataCentral, and if
you are a member of OC, your username and password will automatically allow
you to log in to the MDP web site. However, we have no way to transfer data
from iNaturalist into the MDP database, apart from doing it manually, which
is why iNaturalist doesn't work for us as a data entry portal at this point
in time.  

 

As Ray mentions, it is definitely the season for Common Green Darners that
spent the winter dallying in the southlands to be moving back up north.
Mature adults have already been sighted in Michigan, New York, and southern
Ontario, so this is a great time to get out to your local wetland and start
looking for migratory odes.  If you have any questions about MDP, please
don't hesitate to contact me directly. 

 

Thanks!

 

Celeste

_________________________________________

Celeste A. Mazzacano, Ph. D.

Staff Scientist / Aquatic Conservation Director, Xerces Society

Project Coordinator, Migratory Dragonfly Partnership


The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation

628 NE Broadway, suite 200, Portland, OR 97232, USA

Tel: (503) 232-6639 x105 / Cell: (503) 490-0389 

Toll free: 1-855-232-6639 x105
celeste AT xerces.org / www.xerces.org   
Follow MDP on Facebook & Twitter
 FB_icon_small
 twitter-bird-white-on-blue

Follow Xerces on Facebook

FB_icon_small

 

The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation is an international
nonprofit organization that protects wildlife through the conservation of
invertebrates and their habitat.  Find more information on at-risk aquatic
invertebrates at www.xerces.org/aquatic-invertebrates/ .

 

From: gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com] On
Behalf Of Ray
Sent: Tuesday, April 23, 2013 5:14 AM
To: gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com
Subject: [gl_odonata] Cancel iNaturalist Project for now

 

  

Although this project might fly at a later date, OWA will not be promoting
this avenue of data collection at this time. It is meant to support the
Migratory Dragonfly Project at the Xerces Society. This projcet would only
divert data away from that project. We hope that in the future there will be
a way to integrate data between projects that does not exist today. 
Please support the Xerces Society Migratory Dragonfly Project.
http://www.xerces.org/dragonfly-migration/ 
For instance the appearance of Green Darners in April is evidence that this
species migrates. They are coming from parts south. They are not yet
emerging from larvae in our ponds and wetlands around the Great Lakes.


Subject: Cancel iNaturalist Project for now
From: "Ray" <ray AT ohwetlands.org>
Date: Tue, 23 Apr 2013 12:14:23 -0000
Although this project might fly at a later date, OWA will not be promoting this 
avenue of data collection at this time. It is meant to support the Migratory 
Dragonfly Project at the Xerces Society. This projcet would only divert data 
away from that project. We hope that in the future there will be a way to 
integrate data between projects that does not exist today. 

Please support the Xerces Society Migratory Dragonfly Project. 
http://www.xerces.org/dragonfly-migration/ 

For instance the appearance of Green Darners in April is evidence that this 
species migrates. They are coming from parts south. They are not yet emerging 
from larvae in our ponds and wetlands around the Great Lakes. 




------------------------------------


Subject: Anax junius
From: Mark OBrien <argusmaniac AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 22 Apr 2013 11:13:32 -0700 (PDT)



Spotted a male Anax junius over the Varsity Drive parking lot at 2 pm today. 
(MICHIGAN: Washtenaw Co.,N 42.23591 W 83.72742) sunny, light breeze, ca. 
57F.  


Mark

-----------------------------------------------
Mark O'Brien
Ann Arbor, MI
http://randomphoto.blogspot.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mfobrien/
-----------------------------------------------
Subject: iNaturalist link
From: "Ray" <ray AT ohwetlands.org>
Date: Fri, 19 Apr 2013 11:57:11 -0000
The correct link is 
http://www.inaturalist.org/projects/migratory-dragonflies-in-ohio 


Just in case you need to copy and paste the url into your browser.



------------------------------------


Subject: Re: Migratory Dragonflies in Ohio
From: "Ray" <ray AT ohwetlands.org>
Date: Fri, 19 Apr 2013 11:55:39 -0000
Sorry, the very last link in this message is printed wrong, but the hyperlink 
is correct. It was a copy/paste in haste error. 


--- In gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com, "schoolhouse1885"  wrote:
>
> Dragonfly migration is known to occur in several species but little
> detail is understood about the process. Dragonflies play an important
> role in the ecology of wetlands and other bodies of water. To better
> understand these migrations, data is collected by volunteers who are
> recruited from across Ohio. To better understand how and when
> dragonflies travel great distances, The Xerces Society has initiated the
> Migratory Dragonfly Partnership. This partnership asks volunteer citizen
> scientists to monitor and report data on five known migrants. Using
> iNaturalist, the Ohio Wetlands Association has started the project, to
> record their observations. In addition to basic text listing the target
> species, voucher photographs are uploaded and reviewed. Time and
> location data accompany the sightings and community members have
> discussions on the data collected. Our effort here in Ohio is used to
> support the Xerces project that is continental in scope.See a
> description of the project on the Ohio Wetlands Association website
>   
> http://ohwetlands.org/?page_id=226  
> . You can join the iNaturalist project
>    
> at  http://ohwetlands.org/?page_id=226
>    .
>




------------------------------------


Subject: Migratory Dragonflies in Ohio
From: "schoolhouse1885" <ray AT ohwetlands.org>
Date: Fri, 19 Apr 2013 11:42:30 -0000
Dragonfly migration is known to occur in several species but little
detail is understood about the process. Dragonflies play an important
role in the ecology of wetlands and other bodies of water. To better
understand these migrations, data is collected by volunteers who are
recruited from across Ohio. To better understand how and when
dragonflies travel great distances, The Xerces Society has initiated the
Migratory Dragonfly Partnership. This partnership asks volunteer citizen
scientists to monitor and report data on five known migrants. Using
iNaturalist, the Ohio Wetlands Association has started the project, to
record their observations. In addition to basic text listing the target
species, voucher photographs are uploaded and reviewed. Time and
location data accompany the sightings and community members have
discussions on the data collected. Our effort here in Ohio is used to
support the Xerces project that is continental in scope.See a
description of the project on the Ohio Wetlands Association website
  
http://ohwetlands.org/?page_id=226  
. You can join the iNaturalist project
   
at  http://ohwetlands.org/?page_id=226
   .
Subject: Nymph Workshop at UM- Duluth
From: "Kurt" <mixedboreal AT gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Apr 2013 16:09:35 -0000
Bob DuBois author of Damselflies of the North Woods and Dragonflies and
Damselflies of the Rocky Mountains will be teaching a two day workshop
on the identification of Odonata nymphs.  Bob is an excellent teacher. 
This event is hosted by UMD and is being organized by the Minnesota
Dragonfly Society.

UMD Campus
June 1-2, 2013
8am-4pm
Course fee: $50
Materials fee: $15
This is traditionally a busy weekend in Duluth so hotel rooms may be
hard to find.  An on-campus housing option is being investigated.

To reserve your space in this workshop or if you have any questions,
please send an email to Kurt Mead at info AT mndragonfly.org.  Further
instructions and details will be given to you, then.

Kurt Mead
Minnesota Dragonfly Society
(formerly Minnesota Odonata Survey Project)


Subject: Common Green Darner in Ann Arbor, MI
From: Darrin O'Brien <urbanodes AT gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 17 Apr 2013 16:55:32 -0400
Today, I found a Common Green Darner patrolling our backyard (west of 
Ann Arbor, MI).

-- 

--- Darrin O'Brien
http://urbanodes.blogspot.com/



------------------------------------


Subject: Re: more on the underwater dragonfly larva video
From: Thomas Schultz <schultz AT denison.edu>
Date: Sun, 10 Mar 2013 20:27:44 -0400
The labial palps of this larva, and of libellulids in general, would seem to be 
poorly adapted for grabbing prey the size and shape of notonectids, corixids, 
etc., at least compared to the palps of gomphids and aeshnids. And the larva in 
the video had quite a few misses, (but its speed was awesome). The spoon-like 
palps of libellulids appear better suited for scooping smaller prey or large 
zooplankton. Someone out there probably knows all about this. Are there any 
published studies about partitioning of feeding niches among ode larvae? 


Tom

Sent from my iPad

On Mar 10, 2013, at 7:40 PM, Dennis Paulson  wrote:

> Just another note about the superb video of a dragonfly nymph/larva I sent to 
all a few days ago. When I first looked at it, I didn't realize it had been 
posted from someone in the neotropics. When I looked at a few of his other 
videos and heard the Great-tailed Grackles calling, that tied it down 
geographically. I'm pretty sure the critter is a Pantala hymenaea, so it's not 
surprising it was so voracious. Pantala larvae are well known for their 
supersize eating habits. 

> 
> 
> Dennis
> 
> Begin forwarded message:
>> 
>> Chris Hill posted in Carolina Odonates
>> 	
>> Chris Hill	4:26am Mar 8
>> If you haven't seen this guy's underwater films, check them out.
>> 	Dragonfly larvae hunting backswimmers (#217)
>> www.youtube.com
> 
> 
Subject: Re: Fwd: [Carolina Odonates] If you haven't seen this guy's underwater films,...
From: Margret Chriscinske <margi.c AT att.net>
Date: Sat, 9 Mar 2013 05:53:20 -0800 (PST)
Thank you for sharing!!  That's great!

Margi

--- On Fri, 3/8/13, Dennis Paulson  wrote:

From: Dennis Paulson 
Subject: [gl_odonata] Fwd: [Carolina Odonates] If you haven't seen this guy's 
underwater films,... 

To: nw_odonata AT yahoogroups.com, "CalOdes Sightings CalOdes" 
, "TexOdes Odes" , "Southeast 
Odonata" , "dragonfly listserve" 
, "great lakes odes" , 
"NE Odonata" , "Odonata-l"  

Date: Friday, March 8, 2013, 9:12 PM
















 



  


    
      
      
      Awesome video!

Begin forwarded message:Chris Hill posted in Carolina OdonatesChris Hill4:26am 
Mar 8If you haven't seen this guy's underwater films, check them out.Dragonfly 
larvae hunting backswimmers (#217)www.youtube.com 


View Post on Facebook · Edit Email Settings · Reply to this email to add a 
comment. 




    
     

    
    






  







Subject: (unknown)
From: curt powell <curt.curt AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 7 Jan 2013 03:29:02 -0800 (PST)
http://valdom.com/templates/beez/ndold.php?xjpz=xjpz
Subject: Third edition of Dragonflies of North America - expected in a few months
From: "IORI" <iodonata AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Sun, 2 Dec 2012 22:27:15 -0500
Finally announcing the new edition of  DRAGONFLIES OF NORTH AMERICA by James
G. Needham, Minter J. Westfall, Jr., & Michael L. May, including numerous
additions and corrections for all the currently known species of North
American dragonflies (Anisoptera) from Alaska to northern Mexico and the
Greater Antilles. The text is completely revised, with keys, figures and
drawings for all the species (including larvae) known as of  2012; as well
as, updated checklist to all species, a bibliography, glossary, distribution
table, and index.
 
The projected date for the next edition is January, 2013. The list price
according to the publisher is estimated to be $130,00. Advance orders are be
taken now with FREE S&H for $130 US deliveries, $142 Canada & Mexico,
$152.00 elsewhere. (includes S&H). Florida residents must add 6.25% sales
tax. 
 
ALSO: I have back issues of some Odonatologica for sale. Goto the web site
below and look under books and supplies. e-mail me your needs list.
 
I have about 25 copies left of Sid Dunkle's "Dragonflies Though Binoculars"
for $12.00 each (includes S&H) to US addresses, slightly higher for foreign
addresses.
 
 
All funds are US and must be PAID IN ADVANCE by check or money order made
payable to "International Odonata Research Institute" or I.O.R.I. All
profits will go to the International Odonata Research Institute.
VISA/MC CARD ORDERS use PAYPAL to pay online: Only 3% surcharge (use the
formula X/. 97) [email your order to iodonata AT bellsouth.net and you will be
reverse billed though your email - Paypal account is not necessary using
this method] Or Send Check (US funds only) to: I.O.R.I. % 4525 NW 53RD LN
Gainesville, Fl 32653 USA, Attn: Bill Mauffray
 
Bill Mauffray
International Odonata Research Institute
4525 NW 53RD LN
Gainesville FL 32653
352-219-3141 cell
iodonata AT bellsouth.net  
http://www.iodonata.net  
Subject: RE: [gl_odonata] Re: [CalOdes] The Xerces Society 2013 Dragonfly Calendar
From: "Bob Glotzhober" <bglotzhober AT ohiohistory.org>
Date: Wed, 21 Nov 2012 14:56:28 -0500
I've got mine already. It is beautiful!

Bob Glotzhober

 

From: gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com] On
Behalf Of Dennis Paulson
Sent: Wednesday, November 21, 2012 2:34 PM
To: Michele Blackburn
Cc: nw_odonata AT yahoogroups.com; bcdragonflies AT yahoogroups.ca;
CalOdes AT yahoogroups.com; gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com;
NEodes AT yahoogroups.com; odonata-l-bounces AT listhost.ups.edu;
se-odonata AT yahoogroups.com; SoWestOdes AT yahoogroups.com;
TexOdes AT yahoogroups.com
Subject: [BULK] [gl_odonata] Re: [CalOdes] The Xerces Society 2013
Dragonfly Calendar

 

  

Hello from me too. I've seen the calendar, and it is great. You get two
dragonfly photos for every month and a lot of interesting facts about
the group, as well as learning what The Xerces Society is doing with
them. You should order one before the supply runs out. Buy them as great
Christmas gifts for all your friends whether they are hooked on odonates
or not!

 

Dennis Paulson

Seattle

 

 

On Nov 21, 2012, at 9:35 AM, Michele Blackburn wrote:





  

 

Hi All -

 

A friendly reminder that the Xerces Society's 2013 Dragonfly Calendar is
available for purchase on our website http://www.xerces.org/calendar/ or
by calling toll free 855-232-6639. Full of stunning dragonfly photos
from North America, it is a wonderful gift that keeps on giving
throughout the year!

 

Thanks in advance for your support and to the odeing community that
captured the amazing photos featured in the calendar! 

 

Proceeds of the calendar will help support conservation and
understanding of these remarkable invertebrates.

 

Best,

Michele

Michele Blackburn

Aquatic Program Conservation Associate

 

The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation

1971 - 2011: Forty Years of Conservation!

 

628 NE Broadway Suite 200, Portland, OR, 97232 USA

Tel: (503) 232-6639 x113

Toll free: 855-232-6639 x113

Fax: (503) 233-6479

michele AT xerces.org    |  www.xerces.org
 

 

Connect with Xerces  
   |
Migratory Dragonfly Partnership
   

  

 

The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation is an international
nonprofit organization that protects wildlife through the conservation
of invertebrates and their habitat.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 





 


Subject: Re: camera question
From: Gord Gallant <webnatgg AT yahoo.ca>
Date: Wed, 14 Nov 2012 17:30:24 -0800 (PST)
Big and expensive isn't always better or appropriate. High end P&S cameras and 
3/4 format are great alternatives. They are not great for flight shots but they 
are great for dragonfly and butterfly shots when you don't or can't get too 
close. I used to shoot with a Panasonic FZ20 and produced great shots 
especially if you had good light. 

Gord




________________________________
 From: Arne 
To: gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Wednesday, September 12, 2012 2:08:54 PM
Subject: RE: [gl_odonata] camera question
 

  
DSLR does not necessarily mean heavy.  My standard in-hand setup weighs a 
little over 2 lbs.  If I add the “big” telephoto zoom (150-600mm), it’s 
another pound.  The biggest weight is now the tripod (mine is 5# - I could get 
a carbon fiber one at 3+ lbs). 

My camera bag + all accessories totals around 10 lb.  This is all using 
Olympus’ micro 4/3 system on an OM-D (16 megapixel, in-body IS, 
weather-sealed). 

Arne
Stonehollow-anisoptera 
 
From:gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com] On Behalf 
Of Dennis Paulson 



Hello, all.
 
On our recent trip to Panama, Netta and I realized how burdened we were, both 
while traveling (carryons that weigh 30 pounds) and in the field, with single 
lens reflexes and big telephoto lenses. We spent time with people with little 
point and shoot cameras with long zoom potential and saw that they were getting 
seemingly as good photos of dragonflies as we were. I'm perfectly happy with 
Nikon cameras and Sigma lenses around home, but I'm exploring the possibility 
of carrying smaller and lighter cameras on future foreign trips. 

 
So this message is to ask for commentary on odonate photography with the 
intermediate point and shoot cameras with long zoom lenses, sometimes called 
"bridge" cameras because of their intermediacy between SLRs and the smaller 
P&Ss. I'm looking especially into the Panasonic Lumix FZ200 ($600) as a highly 
reviewed camera, but it has competitors among Nikon, Canon, Sony, and others. 
Has anyone used this Lumix or its predecessors (especially the FZ150) for 
dragonflies and had great success? Have you seen any disadvantages? How about 
others of this genre? What I don't want is a camera that you have to move up to 
within 10 inches or less of the odonate to get its photo in macro mode! I 
assume there are many people on these lists with similar questions. 

 
Please excuse the cross-posting.
 
Dennis
-----
Dennis Paulson
1724 NE 98 St.
Seattle, WA 98115
206-528-1382
dennispaulson AT comcast.net
 
Subject: OFF-TOPIC - Post-Katrina research
From: chris kline <kline_at_pine AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 22 Sep 2012 09:10:52 -0700 (PDT)
Hi all,

My apologies for posting off-topic, but I thought asking you folks might be my 
best shot at success. I think I recall hearing somewhere that a challenge 
forenvironmental studies of the Gulf of Mexico, post-Katrina, is that there 
was not good baseline data of the Gulf, pre-Katrina. 


Has anybody heard that? Would anybody have a link to such information? If it 
is true, I am wanting to use this in a talk I am giving to junior high kids 
next month. 


THX

chris



Chris Kline 
Sugar Grove, Ohio
To learn more about my Tony Spencer Mystery Series and my Butterfly books 
visit: http://beeryridge.yolasite.com 


Subject: Re: bridge cameras 3
From: curt powell <curt.curt AT yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 21 Sep 2012 10:52:15 -0700 (PDT)
Yes, and that is a major downfall of the Canon I forgot to mention.  Manuel 
focus is a menu item which means: Effectively no manuel focus. 




________________________________
From: Dennis Paulson 
To: Odonata-l ; NEOdes Odes 
; SE Odonata ; great lakes 
odes ; Texas Odes ; 
dragonfly listserve ; California Dragonfly and 
Damselfly Sightings CalOdes ; 
nw_odonata AT yahoogroups.com 

Sent: Friday, September 21, 2012 1:08 PM
Subject: [gl_odonata] bridge cameras 3


  
A few more notes about bridge cameras:

Ability to manual focus easily is very important in these cameras that can be 
difficult to autofocus on a small critter in a "busy" scene. Some cameras have 
a ring focus like a typical SLR. You just about have to have that, rather than 
a focus lever or - heaven forbid - a menu item. 


One suggestion is to focus on something that's quite clear and about the same 
size as your subject, lock the focus, and then shift over to the subject, 
moving in and out until the image is clear. Focus on something that should have 
about the same exposure, unless you can lock the focus without locking the 
exposure. 


Also, some cameras have a macro focus assist that magnifies the center of the 
image (not sure which of these four if any have that), making it easier to 
focus critically. 


One correspondent has the Nikon that I said was "reviled" and thinks it is the 
best of all, so be sure to check out this brand as well. 


I didn't mention that these P&S cameras give you more depth of field than an 
SLR with long lens, so you can get dragonfly photos with both wings in focus, 
for example. Not so good if you like those photos with a completely blurred 
background. 


Thanks to the many people who sent comments!

Dennis

-----
Dennis Paulson
1724 NE 98 St.
Seattle, WA 98115
206-528-1382
dennispaulson AT comcast.net


Subject: RE: camera question
From: "John Pogacnik" <jpogacnik AT lakemetroparks.com>
Date: Wed, 12 Sep 2012 15:43:28 -0400
Dennis,

 

I have been using a Panasonic FZ50 for the last 5-6 years.  I am actually on
my second.  I use it every day at work and thus far I have not seen anything
that compares, although I am looking at the FZ200.  I use it as is for some
dragonflies that are a distance away.  More often  than not I use a Nikon 6T
close-up lens screwed to the front.  This lens unfortunately has been
discontinued.   I also use a "Puffer" flash diffuser.  I also have a Canon
D60 and a 100 macro.  I like the Panasonic better.  I highly recommend the
FZ50, although the FZ200 may be a worthy replacement.

 

You can check the Panasonic forum on www.dpreview.com for some photos people
are getting with the FZ200.  Someone had some nice shots a week or so ago.
If you can do a search with fz200 and dragginflies.  Yes, that is the way it
was spelled.  Nice shots though.

 

John Pogacnik

 

From: gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com] On
Behalf Of Dennis Paulson
Sent: Wednesday, September 12, 2012 1:36 PM
To: Odonata-l; NEOdes Odes; SE Odonata; great lakes odes; Texas Odes;
dragonfly listserve; California Dragonfly and Damselfly Sightings CalOdes;
nw_odonata AT yahoogroups.com
Subject: [gl_odonata] camera question

 

  

Hello, all.

 

On our recent trip to Panama, Netta and I realized how burdened we were,
both while traveling (carryons that weigh 30 pounds) and in the field, with
single lens reflexes and big telephoto lenses. We spent time with people
with little point and shoot cameras with long zoom potential and saw that
they were getting seemingly as good photos of dragonflies as we were. I'm
perfectly happy with Nikon cameras and Sigma lenses around home, but I'm
exploring the possibility of carrying smaller and lighter cameras on future
foreign trips.

 

So this message is to ask for commentary on odonate photography with the
intermediate point and shoot cameras with long zoom lenses, sometimes called
"bridge" cameras because of their intermediacy between SLRs and the smaller
P&Ss. I'm looking especially into the Panasonic Lumix FZ200 ($600) as a
highly reviewed camera, but it has competitors among Nikon, Canon, Sony, and
others. Has anyone used this Lumix or its predecessors (especially the
FZ150) for dragonflies and had great success? Have you seen any
disadvantages? How about others of this genre? What I don't want is a camera
that you have to move up to within 10 inches or less of the odonate to get
its photo in macro mode! I assume there are many people on these lists with
similar questions.

 

Please excuse the cross-posting.

 

Dennis

-----

Dennis Paulson

1724 NE 98 St.

Seattle, WA 98115

206-528-1382

dennispaulson AT comcast.net

 





 


Subject: Re: camera question
From: Ryan Chrouser <rjchrouser AT uwalumni.com>
Date: Wed, 12 Sep 2012 14:42:03 -0500
Dennis,

I use a Panasonic Lumix (don't know the model off the top of my head,
I will send it to you when I get home from work).  I really started
photography only a couple of years ago (inspired by dragonflies).
There was a learning curve for me as far as figuring out what settings
I liked for different shots, but I think that is more related to my
inexperience with photography than the camera.  I have taken some
photos of dragonflies that I am very happy with and love the small
size.  It allows me to really focus on my netting instead of lugging a
large camera around.  I will certainly look at buying a Lumix again
whenever I decide to upgrade.

Ryan Chrouser

On 9/12/12, Dennis Paulson  wrote:
> Hello, all.
>
> On our recent trip to Panama, Netta and I realized how burdened we were,
> both while traveling (carryons that weigh 30 pounds) and in the field, with
> single lens reflexes and big telephoto lenses. We spent time with people
> with little point and shoot cameras with long zoom potential and saw that
> they were getting seemingly as good photos of dragonflies as we were. I'm
> perfectly happy with Nikon cameras and Sigma lenses around home, but I'm
> exploring the possibility of carrying smaller and lighter cameras on future
> foreign trips.
>
> So this message is to ask for commentary on odonate photography with the
> intermediate point and shoot cameras with long zoom lenses, sometimes called
> "bridge" cameras because of their intermediacy between SLRs and the smaller
> P&Ss. I'm looking especially into the Panasonic Lumix FZ200 ($600) as a
> highly reviewed camera, but it has competitors among Nikon, Canon, Sony, and
> others. Has anyone used this Lumix or its predecessors (especially the
> FZ150) for dragonflies and had great success? Have you seen any
> disadvantages? How about others of this genre? What I don't want is a camera
> that you have to move up to within 10 inches or less of the odonate to get
> its photo in macro mode! I assume there are many people on these lists with
> similar questions.
>
> Please excuse the cross-posting.
>
> Dennis
> -----
> Dennis Paulson
> 1724 NE 98 St.
> Seattle, WA 98115
> 206-528-1382
> dennispaulson AT comcast.net
>
>
>
>


------------------------------------


Subject: Re: [gl_odonata] camera question
From: Dave McShaffrey <mcshaffd AT marietta.edu>
Date: Wed, 12 Sep 2012 14:12:37 -0400
Dennis - I don't have experience with those cameras, but I have used the
Canon cameras of this type and have the following general comments on things
to watch out for:

 

1.       Handling time - DSLR's are much quicker to focus and shoot, and it
is usually easier to locate the specimen in the viewfinder and zoom the
lens.  

2.       Noise - this varies greatly with camera model, but in general the
DSLR's seem to have less noise at a given ISO.

3.       Chromatic aberration - noticeable on some of the compact cameras.

4.       Flash - if you are going to use flash, some non-dslr's have flash
units that are not suitable for close-ups, and hard to adapt to shoe-mount
flash units.

 

Of course I'd defer to anyone with hands on experience with the cameras you
are looking at; I'm just listing the issues I'd look out for.  Having just
spent a week on mountaintops in BC dragging 24 pounds of camera gear (and
leaving behind the 100-400mm telephoto on the one day I saw a bear), I do
feel your pain.  Literally.

 

Good luck.

 

Dave

 

Dave McShaffrey

Department of Biology and Environmental Science

Marietta College

Marietta, Ohio 45750

mcshaffd AT marietta.edu

740-376-4743

www.marietta.edu/~mcshaffd

 

From: gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com] On
Behalf Of Dennis Paulson
Sent: Wednesday, September 12, 2012 1:36 PM
To: Odonata-l; NEOdes Odes; SE Odonata; great lakes odes; Texas Odes;
dragonfly listserve; California Dragonfly and Damselfly Sightings CalOdes;
nw_odonata AT yahoogroups.com
Subject: [gl_odonata] camera question

 



Hello, all.

 

On our recent trip to Panama, Netta and I realized how burdened we were,
both while traveling (carryons that weigh 30 pounds) and in the field, with
single lens reflexes and big telephoto lenses. We spent time with people
with little point and shoot cameras with long zoom potential and saw that
they were getting seemingly as good photos of dragonflies as we were. I'm
perfectly happy with Nikon cameras and Sigma lenses around home, but I'm
exploring the possibility of carrying smaller and lighter cameras on future
foreign trips.

 

So this message is to ask for commentary on odonate photography with the
intermediate point and shoot cameras with long zoom lenses, sometimes called
"bridge" cameras because of their intermediacy between SLRs and the smaller
P&Ss. I'm looking especially into the Panasonic Lumix FZ200 ($600) as a
highly reviewed camera, but it has competitors among Nikon, Canon, Sony, and
others. Has anyone us ed this Lumix or its predecessors (especially the
FZ150) for dragonflies and had great success? Have you seen any
disadvantages? How about others of this genre? What I don't want is a camera
that you have to move up to within 10 inches or less of the odonate to get
its photo in macro mode! I assume there are many people on these lists with
similar questions.

 

Please excuse the cross-posting.

 

Dennis

-----

Dennis Paulson

1724 NE 98 St.

Seattle, WA 98115

206-528-1382

dennispaulson AT comcast.net

 





 






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Subject: RE: camera question
From: "Dave McShaffrey" <mcshaffd AT mcnet.marietta.edu>
Date: Wed, 12 Sep 2012 14:12:37 -0400
Dennis - I don't have experience with those cameras, but I have used the
Canon cameras of this type and have the following general comments on things
to watch out for:

 

1.       Handling time - DSLR's are much quicker to focus and shoot, and it
is usually easier to locate the specimen in the viewfinder and zoom the
lens.  

2.       Noise - this varies greatly with camera model, but in general the
DSLR's seem to have less noise at a given ISO.

3.       Chromatic aberration - noticeable on some of the compact cameras.

4.       Flash - if you are going to use flash, some non-dslr's have flash
units that are not suitable for close-ups, and hard to adapt to shoe-mount
flash units.

 

Of course I'd defer to anyone with hands on experience with the cameras you
are looking at; I'm just listing the issues I'd look out for.  Having just
spent a week on mountaintops in BC dragging 24 pounds of camera gear (and
leaving behind the 100-400mm telephoto on the one day I saw a bear), I do
feel your pain.  Literally.

 

Good luck.

 

Dave

 

Dave McShaffrey

Department of Biology and Environmental Science

Marietta College

Marietta, Ohio 45750

mcshaffd AT marietta.edu

740-376-4743

www.marietta.edu/~mcshaffd

 

From: gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com] On
Behalf Of Dennis Paulson
Sent: Wednesday, September 12, 2012 1:36 PM
To: Odonata-l; NEOdes Odes; SE Odonata; great lakes odes; Texas Odes;
dragonfly listserve; California Dragonfly and Damselfly Sightings CalOdes;
nw_odonata AT yahoogroups.com
Subject: [gl_odonata] camera question

 



Hello, all.

 

On our recent trip to Panama, Netta and I realized how burdened we were,
both while traveling (carryons that weigh 30 pounds) and in the field, with
single lens reflexes and big telephoto lenses. We spent time with people
with little point and shoot cameras with long zoom potential and saw that
they were getting seemingly as good photos of dragonflies as we were. I'm
perfectly happy with Nikon cameras and Sigma lenses around home, but I'm
exploring the possibility of carrying smaller and lighter cameras on future
foreign trips.

 

So this message is to ask for commentary on odonate photography with the
intermediate point and shoot cameras with long zoom lenses, sometimes called
"bridge" cameras because of their intermediacy between SLRs and the smaller
P&Ss. I'm looking especially into the Panasonic Lumix FZ200 ($600) as a
highly reviewed camera, but it has competitors among Nikon, Canon, Sony, and
others. Has anyone us ed this Lumix or its predecessors (especially the
FZ150) for dragonflies and had great success? Have you seen any
disadvantages? How about others of this genre? What I don't want is a camera
that you have to move up to within 10 inches or less of the odonate to get
its photo in macro mode! I assume there are many people on these lists with
similar questions.

 

Please excuse the cross-posting.

 

Dennis

-----

Dennis Paulson

1724 NE 98 St.

Seattle, WA 98115

206-528-1382

dennispaulson AT comcast.net

 





 







Subject: RE: camera question
From: "Arne" <stonehollowmn AT tds.net>
Date: Wed, 12 Sep 2012 13:08:54 -0500
DSLR does not necessarily mean heavy.  My standard in-hand setup weighs a
little over 2 lbs.  If I add the "big" telephoto zoom (150-600mm), it's
another pound.  The biggest weight is now the tripod (mine is 5# - I could
get a carbon fiber one at 3+ lbs).

My camera bag + all accessories totals around 10 lb.  This is all using
Olympus' micro 4/3 system on an OM-D (16 megapixel, in-body IS,
weather-sealed).

Arne

Stonehollow-anisoptera
  

 

From: gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com] On
Behalf Of Dennis Paulson



Hello, all.

 

On our recent trip to Panama, Netta and I realized how burdened we were,
both while traveling (carryons that weigh 30 pounds) and in the field, with
single lens reflexes and big telephoto lenses. We spent time with people
with little point and shoot cameras with long zoom potential and saw that
they were getting seemingly as good photos of dragonflies as we were. I'm
perfectly happy with Nikon cameras and Sigma lenses around home, but I'm
exploring the possibility of carrying smaller and lighter cameras on future
foreign trips.

 

So this message is to ask for commentary on odonate photography with the
intermediate point and shoot cameras with long zoom lenses, sometimes called
"bridge" cameras because of their intermediacy between SLRs and the smaller
P&Ss. I'm looking especially into the Panasonic Lumix FZ200 ($600) as a
highly reviewed camera, but it has competitors among Nikon, Canon, Sony, and
others. Has anyone used this Lumix or its predecessors (especially the
FZ150) for dragonflies and had great success? Have you seen any
disadvantages? How about others of this genre? What I don't want is a camera
that you have to move up to within 10 inches or less of the odonate to get
its photo in macro mode! I assume there are many people on these lists with
similar questions.

 

Please excuse the cross-posting.

 

Dennis

-----

Dennis Paulson

1724 NE 98 St.

Seattle, WA 98115

206-528-1382

dennispaulson AT comcast.net


Subject: Re: camera question
From: curt powell <curt.curt AT yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 12 Sep 2012 11:06:51 -0700 (PDT)
I use a Canon SX 30 and get excellent photos, and for what its worth, after two 
years still know almost nothing about photography - just basically point and 
shoot.  If you want to see some pics let me know, I can send you some, or look 
me up on facebook (Curt Powell, Michigan, profile pic is my 3 year old daughter 
sitting on a big tree stump)- I have a few posted there, although they do not 
seem to look as good there for some reason.  I have trouble with Macro shots, 
(but I have gotten some good ones), but that may well be a problem with the 
photographer, not the camera.  I did a careful comparison with the Panasonics 
and Nikon.  The Canon was similar to the Panasonic, but focused closer.  I 
did not like the Nikon as well, but I can't recall exactly why.  I have been 
extremely happy with the Camera in well lit situations (such as it always is 
for dragonflies) 

 
Now, and I don't have any idea how this would compare with any other Camera, 
but indoors it is slow so I get blurry pictures if the subject moves.  I 
would guess this is the same for all of them. 

 
Warning if you choose the facebook option you will have to survive various 
family photos and political blah blah as well as the good stuff. 



________________________________
From: Dennis Paulson 
To: Odonata-l ; NEOdes Odes 
; SE Odonata ; great lakes 
odes ; Texas Odes ; 
dragonfly listserve ; California Dragonfly and 
Damselfly Sightings CalOdes ; 
nw_odonata AT yahoogroups.com 

Sent: Wednesday, September 12, 2012 1:35 PM
Subject: [gl_odonata] camera question


  
Hello, all. 

On our recent trip to Panama, Netta and I realized how burdened we were, both 
while traveling (carryons that weigh 30 pounds) and in the field, with single 
lens reflexes and big telephoto lenses. We spent time with people with little 
point and shoot cameras with long zoom potential and saw that they were getting 
seemingly as good photos of dragonflies as we were. I'm perfectly happy with 
Nikon cameras and Sigma lenses around home, but I'm exploring the possibility 
of carrying smaller and lighter cameras on future foreign trips. 


So this message is to ask for commentary on odonate photography with the 
intermediate point and shoot cameras with long zoom lenses, sometimes called 
"bridge" cameras because of their intermediacy between SLRs and the smaller 
P&Ss. I'm looking especially into the Panasonic Lumix FZ200 ($600) as a highly 
reviewed camera, but it has competitors among Nikon, Canon, Sony, and others. 
Has anyone used this Lumix or its predecessors (especially the FZ150) for 
dragonflies and had great success? Have you seen any disadvantages? How about 
others of this genre? What I don't want is a camera that you have to move up to 
within 10 inches or less of the odonate to get its photo in macro mode! I 
assume there are many people on these lists with similar questions. 


Please excuse the cross-posting.

Dennis

-----
Dennis Paulson
1724 NE 98 St.
Seattle, WA 98115
206-528-1382
dennispaulson AT comcast.net


Subject: FW: Ontario - Migratory Dragonfly Short Course at Point Pelee National Park, 9-8-12
From: "Celeste Mazzacano" <celeste AT xerces.org>
Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2012 14:14:26 -0700
 

From: The Xerces Society [mailto:alexa AT xerces.org] 
Sent: Monday, August 27, 2012 1:30 PM
To: celeste AT xerces.org
Subject: Ontario - Migratory Dragonfly Short Course at Point Pelee National
Park, 9-8-12

 


Having trouble viewing this email? Click here
 

 

	


 
 

 



 
 MIGRATORY DRAGONFLY SHORT COURSE

 


Point Pelee National Park, Ontario

September 8, 2012

9:30 AM to 4:00 PM

 


Dragonfly migration occurs on every continent except Antarctica. In North
America, huge numbers of dragonflies can be seen flying south in fall along
both coasts and through the Midwest, but these migrations are still poorly
understood. The Migratory Dragonfly Partnership (MDP), Xerces Society, and
U.S. Forest Service International Programs are pleased to announce an
upcoming Migratory Dragonfly Short Course in Ontario. This full day training
will provide an overview of dragonfly life history, ecology, and migratory
behavior, and train participants to identify key migratory species and
contribute data to ongoing MDP citizen science research projects.

SHORT COURSE DETAILS    

  

Intended audience: 

This course is intended for anyone interested in dragonflies and in
contributing to our growing knowledge about dragonfly migration in North
America. Whether you are a novice or a pro when it comes to dragonflies,
please join us for this fun and informative event to become a volunteer
monitor and help us explore the amazing but understudied phenomenon of
dragonfly migration! 


Agenda:

This course will cover the topics of dragonfly life history, ecology,
migratory behavior, and citizen science monitoring and will include both a
morning classroom and afternoon field component.
 Click here for a detailed agenda and more information
about this course.


Location:
 
 Point Pelee National Park (Camp
Henry) 

1118 Point Pelee Dr

Leamington, ON N8H 3V4  

 

Date/Time: 

September 8, 2012 from 9:30 AM to 4:00 PM   
  

Cost:
Free

Morning snacks will be provided. Lunch is not included; please plan on
bringing a sack lunch.

Registration:
Registration is required for this course.
 Click here to register online. Hurry; space is
limited!

Contact: 
Alexa Carleton
The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation

  alexa AT xerces.org  

   


PARTNERS


 

 
 MDP logo


 
 USFS International Programs logo


 
 The Xerces
Society logo

 
 Point Pelee logo 

 


LEAD INSTRUCTOR


Colin Jones
Natural Heritage Information Centre,
Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources

   

 

THE MDP MISSION
The Migratory Dragonfly Partnership is composed of dragonfly experts,
nongovernmental programs, academic institutions, and federal agencies from
the U.S., Mexico, and Canada. Together, we are combining research, citizen
science, and education and outreach to better understand North America's
migrating dragonflies and promote conservation of their wetland habitat. For
information about the MDP, visit
 www.migratorydragonflypartnership.org/
 or contact   dragonfly AT xerces.org.

PHOTO CREDIT
Blue dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis)
Dennis Paulson


  


  




ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

 

This Migratory Dragonfly Short Course is made possible with the support of
the U.S. Forest  Service International Programs. The Migratory Dragonfly
Partnership (MDP) is chaired by Scott Black (Xerces Society) and
vice-chaired by John Abbott (University of Texas-Austin). The following
organizations are MDP partners:  

 

~ Conservation International ~ Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources ~ Peggy

Notebaert Nature Museum ~ Pronatura Veracruz ~ Rutgers University ~ Slater
Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound ~ Smithsonian
Conservation Biology Institute ~ Texas Natural Science Center, University of
Texas at Austin ~ U.S. Geological Survey ~ Vermont Center for Ecostudies ~
The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation ~ 

 

Special thanks to
 Point Pelee National Park for
hosting this event!    

  

 

 


Copyright C 2012 The Xerces Society. All rights reserved.

	

 


Forward this email
 



 
 

  

This email was sent to celeste AT xerces.org by alexa AT xerces.org |   

Update Profile/Email Address
  | Instant removal
with SafeUnsubscribe
 T | Privacy Policy
 .

The Xerces Society | 628 NE Broadway, Suite 200 | Portland | OR | 97232

 
 
Subject: Re: Michigan ode spots
From: Greg Bauman <hellofafisher AT yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Aug 2012 17:25:52 -0700 (PDT)
I am in Marquette, MI and pretty much the entire UP is a good spot.  Lots of 
National forrest though.  Have to be careful and check maps closely.  I could 
be more specific if you came this far.  I have many spots in and around 
Marquette.  Including a bog. 

Let me know,
 
Greg

From: chris kline 
To: gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Sunday, August 5, 2012 5:55 PM
Subject: [gl_odonata] Michigan ode spots

  
Greetings,

I am planning a bog ode year for next year and am trying to do some planning.  
Does anybody have recommendations for good Michigan ode hunting spots.  Also 
western PA.  THX in advance. 


chris
 
Chris Kline Sugar Grove, Ohio
To learn more about my Tony Spencer Mystery Series and my Butterfly books 
visit: http://beeryridge.yolasite.com/ 



 
Subject: Re: Digest Number 609
From: chris kline <kline_at_pine AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 12 Aug 2012 12:32:49 -0700 (PDT)
THX Kurt.  I have been debating a trip that direction.  Would probably only 
have time for one trip that way.  A two-week window you would recommend to 
maximize species numbers? 

 
chris

 

Chris Kline 
Sugar Grove, Ohio
To learn more about my Tony Spencer Mystery Series and my Butterfly books 
visit: http://beeryridge.yolasite.com 

 
 

--- On Sun, 8/12/12, Kurt Mead  wrote:


From: Kurt Mead 
Subject: Re: [gl_odonata] Digest Number 609
To: gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com
Date: Sunday, August 12, 2012, 3:05 PM



  






During our surveys in Minnesota, this summer, we did see reduced numbers of 
individuals in some habitats.  That said we did seem to find a wide variety of 
Odonates in most places just not as many individuals as I expected (had to work 
harder to find what was there). 


Peatland areas in north central MN do seem to have been hit quite hard.  
Sphagnum should not crunch when walked upon.  In these areas we found very 
little. 


Not sure what it has been like in the rest of the Midwest but MInnesota's 
drought situation is very spotty.  In some areas the corn is dead and brown, 
in other regions they have had floods.  Perhaps by looking at the drought maps 
you could avoid the hardest hit areas and go straight to the regions that are 
closer to normal. 



I would love to help you find habitats in NE MN if you get up this way.  
Drought has been less of an issue up here. 


Kurt Mead 





On Sun, Aug 12, 2012 at 4:02 AM,  wrote:





 
Great Lakes Dragonflies Group 




1 New Message 
Digest #609 









1a 
Re: [SoWestOdes] Fw: [gl_odonata] 2013 by "chris kline" kline_at_pine 





Message 


1a 
Re: [SoWestOdes] Fw: [gl_odonata] 2013 


Sat Aug 11, 2012 5:45 am (PDT) . Posted by: 
"chris kline" kline_at_pine 

THX Dennis.  I am going to follow through with the Big Dragonfly Year.  
Hopefully I will get some good leads from folks for productive places to visit 
in the Great Lakes.  Am also hoping to take a trip west, and see some new bugs 
along the way! 

 
chris

Chris Kline 
Sugar Grove, Ohio
To learn more about my Tony Spencer Mystery Series and my Butterfly books 
visit: http://beeryridge.yolasite.com 

 
 

--- On Thu, 7/12/12, Dennis Paulson  wrote:

From: Dennis Paulson 
Subject: Re: [SoWestOdes] Fw: [gl_odonata] 2013
To: kline_at_pine AT yahoo.com
Cc: "dragonfly listserve" , "great lakes odes" 
 

Date: Thursday, July 12, 2012, 11:41 PM

  

Chris,

I think it's just that no one wanted to discourage you. If the point of doing a 
Big Year is to see how many odonate species you can find, why not just do it? 
Especially if there is no particular record you're trying to achieve. Yes, 
drought can reduce greatly the number of individual odonates and presumably 
make some species downright scarce, but there are usually individuals around if 
you can find the right place. Maybe you'll just have to work a little harder!  


Dennis

On Jul 12, 2012, at 6:36 PM, chris kline wrote:

  

 Never would've thought this question was such a stumper!
 
chris

Chris Kline 
Sugar Grove, Ohio
To learn more about my Tony Spencer Mystery Series and my Butterfly books 
visit: http://beeryridge.yolasite.com 

 
 

--- On Wed, 7/11/12, chris kline  wrote:

From: chris kline 
Subject: [SoWestOdes] Fw: [gl_odonata] 2013
To: "dragonfly listserve" 
Date: Wednesday, July 11, 2012, 10:29 AM

  

Sent this to Great Lakes Odes and did not get a single response, so maybe some 
of you will have thoughts on the question below.  THX 

 
chris

 

Chris Kline 
Sugar Grove, Ohio
To learn more about my Tony Spencer Mystery Series and my Butterfly books 
visit: http://beeryridge.yolasite.com 

 
 

--- On Mon, 7/9/12, chris kline  wrote:

From: chris kline 
Subject: [gl_odonata] 2013
To: gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com
Date: Monday, July 9, 2012, 7:16 AM

  

Hi all,
 
I am strongly considering doing a Big Dragonfly Year for next year but I have a 
concern.  Will this year's drought and heat conditions throughout the midwest 
result in a bad dragonfly season next year?  I am seeing a lot of streams and 
ponds that normally have plenty of water nearly dry right now.  If there is a 
good chance that next year will be a lousy ode year, maybe I'll look for 
wildflowers instead! 

 
chris

 

Chris Kline 
Sugar Grove, Ohio
To learn more about my Tony Spencer Mystery Series and my Butterfly books 
visit: http://beeryridge.yolasite.com 

 
 

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

-----
Dennis Paulson
1724 NE 98 St.
Seattle, WA 98115
206-528-1382
dennispaulson AT comcast.net



Reply to sender . Reply to group . Reply via Web Post . All Messages (4) . Top 
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Subject: Re: Digest Number 609
From: Kurt Mead <mixedboreal AT gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 12 Aug 2012 14:05:36 -0500
> During our surveys in Minnesota, this summer, we did see reduced numbers
> of individuals in some habitats.  That said we did seem to find a wide
> variety of Odonates in most places just not as many individuals as I
> expected (had to work harder to find what was there).
>
> Peatland areas in north central MN do seem to have been hit quite hard.
> Sphagnum should not crunch when walked upon.  In these areas we found very
> little.
>
> Not sure what it has been like in the rest of the Midwest but MInnesota's
> drought situation is very spotty.  In some areas the corn is dead and
> brown, in other regions they have had floods.  Perhaps by looking at the
> drought maps you could avoid the hardest hit areas and go straight to the
> regions that are closer to normal.
>

I would love to help you find habitats in NE MN if you get up this way.
Drought has been less of an issue up here.

Kurt Mead

>
>
> On Sun, Aug 12, 2012 at 4:02 AM,  wrote:
>
>> **
>> [image: Yahoo! Groups] 
 

>> Great Lakes Dragonflies Group 
 

>>     1 New Message
>> Digest #609
>>         1a
>> Re: [SoWestOdes] Fw: [gl_odonata] 2013 
<#1391c33d11434e1c_1391a1257b1f79ad_1a> by 

>> "chris kline" kline_at_pine
>>
>>   Message
>> 1a Re: [SoWestOdes] Fw: [gl_odonata] 2013 
 

>>   Sat Aug 11, 2012 5:45 am (PDT) . Posted by:   "chris kline"
>> kline_at_pine 
 

>>
>> THX Dennis.  I am going to follow through with the Big Dragonfly Year.
>> Hopefully I will get some good leads from folks for productive places to
>> visit in the Great Lakes.  Am also hoping to take a trip west, and see some
>> new bugs along the way!
>>
>> chris
>>
>> Chris Kline
>> Sugar Grove, Ohio
>> To learn more about my Tony Spencer Mystery Series and my Butterfly books
>> visit: http://beeryridge.**yolasite.**com
>>
>>
>>
>> --- On Thu, 7/12/12, Dennis Paulson 
> 

>> wrote:
>>
>> From: Dennis Paulson 
 

>> >
>> Subject: Re: [SoWestOdes] Fw: [gl_odonata] 2013
>> To: kline_at_pine AT **yahoo.com 
>> Cc: "dragonfly listserve" 
>, 

>> "great lakes odes" 
 

>> >
>> Date: Thursday, July 12, 2012, 11:41 PM
>>
>>
>>
>> Chris,
>>
>> I think it's just that no one wanted to discourage you. If the point of
>> doing a Big Year is to see how many odonate species you can find, why not
>> just do it? Especially if there is no particular record you're trying to
>> achieve. Yes, drought can reduce greatly the number of individual odonates
>> and presumably make some species downright scarce, but there are usually
>> individuals around if you can find the right place. Maybe you'll just have
>> to work a little harder!
>>
>> Dennis
>>
>> On Jul 12, 2012, at 6:36 PM, chris kline wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>>  Never would've thought this question was such a stumper!
>>
>> chris
>>
>> Chris Kline
>> Sugar Grove, Ohio
>> To learn more about my Tony Spencer Mystery Series and my Butterfly books
>> visit: http://beeryridge.**yolasite.**com
>>
>>
>>
>> --- On Wed, 7/11/12, chris kline 
> 

>> wrote:
>>
>> From: chris kline >
>> Subject: [SoWestOdes] Fw: [gl_odonata] 2013
>> To: "dragonfly listserve" 
 

>> >
>> Date: Wednesday, July 11, 2012, 10:29 AM
>>
>>
>>
>> Sent this to Great Lakes Odes and did not get a single response, so maybe
>> some of you will have thoughts on the question below.  THX
>>
>> chris
>>
>>
>>
>> Chris Kline
>> Sugar Grove, Ohio
>> To learn more about my Tony Spencer Mystery Series and my Butterfly books
>> visit: http://beeryridge.**yolasite.**com
>>
>>
>>
>> --- On Mon, 7/9/12, chris kline 
> 

>> wrote:
>>
>> From: chris kline >
>> Subject: [gl_odonata] 2013
>> To: gl_odonata AT yahoogro**ups.com 
>> Date: Monday, July 9, 2012, 7:16 AM
>>
>>
>>
>> Hi all,
>>
>> I am strongly considering doing a Big Dragonfly Year for next year but I
>> have a concern.  Will this year's drought and heat conditions throughout
>> the midwest result in a bad dragonfly season next year?  I am seeing a lot
>> of streams and ponds that normally have plenty of water nearly dry right
>> now.  If there is a good chance that next year will be a lousy ode year,
>> maybe I'll look for wildflowers instead!
>>
>> chris
>>
>>
>>
>> Chris Kline
>> Sugar Grove, Ohio
>> To learn more about my Tony Spencer Mystery Series and my Butterfly books
>> visit: http://beeryridge.**yolasite.**com
>>
>>
>>
>> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
>>
>> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
>>
>> -----
>> Dennis Paulson
>> 1724 NE 98 St.
>> Seattle, WA 98115
>> 206-528-1382
>> dennispaulson AT **comcast.net 
>>
>> Reply to sender 
 
. Reply to group 
 
. Reply via Web Post 
 
. All Messages (4) 
 
. Top ^ <#1391c33d11434e1c_1391a1257b1f79ad_toc> 

>> Visit Your Group 
 

>> > 
 

>> View All Topics 
 

>> > 
 

>> Create New Topic 
 

>> > 
 

>>     We are making changes based on your feedback, Thank you !
>> Submit Feedback 
 

>> > 
 

>>   The Yahoo! Groups Product Blog
>>   Check it out!  
>>   >  
>>        [image: Yahoo! Groups]
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>>   CHANGE SETTINGS
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>> > 
 

>>    TERMS OF USE  
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>
Subject: Re: Fw: [gl_odonata] 2013
From: chris kline <kline_at_pine AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sat, 11 Aug 2012 05:45:16 -0700 (PDT)
THX Dennis.  I am going to follow through with the Big Dragonfly Year.  
Hopefully I will get some good leads from folks for productive places to visit 
in the Great Lakes.  Am also hoping to take a trip west, and see some new bugs 
along the way! 

 
chris

Chris Kline 
Sugar Grove, Ohio
To learn more about my Tony Spencer Mystery Series and my Butterfly books 
visit: http://beeryridge.yolasite.com 

 
 

--- On Thu, 7/12/12, Dennis Paulson  wrote:


From: Dennis Paulson 
Subject: Re: [SoWestOdes] Fw: [gl_odonata] 2013
To: kline_at_pine AT yahoo.com
Cc: "dragonfly listserve" , "great lakes odes" 
 

Date: Thursday, July 12, 2012, 11:41 PM



  



Chris,


I think it's just that no one wanted to discourage you. If the point of doing a 
Big Year is to see how many odonate species you can find, why not just do it? 
Especially if there is no particular record you're trying to achieve. Yes, 
drought can reduce greatly the number of individual odonates and presumably 
make some species downright scarce, but there are usually individuals around if 
you can find the right place. Maybe you'll just have to work a little harder!  



Dennis



On Jul 12, 2012, at 6:36 PM, chris kline wrote:


  



 Never would've thought this question was such a stumper!
 
chris

Chris Kline 
Sugar Grove, Ohio
To learn more about my Tony Spencer Mystery Series and my Butterfly books 
visit: http://beeryridge.yolasite.com 

 
 

--- On Wed, 7/11/12, chris kline  wrote:

From: chris kline 
Subject: [SoWestOdes] Fw: [gl_odonata] 2013
To: "dragonfly listserve" 
Date: Wednesday, July 11, 2012, 10:29 AM

  

Sent this to Great Lakes Odes and did not get a single response, so maybe some 
of you will have thoughts on the question below.  THX 

 
chris

 

Chris Kline 
Sugar Grove, Ohio
To learn more about my Tony Spencer Mystery Series and my Butterfly books 
visit: http://beeryridge.yolasite.com 

 
 

--- On Mon, 7/9/12, chris kline  wrote:

From: chris kline 
Subject: [gl_odonata] 2013
To: gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com
Date: Monday, July 9, 2012, 7:16 AM

  

Hi all,
 
I am strongly considering doing a Big Dragonfly Year for next year but I have a 
concern.  Will this year's drought and heat conditions throughout the midwest 
result in a bad dragonfly season next year?  I am seeing a lot of streams and 
ponds that normally have plenty of water nearly dry right now.  If there is a 
good chance that next year will be a lousy ode year, maybe I'll look for 
wildflowers instead! 

 
chris

 

Chris Kline 
Sugar Grove, Ohio
To learn more about my Tony Spencer Mystery Series and my Butterfly books 
visit: http://beeryridge.yolasite.com 

 
 

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




-----
Dennis Paulson
1724 NE 98 St.
Seattle, WA 98115
206-528-1382
dennispaulson AT comcast.net







Subject: Michigan ode spots
From: chris kline <kline_at_pine AT yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 5 Aug 2012 14:55:40 -0700 (PDT)
Greetings,

I am planning a bog ode year for next year and am trying to do some planning. 
Does anybody have recommendations for good Michigan ode hunting spots. Also 
western PA. THX in advance. 


chris



Chris Kline 
Sugar Grove, Ohio
To learn more about my Tony Spencer Mystery Series and my Butterfly books 
visit: http://beeryridge.yolasite.com 


Subject: Re: Female Striped Saddlebags - Tramea calverti - Wisconsin
From: Mike May <may AT aesop.rutgers.edu>
Date: Mon, 30 Jul 2012 17:55:04 -0400
Somebody should really take a close look at surface and upper wind patterns
between MX and the upper Midwest over the last couple of weeks.

 

Mike May

 

From: odonata-l-bounces AT listhost.ups.edu
[mailto:odonata-l-bounces AT listhost.ups.edu] On Behalf Of Dan Jackson
Sent: Monday, July 30, 2012 3:23 PM
To: gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com; odonata-l AT listhost.ups.edu
Subject: [Odonata-l] Female Striped Saddlebags - Tramea calverti - Wisconsin

 

Today, over my lunch hour, I found my first female Striped Saddlebags in an
open area behind my work in La Crosse County, Wisconsin (close to the
Mississippi).  I was able to get a few nice pictures before I netted her for
the WI Odonata Survey project.

 

Here is a link to the first picture of her that I have posted to my photo
site:

http://www.pbase.com/dejackson/image/145082027

 

I also saw a juvenile male Red Saddlebags (Tramea onusta) in the same area.
That is very early!!

 

Good chasing,

 

Dan Jackson

Chaseburg, Vernon County, WI  (near La Crosse)

www.pbase.com/dejackson

 

 

 
_______________________________________________
Odonata-l mailing list
Odonata-l AT listhost.ups.edu
https://mailweb.pugetsound.edu/mailman/listinfo/odonata-l
Subject: Female Striped Saddlebags - Tramea calverti - Wisconsin
From: Dan Jackson <DanJackson AT LBWhite.com>
Date: Mon, 30 Jul 2012 14:23:25 -0500
Today, over my lunch hour, I found my first female Striped Saddlebags in an 
open area behind my work in La Crosse County, Wisconsin (close to the 
Mississippi). I was able to get a few nice pictures before I netted her for the 
WI Odonata Survey project. 


Here is a link to the first picture of her that I have posted to my photo site:
http://www.pbase.com/dejackson/image/145082027

I also saw a juvenile male Red Saddlebags (Tramea onusta) in the same area. 
That is very early!! 


Good chasing,

Dan Jackson
Chaseburg, Vernon County, WI  (near La Crosse)
www.pbase.com/dejackson


_______________________________________________
Odonata-l mailing list
Odonata-l AT listhost.ups.edu
https://mailweb.pugetsound.edu/mailman/listinfo/odonata-l
Subject: Female Striped Saddlebags - Tramea calverti - Wisconsin
From: Dan Jackson <DanJackson AT LBWhite.com>
Date: Mon, 30 Jul 2012 14:23:25 -0500
Today, over my lunch hour, I found my first female Striped Saddlebags in an 
open area behind my work in La Crosse County, Wisconsin (close to the 
Mississippi). I was able to get a few nice pictures before I netted her for the 
WI Odonata Survey project. 


Here is a link to the first picture of her that I have posted to my photo site:
http://www.pbase.com/dejackson/image/145082027

I also saw a juvenile male Red Saddlebags (Tramea onusta) in the same area. 
That is very early!! 


Good chasing,

Dan Jackson
Chaseburg, Vernon County, WI  (near La Crosse)
www.pbase.com/dejackson


Subject: Finally - Announcing the new edition of the Dragonflies of North America
From: "IORI" <iodonata AT bellsouth.net>
Date: Sat, 28 Jul 2012 09:08:13 -0400
Finally announcing the new edition of  DRAGONFLIES OF NORTH AMERICA by James
G. Needham, Minter J. Westfall, Jr., & Michael L. May, including numerous
additions and corrections for all the currently known species of North
American dragonflies (Anisoptera) from Alaska to northern Mexico and the
Greater Antilles. The text is completely revised, with keys, figures and
drawings for all the species (including larvae) known as of  2012; as well
as, updated checklist to all species, a bibliography, glossary, distribution
table, and index.
 
The projected date for the next edition is January, 2013. The list price
according to the publisher is estimated to be $135,00. Advance orders are be
taken now with FREE S&H for $130 US deliveries, $142 Canada & Mexico,
$152.00 elsewhere. (includes S&H). 
 
Florida residents must add 6.25% sales tax. 

All funds are US and must be PAID IN ADVANCE by check or money order made
payable to "International Odonata Research Institute" or I.O.R.I. All
profits will go to the International Odonata Research Institute..

VISA/MC CARD ORDERS use PAYPAL to pay online: Only 3% surcharge (use the
formula X/. 97) [email your order to  
iodonata AT bellsouth.net and you will be reverse billed though your email -
Paypal account is not necessary using this method]
https://www.paypal.com/en_US/i/scr/pixel.gif
Or Send Check (US funds only) to: I.O.R.I. % 4525 NW 53RD LN Gainesville, Fl
32653 USA, Attn: Bill Mauffray
 
Bill Mauffray
International Odonata Research Institute
PO Box 147100
Gainesville FL 32614-7100
352-219-3141 cell
  iodonata AT bellsouth.net
  http://www.iodonata.net
 
Subject: FW: [The Natural Treasures of Ohio] The Federally Endangered Michigan Monkeyflower
From: "Bob Glotzhober" <bglotzhober AT ohiohistory.org>
Date: Wed, 25 Jul 2012 07:55:41 -0400
To Michigan Odonata Society friends:

 

Andrew (A.L.) Gibson is one of Ohio's up and coming promising young
botanist/naturalist/photographers. I thought you would enjoy his blog
site - if nothing else at least this recent one on Leelanau County. The
habitat he shows for the Michigan Monkeyflower seems also like a
wonderful habitat for Odes. Perhaps some of you - like Carl Freeman
maybe - may already know this site. If not, someone needs to check it
out. Seems like it just has to also be home to interesting Odonata!
Wish I were there!

 

Bob Glotzhober

 

========================================================================
=====================================

Robert C. Glotzhober                                          E-mail:
bglotzhober AT ohiohistory.org 

Senior Curator, Natural History                            Phone
614-298-2054

Ohio Historical Society                                       Fax
614-298-2089

800 E. 17th Avenue

Columbus, Ohio 43211-2474

________________________________

From: A.L. Gibson [mailto:indycoltzfan87 AT gmail.com] 
Sent: Wednesday, July 25, 2012 12:49 AM
To: Bob Glotzhober
Subject: [The Natural Treasures of Ohio] The Federally Endangered
Michigan Monkeyflower

 

It feels good to be back and posting on a regular schedule again.  While
I wouldn't grow accustomed to a post every day or two I can still tell
the creative juices and ideas are flowing smoothly through my brain.
About a month ago I spent a week up in northern Michigan and would like
to share the story of a very fascinating plant and probably the rarest
plant I've ever seen to date.

Leelanau County, Michigan has been my summer vacation spot literally all
my life.  A week or two each summer would be spent fishing the lakes for
bass and pike; the cold, spring fed streams for trout; swimming in the
chilly waters of Lake Michigan searching for petosky stones and soaking
in the sun and beauty of northern Michigan.  I'll always cherish my time
up there with my parents and brother and look forward to those days
renewed each summer.  My footprints in the sand along the beach may be
quick to wash away but all the memories made are etched in stone in my
brain.

 
 

On the southern shores of Big Glen Lake


Over the past few summers I have spent more and more time exploring the
fascinating ecosystems and flora this unique area of Michigan has to
offer.  I did a two-part series on the the natural history and flora of
South Manitou Island that can be found HERE
  and HERE
  if interested.  One of my biggest goals this past summer
was to observe and photograph the federally endangered Michigan
Monkeyflower (Mimulus michiganensis), Michigan's rarest plant.  After
some research and phone calls to knowledgeable botanists from the area I
was turned onto one of the best places to see this mega rarity.

 
 

Spring seep emitting from the hillside

 

 
 

Acidic sphagnum seep on the lake shore























I was told to head to the southern shoreline of Big Glen Lake outside
the little village of Glen Arbor.  There I would find a park and picnic
area that fortunately preserves one of the only publicly protected
populations of the monkeyflower.  I walked down to the lake and begin to
wade into the water along the shoreline looking for a series of springs
that emitted from the hillside down into Big Glen.  Just a bit down the
shore I saw the area open up into a mat of sphagnum, jewelweed
(Impatiens spp.) and sedges (mostly Carex flava, one of the favorites!)
speckled with hundreds of yellow dots.  Target acquired!

 
 

Mimulus michiganensis

 

 
 

Mimulus michiganensis























Ohio only has two native species of Mimulus.  Both the Winged
Monkeyflower (M. alatus) and Allegheny Monkeyflower (M. ringens) are
widespread across the state and easily told apart by the color of their
flowers, length of the peduncle and whether or not the leaves are
sessile.  Michigan has an additional four species of Mimulus, including
the scarcest of them all which I happened to be staring directly in the
face.  Just how rare is this wildflower?  Pretty rare!

 
 

Entire distribution of M. michiganensis (courtesy michiganflora.net)


The only plant entirely endemic to Michigan, this monkeyflower can be
found in six counties with only 12 known populations still in existance.
It only grows in cold, calcareous springs, streams and seeps in northern
White Cedar swamps as well as along the shorelines of lakes where a
constant supply of fresh groundwater is present.  Nearly every known
population of this plant occurs near or on the shorelines of the Great
Lakes.  This unfortunate choice of habitat type has done this plant more
harm than good due to mankind's affinity for building their summer homes
and resorts on top of this rare ecosystem.  A large majority of the 12
populations grow on private land where management and preservation
concerns are up to the landowner, who often times don't understand the
little yellow flower that blooms every June and July near their boat and
jet ski dock needs every ounce of protection it can get.  Several
populations have recently met their fate due to construction and altered
hydrology of the site.  Their constant need for cold, flowing spring
water makes them very vulnerable to even nearby construction projects
that could potentially change this necessity of life.

 
 

Mimulus michiganensis

 

 
 

Mimulus michiganensis























It was long treated as a variety to the more western M. glabratus, which
barely makes it east of the Mississippi river.  It has recently been
given full species status after new genetic research and testing along
with DNA sequencing found it to be a separate species only found in this
select area of Michigan.  Further research done at Michigan State
University suggests this species originated from an ancient hybrid
between M. glabratus var. jamesii and M. guttatus; two other Michigan
indigenous, yellow-flowered Mimulus'.

 
 

Mimulus michiganensis

 

 
 

Mimulus michiganensis























The gorgeous yellow, snapdragon-like flowers bloom come June and July in
the leaf axils towards the top of the stem.  Upon closer inspection you
can see an irregular scattering of orange/red dots on the three-lobed
lower lip.  You can tell this apart from the very similar M. glabratus
var. jamesii by it's much smaller oppositely arranged leaves that are
also more deltoid in shape while M. glabratus var. jamesii has rounded
leaves.  The flowers of the Michigan monkeyflower produce very little
viable pollen and thus produce very little seed.  This plant relies
almost entirely on its stolons to reproduce vegetatively, creating dense
colonies of clones.

 
 

Mimulus michiganensis

 

 
 

Mimulus michiganensis























I quickly learned just how careful I had to be when around these plants.
The saturated soil was very mucky and mixed with sand making for a very
unstable and soft substrate.  I didn't want to create too many holes or
compact the soil so I kept to the channels of water cutting through the
population.  It was just so cool to be in one of only a dozen still
extant places on Earth to see this plant!  I've seen many, many rare
plants to Ohio's soils and a few rare to everywhere's soils but nothing
close to this.  The large clonal mat spread amongst the sedges and
jewelweed was a large piece of the pie of what's left.  It's plants like
these that need our help and respect more than anything.  Many probably
look at this and say, "who cares?  It's just one plant that serves no
real purpose, I wouldn't miss it".  Maybe they're right, but when you
turn your shoulder on one species you start an excuse for the next one
and the next.  Before we know it we could be living in a world largely
devoid of what Mother Nature deemed proper and necessary to its
development and structure.  Hopefully when I return to these shores
years from now with my potential future family I hope I can take them to
this spot and show them these wonderful yellow beauties.  Tell them of
their battle for survival and their continued success as one of the
rarest plants in North America.  I won't hold my breath as more and more
people want bigger docks with more boats and houses closer to the shore
but maybe, just maybe these will hold on for future generations to
appreciate. 

--
Posted By A.L. Gibson to The Natural Treasures of Ohio
  at 8/11/2011 04:22:00 PM 
Subject: new Michigan Odonata Atlas Post
From: "argusmaniac" <argusmaniac AT yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 25 Jul 2012 00:04:43 -0000
http://mos-atlas.blogspot.com/2012/07/i-counties-and-look-at-effort.html

Looking to add new county records?  Read this.
Mark



------------------------------------


Subject: latest MOA post
From: "argusmaniac" <argusmaniac AT yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 18 Jul 2012 15:47:40 -0000
Julie and I have put together a post for the wandering Libellulids in 
Michigan... 


http://mos-atlas.blogspot.com/2012/07/rare-and-uncommon-saddlebags-wandering.html 


Mark



------------------------------------


Subject: Re: Fw: [gl_odonata] 2013
From: Dennis Paulson <dennispaulson AT comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 12 Jul 2012 20:41:59 -0700
Chris,

I think it's just that no one wanted to discourage you. If the point of doing a 
Big Year is to see how many odonate species you can find, why not just do it? 
Especially if there is no particular record you're trying to achieve. Yes, 
drought can reduce greatly the number of individual odonates and presumably 
make some species downright scarce, but there are usually individuals around if 
you can find the right place. Maybe you'll just have to work a little harder! 


Dennis

On Jul 12, 2012, at 6:36 PM, chris kline wrote:

> 
> 
>  Never would've thought this question was such a stumper!
>  
> chris
> 
> Chris Kline 
> Sugar Grove, Ohio
> To learn more about my Tony Spencer Mystery Series and my Butterfly books 
visit: http://beeryridge.yolasite.com 

>  
>  
> 
> --- On Wed, 7/11/12, chris kline  wrote:
> 
> From: chris kline 
> Subject: [SoWestOdes] Fw: [gl_odonata] 2013
> To: "dragonfly listserve" 
> Date: Wednesday, July 11, 2012, 10:29 AM
> 
>   
> 
> Sent this to Great Lakes Odes and did not get a single response, so maybe 
some of you will have thoughts on the question below. THX 

>  
> chris
> 
>  
> 
> Chris Kline 
> Sugar Grove, Ohio
> To learn more about my Tony Spencer Mystery Series and my Butterfly books 
visit: http://beeryridge.yolasite.com 

>  
>  
> 
> --- On Mon, 7/9/12, chris kline  wrote:
> 
> From: chris kline 
> Subject: [gl_odonata] 2013
> To: gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com
> Date: Monday, July 9, 2012, 7:16 AM
> 
>   
> 
> Hi all,
>  
> I am strongly considering doing a Big Dragonfly Year for next year but I have 
a concern. Will this year's drought and heat conditions throughout the midwest 
result in a bad dragonfly season next year? I am seeing a lot of streams and 
ponds that normally have plenty of water nearly dry right now. If there is a 
good chance that next year will be a lousy ode year, maybe I'll look for 
wildflowers instead! 

>  
> chris
> 
>  
> 
> Chris Kline 
> Sugar Grove, Ohio
> To learn more about my Tony Spencer Mystery Series and my Butterfly books 
visit: http://beeryridge.yolasite.com 

>  
>  
> 
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
> 
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
> 
> 

-----
Dennis Paulson
1724 NE 98 St.
Seattle, WA 98115
206-528-1382
dennispaulson AT comcast.net


Subject: RE: Fw: [gl_odonata] 2013
From: "Arne" <stonehollowmn AT tds.net>
Date: Thu, 12 Jul 2012 21:38:06 -0500
I’m not sure anyone can provide a response that would help at all. For me 
(central MN), this year is completely different from last year. Not less, just 
different. We had a very wet spring & summer, and very dry fall last year – 
one of my ponds dried up completely. This year is still filled with odonates, 
just different species. Last year I couldn’t buy an Eastern Pondhawk or Blue 
Dasher. This year they are literally everywhere I’ve looked. Lots of 
spreadwings, baskettails, racket-tailed emeralds & clubtails last year; 
haven’t seen many this year (and NO snaketails). But this year I have records 
for Eastern Amberwing, Red Saddlebags and some fairly common (and some unusual) 
bluets that I couldn’t find last year. 


If there’s water around, they’ll be there, but maybe not what you expected. 
If someone has done research on population changes vs weather, I’d be real 
interested in seeing it. J 


Arne

 

From: gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com [mailto:gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com] On Behalf 
Of chris kline 




  


--- On Mon, 7/9/12, chris kline  > 
wrote: 


From: chris kline  > 


Hi all,
 
I am strongly considering doing a Big Dragonfly Year for next year but I have a 
concern. Will this year's drought and heat conditions throughout the midwest 
result in a bad dragonfly season next year? I am seeing a lot of streams and 
ponds that normally have plenty of water nearly dry right now. If there is a 
good chance that next year will be a lousy ode year, maybe I'll look for 
wildflowers instead! 

 
chris


Subject: Re: Fw: [gl_odonata] 2013
From: chris kline <kline_at_pine AT yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 12 Jul 2012 18:36:59 -0700 (PDT)


 Never would've thought this question was such a stumper!
 
chris

Chris Kline 
Sugar Grove, Ohio
To learn more about my Tony Spencer Mystery Series and my Butterfly books 
visit: http://beeryridge.yolasite.com 

 
 

--- On Wed, 7/11/12, chris kline  wrote:


From: chris kline 
Subject: [SoWestOdes] Fw: [gl_odonata] 2013
To: "dragonfly listserve" 
Date: Wednesday, July 11, 2012, 10:29 AM



  




Sent this to Great Lakes Odes and did not get a single response, so maybe some 
of you will have thoughts on the question below.  THX 

 
chris

 

Chris Kline 
Sugar Grove, Ohio
To learn more about my Tony Spencer Mystery Series and my Butterfly books 
visit: http://beeryridge.yolasite.com 

 
 

--- On Mon, 7/9/12, chris kline  wrote:

From: chris kline 
Subject: [gl_odonata] 2013
To: gl_odonata AT yahoogroups.com
Date: Monday, July 9, 2012, 7:16 AM

  

Hi all,
 
I am strongly considering doing a Big Dragonfly Year for next year but I have a 
concern.  Will this year's drought and heat conditions throughout the midwest 
result in a bad dragonfly season next year?  I am seeing a lot of streams and 
ponds that normally have plenty of water nearly dry right now.  If there is a 
good chance that next year will be a lousy ode year, maybe I'll look for 
wildflowers instead! 

 
chris

 

Chris Kline 
Sugar Grove, Ohio
To learn more about my Tony Spencer Mystery Series and my Butterfly books 
visit: http://beeryridge.yolasite.com 

 
 

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





Subject: Re: First Royal River Cruiser (Macromia taeniolata) Report for MN
From: Mark OBrien <argusmaniac AT yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 9 Jul 2012 10:31:51 -0700 (PDT)
Hey, good work on the Macromia taeniolata!


-----------------------------------------------
Mark O'Brien
Ann Arbor, MI
http://randomphoto.blogspot.com
http://www.flickr.com/photos/mfobrien/
-----------------------------------------------